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Better Homes and Gardens star's dream rural property up for grabs

<p><em>Better Homes and Gardens </em>star Charlie Albone and his wife interior designer Juliet Love, have listed their dream Ourimbah home. </p> <p>The 2.07ha property located on the Central Coast has been listed by McGrath Gosford agents Peter Morris and Nate Waters with a $3m to $3.2m price guidance.</p> <p>The four-bedroom, three-bathroom home sits deep behind a gated entry, which ensures privacy and is surrounded by plenty of greenery with its garden alcoves, a stunning wisteria-covered arbour, fruit trees, and a few garden beds for vegetables. </p> <p>There is also a feature dry-stone wall fire pit built by Scottish stonemason Callum Grey, that's perfect for winter and colder nights.</p> <p>The English cottage-style home  comes with a separate self-contained unit that includes a bedroom and kitchenette. </p> <p>The home is every animal lovers' dream with five paddocks that come with animal shelters, plumbed water troughs and a three-stall stable. </p> <p>For those hot summer days, whoever the new owners are can dip into the saltwater pool located on the property. </p> <p>The property is equipped with 100,000-litre tanks and has town water. </p> <p>Albone and his family bought the property in 2012 for $840,000 which means that if it was sold at the price guide then it's almost four times the original price they bought it at. </p> <p>The top acreage sale at Ourimbah currently sits at $3,725,000 for a 13.93ha Dog Trap Rd six-bedroom house, which sold in 2021.</p> <p><em>Images: news.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

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Zimmerman founder sets new price record for Bondi home

<p>Simone Zimmerman has set a new home price record for Bondi, and she didn't even need to take out a mortgage. </p> <p>The fashion guru and founder of Zimmermann has splurged $30 million for her four-bedroom, three-bathroom home just moments away from the iconic Bondi Beach. </p> <p>“This ocean front executive residence is tucked away in a quiet street only moments to the iconic Bondi Beach and all it has to offer,”  the listing for the beachside home read. </p> <p>According to property records, the home - which is located just behind the popular Bondi to Bronte walk - last sold for $5.75m in June 2008.</p> <p>The fashion mogul is reported to have bypassed local real estate agents, purchasing the home directly from a local investor. </p> <p>No major changes have been made to the home since, but prior to Zimmerman's purchase it was being rented out at $4,400 per week. </p> <p>According to PropTrack the median house price for Bondi is around $3.75m, which went up by 4.7 per cent over the past year. </p> <p>The stunning home features 4 double bedrooms, all with large built-in wardrobes and a separate study perfect for the business-woman. </p> <p>It also has a gourmet kitchen with a stainless-steel benchtop and large open dining room. </p> <p>The lounge room opens onto a large deck with beautiful ocean views and plenty of natural lighting. </p> <p>This comes after the luxury womenswear label sold a majority stake in its company to private equity investors in August last year. </p> <p>Sisters Simone and Nicky Zimmerman are founders of the brand, which initially began as a stall in Sydney’s Paddington market, before the sisters opened their first local shop in Darlinghurst. </p> <p>It now operates across 58 global destinations in the USA, UK, Europe and China, with the sisters now having an estimated net worth of around $1bn each. </p> <p><em>Images: Realestate.com.au</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Real estate agency slammed for "greedy" rental increase

<p>Real estate agency Nelson Alexander has come under fire after increasing the weekly rent to one of their vacant properties on the day of the viewing. </p> <p>The property, located in the inner suburbs of Melbourne, had a scheduled viewing on Thursday and many hopeful tenants were keen to check it out. </p> <p>Unfortunately, their interest came at a cost, as the agency sent out a text just hours beforehand saying that they were increasing  the weekly rent from $600 to $650 due to "overwhelming" demand.</p> <p>Journalist Jacqueline Felgate shared the text on social media, and many branded the agency's move as  "greedy" and "disgraceful" and even accused them of perpetuating the rental crisis. </p> <p>The exact location of the property and the number of bedrooms it has <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">is unknown, and after receiving all the backlash, the ad has since been pulled. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">The real estate agency also apologised and said that </span>they "do not solicit or encourage any form of rental bidding".</p> <p>"Whilst the current issue at hand is not a breach of legislation, it fell short of our commitment to fair and transparent practices," the statement read.</p> <p>"We are deeply aware of the moral and social responsibility we have to our community during these challenging times."</p> <p>They also added that they are currently reviewing their processes to "ensure this doesn't ever happen again". </p> <p>It is unclear whether the property has been put back on the market and for what price. </p> <p><em style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #323338; font-family: Figtree, Roboto, 'Noto Sans Hebrew', 'Noto Kufi Arabic', 'Noto Sans JP', sans-serif; background-color: #ffffff; outline: none !important;">Images: Instagram</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Women forced to do shocking act for $100 rent reduction

