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Woman sparks debate after copping $116 fine for "absurd" rule

<p>Shakira Coldwell, 21, has sparked debate online after copping a $116 parking fine for an "absurd" rule she claims she didn't even know existed. </p> <p>The Aussie woman took to TikTok to share her confusion, and asked if anyone else was aware of the rule. </p> <p>“Was I the only one that didn’t know you can get a parking fine for parking nose in, like the front of your car goes in first instead of backing into a car park?” she asked. </p> <p>She then asked whether the rule was only enforced in Noosa, saying that she was "pretty sure" you could park in any way as long as you stay between the lines. </p> <p>Coldwell then shared a photo of how she parked her car when she received the fine and said that she was “clearly” within the parking lines but hadn’t backed into her space like the car next to her.</p> <p>“Does that not just seem a bit absurd, a bit bizarre?” she said.</p> <p>She also said that she was only just made aware of the fine, as she had been travelling, which means that she may be copping even bigger fees as her payment was now overdue. </p> <p>“I’ve asked a couple of people about this and they literally had no idea that rule even existed. Like, I’m within the lines, it doesn’t matter how I’m parked,” she continued. </p> <p>According to the Brisbane City Council website, failing to park as indicated by an angle parking sign will result in a $116 fine, but Coldwell claims that she didn't see any signs. </p> <p>“So I am a bit confused. Is this just Noosa rule or does everyone know this because I literally did not know this was a rule. And low key $116 for a parking fine that's a bit absurd, given I was within the lines,” she said.</p> <p>Many commenters were quick to inform her that it was actually a common parking rule that wasn't restricted to Noosa. </p> <p>“As someone who lives in Noosa I can 100% guarantee there was a sign saying you had to back in,” one person wrote. </p> <p>“Being within the lines literally has nothing to do with it lol,” another said.</p> <p>A few others said that parking the wrong way in angled spots can make it “dangerous” when backing out into traffic, with one commenter claiming “everyone knows this”.</p> <p>However, a few others were just as baffled as the 21-year-old. </p> <p>“I’d be challenging that. I have never heard of it and there should definitely be signs so if you can go and check the signage,” one said. </p> <p>“Never heard of this before I wouldn’t pay it tell them where to go,” another wrote. </p> <p>According to the <a href="https://www.noosa.qld.gov.au/community/local-laws/parking-regulations" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Noosa Council website</a>, rear-in angle parking is enforced in certain areas to “ensure a safer parking experience for everyone in the area," and to prevent cars from crossing into oncoming traffic as they try to exit the parking bay. </p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Legal

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Woman rejects $200k offer for her puppy

<p>A woman has divided social media viewers after she claiming that she declined a stranger's $200k ($303,000 AUD) offer for her Doberman pinscher puppy. </p> <p>In the viral video, which has since racked up over 970,000 views, Alexis Elliott said: “someone offered us $200k for our puppy, and I told my husband, ‘absolutely f**king not’.”</p> <p>“Would you guys sell your dogs for $200k? Like, that is my baby!" the LA-based woman asked her followers. </p> <p>Many couldn't believe that she declined the offer. </p> <p>“It’s a crime to not accept 200k,” one wrote. </p> <p>“In this economy? Yes,” another commented. </p> <p>“Would run upstairs so fast and pack his bag,” a third joked. </p> <p>While some people were eager enough to give up their own dogs for $200,000, others  agreed with Elliot and said that they would never give up their fur babies. </p> <p>“ABSOLUTELY NOT. The people saying yes should not have a dog tbh,” one viewer commented, adding: “That boy is my life.” </p> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #323338; font-family: Figtree, Roboto, 'Noto Sans Hebrew', 'Noto Kufi Arabic', 'Noto Sans JP', sans-serif; background-color: #ffffff; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; vertical-align: baseline; width: 580px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7308537421770116395&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40itsalexiselliott%2Fvideo%2F7308537421770116395%3Flang%3Den&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign.tiktokcdn-us.com%2Ftos-useast5-p-0068-tx%2Ff7435052bbf14b62a0c22bb295962a0f_1701651485%7Etplv-dmt-logom%3Atos-useast5-i-0068-tx%2FoMfzRS5SbCDFYrMIAQZA7AAlb2PgflRLDERaED.image%3Fx-expires%3D1702508400%26x-signature%3Di2tT0G7gwHGCVFhMDi4EPSvcPUI%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p>“A lot of you in these comments don’t deserve a dog,” another slammed. </p> <p>“Omg never. The thought of my dog being confused and feeling abandoned breaks my heart,” a third commented, while another user added that they wouldn't sell their dog even if they were offered one million dollars. </p> <p>One sceptic added: “Nobody offered you 200k for a dog, people with that kind of money are mostly financially smart. And you did not birth it." </p> <p>A few others came to Elliot's defence and said that it had happened to them in the past. </p> <p>“Someone offered me 100k for my dog. He was a pretty well-off athlete. Not everyone is smart with their money,” one commented. </p> <p>“I had a lady offer us $1M for our dog, and when we laughed she said, ‘No seriously, make me an offer, I’ll pay it’,” another claimed.</p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p> <p> </p>

Money & Banking

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British expat cops backlash for calling Australia the "worst country in the world"

<p>British expat and former school teacher Sabrina "Bree" Collins, has faced backlash online after labelling Australia as the "worst country in the world". </p> <p>The former teacher, who is also a writer, went on an extensive rant on social media about her experience living in Queensland and why she hates it, and the video has since gone viral.</p> <p>"Australia has destroyed everything that I was before I came here and there's so much that's happened while I've here but it's not safe to go public with everything that's happened to me," she began her rant. </p> <p>Collins who moved to Australia from the UK, then shared her unsolicited advice for those hoping to migrate Down Under. </p> <p>"When you're a British woman on the other side of the world, you've really got to sit down and think was it worth it? </p> <p>"If you're a British person sat home in the UK and you're wondering about this fantastic life you could have in Australia, you need to know a few things first." </p> <p>She then went on to label Australia as "very sexist", "abusive", "isolated" and "behind".</p> <p>"The internet is like really behind, technology is behind.</p> <p>"When you are in Australia you feel really, really isolated. You feel like you're stuck in the 1980s, and if you're a woman it's even worse," she said.</p> <p>"And I know loads of people are going to contradict what I'm saying and say, 'I'm living a fantastic life in Australia, 'well look at me, look at my CV, look at all my accomplishments before I moved out to Australia, and look at the way I've been treated."</p> <p>The expat who has a masters degree in education, and more than five years experience as a teacher, has claimed that her career as a teacher was ruined due to the abuse she received.</p> <p>She claimed that as a result of the abuse, she now feels too frightened to set foot in a school in Australia. </p> <p>"And that's why I cannot see a purpose or reason to stay in Australia." </p> <p>She then went on to say that she hopes to move to a "more progressive country" like the US, and write a book about her experiences in Australia. </p> <p>Her video has not been well-received, with many telling her to leave clowning her for calling the US more progressive. </p> <p>"Please leave.. and don't trash my country. I've seen yours and you all come over for many reasons," one Aussie commented. </p> <p>"Don’t let the door hit you on your way out missy!! Bye Felicia," another wrote. </p> <p>"UK is far more worse than Australia mate. Have lived in both countries here is lot lot better," a third wrote.</p> <p>"Oh, boo hoo. Please move. As an American, it’s way more backwards than Australia," an American commented on her desire to move to the US. </p> <p>"You're going to exactly the right place for you. You’ll find the schools are really safe and the police...very safe country for women," another added sarcastically. </p> <p>Other's pointed out that she was living up to the British stereotype of a "whinging pom".</p> <p>Collins is not the only British expat to find issue with the way of life in Australia.</p> <p>A few months ago, another expat <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-trouble/please-don-t-be-mad-british-expat-s-bone-to-pick-with-australia" target="_blank" rel="noopener">went viral</a> for listing things she finds frustrating after living in Australia, although she pleaded for everyone's understanding.</p>

Travel Trouble

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"Ignore it": The one parking ticket Aussies can chuck in the bin

