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Embracing the art of beauty without compromise

<p dir="ltr">When it comes to trying out the latest makeup products, people with sensitivities are often left behind. </p> <p dir="ltr">Whether it’s sensitive skin or allergies, makeup users can often find products that work for them and their limitations. </p> <p dir="ltr">But when it comes to having sensitive eyes, there are very few options for those who still want to partake in applying makeup. </p> <p dir="ltr">In answer to this gap in the market, an Australian ophthalmologist has developed a game-changing product that can give everyone the long lashes they deserve, even if they suffer from eye sensitivities. </p> <p dir="ltr">Enter: OKKIYO. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C0xoSFPvHhl/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C0xoSFPvHhl/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Beauty + Makeup for Sensitive Eyes - OKKIYO™️ (@okkiyoeyes)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The OKKIYO Eye-Care collection was crafted with expertise by Dr. Jacqueline Beltz, with each product being the perfect blend of aesthetics and eye health. </p> <p dir="ltr">The range offers meticulously formulated products to beautify sensitive eyes, ensuring you don't just look good but also feel great.</p> <p dir="ltr">From the transformative PRIORITEYES Mascara to the gentle Sensiteyes Cleansing System, every item is a promise of quality, safety, and confidence.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cvd68g8tBWE/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cvd68g8tBWE/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Beauty + Makeup for Sensitive Eyes - OKKIYO™️ (@okkiyoeyes)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The <a href="https://www.okkiyo.com/products/protect-and-preserve-mascara">PRIORITEYES Mascara</a> is crafted with natural ingredients that will protect your eyes, while still doing all the things you want a mascara to do. </p> <p dir="ltr">The mascara is tailored for those with sensitive eyes, ensuring a comfortable, irritation-free experience, making it the perfect blend of medical-grade care and cosmetic elegance.</p> <p dir="ltr">Its clean formula boasts over 90% natural ingredients, including nourishing Australian Manuka honey and rejuvenating citrus extracts, while also promising no smudging, lasting through watery eyes and eye drops, all while being a breeze to remove.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another feature of the OKKIYO mascara is its accessible packaging, as the square tube prevents the product from rolling away and out of sight, with the tube also featuring braille, so those with low vision can identify the product. </p> <p dir="ltr">When it comes to removing eye makeup, cleansing the eyelid margins is one of the most important steps in looking after the delicate eye area, especially if you have sensitive eyes. </p> <p dir="ltr">Thankfully, <a href="https://www.okkiyo.com/products/okkiyo-cleansing-cloth">OKKIYO cleansing cloths</a> effectively remove all traces of eye make-up as well as any dried oil, bacteria and skin cells from the lashes and lids, all while being good for the environment. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C14D7OrvSYd/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C14D7OrvSYd/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Beauty + Makeup for Sensitive Eyes - OKKIYO™️ (@okkiyoeyes)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The reusable muslin cloths cleanse the lid margins allowing the oil glands to function properly, producing tears that naturally desensitise the eyes. </p> <p dir="ltr">OKKIYO is the first Australian beauty brand to cater to the over 2.2 billion people in the world with low vision, and now, after three years in the making, the OKKIYO range is available exclusively at <a href="http://www.okkiyo.com.au/">www.okkiyo.com.au</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">A proportion of profits from each OKKIYO sale will go to supporting Aboriginal Eye Health, improvements for people with low vision and general eye health research.</p> <p dir="ltr">Given the ophthalmologist-created and tested formula, those with eye sensitivities no longer have to choose between protecting their vision and looking fabulous thanks to the revolutionary OKKIYO system. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-5dc0b4d6-7fff-4672-607b-3530170c75c6"></span></p>

Beauty & Style

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Melissa Doyle “bursting with pride” in a heartwarming tribute to her daughter