<p>Two women in Queensland have claimed that they were forced to use a makeshift  "temporary shower" outdoors, while renovations are being carried out in the property's only bathroom. </p> <p>The pair, who were expecting a porta-loo style shower to use during the four-to-six weeks renovation, were horrified when they found out the makeshift shower was just a blue tarpaulin attached to the side of the house.</p> <p>Electrical cords and plumbing pipes can be spotted hanging down in front of the open cubicle, and has no curtain for privacy or a lock, raising questions for their privacy and safety. </p> <p>To make matters worse, the women revealed on Facebook that they initially tried negotiating for a rental discount of $200 per week during the renovations, but their landlord said "no way" offering only a $50 discount, "then $100 as final offer".</p> <p>Dr Chris Martin, Senior Research Fellow in the University of NSW's City Futures Research Centre, slammed the landlord for "a bunch of possible breaches". </p> <p>"There is a big question about whether the temporary arrangement meets the minimum standards that apply to rented premises in Queensland under the Residential Tenancies and Rooming Accommodation Act," he told <em>Yahoo News</em>. </p> <p>"Those minimum standards include that the bathroom and toilet facilities must provide privacy and that a premise must be weatherproof and structurally sound, and there's a standard about security," he added. </p> <p>He also claimed that "there's a bunch of possible breaches of the minimum standards of this temporary arrangement," as intruders could also potentially get in. </p> <p>The Senior Research Fellow also slammed the $100-a-week reduction in rent, calling it "grossly insufficient".</p> <p>"What a professional landlord who takes a bit of pride in themselves as a reputable housing provider would have done, is hire one of those portable bathrooms that come on a little trailer with a little heater and hook it up, and also do a rent reduction for the hassle of having to trot out to the trailer to shower," he said.</p> <p>"That would be the appropriate response."</p> <p>He encouraged the tenants to speak to Tenants Queensland or a local tenants advice service about what to do, adding that they could say that the current temporary arrangements could be deemed "unlivable or uninhabitable". </p> <p>"I suggest they should also be telling the landlord that this arrangement may place the landlord in a further breach of the agreement and for the liability for an even bigger rent reduction and the prospect of compensation if they don't do this better,"  Dr Martin told the publication. </p> <p><em>Images: Facebook</em></p>

Money & Banking

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"Is this legal?" Residents outraged over demanding aircon letter

<p>Residents in a Sydney unit complex were left outraged after they were asked to turn off their air conditioners overnight.</p> <p>A letter placed inside the elevator of the 18-floor apartment building states that the utility can only be used “during the following times."</p> <p>“Weekdays 7am to 10pm, weekends and public holidays 8am to 10pm,” the letter said.  </p> <p>“At other times than this, please turn off your air conditioners, especially after 10:00 PM every day.”</p> <p>The letter, which was posted on Facebook, received a lot of backlash from other residents and renters</p> <p>One resident who lived in the 1960s building for a decade said it was the first time she had heard of such a request.</p> <p>“Can anyone please let me know if this is legal? Can they actually force people to not run their own AC units?” the person asked. </p> <p>Many other renters expressed their annoyance, with one joking that they'd have to pry the aircon off their dead hands. </p> <p>“Anyone else feel like we are in a Nanny State?” one wrote. </p> <p>“To be honest with 30°c nights they can pry my aircon from my cold dead heads,” another quipped. </p> <p>One Facebook user also commented that building developers might be to blame. </p> <p>“I think the strata builders got a bit cheap and installed less expensive aircons and therefore they are too loud. Bet if they had decent ones, the tenants wouldn’t have to suffer hot nights because of the noise,” they said. </p> <p>A few others commented that it might not just be a request from strata, but local councils that are enforcing new noise pollution restrictions which affect aircons. </p> <p>City of Sydney, Inner West, and Penrith councils, are a few of the local governments which require the airconditioners to be turned off 10pm to 7am during the week and until 8am on the weekend, the same time requested on the laters. </p> <p>The local governments also recommend that residents and developers purchase high-quality airconditioners that won't cause noise pollution or disturb neighbours. </p> <p>“Even if you’ve been told that it complies with noise requirements, it doesn’t mean it’s going to suit every location all the time,” the Inner West Council website read. </p> <p>The letter comes as Sydney battles its second heatwave in the span of a week. </p> <p><em>Images: Facebook/ Getty</em></p>

Legal

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Three-bedroom home on the market for unbelievably cheap price

