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Father of fallen footy star speaks out

<p>The father of a talented young footballer killed in a devastating crash over the weekend has expressed a selfless wish for the tragedy to serve as a vital reminder about road safety.</p> <p>Nick Campo, a South Fremantle Colts player, was the rear passenger in a Toyota HiLux that rolled and collided with a Jeep Patriot in Perth’s southern suburbs on Saturday night. Having recently turned 18, Campo <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/rising-star-footy-player-dies-at-just-18" target="_blank" rel="noopener">tragically died at the scene</a>.</p> <p>A 17-year-old HiLux driver faced Perth Children's Court on Monday from his hospital bed, charged with several dangerous driving offences. Despite the heartbreaking loss, Campo's father <a href="https://7news.com.au/news/father-of-nick-campo-sends-remarkable-message-after-tragic-death-of-south-fremantle-footballer-c-15363644" target="_blank" rel="noopener">told 7NEWS</a> that the family is not angry at the driver accused of causing the crash and wants the incident to serve as a crucial reminder about road safety.</p> <p>Dozens of loved ones gathered at the crash site on Farrington Rd in North Lake to lay flowers and remember the talented sportsman known for his cheeky sense of humour.</p> <p>“Nick was one of a kind. A lot of people loved him,” one friend remarked. Another added, “He had a really good heart and was really funny. No matter what situation he was in, he could always make a joke.”</p> <p>Nick's heartbroken sister, Eva, also remembered her brother, expressing gratitude for the support she has received. “I just wanted to say thank you to everyone that’s reached out,” she said. “A lot of people loved him. I think a piece of him lives in a lot of people, including me.”</p> <p>Campo's school reached out to parents to offer support for those needing it. <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">“There are no adequate words to express our grief and sympathy around the loss of this wonderful young man.” Cockburn Cricket Club added, “We are thankful for the time we spent with Nick. A life well lived but gone way too soon.”</span></p> <p>Tyler Rowe, another 18-year-old passenger in the HiLux, remains in critical condition in Royal Perth Hospital’s intensive care unit. The charged driver was granted bail on the condition he does not operate a motor vehicle and will face court again in September.</p> <p><em>Images: 9 News | 7 News</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Rising star footy player dies at just 18

<p>Rising football star Nick Campo has tragically died just two days after his 18th birthday. </p> <p>The South Fremantle player was in the backseat of a ute when it crashed and rolled just before midnight in Perth, before the ute smashed into an oncoming SUV. </p> <p>Two of Campo's teammates, Tyler Rowe and Josh Jackson, were also in the ute and were taken to hospital with injuries. </p> <p>Cameron Britt, CEO of South Fremantle, said the club was in "deep shock" following the sudden tragedy.</p> <p>"South Fremantle Football Club is deeply saddened by news of a car accident overnight involving several of our Colts players, resulting in the tragic death of South Fremantle footballer Nick Campo," he said.</p> <p>"We are a club in deep shock, focused upon supporting our players, staff and their families in these tragic circumstances."</p> <p>Campo's parents have also shared their heartbreak following the accident, saying their lives had been "ripped apart" by the sudden loss. </p> <p>"In the early hours of this morning our beautiful son Nick passed away after he was involved in a tragic car accident," they said on Facebook.</p> <p>"Our lives have been ripped apart, 18 years old, a future with so much hope taken away, we are praying others in the car involved will be ok."</p> <p>In Kalgoorlie, where Campo spent his childhood, his former club described him as "a popular friend to many" with a "life full of promise that was taken way too soon".</p> <p><em>Image credits: Nine </em></p>

Caring

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Entire Knox team stood down after abusing female players

<p>Knox Football Netball Club (KFNC) has stood down its entire mens development indefinitely, following reports of their "inexcusable behaviour" towards an opposing women's team. </p> <p>Reports emerged this week that players from the Melbourne suburban football club rated and attempted to trip over Donvale's female players as they entered the field last Sunday. </p> <p>“They held out their legs to trip the women over and used the phrases yes, no, mediocre, rating each female player. The players were rightly upset but they played out the rest of the game,” veteran reporter Jacqui Felgate said. </p> <p>“I hope the men that did this … are held to account," she continued. </p> <p>KFNC immediately looked into the incident, and on Thursday announced that the whole team had been “stood down indefinitely pending the outcome of the independent investigation” in an open letter shared on Facebook. </p> <p>They also said: "KFNC recognises that such behaviour is completely unacceptable and does not reflect the values of the club."</p> <p>KNFC will also implement a comprehensive behavioural and domestic violence education program across the entire club.</p> <p>“Participation in this program will be mandatory for all members, with a ‘no education, no play’ rule in effect,” Knox said.</p> <p>“KFNC is establishing an ongoing partnership with a local family violence shelter for both education and charitable support.</p> <p>“We understand the gravity of this situation and the importance of taking swift and decisive action. We are committed to learning from this incident and ensuring that such behaviour is not repeated in the future.</p> <p>“Our club stands for inclusivity, respect, and safety for all members, and we will continue to uphold these values in everything we do.”</p> <p>Felgate reacted to Knox's open letter and said that the action was “the very least they could do”.</p> <p>“Women play sport — they should not be subjected to abuse on the field, off the field, whatever, on the base of their sex,” Felgate said.</p> <p>A Donvale player also spoke to the <em>Herald Sun </em>anonymously and said that her team were already "uncomfortable" before the comments began. </p> <p>"We all realised what happened a lot of us broke down in tears and just felt helpless," she told the publication. </p> <p>"I’ve had individual men come up to me and say things that aren’t really appropriate but this was a group of 20 men standing, laughing and making comments about us.</p> <p>“The only thing I want to emphasise is the amount of other men from Knox that were around them not saying anything," she added. </p> <p>“Unfortunately I really do believe that men aren’t going to stop behaving like this unless other men call it out, they don’t listen to women.”</p> <p><em>Image: Facebook/ Knox Football Club</em></p>

Legal

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"It loses its value": Calls for the Last Post to be canned from Anzac Day footy

<p>A radio host has called for the Last Post to be canned from the majority of Anzac Day football games, saying it has lost its meaning over the years, leaving people with "bugle fatigue". </p> <p>An Anzac Day AFL match has taken place every year at the MCG on Anzac Day since 1995, with Collingwood and Essendon going head to head year after year.</p> <p>It was the brainchild of then Essendon coach Kevin Sheedy who had also served in the Australian Army during his playing days for Richmond.</p> <p>The game started as a one off-match, which quickly snowballed into an entire round of games, while the NRL also joined in and created their own Anzac Day matches.</p> <p>Traditionally, each game starts with a ceremony of recognition of our veterans and a performance of the Last Post. before the game kicks off. </p> <p>The addition of the several extra games, all which begin with the Last Post, prompted radio host Greg 'Marto' Martin from Brisbane's <em>Triple M Breakfast with Marto, Margaux & Dan</em> to call for The Last Post to be scrapped from all matches, except the annual fixture between Essendon and Collingwood. </p> <p>"Football has now turned [The Last Post] into a gimmick," he said.</p> <p>"Back in 1995 when Kevin Sheedy, the coach of Essendon, he said, 'Let's have an Anzac Day clash at the MCG,' I reckon it's the most… spine tingling three minutes or so." </p> <p>"97,000 at the MCG… not one person yelling out while that's being played and, the honour that they give to all serving soldiers and returned soldiers is quite extraordinary."</p> <p>"But now what's happened, as football always does, and I'm not just talking AFL I'm talking rugby league as well, they've taken a wonderful thing and they've gone, 'Oh that's good —'"</p> <p>Margaux interrupted saying: "How can we capitalise!"</p> <p>Marto continued, "So what's going to happen this week in all eight games of the AFL and all eight games of the rugby league… every single one of them will play this [The Last Post] and you'll get ANZAC - you'll get bugle fatigue."</p> <p>"We have to stop it somewhere."</p> <p>Margaux said, "It gets saturated, so it loses its value. They all think they are doing the right thing, but all they are doing is turning it into a mockery."</p> <p>The AFL has confirmed that all nine matches across round seven will hold special Anzac observance ceremonies ahead of each game, with AFL General Manager Commercial Peta Webster saying, "Anzac Day is one of our country's most important national occasions so I'd encourage all fans attending matches throughout the round to arrive early to soak up the atmosphere and pre-match formalities that will no doubt be another moving tribute to the sacrifices of our past and present service men and women."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Dreading footy season? You’re not alone – 20% of Australians are self-described sport haters