<p>Western Australian driver, <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">Connor Wright,</span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;"> </span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;"> has gone viral after sharing his advice on how to handle penalty notices issued by private parking companies.</span></p> <p>The TikTok, which now has over 1.5 million views, started off with Wright recalling the moment he walked back to his car to find a ticket issued by Parking Enforcement Services (PES), a division of Wilson Parking. </p> <p>Wright then proceeds to rip up the ticket and told others to "make sure to read the fine print on these bad boys".</p> <p>"If you read at the back, it says important information: 'This is not a parking fine'," he said. </p> <p>"Useless, throw it in the bin, don't pay that sh*t."</p> <p>Many have commented how they "wish they knew this earlier". </p> <p>The ticket itself is a 'breach notice' which starts at a $65 penalty from Wilson and is only issued when a person drives into private car park, for example in a shopping centre, and break the terms and conditions issued by the private entity. </p> <p>"What they try and do is recover the debt for the loss incurred, effectively like a breach of contract, but they're not fines — only a statutory body has the power to issue a fine." Sydney Criminal Lawyers James Clements told <em>Yahoo News Australia</em>. </p> <p>Clements also called the penalty a "bullying tactic" to "effectively try scaring people into paying them," but it is difficult to enforce it due to government "crackdowns." </p> <p>However parking fines from bodies like councils, some universities and hospitals should be paid.</p> <p>Clements advises that when you receive the breach notice you should "ignore it" or "write back and say, 'I dispute this and do not intend to pay'."</p> <p>"What you don't want to do is write to them and say that you disclose you were the driver."</p> <p>Drivers are also encouraged to read signs and the terms and conditions when entering a private car park. </p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Legal

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Pilot praised for revealing simple trick to cope with severe turbulence

<p>A pilot has shared his simple "water bottle trick" for anxious passengers to cope with turbulence in the air. </p> <p>Sydney-sider Jimmy Nicholson and his wife Holly recently shared a video of their bumpy flight with "horrible" turbulence that went viral on TikTok, after Jimmy shared his tips on how to cope with the anxiety. </p> <p>In the video, his wife was filmed hyperventilating, and at one point even pulled out a sick bag. The couple held hands as other passengers were heard screaming during the wild turbulence. </p> <p>“So we’re at the back of the plane so it’s worse here," Jimmy, who looked more calm than most passengers, said in the clip. </p> <p>“It’s not comfortable, probably some of the worst I’ve been in. Could be widespread storms so pilots just have to pick their path of least resistance and go through it so nothing to worry about.</p> <p>“Planes are built to withstand way worse. Not fun evidently, but completely fine.</p> <p>“I’m a pilot and actually fly this aircraft type (Airbus). Here’s why you have nothing to worry about.”</p> <p>For those terrified of turbulence, Jimmy suggested looking at the water inside an upside down water bottle. </p> <p>“Water bottle trick: The water isn’t moving much, is it?” he said.</p> <p> </p> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important; width: 603px; max-width: 100%;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7272043055874723073&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40jimmy_nicholson%2Fvideo%2F7272043055874723073%3F_r%3D1%26_t%3D8fD3XY38vB4&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2FoM6n8BXn3ENnHuqtQEMUDb4jUe6fkgAi0BORgF%3Fx-expires%3D1693292400%26x-signature%3DrKGHV84h94FBzJrVu4RsUV8upK0%253D&amp;key=5b465a7e134d4f09b4e6901220de11f0&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p>He added that if the water appears to be moving gently in the water bottle, then the turbulence feels worse than it actually is. </p> <p>“Remind yourself it’s completely normal. The plane isn’t going to fall out of the sky,” he said.</p> <p>The pilot suggested turning on the air conditioning and looking out the window to calm your nerves. </p> <p>The video ended with passengers clapping after they rode out the turbulence, and the TikTok has been viewed over 2.4 million times, with many thanking Jimmy for his tips. </p> <p>“This helps so much! We need more pilots to post about the stuff the rest of us think will be the last minutes of our lives,” one wrote.</p> <p>“Thank you for explaining this. I’m an anxious flyer and seeing you talk about it has helped," commented another. </p> <p>“Thank you for this video. I saved it and going to watch it in my flights when I am frightened," wrote a third. </p> <p><em>Images: TikTok/ Instagram</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Jock Zonfrillo's daughter receives flood of love over emotional video

<p>Jock Zonfrillo's eldest daughter, Ava, has received an outpouring of love after she shared an emotional TikTok of her late father.</p> <p>“I never thought I’d lose you at 22,” she captioned the post.</p> <p>“Life is unfair. I miss you dad," she added, with a series of photos and videos of moments she shared with her father.</p> <p>She used a popular TikTok sound with sombre music and Zendaya's <em>Euphoria</em> character Rue, who also lost her father expressing her sadness.</p> <p>“I miss you dad. I miss you when I close my eyes,” her character said through tears.</p> <p>At the end of the video, Ava put a video of her dad and younger brother Alfie, sending her a message.</p> <p>“We love you Ava, we miss you,” the late chef said.</p> <p>“Miss you,” Alfie sweetly echoed.</p> <p>“Say ‘I love you Ava’,” Zonfrillo told Alfie, who copied his dad.</p> <p>“Aw your big sister, where is she?” he added.</p> <div><iframe title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7264800785194700039&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40avazonfrillo%2Fvideo%2F7264800785194700039%3Flang%3Den&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2Fb279df6fd76b4f4fb3b61e4df86af24a_1691468249%3Fx-expires%3D1691647200%26x-signature%3Dkjt1j9OWCHSdvm1v6xMj7dBCdFk%253D&amp;key=5b465a7e134d4f09b4e6901220de11f0&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>The video has since racked up almost 900,000 views with thousands of fans sharing their love and support.</p> <p>“Oh sweetheart, it’s so cruel and unfair that you had to lose him so young. You’re going to live an amazing life that would make him proud xoxox,” commented one person.</p> <p>“This is heartbreaking,” wrote another.</p> <p>"I am SO sorry for your loss beautiful girl. As someone who looked up to your dad, hearing about his death absolutely broke me. You are so strong gorgeous," wrote a third.</p> <p>"Oh my sweet girl, my heart breaks for you. He is with you always. Meet him in the garden of your dreams," commented another.</p> <p>The post comes just two months after she <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/jock-zonfrillo-s-daughter-pays-tribute-to-her-late-father" target="_blank" rel="noopener">paid tribute</a> to her late dad.</p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Man fakes own death to teach his family a tough life lesson

<p>A Belgian TikToker has become the subject of the internet’s scorn after playing a prank on the loved ones and mourners gathered to bid him farewell at what they believed to be his funeral. </p> <p>They were under the assumption that the service was being held for the recently-departed David Baerten - their 45-year-old friend who was not, it turns out, dead after all. </p> <p>Instead, Baerten had devised a plan with his wife and children to trick everyone into believing he’d passed on, all so that he could teach them a ‘valuable’ lesson in the importance of staying in touch.</p> <p>In a bid to make Baerten’s friends and followers believe the lie, one of his daughters even posted to social media about his passing, writing “rest in peace Daddy. I will never stop thinking about you.</p> <p>“Why is life so unfair? Why you? You were going to be a grandfather, and you still had your whole life ahead of you. I love you! We love you! We will never forget you.”</p> <p>The ‘funeral’ was held near Liege for the TikToker - who uses the name Ragnar le Fou for his social media antics - with his family and friends coming together for what they thought was a final farewell. But as they prepared for that difficult task, things took a sharp turn. </p> <p>Baerten, who had been alive the entire time, descended in a helicopter with a camera crew in tow to surprise them all. In a video later shared to social media, he could be heard telling them “cheers to you all, welcome to my funeral.” </p> <p>Another user - who was present at the time - shared a clip of Baerten in the arms of his sobbing loved ones, while others took the opportunity to complain about the entire “joke”. </p> <p><iframe style="border-width: initial; border-style: none; display: block; font-family: proxima-regular, PingFangSC, sans-serif; font-size: 16px; letter-spacing: -0.01em; text-align: center; background-color: #ffffff; width: 605px; height: 740px; visibility: unset; max-height: 740px;" src="https://www.tiktok.com/embed/v2/7243399474553425179?lang=en-GB&amp;referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dailymail.co.uk%2Fnews%2Farticle-12190705%2FMan-fakes-death-arrives-funeral-helicopter-teach-family-lesson.html&amp;embedFrom=oembed" name="__tt_embed__v11218062736010092" sandbox="allow-popups allow-popups-to-escape-sandbox allow-scripts allow-top-navigation allow-same-origin"></iframe>They were complaints that continued online, as the videos gained traction and many raced to condemn him for the heartless stunt. </p> <p>“Really shocking, it should be punishable by law!” one user declared. </p> <p>“I'm shocked,” another said, before asking how he’d been able to do that to those close to him. </p> <p>“He wanted to see who would be there with his eyes,” one said, “what narcissism”.</p> <p>Someone else agreed, noting that “you really have to be full of yourself to do such a thing.”</p> <p>The feedback was so strong that Baerten was forced to explain his actions, claiming that “what I see in my family often hurts me. I never get invited to anything. </p> <p>“Nobody sees me. We all grew apart. I felt unappreciated. That’s why I wanted to give them a life lesson, and show them that you shouldn’t wait until someone is dead to meet up with them.”</p> <p>And while he is yet to share his own professional footage from the day, his plan had worked.</p> <p>“Only half of my family came to the funeral,” he said. “That proves who really cares about me. Those who didn’t come, did contact me to meet up. </p> <p>“So in a way I did win.”</p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Family & Pets