<p>A three-bedroom home located on the border of Victoria and South Australia is up for sale for just $65,000. </p> <p>But there is a catch to future homeowners who want to experience the “quiet and cheap country living”, as they might need to be handy with a hammer. </p> <p>“If you’re a handyman and willing to put some elbow grease into it, then this one might be for you,” the listing read. </p> <p>The home itself is located on two plots of land measuring 2,100m2 in Serviceton, Victoria, and is only 16 minutes away from Bordertown, South Australia. </p> <p>“Being on two titles, you can utilise both or sell the vacant allotment as all the dwellings are on one,” the listing read. </p> <p>It also features a large lounge room with wood-fire heater, and a centrally located bathroom with a bath and vanity. </p> <p>There's plenty of room to cook in the massive kitchen, despite it needing a lot of work, it features a formal dining area that has a sliding servery window which connects to the lounge room.</p> <p>Outside, the future homeowner can find a large shed, rain water storage, and a gate that opens up to a park. </p> <p>“It went under contract ... an hour and a half (after it was listed),” Ray White agent Hayden Obst told<em> 7News</em>. </p> <p>The condition of its electrical, plumbing and appliances are unknown, but people are still expressing their interest.</p> <p>Despite this, many people from different parts of the country and a few investors are still calling the real estate agent, just in case the contract falls through. </p> <p><em>Images: 7News.com.au</em></p>

Real Estate

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Historic lighthouse keeper's cottage up for sale

<p>A cottage next to Macquarie Lighthouse has been put up for sale, and one lucky buyer will have the chance to say they live next to one of the country's oldest lighthouses. </p> <p>Located on beautiful South Head Vaucluse, the lighthouse itself has stood since 1883 and it is the second tower built there after the first convict-designed one deteriorated. </p> <p>You don't have to worry about any noise as there's only one neighbour in sight. </p> <p>"How many houses can you buy with a lighthouse next door," McGrath sales agent Robert Alfeldi said. </p> <p>For $12 million,  the lucky buyer will get the heritage home that was built 1881, with most of its original fittings still in tact and an old stables building, perched on 2600 square metres of land. </p> <p>Although the property has kept most of its original elements, the interior - specifically the kitchen and bathroom - have been updated into more modern versions of the original. </p> <p>However, those looking to renovate the property and add a second floor should look for a different property as it is a heritage home, so it limits what future owners can add. </p> <p>“It’s quite a unique property. People show up thinking they can put a second storey on. But it is what it is for a reason," Alfeidi said. </p> <p>Iconic properties like this don't go for sale often, and tends to create a buzz among wealthy potential buyers. </p> <p>The property was previously sold in October 2016 for $7 million. </p> <p><em>Images: Domain/ Nine</em></p>

Real Estate

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Accused mushroom killer puts home up for sale

<p>Erin Patterson, the woman charged with <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/erin-patterson-charged-with-eight-counts-of-murder-and-attempted-murder" target="_blank" rel="noopener">eight counts of murder and attempted murder</a>, after allegedly lacing meals with death cap mushrooms, has put her Melbourne property up for sale. </p> <p>In a case that has gripped the nation, Patterson is facing these charges following the tragic incident that occurred on July 29, as well as historic incidents involving her former husband.</p> <p>The major incident involved a mushroom lunch hosted in Patterson's home in Leongatha, where her former parents-in-law Don and Gail Patterson, both 70, and Gail’s sister, Heather Wilkinson, 66, died shortly after allegedly consuming a beef wellington.</p> <p>Heather's husband and Baptist church pastor, Ian Wilkinson, who also had the meal, miraculously survived, but was hospitalised in critical condition for nearly two months before being released in September. </p> <p>Patterson is also charged with four counts of attempted murder of her former partner, Simon Patterson, in separate incidences between between November 2021 and September 2022 and on the day of the lunch. </p> <p>She has consistently denied any wrongdoing. </p> <p>Now, her $1 million townhouse in Melbourne's east at the suburb of Mount Waverley has hit the market. </p> <p>She first bought the three-bedroom, three-bathroom property in 2019, and has infrequently visited it. </p> <p>It is not the house where the fatal mushroom incident took place. </p> <p>The 249-square-metre townhouse, will go to auction at 11am on Saturday and is expected to sell for around $960,000 to $1,050,000. </p> <p>Real estate agency Ray White has pitched the home to downsizers and families that want to send their children to a good school. </p> <p>“Desired for its defined dimensions and convenient placement in the Mount Waverley Secondary Catchment (STSA), this easy-care townhouse is equally suited to those starting out or downsizing as it is for families and investors,’’ the agents said.</p> <p>They also provided a description of the townhouse, which read: “Quietly tucked at the rear of only two, the residence takes great care in providing a comfortable lifestyle with the lounge room enriched with large windows, while the dining zone is accompanied by a well-equipped kitchen complete with a Bosch dishwasher.”</p> <p><em>Images: Realestate.com.au / A Current Affair</em></p>

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Why Dave Hughes didn't buy the final Block house