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/hunter-fujak-290599">Hunter Fujak</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/deakin-university-757">Deakin University</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/heath-mcdonald-92440">Heath McDonald</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p>With the winter AFL and NRL seasons about to start, Australia’s sporting calendar is once again transitioning from its quietest to busiest period.</p> <p>For many, the return of the AFL and NRL competitions is highly anticipated. But there is one group whose experience is very different: the approximately 20% of Australians who hate sport.</p> <p>We are currently conducting research to better understand why people feel this way about sport and what their experiences are like living in a nation where sport is so <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1329878x15616515">culturally central</a>. We have completed surveys with thousands of Australians and are now beginning to interview those who have described themselves as “sport haters”.</p> <h2>Australia, a ‘sports mad’ nation</h2> <p>Australia has long been described as a “<a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14660970902955588">sports mad nation</a>”, a reasonable assertion given the Melbourne Cup attracted crowds of <a href="https://catalogue.nla.gov.au/catalog/2178266">more than 100,000 people</a> as far back as the 1880s.</p> <p>Australia’s sport passion is perhaps most evident today from the number of professional teams we support for a nation of 26 million people, one of the highest per capita <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Heath-Mcdonald/publication/326140082_Are_Sport_Consumers_Unique_Consumer_Behavior_Within_Crowded_Sport_Markets/links/5e9465fd92851c2f529c4322/Are-Sport-Consumers-Unique-Consumer-Behavior-Within-Crowded-Sport-Markets.pdf">concentrations</a> in the world.</p> <p>In addition to our four distinct football codes – Australian rules football, rugby league, rugby union and soccer – we have professional netball, basketball, cricket and tennis. In all, there are more than <a href="https://www.clearinghouseforsport.gov.au/kb/structure-of-australian-sport">130 professional sport teams in Australia</a> today (across both genders).</p> <p>Australia also hosts – and Australians attend – major sport events at a rate wildly disproportionate to the size of our population and economy. <a href="https://www.blackbookmotorsport.com/news/f1-australian-grand-prix-record-crowd-melbourne-albert-park/">Formula One</a>, the <a href="https://ausopen.com/articles/news/record-breaking-australian-open-ao-2024-numbers">Australian Open</a>, the <a href="https://nbl.com.au/news/nbl-sets-new-season-attendance-record">National Basketball League</a>, the <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/sport/nrl/nrl-attendance-records-tumble-as-fans-flock-back-to-footy-20230902-p5e1ib.html">National Rugby League</a> and <a href="https://mumbrella.com.au/64-of-aussie-population-watched-matildas-new-deakin-research-claims-797902">Matildas</a> have all recently broken attendance or television viewership records.</p> <h2>Why people hate sport</h2> <p>The ubiquity of sport in our culture, however, conceals the fact that a significant portion of people strongly and actively dislike sport. Recent <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/14413523.2023.2233342">research</a> by one of the co-authors here (Heath McDonald) has begun to shine light on this cohort, dubbed “sport haters”.</p> <p>Sport haters account for approximately 20% of the Australian population, according to two surveys we have conducted of nearly 3,500 and more than 27,000 adults. Demographically, this group is significantly more likely to be female, younger and more affluent than other Australians.</p> <p>Their strong negative sentiments are reflected in the most common word associations <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/14413523.2023.2233342">study participants</a> used to describe sport. In the case of AFL, these were: “boring”, “overpaid”, “stupid/dumb”, “rough”, “scandal” and “alcohol”.</p> <p>While the reasons for disliking sport vary from person to person, research shows there are some common themes. The first is in childhood, where negative experiences participating in sport or attending games or matches can lead to a life-long dislike of all sport. As one professed sport hater said in an <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/AskMen/comments/1zxfyt/guys_who_do_not_like_sports_can_you_explain_why/">online forum devoted to men who don’t like sport</a>: "My brother would force me to play soccer against my will all the time as children. I think that is where my resentment for physical sport comes from because the choice was taken away from me by my twat of a brother."</p> <p>Sport hatred can also derive from social exclusion or marginalisation. Sport has historically been a male-centric domain that <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0277539587900525">celebrates</a> masculinity and can lead to <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-02-20/taylor-swift-effect-sports-fandom-nfl/103486274">toxic behaviour</a>, which can exclude many women and some men.</p> <p>Sport has also had to overcome racism, perhaps most symbolically visible by AFL player Nicky Winmar’s <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-04-17/nicky-winmar-indigenous-afl-racism-anniversary/102222960">iconic protest</a> in 1993. In addition, individuals with a disability still face <a href="https://www.sportaus.gov.au/integrity_in_sport/inclusive-sport/understanding-our-diverse-audiences/people-with-disability#:%7E:text=People%20with%20disability%20receive%20the,than%20adults%20who%20don't.">barriers</a> that result in lower rates of sport participation.</p> <p>Here, the current <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-02-20/taylor-swift-effect-sports-fandom-nfl/103486274">Taylor Swift effect</a> is noteworthy. The singer’s attendance at National Football League games, including the Superbowl, resulted in huge spikes in television viewership. Through her association, Swift helped make the sport more <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S096969892300317X#bib122">psychologically accessible</a> for many women and girls.</p> <p>The <a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?hl=en&amp;lr=&amp;id=AvjrDwAAQBAJ&amp;oi=fnd&amp;pg=PT125&amp;dq=Contesting+national+Culture&amp;ots=1_lQuBpKK7&amp;sig=dMb-5s0PgpUumUTSFeEKZiNq0dg#v=onepage&amp;q=Contesting%20national%20Culture&amp;f=false">cultural dominance</a> of sport also fuels its detractors, with many critical of sport’s media saturation and its broader social and even political prioritisation. (The <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2024-02-16/macquarie-point-stadium-dominates-election-campaign-day-one/103473124">debate in Tasmania</a> over the controversial AFL stadium proposal is a good case in point.)</p> <p>From a media perspective, Australia’s particularly strict <a href="https://theconversation.com/regardless-of-the-rules-sport-is-fleeing-free-tv-for-pay-and-it-might-be-an-avalanche-154640">anti-siphoning</a> laws have ensured that sport remains front and centre on free-to-air television programming.</p> <p>Sport’s cultural dominance also fosters resentment for overshadowing people’s non-sporting passions and pursuits, as well as creating societal out-groups. Journalist Jo Chandler’s <a href="https://libraryedition.smedia.com.au/lib_a/Default.aspx#panel=document">2010</a> description of moving to Melbourne is no doubt shared by many: "In the workplace, to be unaligned is deeply isolating. Team tribalism infects meetings, especially when overseen by male chiefs. In shameful desperation, I’ve played along."</p> <p>In life, it’s fairly easy to avoid most products you might dislike. But given sport’s ubiquity, simply tuning out is sometimes not an option.</p> <h2>The Anti-Football League, a club for haters</h2> <p>In 1967, two Melbourne journalists, Keith Dunstan and Douglas Wilkie, launched an anti-sport club in response to this growing cultural dominance. In his founding address to the <a href="https://www.academia.edu/7584522/Football_is_a_Fever_Disease_Like_Recurrent_Malaria_and_Evidently_Incurable_Passion_Place_and_the_Emergence_of_an_Australian_Anti_Football_League">Anti-Football League</a>, Wilkie made clear who the club was for: "All of us who are tired of having football personalities, predictions and post mortems cluttering our newspapers, TV screens and attempts at alternative human converse – from beginning-of-morning prayers to the last trickle of bed time bathwater – should join at once."</p> <p>Membership quickly reached the thousands. Soon, a Sydney branch was launched, bringing national membership to a high of around 7,000. According to sport historian Matthew Klugman, members found joy in being “haters”.</p> <p>"…they wanted to find a shared meaning in their suffering, not to extinguish it, but to better enjoy it."</p> <p>This led to some curious rituals, with members ceremonially cremating footballs or burying them. An Anti-Football Day was also launched, taking place on the eve of the Victorian Football League Grand Final.</p> <p>The club would go on to experience periods of both prosperity and hiatus over the years, but has been dormant since <a href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/vale-keith-dunstan-gentle-footy-hater-cyclist-and-master-of-words-20130911-2tklh.html">Dunstan’s death</a> in 2013.</p> <p>With eight more years to go in Australia’s so-called “<a href="https://this.deakin.edu.au/career/golden-decade-of-sport-ahead-for-australia">golden decade of sport</a>”, which began with <a href="https://www.fiba.basketball/womensbasketballworldcup/2022">2022 Women’s Basketball World Cup in Sydney</a> and culminates with the 2032 Brisbane Olympics, it may be time sport haters to start a new support group.</p> <p>If you consider yourself a sport hater, and are interested in contributing your experience to our ongoing research, please provide your contact information <a href="https://researchsurveys.deakin.edu.au/jfe/form/SV_a4CqHyqipjYj5SC">here</a>.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/223733/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/hunter-fujak-290599"><em>Hunter Fujak</em></a><em>, Senior Lecturer in Sport Management, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/deakin-university-757">Deakin University</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/heath-mcdonald-92440">Heath McDonald</a>, Dean of Economics, Finance and Marketing and Professor of Marketing, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/rmit-university-1063">RMIT University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/dreading-footy-season-youre-not-alone-20-of-australians-are-self-described-sport-haters-223733">original article</a>.</em></p>