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1983 vs 2023: Truth of Australia’s housing crisis exposed

<p dir="ltr">Australian filmmaker Jack Toohey has painted a bleak picture of the reality of the nation’s housing crisis, with four decades of comparison to back up his case.</p> <p dir="ltr">As Toohey himself proclaims in the caption to his video, the “market is broken”, and there’s far more to the story than older Aussies - many of whom believe earlier generations had it much harder in life - might expect.</p> <p dir="ltr">To begin, Toohey throws himself “back in time to 1983 to buy a house”, where he goes on to explain that he’s only “an average person looking to buy an average house”.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to Toohey, the average cost of a house in 1983 was $64,039, while the average annual income was $19,188, and an average university degree cost nothing. Average taxes and rents were $4,377 and $2,494, and the average disposable income for Aussies was $12,315.</p> <p dir="ltr">And for anyone who managed to save 50% of what was left of their income to put towards a mortgage, they could expect to have enough in their account within two years to put towards a 20% deposit.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Remember that as we head back to 2023,” Toohey said, “and I’m still an average person looking to buy an average house.”</p> <p dir="ltr">It was then that things took a turn for the worst, with Toohey sharing just how much things had changed over the course of 40 years.</p> <p dir="ltr">In comparison to 1983, Australians in 2023 could expect to have to fork out - on average - $920,100 for a home. And their savings were set to take a bigger hit, too, with the cost of a degree rising from the low price of “free” to an average HECS debt of $23,685, and wages at an annual average of $90,896.</p> <p dir="ltr">Taxes and rent had taken a hit, too, coming in at $20,008 and $28,600 - with the added problem of $5,453 HECS repayments.</p> <p dir="ltr">And the new average disposable income was $36,835, leaving hopeful Aussies with $18,417 after their repayments and taxes, and 10 whole years before they could even consider putting down a house deposit.</p> <div><iframe title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7240732571313638664&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40jack_toohey%2Fvideo%2F7240732571313638664&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2Fd8c1512dcd27459288fba5180051cbff_1685864431%7Etplv-dmt-logom%3Atos-alisg-i-0068%2F23958d0b68604bf7ba312a5dce455671.image%3Fx-expires%3D1686117600%26x-signature%3DJt8ZF65d8EGFALqjAbYSYOeu0Do%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p dir="ltr">As Toohey noted, it was no surprise that many were feeling the pressure, and that “clearly it’s not just lazy layabout young people sipping lattes, indulging, that’s the problem”. It would, he pointed out, take him 84 years to save up if he started skipping his one daily takeaway coffee.</p> <p dir="ltr">To simplify, he explained that the average house price had increased by 14 times in four decades, while the average yearly salary had only increased by 4.7 times - information he stressed had been drawn from both the ABS and ATO.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Houses used to cost three times your salary,” he said, “and now they cost 10 times.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Real Estate

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American influencer shocked to discover speed cameras are real

<p dir="ltr">An American influencer currently living in Sydney has learned an expensive lesson in obeying the rules of the road, particularly while in full view of speed cameras.</p> <p dir="ltr">TikToker Sophia Kim was caught racing through Sydney’s Cross City Tunnel at 21 km/h over the speed limit - 101 km/h in an 80 km/h zone - and took to social media to share her surprise at receiving a ticket for her actions.</p> <p dir="ltr">In a video posted to her TikTok account, Sophia broke the news to her followers, running through what had transpired - her ‘reasons’ for speeding, and sharing images of her car between lanes in the tunnel, along with the caption “this is BS and I was only going 60 mph”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I got a speeding fine because I was going 100km in the Cross City Tunnel when it was 80km,” she explained in the now-viral post, “and apparently there are cameras in the tunnel.</p> <p dir="ltr">“As an American, I got a licence here without taking any test, without learning about the Australian [driving] laws here, and I didn’t realise that you guys have cameras for speeding in the tunnels.</p> <p dir="ltr">“And apparently there are signs everywhere.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Sophia went on to describe how she’d been “so focussed on driving” and “stressed out” trying to navigate while “driving for the first time in a different country on the other side of the road”.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to the TikToker, at home in America there might be cameras involved when it came to running red lights, but that speeding offences fell to police officers and their scanners. At this stage, Sophia was talking over an image of her car with an 80 km/h sign clear on the ceiling of the tunnel.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The fine is $295,” she announced, before revealing that she’d been having a great day, on her way to Fashion Week events, and “was rushing to get there.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I thought I was saving money by driving and not Ubering but no, it’s actually more when you get a fine.”</p> <p dir="ltr">It turns out that Sophia had borrowed the car from a friend, who informed her that he couldn’t afford “to lose 3 points over this”, and had to transfer the fine into her name.</p> <p dir="ltr">And despite claiming that she would pay the fine and have the points deducted from her licence, she then asked her followers if she “should fight this”.</p> <div><iframe title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7237487133483814187&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40sophiainsydney%2Fvideo%2F7237487133483814187&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign.tiktokcdn-us.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-useast5-p-0068-tx%2Ff969d5dac251496aa62d08dfdb8a417f_1685108800%3Fx-expires%3D1685433600%26x-signature%3D%252FwZf1iguRsEhBEcz37LOvMtuELI%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p dir="ltr">Her post attracted more than 9,000 comments, and while some took Sophia’s side, most were of the opinion that fighting the fine would be a waste of time, and had many thoughts to share about the whole situation.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There’s no fighting this one,” one told her, “if there’s a speed sign that says 80 right in front of you they’re not gonna be forgivable”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“That's a fair bit over the limit. Maybe just don't speed hey!” one suggested.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If only there were large LED displays hung above the road every 1 km to tell you the maximum speed you can do,” another mused.</p> <p dir="ltr">And as a like-minded soul put it, “[it’s] almost like speed signs exist for a reason and not decoration”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Because the signs with the speed limit and the fact they tell you every 100m there’s a speed camera don’t help,” someone else added.</p> <p dir="ltr">Meanwhile, one was of the opinion that it could have been worse, sharing that “in QLD that would be a $646 fine for 21km over the limit. NSW is cheap”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Lesson learned I guess,” one more supposed, before noting that at least “now you know."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

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Wes Anderson has an obsessive, systematic repetition of stylistic choices. He’s perfect for this TikTok meme