<p>David ‘Hughesy’ Hughes was the surprise guest at this year's <em>The Block</em> auctions, and the Aussie comedian was keen on buying the final home to go on auction <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">– </span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;"> Leah and Ash’s house. </span></p> <p>Hughes was one move away from buying House 2 - which was passed in after it failed to hit reserve - but his wife blocked him from buying the home. </p> <p>“I was accosted as I left the auction, trying to get out of there, because one house didn’t sell and I said, ‘I’ll go talk to my wife’,” Hughes said on KIIS FM’s <em>Hughesy, Ed &amp; Erin </em>on Tuesday morning. </p> <p>The radio host then called his wife Holly live-on-air so she could explain the reason why they did not buy House 2. </p> <p>Holly revealed that she "was being asked by students and teachers,” about whether or not the couple bought the <em>Block</em> house. </p> <p>“You [Hughes] came home and as we were getting into bed, you said, ‘How would you have felt if I just bought that house?’ And I said, ‘Furious’," Holly revealed. </p> <p>She then called out her husband, claiming that he only wanted to buy the house to "show off". </p> <p>“If you bought a third house [in Melbourne] without consulting with me …” she said. </p> <p>“He never expressed any interesting in investing in that part of Melbourne, it’s so random, he would’ve just been buying a house to show off.</p> <p>“He had not looked at the houses or anything. He hadn’t watched an episode.”</p> <p>Although Hughes didn't get a property this season, his <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/money-banking/dave-hughes-sets-the-record-straight-over-famous-block-house-purchase" target="_blank" rel="noopener">previous <em>Block</em> buy</a> in 2017 was a huge success.</p> <p><em>Image: Nine</em></p>

Money & Banking

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"These guys have held on": Why a family turned down $50 million for their home

<p>A Sydney family has repeatedly refused to sell their family home to major developers, despite being offered an eight-figure sum for the property. </p> <p>The Zammit family have lived in their impressive home for several decades and have said time and time again that they have no intentions of selling the house, which is situated on a 20,000 square metre parcel of land in western Sydney. </p> <p>With the massive area of land being smack bang in the centre of a major housing development, some realtors have estimated that the property could fetch a price as high as $50 million.</p> <p>Despite the family saying they would be staying in the home, documents obtained by <a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/real-estate/selling/sydney-familys-home-goes-from-858k-to-50m-as-major-development-crops-up/news-story/eb0bacc20cdae5cad461ff89797cb71d" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>news.com.au</em></a> have confirmed that the house was up for sale in both 2015 and and 2016. </p> <p>The house was swiftly taken off the market after being initially listed with a price range $858,000 to $945,000.</p> <p>And just a few years later, they are believed to have received offers of between $33 million and $50 million.</p> <p>The massive property boasts a lush green lawn in stark contrast to all the houses around it and also a huge 200 metre driveway.</p> <p>But just metres away are rows and rows of carbon copy grey houses crammed into tight blocks as part of a major development. </p> <p>The high-density neighbouring homes are built right up to the fence of the Zammit's property, and neighbours reportedly don’t want the owners to sell as they like living in a cul-de-sac.</p> <p>It’s estimated that 50 houses could fit on the Zammit's block of land if they followed the same style as other developer homes in the area. </p> <p>A local real estate agent previously praised the Zammit family for staying put, despite the big payouts they have likely been offered.</p> <p>“The fact that most people sold out years and years ago, these guys have held on. All credit to them,” Ray White Quakers Hill agent Taylor Bredin told <em>7News.</em></p> <p>“Depending on how far you push the development plan, you’d be able to push anywhere from 40 to 50 properties on something like this, and when subdivided, a 300 square metre block would get a million dollars.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: 7News</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Eye-watering price tag for Melissa Caddick's penthouse

<p>A penthouse formerly owned by fraudster Melissa Caddick is on the market for an estimated $5.5 million.</p> <p>The apartment, which was previously occupied by her parents Ted and Barbara Grimley, was listed for auction on October 10 and boasts stunning panoramic views of the city skyline.</p> <p>“Spacious throughout and stylishly presented with understated contemporary finishes, this is the perfect opportunity for downsizers, executives and families who seek undeniable quality and convenience,” read an online listing.</p> <p>Viewings for the apartment located in Eastpoint Tower at Edgecliff are only available through appointments, according to managing agents Richardson and Wrench.</p> <p>Liquidators hope that the sale of the penthouse will help recover some of the money Caddick stole from over 50 investors as part of her ponzi investment scam.</p> <p>The 49-year-old lived a life of luxury after stealing up to $30 million from the investors, many of whom were reportedly her close friends and family.</p> <p>Jones Partners, the accounting firm in charge of liquidating Caddick's former assets, have already recouped $3 million to investors after the sale of her share portfolio and Dover Heights cliff-top mansion.</p> <p>At the time, Jones Partners principal Bruce Gleeson said that it wasn't rare for investors to not get anything back from ponzi schemes.</p> <p>However, he has said that the sale of the Edgecliff apartment in Sydney's eastern suburbs, would allow for further significant distributions to investors.</p> <p>Caddick disappeared in November 2020, just days after her home was raided by ASIC investigators.</p> <p>She is believed to be dead after her badly decomposed right foot was found washed up on a beach in the south coast of NSW on February 2021, but the rest of her body has not been found.</p> <p><em>Images: </em><em>Richardson &amp; Wrench </em></p>