TV

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All the footy stars are getting married!

<p>Love was in the air, and wedding bells rang joyfully as AFL star Jack Silvagni and his beautiful bride, Grace Phillips, sealed their love in a heartwarming ceremony over the weekend.</p> <p>The couple, who have been together since 2014, took the plunge into marital bliss in a picturesque setting in Noosa, Queensland. Their love story, culminating in a beautiful union, is a testament to the power of love and commitment.</p> <p>As the 25-year-old Carlton forward and his stunning bride exchanged vows, they did so in the company of their nearest and dearest. The joyous occasion was made even more special as it coincided with a wave of AFL weddings, with teammates Mitch McGovern and Matt Kennedy also embracing the off-season to celebrate their nuptials.</p> <p>Jack Silvagni, the eldest son of Carlton legend Stephen Silvagni and model Jo Silvagni, looked every bit the dashing groom in his suit, but the true star of the day was of course his radiant bride, Grace Phillips.</p> <p>She donned an enchanting ivory off-the-shoulder gown by Kyha Studios, setting hearts aflutter as she walked down the aisle. The couple shared their first photo as newlyweds on Instagram, a picture-perfect moment captured in time, and their caption, "19•10•23 🤍", was a simple but powerful declaration of their love.</p> <p>The Carlton Football Club, recognising the significance of the day, congratulated the newlyweds with heartfelt wishes on their official Instagram account, "Congratulations Jack and Grace 💍💕." It was a wonderful show of support from their football family, acknowledging that love and happiness transcend the boundaries of the game.</p> <p>Surrounded by a guest list that included their closest friends and family, the day was filled with laughter, love, and cherished moments. Silvagni's Carlton teammates, Patrick Cripps, Jack Martin and Sam Docherty, were in attendance to witness this beautiful chapter in their lives.</p> <p>Silvagni's proposal to Phillips last year marked the beginning of their journey towards this day. Their engagement, shared on the same day as Richmond's Tom Lynch and Olivia Burke, was a special moment that foreshadowed the love-filled year ahead. Burke, the Senior Marketing Manager for Kyha Studios, wore the same brand that Phillips chose for her wedding dress, adding a poetic touch to their story.</p> <p>In the world of football, love clearly knows no bounds, as Western Bulldogs star Jason Johannisen also recently tied the knot, marrying Logan Shine in Bali. And Carlton star Mitch McGovern also found his forever love over the weekend, marrying Kirsten Prater in South Australia.</p> <p>With so much love in the air, it's clear that the AFL community knows how to celebrate both on and off the field. Silvagni and Phillips' wedding day was not just a celebration of their love, but a reminder that love conquers all and brings joy to everyone it touches. We wish the newlyweds a lifetime filled with love, happiness, and memorable moments.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Relationships

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“One of a kind larrikin": Footy legend passes away at 38

<p>Footy legend Damien Medwin has tragically passed away aged 38 in Tasmania’s north after a fatal car crash on Sunday. </p> <p>Tributes have poured in for the NSW and NT player and father of three, after his body was found in a car submerged in water on the state's northwest. </p> <p>Stowport Cricket Club’s Nic Bellinger has said that Medwin was always the first person “put a positive spin on things when the chips were down”.</p> <p>He was described by his heartbroken family and friends as "the life of the party." </p> <p>“Damien is well known all over our state and country through his many contacts from sport and friendships,” Bellinger added. </p> <p>“Over his lifetime, he was always leaving a positive impact with the people who he came into contact with.”</p> <p>Bellinger launched a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/damien-boony-medwin-and-family" target="_blank" rel="noopener">GoFundMe </a>campaign on Tuesday to help support Medwin's grieving wife Bec and his three children, Hudson, Jordy and Marni. </p> <p>He said that the family have a “long, tough road ahead” as they grieve the loss of  a “very loving husband”. </p> <p>As of Thursday the campaign has raised over $62,000 with the highest donation at $2,500. </p> <p>The football legend played for eight different clubs in his lifetime, with stints in both NSW and NT. </p> <p>He was a player and assistant coach for the Circular Head Saints Football Club, before his tragic death. </p> <p>The football club have released a statement and said that they were “devastated” by the “sudden and tragic passing of our life member, teammate, club legend and friend”.</p> <p>“He was the clubs leading goal kicker on several occasions and was made life member at the end of 2018, just as the club went into recess,” they said.</p> <p>“He was a one of a kind larrikin who filled the room with smiles and laughter.</p> <p>“Our lives are better for knowing him and sharing so many wonderful memories with such a treasured friend. Boony and his beautiful family have had a huge impact on our club for many years.”</p> <p>Medwin was also a senior assistant for the Forest-Stanley Football Club, who have also paid tribute to the football great. </p> <p>“Words can’t describe the pain of the loss of you mate! Everyone’s mate, our coach &amp; player. You were always positive, our number 13,”  they said. </p> <p>“You made people so welcome. You gave us hope even when the chips were down.”</p> <p>Emergency services were called to the scene at 9:30am on the day the car was found, according to a spokesman for the Tasmanian Police. </p> <p>“Initial inquiries indicate the man was travelling west on Backline Road, Forest in a silver Ford Territory when the vehicle has left the road coming to rest in water,” the spokesman said.</p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