<p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alex-munt-1380279">Alex Munt</a>, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-technology-sydney-936">University of Technology Sydney</a></em></p> <p>Iconoclastic film director Wes Anderson <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sdt0oam6O1o">says of his films</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>I always feel like any character from one of my movies could walk into another one of the movies and be at home there.</p> </blockquote> <p>With the premiere of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9FXCSXuGTF4">Asteroid City</a> at the 2023 Cannes Film Festival next week, fans have been doing just that – walking themselves into faux Anderson movies.</p> <p>TikTokers are creatively “Wes-Andersonifying” their everyday lives: <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@keithafadi/video/7221582114880294150">at lunch</a>, <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@taramilktea/video/7226286920093977857?q=wes%20anderson%20challenge&amp;t=1683337148719">at the hotel pool</a> or <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@hilakleinh3/video/7225644281799691563?q=wes%20anderson%20challenge&amp;t=1683337148719">at the bookstore</a>. The TikToks are all set to a score by Alexandre Desplat from The French Dispatch (2021).</p> <p><iframe id="tc-infographic-855" class="tc-infographic" style="border: none;" src="https://cdn.theconversation.com/infographics/855/b970b886fa15cd22f469e5441d15262ddaa1d2c8/site/index.html" width="100%" height="400px" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p>It’s fun to see Anderson’s film style rolled out across diverse cultural and geographic borders. This syncs with the filmmaker’s affinity for global cinema. He draws inspiration from the films of Yasujirō Ozu, Satyajit Ray, Jean Renoir, Jean-Luc Godard, Francois Truffaut and Jacques Rivette – to name just a few.</p> <p>For Tiktok’s Anderson fans, here’s a “<a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@andyyongfilms/video/7227440401572039938">How To</a>” by @andyyongfilms which shows a recipe for the film style: a title card (Futura font, with typewriter effect), symmetrical compositions, bright coloured or pastel outfits, retro props, an overhead shot plus a “<a href="https://www.studiobinder.com/blog/swish-pan-whip-pan-definition-film/">whip-pan</a>” camera movement. A few of the TikToks are highly polished, clearly from creators with a film education, such as <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@qmike/video/7223410519741418757">The British Dispatch</a>.</p> <p><iframe id="tc-infographic-856" class="tc-infographic" style="border: none;" src="https://cdn.theconversation.com/infographics/856/3ed36e627f542ded4bb2f6244eb11b5a4b4a1626/site/index.html" width="100%" height="400px" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <h2>Reimagining a film style</h2> <p>The Anderson-inspired TikToks are playful ruminations on the question of “film style” today. Stanley Kubrick once said a film director is a “<a href="https://craigberry93.medium.com/stanley-kubrick-at-the-design-museum-4e79b3c11af9">taste machine</a>”, which Anderson revels in to excess.</p> <p>Symmetry within the frame is perhaps the most obvious element of the Anderson film style and one easy to replicate in the TikToks. With an obsessive devotion to staging scenes in symmetry, Anderson breaks the “<a href="https://www.studiobinder.com/blog/what-is-the-rule-of-thirds/">rule of thirds</a>” for visual composition. In contrast, he pins his actors dead centre as shown in this <a href="https://vimeo.com/89302848">video essay</a> by Kogonada.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/89302848" width="500" height="281" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Working with his regular cinematographer Robert Yeoman, Anderson uses planar compositions to create graphic cinema which shares an affinity with illustration and painting.</p> <p>His “planar” approach to staging means the camera remains perpendicular to the subject, which the rapid whip-pan camera movements maintain <em>within</em> a shot. Anderson stages his actors across the frame – like garments on a clothesline – and in depth. You can see this in the image from Asteroid City above.</p> <p>This staging style is a departure from the mainstream visual style of film and television today which situates the camera at oblique angles to the actors, enhancing the layers of foreground, midground and background – closer to the way we see and experience the world.</p> <p><iframe id="tc-infographic-857" class="tc-infographic" style="border: none;" src="https://cdn.theconversation.com/infographics/857/4a449631c65d123c2342e08df14cd09f3b6d79a4/site/index.html" width="100%" height="400px" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p>In contrast, Anderson’s approach calls out the artificiality of cinema. He recalls historical film styles from early cinema theatricality to the pop-art cinema of the late 1960s, for example in the films of the late Jean-Luc Godard.</p> <p>Colour is another aspect of Wes Anderson’s visual style, which spills across the TikToks. Like a handful of directors today, he still shoots on film (16mm and 35mm) but now uses digital tools to <a href="https://musicbed.com/articles/filmmaking/cinematography/robert-yeoman-asc-on-shooting-wes-andersons-the-french-dispatch">grade the colour</a> of the images. The Euro-pastels from The Grand Budapest Hotel resurface in American shades for Asteroid City.</p> <p><iframe id="tc-infographic-858" class="tc-infographic" style="border: none;" src="https://cdn.theconversation.com/infographics/858/d333cb73c1d0b0fdb4ca1f8d48313a013754f2ec/site/index.html" width="100%" height="400px" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <h2>Where to next?</h2> <p>As a system in and of itself, the film style of Anderson is ripe for TikTok due to its boldness, clarity and repetition of techniques.</p> <p>Film style operates at the level of the shot. We might recall signature shots such as Hitchcock’s “vertigo effect” (where the camera lens zooms into a subject as the camera moves away), Scorsese’s tracking shots, Nolan’s close-up shots of hands or Tarantino’s point-of-view shots from inside a car boot.</p> <p>But these are isolated shots rather than Anderson’s obsessive, systematic repetition of stylistic choices within each film and across his oeuvre. On TikTok some shots are easier to craft that others, as @astonmartinf1 details in his <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@jllacar/video/7226811816553270571?q=wes%20anderson%20challenge&amp;t=1683337148719">analysis</a> of the Wes Anderson Trend, noting the omission of camera movement in many of the videos which is a defining aspect of his film style proper.</p> <p><iframe id="tc-infographic-859" class="tc-infographic" style="border: none;" src="https://cdn.theconversation.com/infographics/859/f9767494a7a94dd0475e121fc36513afcc110279/site/index.html" width="100%" height="400px" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p>In filmmaking, moving the camera is often expensive, separating the amateur from the professional. Anderson’s tracking shots are only feasible within an industrial filmmaking process. While the TikToks may be highly creative, they are made with slim resources a world away from the film budgets of Anderson, who enjoys Medici-like support <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/reliable-source/wp/2015/01/23/mysterious-d-c-mogul-steve-rales-is-behind-oscar-nominated-pic/">from US billionaire Steven Rales</a>.</p> <p>Saying this, there are other aspects of the Wes Anderson style the TikToks could hijack on a budget, such as playfulness with the image aspect ratio and slow-motion photography. Aspect ratio is the relationship between the width and height of an image. TikTok is 9:16, an inverted ratio to our widescreen TVs.</p> <p>As part of his film style, Anderson uses the Classical Hollywood ratio of 4:3 seen in <a href="https://youtu.be/dvubfl-qeC8">The French Dispatch</a>. Both ratios are designed for people (all those selfies) over landscapes, so creative opportunities here for TikTokers.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dvubfl-qeC8?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>Anderson is also a fan of <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yRGqeHIItY8">slow-motion</a> to accentuate key dramatic moments in his films. Today’s smartphones shoot “slo-mo” well, and using TikTok and other basic editing apps the user can apply speed effects to their footage.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yRGqeHIItY8?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>And as generative AI representations of film style wash across social media there’s a new set of questions altogether. Here’s <a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqxBkJnvPRa/?igshid=MDJmNzVkMjY%3D">Harry Potter as directed by Wes Anderson</a> created by @panoramachannel with AI software Midjourney. But that’s another conversation.<!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alex-munt-1380279">Alex Munt</a>, Associate Professor, Media Arts &amp; Production, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-technology-sydney-936">University of Technology Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/wes-anderson-has-an-obsessive-systematic-repetition-of-stylistic-choices-hes-perfect-for-this-tiktok-meme-204803">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Images: Searchlight Pictures</em></p>

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Australia’s “most boring state” is making waves

<p dir="ltr">The South Australian Tourism Commission is in hot water with its own shadow minister after forking out the funds for influencers to come visit the state, only to have them dub it Australia’s “most boring state”. </p> <p dir="ltr">It was an interesting take, but not necessarily one that was all too surprising - it’s a long-running joke plaguing the state, and the content produced by the Tiktokers has been defended as both intentional and ironic.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Shadow tourism minister Jing Lee does not share that opinion, demanding to know “who has chosen them, why they are here, [and] how they have been selected.”</p> <p dir="ltr">7News have also reported that the opposition are calling for the campaign’s cost to be made public. </p> <p dir="ltr">South Australia’s tourism organisation put their plan into motion in 2022 when they invited 12 social media influencers with millions of followers between them on a fully funded trip to the state. </p> <p dir="ltr">Their itinerary was reportedly designed to highlight “the very best that SA has to offer”, from its “raw beauty” to its “culinary delights”. </p> <p dir="ltr">“What we’re trying to do is demonstrate that people’s perception of Adelaide is patently wrong,” South Australia’s treasurer Stephen Mullighan explained. “That was the whole idea behind it.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Many of the videos that came from the campaign run with captions declaring it to be “the most boring state ever”, or with the influencers asking their followers if they were ready to run amok with them. </p> <p dir="ltr">No matter which tagline the Tiktokers ran with, the content they produced all contained the same hidden message: South Australia was not such a ‘boring’ getaway after all. </p> <p dir="ltr">The clips they featured painted a positive picture of the state, showcasing everything from dolphin cruises to wineries, spectacular dining experiences, and an oyster farm. </p> <p dir="ltr">And as SATC have been happy to report, the campaign has been viewed over 5 million times across TikTok.</p> <p dir="ltr">It still wasn’t enough for Jing Lee, who shared her belief that “the Labor government has an obsession with influencers.”</p> <p dir="ltr">But Stephen Mullighan had his own thoughts on the matter - and more specifically, one of the opposition’s previous attempts at a tourism campaign. </p> <p dir="ltr">“We’re certainly not going to get lectured to by Jing Lee, John Gardner, and the Liberals,” he said, “who were of course responsible for the most humiliating tourism campaign [the 2019 ‘Old Mate’ campaign] that’s been rolled out in our nation’s history in recent times.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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How beauty filters like TikTok’s ‘bold glamour’ affect tweens using social media