Real Estate

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Peter Stefanovic and Sylvia Jeffreys list multimillion-dollar home

<p dir="ltr">TV presenter power couple Peter Stefanovic and Sylvia Jeffreys have listed their Double Bay terrace for sale. </p> <p dir="ltr">The couple placed their home on the market for $4.5 million, as they start the search for a bigger and better family home for them and their two sons. </p> <p dir="ltr">The four-bedroom terrace with two-and-a-half bathrooms in Epping Rd is scheduled to go under the hammer on August 22nd with a $4.5m price guide via Oliver Lavers of The Rubinstein Group.</p> <p dir="ltr">Stefanovic, a co-host of <em>First Edition</em> on Sky News Australia, and Jeffreys, co-host of <em>Today Extra</em> on Channel 9, had bought the home on a 186 sqm block for $2.7m in 2016.</p> <p dir="ltr">In their seven years at the home, the couple have made a range of improvements including adding off-street parking, and created an impressive outdoor entertainment area with inbuilt seating and barbecue in the rear courtyard.</p> <p dir="ltr">The impressive property boasts open plan living areas, polished timber floors, marble finishes in the kitchen, and underfloor heating in the bathrooms. </p> <p dir="ltr">Two master-sized bedrooms open to balconies, alongside a third on the upper floor, and a versatile fourth bedroom could serve as an office.</p> <p dir="ltr">The couple met in 2014 when they were both colleagues at Channel Nine - she was working on <em>The Today Show</em> while he was a foreign correspondent for <em>Nine News</em>, and they bumped into each other in the station’s carpark. </p> <p dir="ltr">Two years later in 2016, Stefanovic popped the question in a French vineyard, and they were married the following year in Kangaroo Valley.</p> <p dir="ltr">The couple have two sons - Oscar, who was born in early 2020 and Henry, who arrived a little more than a year later.</p> <p dir="ltr">With their sons growing up and needing more space, the family are looking for a bigger home in Sydney’s eastern suburbs. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: realestate.com.au / Instagram</em></p>

Real Estate

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Sneak peek into Grant Denyer’s countryside home

<p dir="ltr"><em>Better Homes and Gardens</em> host Johanna Griggs has shared a sneak peek into Grant Denyer’s countryside home, for an upcoming episode of the show.</p> <p dir="ltr">On Tuesday, Joh took to Instagram to share a snippet from the episode she filmed with the former <em>Sunrise</em> star, who has spent the last few years renovating his home in Bathurst.</p> <p dir="ltr">“On this week’s show @johgriggs7 catches up with @grantdenyer who has carved out a life in the countryside, renovating a stunning country home and even raising a herd of Scottish highland cows 🐮,” the caption read.</p> <p dir="ltr">In the video, Joh visited Grant’s home and took in the incredible natural views and even fed Grant’s highland cows in a unique bonding moment.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So Grant, what has more pressure, working in live TV or out here in a paddock with cows?” Joh jokingly asks in the clip.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Well, actually, there’s a lot of similarities to be honest,” Grant replied.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You’ve gotta watch your back!” he added when a cow headed straight towards a nervous-looking Joh.</p> <p dir="ltr">They then moved into Grant’s open plan living room which boasted plenty of natural light and beautiful views of the countryside.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This has got to be one of the most serene, beautiful kitchens I’ve ever seen,” Joh said as the camera panned around the kitchen.</p> <p dir="ltr">The pair even joked about how big the bench top was and Grant joked that it was “5.8 Grants Denyers long.”</p> <p dir="ltr">To which Joh quipped: “and two Johannas,” which elicited a fit of giggles among the two.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CuiPOI9B4No/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CuiPOI9B4No/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Johanna Griggs AM (@johgriggs7)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Fans took to the comments to share their awe over Grant’s home.</p> <p dir="ltr">“That view from the kitchen window 🙌🏻” wrote one fan.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Oh this will be fabulous. Two of my favourite people in one place. Their home is stunning,” commented another.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Wow that’s just a magnificent Kitchen. What a view,” wrote a third.</p> <p dir="ltr">Grant lives in the idyllic property with his wife Chezzi and three daughters Sunday, Scout and Sailor.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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Outrage after renters confronted with cleaning “scoring system”