News

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Father of fallen teen footy player speaks out

<p>Castlemaine Football Netball Club, and the wider AFL Central Victoria community, are in mourning after losing one of their own over the weekend. </p> <p>Dallas Keogh-Frankling, an up-and-coming CFNC Under 18s player, was participating in an away game at the Kyneton Showgrounds when he was tackled. </p> <p>While the 17-year-old got up from the collision, even going on to play the rest of the game, he collapsed after the game, and passed away awaiting hospital transfer. </p> <p>His father, who had been with Dallas at the time of the tragedy, told the <em>Herald Sun</em> that, “late in the last quarter he was tackled on the boundary line by two people.</p> <p>“His arms were pinned and he landed on the ball next to the gates where people come onto the field.”</p> <p>Mark Frankling also reported that Dallas had gotten up “straight away”, but that on his way to the bench he could be seen grasping “his guts”, and that when Mark had gone to check on his son, he’d noted that he “might have broken ribs”.</p> <p>It was after the team’s coach had addressed the boys in the changing rooms that Dallas’ condition took a turn for the worst, with Mark recalling how he’d “looked over and saw his face was in a bit of pain, and I asked him if he was all right.</p> <p>“His eyes rolled in the back of his head, I yelled for the ambulance, and then he came to.”</p> <p>Mark had been certain things would be alright if Dallas - whose face looked “grey” - could just get to the hospital, and followed the ambulance his son was taken in.</p> <p>However, when he arrived at Kyneton Hospital, he could see paramedics attempting to revive his teenage son - and while he “came back … he flatlined again”.</p> <p>Dallas was meant to be transferred to Melbourne for further treatment, but tragically passed away before that could occur. </p> <p>“They worked again on bringing him back,” Mark said. “I held his hand and it felt cold. After an hour-and-a-half, they couldn’t bring him back.</p> <p>Mark and the rest of Dallas’ family are now asking the coroner to investigate, hoping for some answers into why Dallas - who was healthy and had no known pre-existing medical conditions - had died under these circumstances, because they “don’t want this to happen to anyone else.</p> <p>“I don’t want this to happen to any other kid, I don’t think Dallas would want this either.”</p> <p>As Mark went on to explain, he wanted “only good things” to come out of it, certain that his son would have wanted his friends to continue playing, rather than hanging up their boots in the wake of Dallas’ passing. </p> <p>“That’s life,” Mark said, “things can happen, accidents can happen. I just don’t want this to affect the footy club.” </p> <p>“But I want only good things to come from this. Dallas would still want them to play footy instead of not playing footy.</p> <p>“That’s life, things can happen, accidents can happen, I just don’t want this to affect the footy club.”</p> <p>According to Mark, Dallas had been “growing up so well”, devoting his life to the sport that he loved, and confessed that “it’s still hard to comprehend I won’t be driving him to footy, and him telling me what he’s going to do today.”</p> <p>“He was just a great kid. There was never a bad word about him. He had great people around him, quiet and polite.”</p> <p>The same message carried on across Castlemaine Football Netball Club’s heartfelt tribute to their young star - in which they also confirmed the heartbreaking news - with many of Dallas’ friends and teammates taking to the comments to share their messages of love and loss. </p> <p>“Dallas loved his football, he loved his Club, and he loved his team mates,” they wrote. “It is unfathomable to us that he is gone. At the behest of his family, training will continue to be offered this week to honour the fact that he would never want his death to dampen our love of the game …</p> <p>“To our wider football and netball community who have provided condolences, sent personal messages and posted tributes - we feel your support.</p> <p>“Our focus is now on Dallas’s family, his teammates, friends, and our wider Club community as we process his loss and come to terms with our collective grief.”</p> <p><iframe style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fcastlemainefnc%2Fposts%2Fpfbid02M48rZWpbd9kF8Y4ZsUvjhePYW89J74kkBDSKdGTZBCLZJME4UVNwioD9RaxjYKvvl&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=500" width="500" height="738" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p><em>Images: Facebook, 9News / Nine</em></p>

Caring

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Iconic footy commentator reveals tragic diagnosis

<p dir="ltr">Broadcasting legend Sandy Roberts has shared the details of his ongoing health battle, after being diagnosed with a rare, incurable cancer.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 73-year-old has returned to the MCG as he is fronting a new campaign to help save the lives of others, and himself, by trying to find a cure.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I have so many great, fond memories of this mighty ground,” says the former Channel 7 AFL commentator in the campaign launch.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This is my greatest call ... help me find a cure for myeloma.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Roberts’ cancer was found last year after he had a fall and had to undergo a series of x-rays.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite always staying active during his retirement, he has broken his ribs in the fall, while the scans also showed the much more sinister diagnosis.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If I hadn’t fallen down the stairs, I wouldn’t have known I had multiple myeloma,” Roberts exclusively told <a href="https://7news.com.au/sport/afl/broadcasting-legend-sandy-roberts-facing-frightening-health-battle-with-incurable-cancer-c-10658323" target="_blank" rel="noopener">7NEWS</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The doctor finished up saying, ‘Of course, you’ve also got cancer’. Well, you could have blown us down with a feather. I mean, we had absolutely no idea … I mean, what’s he talking about?”</p> <p dir="ltr">Myeloma is a rare type of blood cancer, with experts saying that it is one of the few cancers in the 21st century that remains incurable.</p> <p dir="ltr">”Almost 30 per cent (of sufferers) die within 18 months of being diagnosed,” Roberts said during the campaign.</p> <p dir="ltr">For 40 years, Roberts was the face of Channel Seven sport, with his unique commentary being known for his cheeky and witty takes on sporting games.</p> <p dir="ltr">Since being diagnosed, Roberts has undergone chemotherapy and radiation, which has left him desperately sick and having to remain in hospital for extended stays.</p> <p dir="ltr">”I lost weight and I was weak and lethargic ... yeah, it wasn’t pleasant,” Roberts said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Roberts’ wife, Carolyn, said the illness had taken an emotional toll on him and his entire family.</p> <p dir="ltr">”Sometimes you want to fall into a hole, you definitely do,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“And there were times when I’d go into the bedroom and cry, and I’m sure Sandy did the same, but you’ve got to keep going.”</p> <p dir="ltr">With new treatments helping him feel much stronger, he is thrilled to be the face of the long overdue awareness campaign.</p> <p dir="ltr">The campaign is aimed to raise awareness for the overlooked type of cancer, while experts are also asking for donations to help fund their research into a cure.</p> <p dir="ltr">”Experts within Myeloma Australia and around the world are saying that a cure is very close,” Roberts said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So fingers crossed it’s REALLY close.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Seven</em></p>

Caring

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“What a disgrace”: Grace Tame slams footy star’s child abuse verdict