<p><a href="https://www.cosmopolitan.com/entertainment/celebs/a43203022/tiktok-bold-glamour-filter/">TikTok’s new “bold glamour” filter</a> “enhances” physical features in a way that makes it difficult to distinguish whether someone is using a filter or not, despite its airbrushing qualities.</p> <p>Unlike its predecessors, this filter allows movement through an AI feature with the filter remaining fixed on when, for example, a hand crosses the face, with fewer glitches. </p> <p>Users could be left comparing their unfiltered appearance with their “perfect” filtered self. They may start to develop unrealistic goals of perceived physical perfection that affect their self esteem. </p> <p>Although the terms of service for most social media platforms require users to be at least 13, a significant number of “tweens” (children between the ages of nine and 12) <a href="https://www.ofcom.org.uk/research-and-data/media-literacy-research/childrens/children-and-parents-media-use-and-attitudes-report-2022">now have a social media profile</a>.</p> <p>Online safety lessons in schools <a href="https://www.childrenscommissioner.gov.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Childrens-Commissioner-for-England-Life-in-Likes-3.pdf">tend to concentrate</a> on physical risk and predatory behaviour rather than emotional risks that children may encounter, as these may not be as apparent or experienced by adults.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">I am old enough and tough enough that filters don’t have an impact on me. My face tells the story of my life and I know its value; I can (mostly) look at who I am with love and acceptance. But if I had had access to Tiktok’s Bold Glamour as a kid, I would have been destroyed. <a href="https://t.co/USjFcLJkoh">pic.twitter.com/USjFcLJkoh</a></p> <p>— Rebecca Seal (@RebeccaSeal) <a href="https://twitter.com/RebeccaSeal/status/1640275766100279296?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 27, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>The <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1461444819873644">damaging effect of “filters”</a> (digital image effects that alter a person’s appearance) is less commonly taught.</p> <p><a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/KXDECXZB3CVNZNDHNURF/full?target=10.1080/03004279.2022.2095416">In my research</a>, I presented eight focus groups with activities to generate discussions with children of 10 and 11 years of age who were in their final year of primary school. One of the activities was related to the use of filters.</p> <p>Participants were given a set of photographs of people using filters on the social media site Snapchat and were asked questions such as: “How are these different from how they look in real life?” and “why do people use these filters?”</p> <p>The results demonstrated a clear and distinct gender divide. The boys said they used filters for fun and entertainment, favouring dog ears and exaggerated tongues to “make people laugh”. The girls used filters to create an idealised image that conformed to beauty ideals and for validation in the form of likes and comments.</p> <p>One girl, Samantha, said: “[filters] make you look perfect and flawless”. Another explained: “I like putting filters on because it doesn’t show my birthmark at all. It takes the blemishes off my face”. </p> <p>Similarly, tween Mia explained: “when you put a filter on, it makes your skin tone better and it covers up any spots or like any bruises and stuff that you feel insecure about in yourself.”</p> <p>My findings suggest that girls are internalising and aspiring to the beauty ideals that they are consuming via social media. There is a pressure to adopt a polished, physical appearance through filters, which may have <a href="http://sro.sussex.ac.uk/id/eprint/82913/3/__smbhome.uscs.susx.ac.uk_dm50_Desktop_Jaynes%20V.pdf">emotional repercussions</a>.</p> <h2>‘Beauty isn’t everything’</h2> <p>I also used collaging as an activity for exploring individual experiences. One child, Sophie, chose to show a binary depiction of herself as two halves.</p> <p>On the social media side, she used lots of different animal prints in triangles to show that you can be lots of different things and there are lots of different parts of yourself.</p> <p>She explained that the patterns she had chosen looked unnatural, unlike the more realistic filters online. </p> <p>Because (like other females in the study) she felt that there is an expectation for girls to look a certain way, Sophie also wrote “no one is perfect” on her collage.</p> <p>For the girls in my research, there was a sense that self expression was strongly linked to appearance, with a <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26612721/">pressure to adhere</a> to certain perceived physical ideals.</p> <p>In her collage, Karen discussed at length how social media can be an augmented reality and can emphasise feelings of self consciousness linked to physical appearance.</p> <p>The characters drawn on her collage show a “real-life” self that had no filter, which “makes her sad” and a “filter self” which used make up and filters to enhance her appearance and made her happy. </p> <p>She also emphasised the feelings of negative self-esteem that viewing filtered images could have by saying, "People try and make themselves look beautiful and at the end it may really disappoint them."</p> <p><a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1461444819871669?journalCode=nmsa">Similar research from 2020</a> also concluded that girls tend to replicate “female” cues popularised through social media patterns, such as exaggerated lips and flawless skin. </p> <p>Although my research specifically focused on Snapchat, other social media platforms such as TikTok and Instagram also encourage enhancing appearance through filters.</p> <p>Beauty filters reinforce the message that wearing makeup, looking a certain way and conforming to beauty ideals, is the desired physical state for women. Isabel had a strong message for girls in her collage: “be your own person and stop comparing yourself to others”.</p> <p>The widespread use of filters is certainly not facilitating this message and it is important that the emotional repercussions of using these appearance altering tools – as well as continually seeing them in social media feeds – is addressed. </p> <p>Open discussions could help educate girls to learn that these unattainable physical aspirations do not represent reality.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-beauty-filters-like-tiktoks-bold-glamour-affect-tweens-using-social-media-203383" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

Beauty & Style

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93-year-old grandma shares her blunt dating advice with the world

<p>A 93-year-old woman from the United States has reached viral heights on social media with her frank dating advice for singles around the world - particularly when it comes to which men she thinks it best to avoid. </p> <p>In a series she calls ‘Red Flags for Guys’, Lillian Droniak has educated - and entertained - her audiences, warning them off of everyone from those who won’t open doors to those who won’t provide regular compliments, don’t have soup on hand, and don’t like bingo. </p> <p>In a later entry, she expanded on her own list, declaring that those who lie about their height, those who are water signs, anyone with a name starting with the letter J, plays golf, and don’t like cats are major red flags in the romantic department. </p> <p>“If he doesn't like bingo, I don't date him because I love bingo,” she explained. “If he doesn't keep enough soup for me in the refrigerator. I always like soup and eat soup … if he doesn't call me pretty all the time, I don't want anything to do with him.”</p> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; vertical-align: baseline; width: 620.262px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7187092528930327850&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40grandma_droniak%2Fvideo%2F7187092528930327850%3Flang%3Den&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign.tiktokcdn-us.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-useast5-p-0068-tx%2F0185552c26ef45e9a4155e25fdc88e95_1673375409%3Fx-expires%3D1680606000%26x-signature%3D2Bbvh8va4bNkeTSlql8fJ3xRfnU%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>As Lillian told <em>Good Morning America</em> of her decision to launch her account, she gives her advice because she’s already been through it, and that the next generation “are maybe too young to think about it. </p> <p>“I was bashful when I was young. And now I’m too much trouble sometimes.” </p> <p>And while Lillian is happy to dish out her advice, it isn’t without some personal experience. The grandmother has also been open with her followers about her own journey back into the realm of dating, even sharing a clip of her preparing for an upcoming date after 25 years without embarking on one. </p> <p>“My first date in 25 years and he's going to pick me up in 20 minutes,” she said. “I'm getting nervous now. I met him at bingo and that's the way it goes.</p> <p>“He's really handsome and I couldn't say no ... I might kiss him, you never know but I'm going to still put lipstick on just in case.”</p> <p>"If he doesn't like it, he could leave,” she explained, after showcasing her outfit for the camera, “all I want is a free dinner. </p> <p>“I'm not even going to bring my wallet or my purse. I'll let you know how it goes.”</p> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; vertical-align: baseline; width: 620.262px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7197847511887858986&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40grandma_droniak%2Fvideo%2F7197847511887858986%3Flang%3Den&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign.tiktokcdn-us.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-useast5-p-0068-tx%2F3958e1d1760c44539a23ef404b267a18_1675879484%3Fx-expires%3D1680606000%26x-signature%3DkHJqxjdpR2WgDEE6KGU%252FWFxlSWw%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>Unfortunately, it wasn’t destined to work out for Lillian and her would-be partner, as she later returned to inform everyone that she “just got back from my date and it was no good.</p> <p>“He didn't even look at my outfit and say that it looks pretty. He was rude to the waiter, he was just a rude person. He didn't even hold the door for me like a gentleman should.</p> <p>“Bottom line he wasn't a gentleman, not my type. And he was shorter than me.”</p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Relationships

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Mum breaks down after people make fun of her baby’s name