<p dir="ltr">An Australian real estate agent has come under fire for their “demoralising” scoring system for tenants during routine inspections. </p> <p dir="ltr">One fired up renter said they were shocked to receive a scorecard from the agent after they complied with an inspection, and shared their feedback on Reddit. </p> <p dir="ltr">The scorecard rated the tenant’s efforts cleaning the property in 17 different rooms and areas, marking them on cleanliness, and if the areas were damaged or required maintenance. </p> <p dir="ltr">The renter was then also given an overall rating out of five stars, based on the upkeep of their rental home. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Reddit user showed that they received just three and half stars, despite being marked down in only one area due to a light globe not working.</p> <p dir="ltr">In their post, the tenant said they had made every effort to clean the home, adding that the rating was “demoralising”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve been renting a long time, and my deep cleaning routine is based around inspections,” they explained.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I go all out - every room in my little 3x2 villa is given a spring clean, every surface is washed including walls, doors, lights, windows, carpets etc.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Had my latest inspection a few weeks ago and just received the report. Despite the agent commenting once again that she never sees houses as clean as mine, and taking 112 (!) photos of every single thing that shows how great the condition of the house is - having one light globe not working is so terrible that I’m scored three and a half out of five.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The renter went on to say that they had only recently discovered that the broken light globe was the real estate’s responsibility to replace, and does not warrant such a severe marking down in their “score”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The globe in question is a downlight fitting. We have so many downlights that I don’t even use this particular one,” they continued.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I can’t replace the globe itself, I need to get into the roof to replace the whole unit. Thanks to people here I’ve learned this isn’t even my responsibility to fix!”</p> <p dir="ltr">The renter’s post sparked a huge outrage online, with many up in arms over the current state of the rental market and unrealistic expectations of estate agents. </p> <p dir="ltr">One person said, “I fully believe that the average renter keeps a home to a higher standard than an owner, and it seems deliberately demoralising that someone could be marked down for having a light out.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Another added, “This is ridiculously petty, and more importantly, totally irrelevant to the purpose of a periodic inspection. Which is to identify whether any maintenance is needed.”</p> <p dir="ltr">A third person took their anger out on the entire system, summing it up by writing, “I sort of wonder what little lightbulb clicks in your mind and you wake up one day and ask yourself, ‘How can I be a massive c*** who offers no value to society? I know! I will get into real estate.’”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images / Reddit</em></p>

Real Estate

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Man living in a tent after partner “gave up” on Covid restrictions

<p dir="ltr">A hyper-vigilant man has resorted to living in a “pressurised” tent in a garage to avoid contracting Covid, after his girlfriend relaxed about restrictions. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Aussie man named Jason, who is a self-proclaimed “Covid education activist” caused a stir online after he posted a photo of his unusual sleeping arrangements. </p> <p dir="ltr">The now-viral post shared by Jason featured a picture of the peculiar tent he claims to be sleeping in, with an air purifier sticking out of the door, igniting a firestorm of reactions on Twitter, ranging from agreeance, to humour, to concern.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the media storm, Jason defended his decision to maintain strict pandemic precautions, despite never having contracted Covid-19. </p> <p dir="ltr">“This is my bed in the garage because my partner has dropped precautions. I take precautions 100 per cent of the time. Don’t tell me that this hasn’t upended every f**king second of my life,” Jason declared in his original post, which included the image of his extraordinary sleeping arrangement.</p> <p dir="ltr">Taking his precautions to the next level, Jason also revealed that he has experimented with sleeping in a face mask, but he admitted that he found it uncomfortable and could not sleep properly with it. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve tried to sleep in a mask, and I can’t. I know people sleep in CPAP masks all the time, so it’s possible, but I can’t do it,” he shared on Twitter.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the flurry of reactions to Jason’s living arrangement, he did receive some support for his precautionary measures, while some even suggested Jason leave his partner, to which he admitted the thought “had occurred to me”. </p> <p dir="ltr">Another Twitter user commended the tent and air filter idea, considering it a cost-effective and potentially effective solution to avoid contracting Covid. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I like the tent+filter idea. It’s cheap and should be effective,” another agreed.</p> <p dir="ltr">A few people shared that they empathised with Jason, and are also maintaining strict pandemic precautions. </p> <p dir="ltr">One person wrote, “Initially didn’t think much of the pic, but this is infuriating. I spend all my salary in-flo mask, enovid (antiviral nasal spray), no social life, so yes, I take precautions 100 per cent of the time.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m sorry you have to live like this. I no longer see my family since they stopped masking,” another added.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, not everyone empathised with Jason’s living arrangements, saying he was being unrealistic about the future of Covid. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I work in senior living, and in the two years we’ve been open, we’ve lost zero to Covid. Even the (85-year-olds) getting it now are mild cases. Why? They’re boosted, so they don’t panic or sleep in a garage,” one commenter explained. </p> <p dir="ltr">“The vaccine is meant to enable you to live normally without worrying. Covid is endemic, so you will be in the tent for the rest of your life, lol.” posted another.</p> <p dir="ltr">In response to the viral post, one Twitter user humorously remarked, “We’re a few years away from a really good documentary on how this virus broke people’s brains.”</p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 18pt;"><em>Image credits: Getty Images / Twitter</em><span id="docs-internal-guid-929ebb36-7fff-a45a-7dfd-5c273933cc32"></span></p>