<p dir="ltr"><em>Content warning: This article includes mentions of child sex abuse (CSA) and child exploitation material.</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Activist Grace Tame has slammed the Australian legal system after former NRL star Brett Finch avoided jail time for sharing child sex abuse (CSA) material.</p> <p dir="ltr">Finch, a former halfback, pleaded guilty to one charge of using a carriage service to transmit, publish or promote child abuse in August, but was sentenced to a $1000 two-year good behaviour bond on Wednesday.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 41-year-old was under the influence of drugs when he left a series of messages on a gay chat-line expressing a desire to perform sex acts on young boys.</p> <p dir="ltr">In Sydney’s Downing Centre District Court, Finch admitted to feeling disgust at himself for making the calls, saying his intention behind them was to obtain cocaine.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Tame shared her outrage in a series of posts on social media on Wednesday night, describing the verdict as a shame on Australia.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This pathetic verdict is a shame on our nation. The fact that Judge Phillip Mahony accepted the distorted narrative alleged by Brett Finch that his production of child abuse material was a means of scoring drugs shows just how undervalued children are in Australia,” she wrote over a screenshot of a news story about Finch’s sentencing.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The buck continues to stop with innocent lives. What a disgrace.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Let’s be real here: of all the avenues to score cocaine, a paedophile ring is probably THE LAST PLACE you’d need to look. In the words of Robin Williams, ‘that’s like getting chemotherapy because YOU’RE TIRED OF SHAVING YOUR HEAD’.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The 27-year-old said that whether his story was true or not, the outcome of his actions remains the same.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It does not change the fact that he produced child exploitation material,” she continued.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It does not change the fact that he engaged with convicted paedophiles, therefore aiding and enabling the cycle of abuse culture and providing the social cue of legitimacy to a crime against humanity.”</p> <p dir="ltr">In response to his claims that the messages were just “s**t talk”, Ms Tame said it served to “dehumanise and objectify” children.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Yeah, that’s all it ever is, isn’t it, just “s**t talk?” she wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s just “s**t talk” to dehumanise and objectify an underage member of your own species.”</p> <p dir="ltr">During Finch’s sentencing, Judge Phillip Mahoney described the content of the athlete’s messages as “highly depraved” and “morally reprehensible”.</p> <p dir="ltr">While the maximum penalty for the offence is 15 years, the Crown had asked that Finch be sentenced to full-time custody.</p> <p dir="ltr">Judge Mahoney found that there were some exceptional circumstances surrounding Finch’s offending, accepting that he had been motivated by a “patently absurd” attempt to source drugs rather than out of sexual interest in children.</p> <p dir="ltr">He noted that Finch hadn’t created or shared any images and had acted alone and while under the influence, with the offending being “entirely unsophisticated”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I accept that he is genuinely remorseful for his offending conduct,” the judge said, noting Finch’s lack of a criminal record and his involvement in junior football coaching and charity work.</p> <p dir="ltr">The court heard that Finch was at the height of his drug use at the time, which had started in 2013 and peaked with his use of 12 to 25 grams of cocaine a week.</p> <p dir="ltr">There was evidence that he failed to adapt to life after his NRL career, and that he was ashamed of his actions and had been abused in public, prompting him to rarely leave his home following the arrest.</p> <p dir="ltr">Under his release order, Finch must be of good behaviour, not travel interstate or overseas without permission, and must undergo drug testing and treatment.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>If you or someone you know have been a victim or affected by child sexual abuse, support is available. You can contact Bravehearts on 1800 272 831 or Blue Knot on 1300 657 380 for support.</em></p> <p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-0aeebea0-7fff-4515-96fd-837a56bf31c7"></span></em></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram / Getty Images</em></p>

Legal

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Steve Price unloads on women's footy

<p>Steve Price and Peter Helliar have gone toe-to-toe on <em>The Project</em>, as Price was forced to defend his controversial opinion on the "substandard" AFLW. </p> <p>Price, whose opinion piece was published in the <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/subscribe/news/1/?sourceCode=HSWEB_WRE170_a_NEW&amp;dest=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.heraldsun.com.au%2Fnews%2Fopinion%2Fsteve-price-why-female-footy-is-substandard-and-doesnt-deserve-focus-or-funding-it-gets-from-afl%2Fnews-story%2F559552f19f1c3029abacd048e954ae93&amp;memtype=anonymous&amp;mode=premium&amp;v21=dynamic-high-control-score&amp;V21spcbehaviour=append" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Herald Sun</a> on Friday, slammed the women's AFL competition for being lacklustre compared to the men's competition, and was "not deserving of the attention and funding it gets.”</p> <p>Carrie Bickmore broached the article with Price, saying, “Let’s talk about your article on the AFLW last week that got a few people worked up.”</p> <p>“You knew exactly what you were doing and executed it perfectly."</p> <p>As Steve began to defend his views, he went on to say women's AFL games are drawing in minimal crowds, and games are resulting in very few points scored. </p> <p>He doubled down by saying the ambition of the AFL to expand the women's teams so rapidly was misguided, saying there was "not enough talent".</p> <p>Helliar quickly interjected and defended young sportswomen, saying the AFLW is only in its infancy and will continue to get better. </p> <p>He said, "I think of my sisters who are footy mad and they would have loved to have dreamt the opportunity - the opportunity to have dreamed to play AFLW."</p> <p>'This is better than it was four years ago, it will continue to get better."</p> <p>Price responded, "Let me clear up what I am saying simply. I think the AFL went too early and too hard. There is not enough talent to fill 18 teams."</p> <p>"They should have gone more quietly and you wouldn't have the issues you are having at the moment. The media exposure is extraordinary for something that is not very good."</p> <p>Helliar then asked whether the Price simply didn't like women playing physical sport, before Price defended his take by listing other sports he enjoyed watching women play.</p> <p>Price cut the debate short by shutting down Helliar, saying, "I don't think you understand writing a column is about an opinion that you have and that is my opinion. I don't mind that you don't agree with it."</p> <p><em>Image credits: The Project</em></p>

TV

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Man wearing Melbourne footy jersey arrested for yelling at Prince Andrew

<p dir="ltr">A man wearing a Melbourne City FC jersey has been arrested after screaming at Prince Andrew as he walked behind Queen Elizabeth II’s coffin. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Queen’s coffin travelled through Edinburgh on Monday to St Giles' Cathedral as mourners paid their respects to the late monarch. </p> <p dir="ltr">Her four children, ​​King Charles III, Princess Anne, Prince Andrew and Prince Edward, were walking behind the hearse when a man began shouting at Prince Andrew. </p> <p dir="ltr">The man was seen cupping his hands around his mouth before shouting, “Andrew, you're a sick old man”. </p> <p dir="ltr">Police and mourners ganged up on the man before he was arrested and continued shouting “disgusting” and “I’ve done nothing wrong”. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Prince Andrew heckled as the Queen's coffin passes <a href="https://t.co/85m9jUgszF">pic.twitter.com/85m9jUgszF</a></p> <p>— Christopher Marshall (@chrismarshll) <a href="https://twitter.com/chrismarshll/status/1569323294716829700?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 12, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Police Scotland confirmed a 22-year old man was arrested “in connection with a breach of the peace' on the Royal Mile around 2.50pm on Monday.</p> <p dir="ltr">The man later identified himself on Scottish TV as “Rory”. </p> <p dir="ltr">It it believed the attack on Prince Andrew was due to his relationship with disgraced sex offender Jeffery Epstein. </p> <p dir="ltr">Prince Andrew was not allowed to wear military dress for the event, and other ones due to his relationship.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, an exception will reportedly be made for him to wear military dress as a special mark of respect for the Queen at the final vigil in Westminster Hall.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Twitter</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Footy player jailed after king hit and headbutt

<p><em>Image: NT News</em></p> <p>Footballer Warrick Williams will spend over a year behind bars after breaking a man’s jaw on Darwin’s party strip.</p> <p>The 28-year-old is a Victorian recruit for the Wanderers Football Club and continued to play in the Northern Territory Football League while on bail.</p> <p>He has pleaded guilty to unlawfully causing serious harm, which carries a maximum penalty of 14 years' imprisonment.</p> <p>The court heard an argument broke out over a piece of litter outside the Istanbul Kebab Bar on Mitchell Street in 2020.</p> <p>"Not only did you headbutt him... you king hit him at a time when he... was not expecting to be hit," Justice Peter Barr of the Northern Territory Supreme Court said.</p> <p>"You were a taller and more powerfully built man — no doubt you made that assessment."</p> <p>Williams claimed he had been provoked by the man's racial slurs towards him.</p> <p>However, after reviewing CCTV and hearing evidence from both parties, Justice Barr ruled he was not satisfied that the victim had used provocative and offensive racist language.</p> <p>The judge noted Williams was a talented footballer with a clean tribunal record and had made an effort to turn his life around.</p> <p>"But an offender who engages in drunken violence causing serious consequences must expect a sentence of imprisonment," Justice Barr said.</p> <p>Warrick Williams has been handed a jail sentence of three years and four months. He will be released after serving 14 months.</p>

News

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“Last week I was playing touch footy. This week we were making funeral plans.”