<p dir="ltr">A tearful mum-fluencer has taken to TikTok to call out the “cruel” adults making fun of her son’s name.</p> <p dir="ltr">Liana Jade and her partner Connor Darlington often post videos about their lifestyle, pregnancy and parenting, racking up over 2.7 million followers on Youtube.</p> <p dir="ltr">The couple have an eight-month-old son, with an unusual name that is meaningful to them- Koazy, pronounced “cosy”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Jade was minding her business when it was brought to her attention that people had mentioned her son’s name in another influencer’s video.</p> <p dir="ltr">In an episode of The Unplanned Podcast hosted by US couple Matt and Abby Howard, the pair discussed unusual baby names and said that quirky choices for baby names in 2023 were becoming “ridiculous”.</p> <p dir="ltr">They also mentioned that it’s not a great idea to name your child something quirky, especially when they become adults.</p> <p dir="ltr">Although they didn’t mention Koazy’s name specifically, the people in their comment section were more relentless, as they began ripping at Koazy’s name.</p> <p dir="ltr">Visibly upset, Jade posted her own TikTok and explained why she chose that name.</p> <p dir="ltr">“People have said we called him Koazy because he was cosy in the womb,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But no. It was a name we already had and as I was getting so heavily pregnant, people were saying ‘he’s so cosy in your belly’.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It confirmed to us that is what we should name him... we were like ‘Oh my God, it’s meant to be’.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Jade also mentioned that she understood Koazy’s name wasn’t going to be everyone’s cup of tea and that “everyone is entitled to their own opinion”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But it’s just different when there’s this comment section open on such a big influencer’s video of people, fully grown adults, just sat there slandering my baby’s name.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I think it’s quite cruel – and if I had posted that video personally, I think I would have been very mindful of who was being named and how that can have an effect on other people,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Jade’s <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@lianajadee/video/7209646914298449158" target="_blank" rel="noopener">TikTok</a> has since gone viral with over 6.8 million views, and fans have supported her right to name her child whatever she liked.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Koazy is a lovely name,” one person wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Everyone has an opinion, but a name is personal to the parents who chose it and shouldn’t be judged by anyone else. Stay strong,” commented another.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Howards have since turned the comments off their podcast.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Instagram, TikTok</em></p> <p dir="ltr"> </p>

Family & Pets

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"Back to the kitchen": Granny Guns flexes down at online trolls

<p>A body-builder granny has hit back at trolls after showcasing her killer biceps online.</p> <p>The TikTok star, 62, shows herself pumping iron, and doing various workouts on her account, with nasty individuals leaving comments saying she belongs in the kitchen.</p> <p>The 62-year-old enjoys making TikTok fitness videos, and she’s proved to be extremely successful online, having just shy of 800,000 followers.</p> <p>In one video, the granny is pumping iron at the gym.</p> <p>The video then cuts to her dancing around with a tray of homemade cookies, which she says is how she acts “any other time”.</p> <p>However, trolls online labelled her as just a woman made for the kitchen, and that’s when the biceps came out.</p> <div><iframe title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7208386374041423146&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%4065_strong%2Fvideo%2F7208386374041423146%3Flang%3Den&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign.tiktokcdn-us.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-useast5-p-0068-tx%2F632c57901f47459e97728aea3dbe7729_1678333249%3Fx-expires%3D1678683600%26x-signature%3DQUziUnUI1Gk%252FIjO45MfLA8OhWNk%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>The granny made a video where she threw shade at a few hate comments such as “women are weak” or “back to the kitchen”.</p> <p>The video then cuts to her friends lifting weights in a show of strength.</p> <p>The gym granny was showing off a tough move at the bicep curl machine.</p> <p>As she pulled the bar to her chest, her biceps flexed to reveal some serious muscle.</p> <p>She captioned her TikTok, “For all my fellow female fitness lovers”.</p> <p>Fellow users flocked to the comments to show their support.</p> <p>“I have a crush on everyone,” one user said.</p> <p>Another exclaimed: “I love this! And all the amazing women in this video!”</p> <p>“I love you grandma”, a third gushed.</p> <p>To which the granny replied, “Love you back”.</p> <p><em>Image credit: TikTok</em></p>

Body

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Mum speaks out after reaction to cling wrap video

<p><span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: bolder; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, 'system-ui', 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji'; font-size: 16px; background-color: #ffffff;"><em style="box-sizing: border-box;">Warning: This article contains disturbing content which some readers may find distressing. </em></span></p> <p>A TikTok influencer said her son was temporarily taken from her home by child protection authorities after she <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/mum-slammed-for-cruel-cling-wrap-prank" target="_blank" rel="noopener">posted a video</a> of her husband pushing the child around while he was swaddled from the neck down in cling wrap.</p> <p>The mum, Savannah Glembin, who has 1.1 million followers on TikTok, appeared emotional as she announced in a clip that authorities took her son, Gunner, away following the initial video.</p> <p>“Gunner has been taken from us until CPR can evaluate our home because I posted a video of my husband and son playing," she said.</p> <p>The video of the incident sparked concern among TikTok users, Gunner, who appears to be about two years old, was tightly wrapped in cling wrap while being moved around by his father, Hank.</p> <p>Savannah defended their actions in the video, saying it was “just a funny thing Hank did because Gunner was getting into the stove that day and tried putting a fork in a socket”.</p> <p>Several TikTok users commented how they were left feeling uncomfortable and disturbed by the video, which has since been taken down, with one user @auntkaren0 reposting the video, calling it “feels like abuse”.</p> <p>At one point the boy is placed standing on the bed before he falls forward onto his knees, unable to move his arms as he’s constrained by the cling wrap.</p> <p>“He’s a worm”, his father joked.</p> <p>“If you have a grumpy toddler all day, this is the only way,” the mum is heard saying in the background of the video.</p> <p>Hank, in military uniform, then proceeded to place Gunner face down on the bed before he was flipped over onto his back.</p> <p>User @auntkaren0, who reposted the video, also said, “I don’t see what’s funny here. I don’t understand how putting your toddler in an uncomfortable position is funny and then posting it for views.</p> <p>“Not only did you not just do this for your own entertainment, you thought this was going to be everybody’s entertainment.</p> <p>“This is why I don’t like family channels like this, because they will go to any length for views.”</p> <p>Many other TikTok users shared their concern for the child, one comment said, “My anxiety when he fell forward and I was like omg he’s going to suffocate.”</p> <p>Another comment read, “That gave me anxiety. The feeling of not being able to move! That poor kid.”</p> <p>A third user said, “That gave me anxiety. The feeling of not being able to move! That poor kid.”</p> <p>Addressing the initial video, Savannah appeared tearful, saying, “Right now, we're dealing with a situation where Gunner has been taken from us until CPS can evaluate our home because I posted a video of my husband and son playing.</p> <p>“That video was skewed in a way [that resulted in] people thinking we were abusing our child. But he was laughing and smiling and it was just a funny thing Hank did because Gunner was getting into the stove that day and tried putting a fork in a socket.</p> <p>“Hank playfully wrapped him in cling wrap - he had room to move. He looked like a little worm, like a little cucumber. He was at no point in distress or crying.</p> <p>“We would never hurt our son, we would never hurt our child. He is the best thing that's ever happened to us.</p> <p>“I posted that video two days ago and the response that it had gotten was positive so like I didn't know that someone had thought it was bad until yesterday when cops showed up at our door and separated us, his family.</p> <p>“We went down and made our statements, thinking Gunner was going to be returned to us that day and that CPS would do their investigation and see that our home is safe.”</p> <p>“All I can say is that my son is so loved and cherished. He is my miracle baby, he was my fourth pregnancy after three miscarriages, and he's the light of my life.” She added.</p> <p>“We made a mistake and we don't deserve our child taken away because of it.”</p> <p>The mumfluencer then posted another TikTok that appeared to show the child was back home in the custody of her and her husband.</p> <p><em>Image credit: TikTok</em></p>

Legal

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Mum slammed for cruel cling wrap ‘prank’