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Amanda Keller snaps up multi-million dollar townhouse

<p dir="ltr">Australian radio and TV presenter Amanda Keller has snapped up a townhouse in Sydney’s Newtown area with husband Harley Oliver. </p> <p dir="ltr">The property set them back $1.923 million, a hefty price tag that likely had a lot to do with its sought after location just steps from the busy Enmore Road. </p> <p dir="ltr">It boasts a modern warehouse-style appearance, with two levels that contain three bedrooms - one with its own built-in wardrobe and balcony - and an additional 47 sq m for garage space. However, the home’s title declares a total of 343 sq m, as it also includes a garden courtyard.</p> <p dir="ltr">Described as being at the back of “a whisper-quiet complex”, the townhouse is one of four, and features polished concrete floors throughout, an open plan living space with bifolds onto a paved courtyard, a renovated laundry, and high ceiling with exposed beams. </p> <p dir="ltr">“The combination of quality modern comforts and generous proportions offers an unsurpassed standard of living,” its listing read. </p> <p dir="ltr">It was listed through Adrian William Real Estate’s Adrian Tsavalas and Kate Ferrante, and was the first time the house had been on the market since 2013, when it sold for less than half of its 2023 price at $870,000.</p> <p dir="ltr">The median price of a three-bedroom home in Newtown has been tracked by PopTrack as $1.876, while in July 2022, it was at a high of $1.95 million.</p> <p dir="ltr">Keller and Oliver reportedly snapped up their latest property as an investment, though there is currently no evidence that it is being advertised on any rental website.</p> <p dir="ltr">The couple - who have been married since 1990 - are no strangers to Sydney real estate, having lived in Coogee for over two decades after making a move from the northern beaches. They’ve made their fair share of changes to their home in that time, submitting four different development applications for the likes of a pool and a ‘vergola’.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to CoreData, they bought that long-term home in 2001 for $900,000, while prices now average at around $2.615 million in the suburb.</p> <p dir="ltr">They also own a property in the South Coast at Culburra Beach, and paid only slightly less for it - $1.475 million - than their lavish Newtown buy.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: realestate.com.au, Getty</em></p>

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Sweet reason for Ray Hadley's big property purchase

<p dir="ltr">2GB broadcaster Ray Hadley has purchased a stunning Central Coast property with his wife, Sophie. </p> <p dir="ltr">The seaside retreat is situated on the Bouddi Peninsula in New South Wales, right on the water’s edge of Pretty Beach, and boasts impressive views across Brisbane Water - views that a balcony accessed by the living, kitchen, and dining space makes the most of.</p> <p dir="ltr">The property has five bedrooms, allowing plenty of space for Hadley and Sophie to host their visiting family members  - and most importantly, their grandkids. </p> <p dir="ltr">Hadley, who currently resides in the northwest of Sydney, has four children with five grandchildren from them. And, in happy news for the family, another on the way. </p> <p dir="ltr">He regularly provides his radio listeners with updates on the growing brood, with a focus on the youngest generation - all of them five and under - who mean the entire world to him. </p> <p dir="ltr">As he told <em>9Honey</em>, “​​before I had grandkids five years ago, mates would say, 'you won't believe the difference it makes' ... it's basically changed my life.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Five years ago I had none, now I've got five and another one on the way. They basically are my life.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I just adore them, every one of them, and they've all got different personalities, they're all different people.”</p> <p dir="ltr">He went on to share that the youngest is learning to walk and talk, while the others are prepping for school, with his eldest granddaughter even going so far as to ask him not to work, and to instead come along for her first ever school drop-off. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Just the fact that she asked me to do it made me feel 10-foot tall,” he shared.</p> <p dir="ltr">And the new property will give him the chance to spend more time with them, serving as a midway point for sleepovers, after years of the radio host travelling up the M1 from Sydney to be with them.</p> <p dir="ltr">It isn’t the first time Hadley has dipped his toes into the real estate market, either, with the 68 year old having downsized from his acreage after he turned 66, moving for the first time since the mid-1990s.</p> <p dir="ltr">The home isn’t even his first coastal retreat, with Hadley having snapped up a property on the Gold Coast in 2016, and planning to make an upgrade once again at Main Beach.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though for the time being, he may be a little busy settling into his new home, and maybe even treating himself and Sophie to a night out at their friend John Singleton’s nearby eatery.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: realestate.com.au, Getty</em></p>

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$35,000 home comes with a catch