<p>Images: Facebook / Karina Haira </p> <p>When Karina Haira, a young mother from Hamilton, first caught Covid, she thought she could get the better of it, no problems.</p> <p>“I just thought, I can beat this. It’s just the flu,” said the 37-year-old. Karina is an active asthmatic who played a lot of sport. She has never smoked and doesn’t take drugs.</p> <p>However, six days after testing positive for Covid-19 in November, her condition suddenly deteriorated. Initially, chills and body ache developed into a high fever. She quickly became bed ridden and couldn’t breathe properly.</p> <p>After admission to hospital, the days became a blur. She could hear chatter regarding the intensive care unit but really had no idea what was going on. She was told her lungs had collapsed.</p> <p>“That’s when I realised, oh shoot this is real,” she said.</p> <p>Haira has now turned a corner and spoke to the New Zealand Herald from hospital on day 20 of her Covid infection. She fought for her life in the ICU for roughly 4-5 days when she nearly had to be put into an induced coma because her lungs were failing. Her fever was 39°C and the doctors just could not bring it down.</p> <p>"I'm a pretty strong woman ... when I put my mind to things I get it done. But this time round I was scared, really scared," said the mother of five who works in traffic management.</p> <p>The hardest part was not being able to see and touch her children. "I had a meeting with my children and family on video call, and the pain I saw in their hearts, we were all crying.</p> <p>"Last week I was running around playing touch, and this week we were even making funeral plans.</p> <p>"As dramatic as that sounds, that's pretty much something the doctor had mentioned I might want to put into place."</p> <p>One of her kid's sports coaches had suggested she post a Facebook video to share her story with others when she was first diagnosed.<br />Haira did, and that was the start of a series of live broadcasts that would track her battle with Covid-19 as her condition deteriorated, getting likes, comments and shares from hundreds of people.</p> <p>"Bro, this is not just the flu," Haira said in a video post taken on day 14 of her illness, panting despite having a tube in her nose that helped her to breathe.</p> <p>"If I take this out right now, I can't breathe, at all ... It's like my lung disappeared."</p> <p>On day 20, the doctors finally took off her oxygen mask. "I can actually inhale quite deep without it hurting and feeling like I'm being cut in my throat or cut in my lungs," she said. "Just walking around my room I get a little bit tired."</p> <p>Her husband and two of her children, both teenagers, were also infected but did not develop severe symptoms. They are now recovering in home isolation.</p> <p>She plans to get the whole family vaccinated as soon as possible. The doctors have advised her to wait at least four weeks after she is fully recovered to get the jab.</p> <p>"Never ever do I want to go through this again, never ever do I want my kids to get it," she said.</p> <p>Haira is not anti-vax, she says. Her mother had vaccinated them as children so the vaccine itself was never an issue. She was unvaccinated but had been speaking about it with her GP. She was what she called “anti-Covid”.</p> <p>"I didn’t believe it was real," she says. "I know there was proof in the media, but I just didn’t know anybody personally that had it, that could say to me, yup Covid’s real, this is what happened.”</p> <p>She decided to be "that person" with her Facebook "lives", hoping it would reach someone, anyone who was listening.</p> <p>"Once I ended up in hospital that's when I thought, I'm that person that used to say Covid's a lie. I'm going to post this, and I went from there."</p> <p>Her social media feed became inundated with messages and comments responding to her Covid story and she is feeling quite overwhelmed, she says. Out of ICU but still in hospital, she plans to hit the beach with her children once she is well.</p>

Caring

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Designer home comes with its OWN footy field

<p dir="ltr">A designer homestead in the middle of the Western Australian bush has been<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.realestate.com.au/property-lifestyle-wa-muckenburra-700170614?cid=content-article:buyers:featured-property" target="_blank">listed</a><span> </span>for sale, and its expansive 100-acre surroundings comes with its own private football oval.</p> <p dir="ltr">The home, with its “contemporary industrial meets country resort” aesthetic, took its creator five years to construct.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The purpose-built property is a model of the perfect country retreat dreamed up by its owner, who is an architect and university lecturer,” Nick French, of Dethridge Groves Real Estate,<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.realestate.com.au/news/designer-bush-homestead-on-100-acres-just-outside-perth-comes-with-own-afl-oval/" target="_blank">said</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s seamless and all the spaces are huge, which gives a very relaxed flow, and it all sits within a pristine bush setting with no other houses in view.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Along with its three bedrooms and bathrooms, the home boasts oversized entertaining spaces, a library and study, and a courtyard garden and plunge pool belonging to the master suite.</p> <p dir="ltr">The property also comes with a two-storey bunkhouse with two full-sized bedrooms of its own.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite being only an hour from the city, the property has an isolated feel.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The 100 acres of ever-changing natural bush land has many, many species of flowering natives - including some rare orchids,” Mr French said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though the natural beauty surrounding the home is a huge bonus, the highlight of the outdoor spaces has to be the quarter-sized AFL oval, along with its own seating for spectators “to take in all the fun”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There’s also a huge rear entertaining patio with built-in barbeque area and woodfired pizza oven,” Mr French said.</p> <p dir="ltr">With a solar energy system and water tanks capable of storing 90,000 litres, he added that the home also has a 10-star energy rating.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The owners have moved to new employment positions in Victoria and had to sell up both their main home and this holiday home,” Mr French said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It might not be the place you immediately think of when buying a holiday home or a weekender, but it’s only an hour drive from Perth but is completely secluded on its own huge land holding of diverse, native bushland.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The local town is utterly delightful with a number of historic buildings.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The home is open for inspections by appointment, and Mr French said he is welcoming offers starting at $1.7 million.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Realestate.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

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Footy legend sells deluxe home for $9 million