<p><strong><em>Warning: This article contains disturbing content which some readers may find distressing. </em></strong></p> <p>Tiktok influencer Savannah Glembin and her husband have come under fire for their decision to wrap their distressed toddler’s entire torso in cling wrap. </p> <p>In the now deleted video, the couple can be seen taking a concerning approach to discipline with their “stubborn” child. While Enya’s ‘Only Time’ plays in the background, Savannah’s husband Hank is standing behind their son, Gunner, as the toddler perches on a bed, his arms trapped against his sides in layers of cling wrap.</p> <p>“Grumpy toddler all day?” Savannah can be heard asking her audience, while over the video the text “this is the only way” is displayed. </p> <p>The family’s dog appears, before Hank lays Gunner on the bed, facedown, and states that “he’s a worm”. Gunner, then on his back, cries as he rolls to his side, unable to move any further. </p> <p>Although Savannah removed the incident from her feed, many accounts stitched the original video (the TikTok equivalent of a repost with additional commentary) beforehand. One user, known on the app as Aunt Karen, offered a trigger warning at the beginning of hers, stating that “this feels like abuse.”</p> <div class="element-embed clear-both" style="box-sizing: border-box; clear: both; text-align: center; margin-bottom: 20px; color: #333333; font-family: roboto_regular, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 17px; background-color: #ffffff;"> <blockquote id="v13272776541841646" class="tiktok-embed" style="box-sizing: border-box; position: relative; width: 605px; margin: 18px auto; line-height: 1.15; overflow: hidden; text-size-adjust: 100%; font-family: proxima-regular, PingFangSC, sans-serif; max-width: 605px; min-width: 325px;" cite="https://www.tiktok.com/@auntkaren0/video/7207105964476992811" data-video-id="7207105964476992811"><p><iframe style="box-sizing: border-box; border-width: initial; border-style: none; max-width: 100%; width: 605px; height: 740px; display: block; visibility: unset; max-height: 740px; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important;" src="https://www.tiktok.com/embed/v2/7207105964476992811?lang=en-GB&amp;referrer=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tvanouvelles.ca%2F2023%2F03%2F07%2Fune-video-tiktok-seme-lindignation-alors-quun-bambin-est-la-proie-du-jeu-lugubre-de-son-pere" name="__tt_embed__v13272776541841646" sandbox="allow-popups allow-popups-to-escape-sandbox allow-scripts allow-top-navigation allow-same-origin"></iframe></p></blockquote> </div> <div id="magnite_outstream" class="splitbox-container" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: #333333; font-family: roboto_regular, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 17px; background-color: #ffffff;"></div> <div id="fsk_splitbox_992_onscreen" class="fsk_splitbox_992_onscreen" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; color: #333333; font-family: roboto_regular, arial, sans-serif; font-size: 17px; background-color: #ffffff;"> <div id="fsk_splitbox_992" class=" fsk_splitbox_992" style="box-sizing: border-box; max-width: 603px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; height: 0px; text-align: center;"><iframe id="fsk_frame_splitbox" style="box-sizing: border-box; width: 602.998px; height: 0px; border-width: initial; border-style: none; margin: 0px;" name="fsk_frame_splitbox" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> </div> <p>"I don't see what's funny here,” Aunt Karen concludes. “I don't understand how putting your toddler in an uncomfortable position is funny and then posting it for views. </p> <p>“Not only did you not just do this for your own entertainment, you thought this was going to be everybody's entertainment. </p> <p>"This is why I don't like family channels like this, because they will go to any length for views."</p> <p>People from all around the world were in agreement, outraged at the treatment of the toddler. </p> <p>The uproar grew so loud that child protective services in the US - where the family reside - got involved, and Savannah was forced to post a tearful ‘apology’ to her account.</p> <p>“I made the biggest mistake of my life posting this video. Genuinely and truly he was laughing and smiling and was out of the plastic in under five minutes,” she said. Many were quick to point out that while Savannah had apologised for posting the content, she hadn’t actually owned up to what they’d done to their son. </p> <p>“Right now, we're dealing with a situation where Gunner has been taken from us until CPR can evaluate our home,” Savannah told followers in another video, “because I posted a video of my husband and son playing."</p> <p>Savannah insisted that her son was not upset, despite his distressed demeanour in the original post. </p> <p>"That video was skewed in a way [and led to] people thinking we were abusing our child,” she said. “But he was laughing and smiling and it was just a funny thing Hank did because Gunner was getting into the stove that day and tried putting a fork in a socket.</p> <p>"Hank playfully wrapped him in cling wrap, he had room to move, he looked like a little cucumber. At no point was he in distress or crying.</p> <p>"We would never hurt our son. He is the best thing that's ever happened to us.”</p> <p>Savannah noted that they hadn’t expected the response their video received, and claimed that they hadn’t realised anyone felt negatively “until yesterday when cops showed up and our door and separated us, his family.”</p> <p>"We made a mistake,” Savannah concluded, “and we don't deserve our child taken away because of it."</p> <p>Gunner has since been returned to the couple, with Savannah captioning yet another TikTok update “home where he belongs”.</p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Is 13 too young to have a TikTok or Instagram account?

<p>The surgeon general is the “<a href="https://www.hhs.gov/surgeongeneral/index.html">nation’s doctor</a>” in the United States. They are tasked with giving Americans the “best scientific information” about their health.</p> <p>Late last month, the current US surgeon general, Vivek Murthy, <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2023/01/29/health/surgeon-general-social-media/index.html">warned</a> 13 is too young to join social media. He said it poses a risk to young people’s “self-worth and their relationships”, adding, "I, personally, based on the data I’ve seen, believe that 13 is too early […] the skewed and often distorted environment of social media often does a disservice to many of those children."</p> <p>Is 13 too young? What should parents think about when it comes to their kids and social media accounts?</p> <h2>Why are we talking about 13?</h2> <p>Major social media platforms, including <a href="https://help.twitter.com/en/managing-your-account/account-restoration">Twitter</a>, <a href="https://about.instagram.com/blog/announcements/new-ways-to-verify-age-on-instagram">Instagram</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/help/157793540954833">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/safety/en/guardians-guide/">TikTok</a>, require users to be at least 13. This includes those in Australia and New Zealand.<br />This minimum age requirement stems from <a href="https://www.ftc.gov/legal-library/browse/rules/childrens-online-privacy-protection-rule-coppa">1998 US legislation</a> which banned the collection of children’s personal data without parental consent.</p> <p>For many parents, schools and cybersafety experts, this minimum age has become something of a benchmark. Many assume it comes with the implicit assurance social media platforms are appropriate and safe for children once they turn 13. Conversely, they also assume they are unsafe for children under 13.</p> <p>But this is not necessarily the case.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">When I speak with kids &amp; parents about <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/YouthMentalHealth?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#YouthMentalHealth</a>, the number one question I get is if social media is harming our kids. Based on the data I’ve seen and the conversations I’ve had, I believe 13 is too young for our kids to start using social media. <a href="https://t.co/vpBEcWySFc">https://t.co/vpBEcWySFc</a></p> <p>— Dr. Vivek Murthy, U.S. Surgeon General (@Surgeon_General) <a href="https://twitter.com/Surgeon_General/status/1621644953347563526?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 3, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <h2>What does the evidence say?</h2> <p>Social media platforms do present some risks for young people. These include <a href="https://theconversation.com/cyberbullying-among-teens-our-research-shows-online-abuse-and-school-bullying-are-often-linked-119442">online bullying</a> and harassment, exposure to misinformation and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2022/dec/15/tiktok-self-harm-study-results-every-parents-nightmare">inappropriate content</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/children-can-be-exposed-to-sexual-predators-online-so-how-can-parents-teach-them-to-be-safe-120661">grooming</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/dozens-of-us-schools-universities-move-to-ban-tiktok-197393">privacy breaches</a> and excessive use.</p> <p>Stories documenting the potentially harmful effects of social media are rarely out of the news. Studies claim links between social media and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/science/2022/mar/28/social-media-may-affect-girls-mental-health-earlier-than-boys-study-finds">poor mental health</a> and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2023/jan/01/social-media-triggers-children-to-dislike-their-own-bodies-says-study">low self-esteem</a>.</p> <p>These findings are concerning, and there is no doubt social media may negatively affect some young people’s wellbeing. However, it is not a straightforward question.</p> <p>While these studies might find a correlation or link between excessive social media use and poor self-esteem, for example, they rarely point to direct causation. Young people already experiencing low self-esteem and depression may use social media significantly more than others.</p> <h2>So why don’t we just increase the age?</h2> <p>Murthy acknowledges it is difficult to keep kids off their devices and social media. But he suggests parents band together, "and say you know, as a group, we’re not going to allow our kids to use social media until 16 or 17 or 18."</p> <p>But any increase in the age - whether formal or informal – will not necessarily keep children safer online. Children can easily falsify their ages (<a href="https://academic.oup.com/jcmc/article/18/3/303/4067510">many already do</a>). And young people are good at finding creative and secretive ways of doing what they want regardless.</p> <h2>Why can’t parents just say no?</h2> <p>It is often suggested – by cyber safety experts – that parents <a href="https://www.cybersafetysolutions.com.au/top-tips/">just say no</a>. This message has been reinforced by celebrity commentators such as British actress Kate Winslet, who recently told the BBC, "My children don’t have social media and haven’t had social media."</p> <p>While these approaches may work with younger kids, older children are unlikely to simply comply. Blanket bans and restrictions not only lead to <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/1461444816655099?casa_token=q7SXs7TW4vMAAAAA:F8rirALQj6c2dGZb3pH8OHPbfy7zqwG-pkktOkU6H7Ig6MKg1jmbVNBHFt17bCOh8IfGOsVpsw5aPg">family conflict</a>, but are also more likely to lead to children using social media without parental consent or <a href="https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/parenting4digitalfuture/2017/02/07/digital-skills-matter-in-the-quest-for-the-holy-grail/">knowledge</a>.</p> <p>This is a problem because parents play an important role in helping children navigate online spaces, including the sometimes fraught nature of peer relationships on social media.</p> <p>If a child has a social media account without parental permission, they are much less likely to seek out their parents for help if they have a problem online, for fear of getting into trouble or having their device taken away.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cl3aWdyPqGw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cl3aWdyPqGw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by BBC Woman's Hour (@bbcwomanshour)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <h2>Children also have a right to be online</h2> <p>Discussion about risks also tends to ignore the <a href="https://www.pewresearch.org/internet/2022/11/16/connection-creativity-and-drama-teen-life-on-social-media-in-2022/">potential benefits</a> of being online.</p> <p>Social media is incredibly important for many young people. It keeps them connected with friends and extended family, provides a platform for creativity and self-expression, and enables civic participation and activism.</p> <p>Social media also provides access to like-minded individuals and communities who may provide solidarity and support, especially for marginalised teens.</p> <p>Children, particularly teenagers, also have a right to participate in online spaces, including use of social media.</p> <p>The United Nations’ Committee on the Rights of the Child <a href="https://docstore.ohchr.org/SelfServices/FilesHandler.ashx?enc=6QkG1d%2FPPRiCAqhKb7yhsqIkirKQZLK2M58RF%2F5F0vEG%2BcAAx34gC78FwvnmZXGFUl9nJBDpKR1dfKekJxW2w9nNryRsgArkTJgKelqeZwK9WXzMkZRZd37nLN1bFc2t">notes</a> children have the right to “meaningful access to digital technologies” as a way of realising the full range of their civil, political, cultural, economic and social rights.</p> <h2>So, when should my child get a TikTok account?</h2> <p>There is no one-size-fits-all approach here. Children vary tremendously in terms of their maturity, skills, life experience and judgement.</p> <p>On top of this, online risk is not equally distributed, as children who are <a href="https://blogs.lse.ac.uk/parenting4digitalfuture/2019/02/20/vulnerable-offline-and-at-risk-online/">more vulnerable offline are more vulnerable online</a>. For example, children with mental health problems, learning difficulties, a disability or who have problems at home are more likely to experience high-risk situations online.</p> <p>In deciding whether your child is ready for a social media account, parents might consider:</p> <ul> <li> <p>Is my child especially vulnerable to online harms?</p> </li> <li> <p>Does my child have the required maturity and resilience to manage potentially negative online social interactions?</p> </li> <li> <p>Does my child listen to advice and follow rules?</p> </li> <li> <p>Is my child aware of the risks, and do they have strategies for managing them?</p> </li> <li> <p>Will my child come to me with any problems they encounter online?</p> </li> </ul> <p>Parents might also consider their children’s offline lives, as these often carry over into online spaces. This includes what their friendships are like, their propensity for taking risks, and their ability to consider the consequences of their actions.</p> <h2>Start talking early</h2> <p>The best thing that parents can do is initiate conversations about social media and the internet early and often.</p> <p>Many issues that play out on social media are extensions of young people’s existing peer relationships. Parents can talk to their children about their friends and peers, show an interest in their child’s online activities, and openly discuss their child’s rights and responsibilities online.</p> <p>Some parents may wish to set reasonable expectations and rules about appropriate use of social media. Documenting these expectations through a “family technology agreement” that is negotiated <a href="https://eprints.lse.ac.uk/106403/1/parenting4digitalfuture_2020_08_19_parenting_for_a_digital_future.pdf">democratically</a> as a family, rather than through top-down rules, is more likely to succeed.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-13-too-young-to-have-a-tiktok-or-instagram-account-199097" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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Warning against latest egg-stremely restrictive diet trend