<p dir="ltr">Etsy is an online marketplace best known for its handmade trinkets and creative wares, but now, the site has decided to broaden its horizons and try its hand at selling houses too. </p> <p dir="ltr">A new listing from the ‘store’ Modular Home Direct is offering eager homeowners and passionate crafters the chance to own a 432-square-foot tiny house for just $35,306.09 ($22,896 USD). </p> <p dir="ltr">However, the property comes with a catch: its loving owner must construct it by themselves.</p> <p dir="ltr">The listing’s description declares it to be a “beautiful modern low cost home” that comes with “doors, windows, insulated wall panels, flooring, baseboard trims, drywall, insulated roof, plumbing and electrical hook ups”. Furniture, however, was not included.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to the American real-estate company Zillow, the home’s asking price of $22,896 USD is less than one tenth of the average cost of a home in the United States (~$346,270 USD).</p> <p dir="ltr">The flatpack property is manufactured by Modular Home Direct, the same company behind the listing, and features all the key necessities in a tiny home as well as a few bonuses - a bedroom, a bathroom, a kitchen, a living room, loft, and even front and rear porches.</p> <p dir="ltr">And for anyone looking to take on the challenge - though the offering is limited to the United States due to shipping logistics - there are a few things to consider. For as well as the base construction, the home will also require the installation of electricity and plumbing. </p> <p dir="ltr">According to the <em>Daily Mail</em>, the US-based property site Home Advisor has estimated that these costs would see potential owners forking out anywhere between $550 to $2,3000 USD on just the property’s electrical wiring, while plumbing could start at around $360 and could reach up to $2,000. </p> <p dir="ltr">Modular Home Direct aren’t the first to try and capitalise on the growing tiny house movement, as people all over the world seek alternative housing options as real estate prices continue to soar. </p> <p dir="ltr">And while some online weren’t thrilled with the idea, others were onboard, though most seemed to agree that the price was too good to be true, and likely would increase as more costs came to light.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The cost of materials in a house is much less than the ground it sits on,” a<em> Daily Mail </em>reader said. “By the time you buy the land, go through the permitting process, bring utilities in.. the cost gets closer to an established home.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“They have an interesting website, if you're handy it could be a diy project. My brother in law has a diy log cabin, family pitched in to build it, it's very nice,” one shared. “I think my husband and I could build this. We both know electrical and plumbing... only bump would be the heat pump”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You have to buy the land, buy the house, put the house together (or pay someone to put it together), and pay someone to hook up the electricity and water. You'd probably have to pay for building permits and inspections,” someone said, before noting that “so once you've done all that, it would probably be easier just to buy a move-in ready house.”</p> <p dir="ltr">And as another wrote, “like everything else meant to be affordable, it will soon cost $109K when it catches on.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Etsy</em></p>

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Melissa Caddick’s parents ordered to vacate

<p dir="ltr">Barb and Ted Grimley, the parents of alleged conwoman Melissa Caddick, have been ordered to vacate their daughter’s Sydney eastern suburbs property within six weeks.</p> <p dir="ltr">The apartment, which is reportedly the last of Melissa’s assets to be sold, <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/melissa-caddick-s-parents-at-war-with-fraud-victims">has been the subject of a long-running legal dispute</a> between her parents - who were co-owners of the Edgecliff property after buying a share in it - and her victims. </p> <p dir="ltr">Melissa disappeared in late 2020 after the ASIC raided her Dover Heights home as part of a corporate watchdog investigation into a multi-million-dollar Ponzi scheme, with claims that Melissa had stolen upwards of $23 million. </p> <p dir="ltr">And when it came to the apartment purchased with those funds, the Grimleys claimed that they deserved a larger share of the estate’s proceeds, while those who had suffered from Melissa’s scam argued that the earnings from the apartment’s sale should be split evenly among them. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Grimleys were refusing to leave unless they were paid a sum of $950,000 - which would see them take home most of what they’d allegedly put into the apartment’s $2.25 million mortgage. </p> <p dir="ltr">And on June 5, Federal Court Justice Brigette Markovic proclaimed that Barbara and Ted had to leave the property within a six week timeframe if they wanted to see that $950,000.</p> <p dir="ltr">More than 50 investors were being represented in the ASIC’s Federal Court case, hoping to regain the money they’d lost through the sale of Melissa’s assets. </p> <p dir="ltr">To date, Melissa’s substantial collection of designer clothing, luxury cars, jewellery, and multimillion dollar properties with stunning views of Sydney Harbour have come under scrutiny, with many facing the auction block in Sydney in a bid to repay the investors. </p> <p dir="ltr">Additionally, another order was passed down that would see them get an “interim distribution” of $3 million.</p> <p dir="ltr">Neither the Grimley’s lawyers or the investors’ opposed the “only way forward” settlement, with the latter set to take over the ownership of the controversial apartment once Melissa’s parents have vacated the premises, and will get to work preparing to sell it.</p> <p dir="ltr">And, as some have theorised, the agreement could mark the end of the ASIC investigation. However, Justice Markovice was clear that the identities of the investors would remain confidential until legal proceedings concluded, with the court hearing that they would be classified as interested parties in the following proceedings, as well as Barb and Ted Grimley. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: 9News / Nine </em></p>

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