<p dir="ltr">Footy star Shane Crawford and his partner Olivia Anderson have sold their home in Brighton, Victoria, after listing it last month.</p> <p dir="ltr">The four-bedroom house<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.realestate.com.au/sold/property-house-vic-brighton-137066158" target="_blank">was listed</a><span> </span>with a price guide of $9 million to $9.9 million, more than 10 years after the couple bought it for $3.05 million.</p> <p dir="ltr">Industry sources told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.realestate.com.au/news/shane-crawford-olivia-anderson-sell-renovated-brighton-home/?rsf=syn:news:nca:hs:article" target="_blank"><em>realestate.com.au</em></a><span> </span>that the final selling price was “in the vicinity of $9 million”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The property attracted high-end buyers and a “couple of quite excited Hawks supporters” according to Fredman Property Group owner Joel Fredman.</p> <p dir="ltr">Eventually, a family with three kids looking to upsize from their current Brighton home purchased the property.</p> <p dir="ltr">Shane and Olivia completely renovated the home before the sale, but still maintained some traditional fittings.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There’s the richness of the original Victorian period features - the marble fireplaces, the ceiling roses, the lacework, the verandah,” Mr Fredman said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The location is also so central to Brighton Grammar, Firbank Grammar and Bay Street. And there’s a reserve around the corner in Middle Crescent, which is a great place for families to be hanging out.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The family sold the property after purchasing a property in Northern New South Wales last year, with Shane intending to spend more time there with Olivia and their sons Charlie, Ben, Jack, and Harry.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Covid has brought a lot of change, and the family has made a sea change, so it’s a waste living in such a big house here,” Shane<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-10081619/AFL-Hawthorn-great-Shane-Crawford-sells-Brighton-mansion-9million.html" target="_blank">said</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We have had 12 amazing years there and restored it back to its prime,” Olivia said, adding that the time had come to “pass on our home for another family to enjoy”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s the childhood home of the four boys, so it’s sad. But times have changed and we are so excited about the next chapter.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The 1887-property, called the ‘Ellesmere’, was once home to Thomas Wilson, the mayor of Brighton.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sitting on a 1477-square-metre lot, the property features a 20-metre pool, a tennis court, a gym, and a steam room.</p> <p dir="ltr">Inside, the home boasts high ceilings, bay windows, and Tasmanian Oak parquetry flooring, as well as modern marble benches, and hydronic in-floor heating.</p> <p dir="ltr">Listing the property during lockdown also didn’t seem to faze Mr Fredman, who told the<span> </span><em>Herald Sun</em><span> </span>he wasn’t worried since it was “the type of property you do wait for”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Listing it during lockdown gave me time to get to know the buyers, inform them of the details of the property and qualify them (as legitimate buyers),” he said. “So by the time inspections were allowed, I had everyone booked in for private tours.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s an emotive property (the buyers) could be in for 10-20 years.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: @flatoutmum / Instagram, realestate.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

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“Worst I’ve seen”: NRL world rocked by “horrific” injuries

<p>Trent Robinson says the Rooster’s injury crisis is “without a doubt” the worst he has ever seen after his side lost three players during Thursday night’s game. </p> <p>Luke Keary was rushed to hospital with a suspected ruptured spleen in the Roosters’ 26-4 loss to Melbourne at the SCG.</p> <p>He joins a list of the growing casualties including Keary, Mitch Aubusson, with his fractured wrist, and Lachlan Lam, who injured his ankle, who were all taken from the field on Thursday night.</p> <p>Test five-eighth Keary was taken off the field on Thursday in the 63rd minute after he said he was in severe pain.</p> <p>Paramedics rushed him to hospital and initially believed he had a rib injury. </p> <p>Despite his injury, he refused to give up and went back on to the field before he was taken off again.</p> <p>In the sheds, concerns grew for a ruptured spleen given the location of the hit where he was hit by Storm centre Brenko Lee.</p> <p>“He was running and trying to stay on but we could see it,” Robinson said.</p> <p>“It was actually our call to get him off rather than his call in the end. He sent (the trainer) away, but you've got to save them from themselves sometimes.”</p> <p>Aubusson having a fractured wrist could mean the 301-game player is off contract at the end of the season.</p> <p>It adds to an already long injury list that includes Boyd Cordner, Brett Morris, Victor Radley, Daniel Tupou, Angus Crichton and Jared Waerea-Hargreaves.</p> <p>Discussing the injury crisis on the Matty Johns Show after the game, Roosters great Luke Ricketson labelled it “horrific.”</p> <p>“I’m not quite sure what it is,” Ricketson said.</p> <p>“People are stalking about the time off that everyone’s had and coming back and not being conditioned for this style of football but the game’s just got a lot faster and there’s more minutes being played and people are just not adapting to it and the injuries are just going everywhere.”</p> <p>Robinson and Craig Bellamy both suggested that the new six-again rule had contributed to the mounting injury toll.</p> <p>Less stoppages in play could point to players feeling increased fatigue.</p> <p>‘NRL Physio’ Brian Sweeney wrote on Twitter that “major injuries (that require 5+ weeks recovery time) have increased to 6.64 per round this season (an increase of over 60% since 2018).”</p> <p>Robinson said: “We knew the risk of it all and we assumed the risk because that’s what we are here to do.”</p> <p>“Not having byes and the rule changes have increased the intensity by about 10 to 15 per cent.</p> <p>“There are consequences for that, a better game and more injuries at the moment.”</p> <p>The Storms lost their own additional players including lost Jahrome Hughes with a groin injury and Suliasi Vunivalu with a broken jaw.</p> <p>They join stars Cameron Smith and Cameron Munster on the sidelines.</p> <p>Although the injury toll in Melbourne is not nearly as bad as some, Bellamy says that rule changes need to be readvised and reconsidered for the safety of the players at the end of the season.</p> <p>“Losing a guy like Luke Keary, he’s one of the elite players in our competition,” he said.</p> <p>“I thought the last 20 minutes was a bit of an ugly game to be quite honest. We had players playing in positions they’re not used to. The Roosters had that too.</p> <p>“The fatigue in the game, we decided we wanted that but I’m not sure if there’s too much fatigue with the amount of teams that have got a lot of injuries.</p> <p>“We’ve got two of our most influential players out and it’s not just about fatigue and soft tissue injuries.</p> <p>“When people get fatigued they put their bodies in the wrong places when they make tackles or absorb the contact and you get injured from there.</p> <p>“It’s something we need to have a look at, because it was like a MASH unit tonight. It seems as though there’s a lot of injuries.”</p>

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Footy stars’ incredible response to tragic video of bully victim

<p>The relentless bullying of a nine-year-old Indigenous boy has prompted some of NRL’s biggest stars to show their support.</p> <p>Quaden Bayles’ mother, Yarraka, took to social media to share a video of her son visibly distraught after suffering from ongoing bullying – something she said happens “every single freakin’ day”.</p> <p>In the video, Quaden admits that he wants to take his own life, with Yarraka revealing to NITV that he has made attempts in the past.</p> <p>The article identities Quaden as a Murri boy and said he was born with Achondroplasia, which is the most common form of dwarfism. Speaking to NITV, his mother said that on the day in question she saw him being teased for his height.</p> <p>“There’s no escaping it, this is our reality,” said Yarraka in the video.</p> <p>“I used to tell him just ignore it; well no, f***ing ignoring it doesn’t solve the problem. How does that address bullying if you choose to ignore it?</p> <p>“It needs to be addressed straight away and that’s exactly what I’m doing now. Every time it happens, I’ll be doing a live video so that people know. So hopefully we can make some changes so that this doesn’t happen to another family and hopefully we don’t lost another young innocent life to bullying.”</p> <p>She released a statement, saying “bullying has to stop” and thanking people from “all around the world” for their support after the video garnered 4 million views on Facebook only a short while after posting.</p> <p>“Due to the large volume of messages, we are unable to respond to everyone at this time as we need time to process as a family and would like to ask that media respect the family’s wishes, they are not taking calls and will be speaking to First Nations Media only at this time,” a statement read.</p> <p>“Again, thank you everyone, Quaden’s feeling the love and now he needs a good rest.</p> <p>“We are meeting with the appropriate people in power to make changes and make a stand against bullying.”</p> <p>With the NRL All Stars game between an Indigenous and a Maori side to be played on Saturday night, the Indigenous All Stars reached out, asking the Brisbane boy to lead them only to the field on the Gold Coast.</p> <p>The team posted a video to Twitter, with South Sydney Rabbitohs star Latrell Mitchell, who met Quaden back in 2016 at the Koori Knockout rugby league carnival, doing the talking.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The Indigenous <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/NRLAllStars?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#NRLAllStars</a> are behind you Quaden! 👊🏽❤️ <a href="https://t.co/52RLy8SrSd">pic.twitter.com/52RLy8SrSd</a></p> — NRL (@NRL) <a href="https://twitter.com/NRL/status/1230331560848543750?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 20, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>“Hey Quadey, how you going, cuz?” he addressed the boy who he said is a “little super hero” after their meeting in 2016.</p> <p>“Just want to wish you all the best, brother. We know you’re going through a hard time right now but the boys are here, we got your back, we’re here to support you, bud. And we just want to make sure that you’re doing alright.</p> <p>“Your mum’s on your side, we’re on your side and [we want to] make sure you’re thinking the right things, bud, because we want you around.</p> <p>“We want you to lead us out on the weekend. It’s gonna mean more to us that it will to you, bud. So just make sure you’re looking after yourself and hopefully we get to see you in the next couple of days.”</p>