<p>A viral “egg diet” is the latest weight loss trend taking over TikTok as people continue to find ways to drop a few kilos.</p> <p>The #eggdiet has attracted over 68.5 million views, with a lot of people sharing their weight-loss success. Nutritionists warn the egg-stremely restrictive diet is simply unsustainable and just another eggs-ample of why most diets fail.</p> <p>According to TikTok users, the egg diet consists of eating only eggs for every meal, alongside low-carb snacks such as fruit, veggies, and some additional protein.</p> <p>While this diet is capable of boosting your metabolism and burning fat in the short term, it can then slow the metabolism and make it more difficult to lose weight in the future.</p> <p>One TikTok user trying the diet admitted she had broken it, writing, ”I think the last nine days of eating the bare minimum has caught up with me today. The whole day I just felt nauseous.”</p> <p>A diet focused on one food eggs-cludes many healthy food groups that are otherwise beneficial for your body. This can lead to nutritional deficiencies, an unhealthy amount of weight loss, mood changes, muscle weakness, and hair loss.</p> <p>A nutrition eggs-pert from Fitness Volt says most people fail to stick with their diet long enough for it to work sustainably. They make fast progress, but egg-ventually, they fall off the wagon and return to their previous diet plan.</p> <p>"That's why so many of us lose weight only to regain it shortly afterwards, and it seems long-term, sustainable weight loss is rare nowadays," Saini said.</p> <p>"Fortunately, healthy eating doesn't have to be complicated or unpleasant, and weight management doesn't have to take over your life.</p> <p>"You don't even have to give up your favourite foods. However, you will need to quit looking for short-term fixes and adopt healthier long-term habits.”</p> <p>It is clear the #eggdiet is not sustainable and the lack of nutrition is likely to leave your brain scrambled.</p> <p>The idea is a bit of a crack-up, but don’t <em>whisk</em> it.</p> <p><em>Image credit: TikTok</em></p>

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“Please don’t be mad”: British expat’s bone to pick with Australia

<p>British expat Jordana Grace has taken to TikTok to share her three biggest gripes with Australia, with the claim that most Australians don’t bat an eyelid at them.</p> <p>Jordana lives on Queensland’s Sunshine Coast after leaving the United Kingdom behind, and boasts a following of almost 300k on her TikTok where she regularly shares insight into her Australian adventure.</p> <p>“Sorry in advance,” the budding MixFM radio host began, “I’m gonna make Australia mad.”</p> <p>“Three things I don’t like about Australia,” she went on, “that Aussies don’t even realise is a thing.”</p> <p>From there, Jordana went on to list the aspects of life in Australia that were causing her the most trouble, though her claim about Aussies may have missed the mark, with Jordana’s gripes known frustrations across the country.</p> <p>“First up is the slow internet speed - like, what the fudge?” She said, “sorry for the salty language, but it’s like nails on a chalkboard how in some areas in Australia the internet and WiFi is just so slow.”</p> <p>In 2023, the UK ranked 45th in the world for average broadband speed with 145.33 Mbps, while Australia came in at 73rd with an average speed of 88.77 Mbps.</p> <p>“Please don’t be mad,” Jordana continued, “but next is the terrible phone service. There’s like three major providers in Australia, and they all have nicknames like Vodafone is Vodafail, Optus is Optus Droptus, and Telstra … no-one can come up with a clever nickname for but it’s just very inconsistent phone service over here."</p> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; vertical-align: baseline; width: 620px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7197724229943446789&amp;display_name=tiktok&amp;url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40thejordanagrace%2Fvideo%2F7197724229943446789&amp;image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-va.tiktokcdn.com%2Ftos-maliva-p-0068%2Fo0hBIk9tbBrEQhCIsd8xABfiuj1zkbogAuDFjA%7Etplv-dmt-logom%3Atos-useast2a-v-0068%2F0f22bd61bc15443ea1f3e5214fcdd9f3.image%3Fx-expires%3D1676361600%26x-signature%3D1ck2cF1fvQNZsDbJz4kKysELBSg%253D&amp;key=59e3ae3acaa649a5a98672932445e203&amp;type=text%2Fhtml&amp;schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p> </p> <p>“And finally, the postage cost and speed," she said. "In the UK I didn’t realise that next day delivery was such a luxury, because over here postage not only can take weeks but the postage cost can cost as much as the item sometimes.”</p> <p>In the United Kingdom, prices to post a parcel begin at £3.95 for 1st class ($6.90). In Australia, 1st class parcel postage begins at $9.70. And as any Australian knows, postage times can span from a couple of days to a couple of weeks in busy periods.</p> <p>“Okay, but that’s it!” Jordana concluded, before pleading for everyone’s understanding, “I love you Australia, please don’t hate me.”</p> <p><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

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