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“Totally inexcusable”: Erin Molan thankful for support amid reports of Andrew Johns feud

<p>Fellow sports presenters and TV figures have thrown their support behind Erin Molan amid reports of a growing feud with rugby league legend Andrew Johns.</p> <p>The Channel Nine reporter has reportedly been blamed by social media trolls for Johns’ exit from live Friday night football coverage.</p> <p>Over the weekend, <em>The Sunday Telegraph </em>reported that Johns left his position due to an “awkward” falling out with Molan. Johns also left <em>The NRL Footy Show </em>after Molan replaced Paul Vautin on the program in 2017.</p> <p><em>Supercars </em>reporter Riana Crehan wrote on Twitter that the attacks against Molan were “disgusting” and “inexcusable”.</p> <p>She wrote on Monday, “The current trolling of @Erin_Molan is disgusting &amp; makes me embarrassed to be part social media.</p> <p>“The horrific comments are totally inexcusable. Ez is the most brilliant human, broadcaster &amp; mentor &amp; what she has done away from TV goes beyond what many will ever dream to achieve.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Thank you lovely X</p> — Erin Molan (@Erin_Molan) <a href="https://twitter.com/Erin_Molan/status/1178588029054701569?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 30, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Former <em>Footy Show </em>co-star Beau Ryan told <em>The Daily Telegraph </em>it is “bulls**t” for trolls to hold Molan responsible for the network’s decision.</p> <p>“That’s what happens to these reality stars … they get on there and think everything’s going to be rosy and then they get trolled and can get really down and dark. I saw that happen to Erin,” Ryan said.</p> <p>“She’s got a journalism background, she’s done nothing wrong and been trolled for her looks or what she’s done or said, or the show she’s working on, or the team she supports. And it took a toll on her.”</p> <p>Former <em>Studio 10 </em>executive producer Robert McKnight <a rel="noopener" href="https://twitter.com/rob_mcknight/status/1178835880007483393" target="_blank">wrote</a>, “All I will say is that if anyone has a problem with @Erin_Molan than the problem is with them. Erin is one of the nicest people you will ever meet and an amazing person.”</p> <p>Channel Nine director of sport Tom Malone told the <em>Telegraph </em>that the supposed relationship breakdown between the two presenters “is not a story”.</p> <p>“There are plenty of people in TV who get on with each other and others who don’t,” he said.</p> <p>Molan became the host of Friday night NRL coverage after the <em>Footy Show </em>was axed in 2018.</p>

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“Devastated”: AFL coach Danny Frawley’s family release statement about his death

<p>The devastated family of Danny Frawley have spoken out about his shock death yesterday after the tributes flowed in for the AFL legend.</p> <p>The 56-year-old St Kilda Hall of Famer died at the scene of a car crash near Ballarat in Victoria on Monday.</p> <p>He was the only person in the car when it crashed into a tree at around 1:30pm, in what Victorian Police have described as a “significant collision scene”.</p> <p>The world of AFL was left reeling from the passing of a legend of the game and yesterday, the family released their first statement.</p> <p>“On Monday Danny was taken tragically from us,” the statement read.</p> <p>“The Frawley family are devastated, but full of love and pride for a remarkable man who touched the lives of many.</p> <p>“To some he was known as an AFL footballer, coach and media figure, but to his wife Anita and their three daughters; Chelsea, Danielle and Keeley, Danny was a loving husband and a devoted dad. Danny adored his family.</p> <p>“The Frawley families are totally shocked and devastated by his passing, but Danny provided us with strength, good humour and unwavering support during his extraordinary life, memories which will be cherished and help us cope with his tragic death.”</p> <p>“We would like to sincerely thank everyone for the outpouring of love and kindness at this time. We are overwhelmed by the messages of support following his death. We are humbled, proud and incredibly touched,” the statement continues.</p> <p>“His legacy and love of his family will never be dimmed. Forever in our hearts.”</p> <p>Tributes have flowed for the Hall of Famer, with Fox Footy having dedicated their Monday night to remember the legacy that Danny has left behind.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Tributes have flowed today for Danny Frawley after his tragic death yesterday. <br /><br />“People got to tell their Danny stories today. I was amazed how many people had a single, fleeting encounter with Danny, that was lasting.” - Gerard <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AFL360?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AFL360</a> <a href="https://t.co/J2Fnk4YWCt">pic.twitter.com/J2Fnk4YWCt</a></p> — FOX FOOTY (@FOXFOOTY) <a href="https://twitter.com/FOXFOOTY/status/1171362353293561858?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 10, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>AFL CEO Gillon McLachlan has detailed how the league plans to honour the memory of Danny, as two games will take place during the weekend with both games holding a moment of silence. All players, umpires and match officials will be wearing black armbands.</p> <p>“Danny was a friend to everyone in footy and his passion for the game, from the elite to the grassroots was unmatched,” he said to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/sport/afl/petition-for-the-afl-to-honour-danny-frawley-with-award-keeps-growing/news-story/30d0c706d30a003246bc631677f87517" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</em></p> <p>“Whether you knew him as the St Kilda Captain, the Richmond Coach, or the loveable guy on the TV or radio who always made you smile, the acknowledgment this weekend is a way for everyone to pay tribute to the man we all knew and loved.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Danny Frawley will be acknowledged with a moment of silence at this weekend’s Toyota <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AFLFinals?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AFLFinals</a> Series matches. All playing clubs along with the umpires &amp; match officials will wear black armbands as a mark of respect to the former player, coach, administrator &amp; media personality. <a href="https://t.co/Yg9dSoKPKX">pic.twitter.com/Yg9dSoKPKX</a></p> — AFL (@AFL) <a href="https://twitter.com/AFL/status/1171312804348850176?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 10, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>A <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.change.org/p/afl-make-the-golden-fist-a-proper-afl-award-in-honour-of-danny-spud-frawley" target="_blank">change.org petition</a> has also been started, calling for an award to recognise the AFL’s best defender. The petition has 57,754 signatures at the time of writing.</p> <p>Danny was unofficially recognised with the “Golden Fist” segment on Fox Footy show “Bounce” since 2012, but petition starter Alex Baggio says this isn’t enough.</p> <p>“Danny ‘Spud’ Frawley was an AFL legend, and made the Golden Fist segment on Bounce something widely recognised across the AFL community,” petition starter Alex Baggio wrote.</p> <p>“In honour of his passing, the AFL should introduce the Danny Frawley Golden Fist award for the best defender on Brownlow night.”</p>

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