<p dir="ltr">Former Channel 7 star and TV personality Melissa Doyle has shared a touching tribute to her daughter on social media, confessing her pride in the 19-year-old on their “extra special” visit to Kenya.</p> <p dir="ltr">The pair were in the country with humanitarian aid organisation World Vision - Melissa had been an ambassador of World Vision Goodwill for nearly two decades. And while this was not the former <em>Sunrise</em> host’s first trip, it was her first alongside daughter Talia.</p> <p dir="ltr">Melissa shared a series of pictures of her, Talia, and the people they had met along the way to her Instagram account, writing “this is my beautiful baby girl, all grown up &amp; visiting a school in Kenya. My heart is bursting with pride.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It is such a privilege to see first hand the work @worldvisionaus is doing to give children access to health care &amp; education. To take Talia with me made it extra special.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Just five days prior, Melissa had mentioned the “precious trip” in another post, sharing her gratitude to <em>Women’s Weekly</em> magazine for accompanying them, and how special it was for Talia to “finally [be] able to join me on a field trip and see for herself just how important and special the work is.”</p> <p dir="ltr">In that post, she went on to explain how they had travelled to Kenya to see “farming regeneration projects, a child protection group, a Women’s Savings for Transformation group and to meet our 4 yo [year old] sponsor child Bridget.”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CraLRoWrm-U/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CraLRoWrm-U/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Melissa Doyle (@melissadoyleofficial)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">And on her Talia tribute post, friends and fans shared their pride in both Doyle’s, with many agreeing that it must have been a special time indeed.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Oh wow this is so special,” wrote producer Chezzi Denyer.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Wonderful trip to do together,” actress Danielle Spencer said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Extra special,” singer Tina Arena agreed.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Soo good for children who come from fortunate backgrounds to see the world is not all like their experiences,” one fan confessed. “I hope to show my kids how we need to give back to those less fortunate.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“What a special time for you both,” said another.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Daughter like mother! Proud kind Mama! So happy for you both,” one other supporter declared. “Making our fractured world a better place.”</p> <p dir="ltr">It isn’t the first time that Melissa had spoken out about her pride in her daughter, and in the things she’s on the path to achieve in life.</p> <p dir="ltr">In 2021, she told <em>Women’s Weekly</em> that she believes Talia would do “great things”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m very proud of my young woman of the future,” she said, “and what she will do next. I’m excited for her and for all of us.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I hope that she has just seen that there is now every opportunity available and she makes the most of it, never wastes a moment and will just be the kind, gorgeous woman that she is.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

TV

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Tips for choosing an optometrist

<p>If your vision is starting to get a tad blurry, or you’re in the market for a new pair of glasses, these are the points to consider before choosing an optometrist. Remember that if the optometrist you initially choose doesn’t meet expectations, don’t be afraid to try someone else. Eye health is important, especially as you age, so make the effort to find an optometrist you get along with and trust.</p> <p><strong>1. Experience</strong></p> <p>An optometrist with a long history may be better at diagnosing problems simply because they’ve seen more patients, and consequently more eye conditions. This is not always the case but often it’s best to err on the side of experience.</p> <p><strong>2. Credentials</strong></p> <p>Don’t hesitate to check your optometrist credentials. These days you can find details online like on the optometrist’s website or you can ask the optometrist in question.</p> <p><strong>3. Specialty</strong></p> <p>If you have a particular condition such as glaucoma or macular degeneration, make sure your optometrist has experience treating the eye condition. It’s worth asking if your optometrist specialises with specific diseases or treating age-related conditions.</p> <p><strong>4. Knowledge</strong></p> <p>In your consultation, the optometrist should be offering you detailed information about all aspects of your vision, eye conditions and spectacles. You should leave the exam feeling like you thoroughly understand your eyesight.</p> <p><strong>5. Rapport</strong></p> <p>When you go for your first appointment think carefully about the exam experience. Did you feel comfortable? Did your optometrist take the time to listen to your questions and respond to them in a thorough and clear fashion? All these factors are important as if you don’t like your optometrist you’ll be less likely to go for check-ups.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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This new illusion tricks your mind and your eyes

<p dir="ltr">A new “expanding hole” illusion is strong enough that we’re both physically and mentally fooled, according to new research.</p> <p dir="ltr">The illusion depicts a black hole in the centre of a white background covered in smaller black circles and, if you’re one of the 86 percent of people tricked by it, the black hole will look like it’s expanding.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-35844208-7fff-7feb-1e6f-58b7e7c328f5"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">According to the researchers who studied this illusion, which is completely new to science, those who were fooled by the illusion had a physical reaction, with participants’ pupils dilating as if they were actually moving into a dark area.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/06/fnhum-16-877249-g001.jpg" alt="" width="1950" height="1221" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Does it look like the black hole is growing? You’re not alone in thinking that, according to this new study. Image: Supplied</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Dr Bruno Laeng, a psychology professor at the University of Oslo and the study’s first author, said the illusion showed that our pupils react to light we perceive, “even if this ‘light’ is imaginary”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The ‘expanding hole’ is a highly dynamic illusion: the circular smear or shadow gradient of the central black hole evokes a marked impression of optic flow, as if the observer were heading forward into a hole or tunnel,” he <a href="https://www.scimex.org/newsfeed/can-you-see-the-expanding-hole-most-peoples-brains-are-fooled-by-this-new-optical-illusion" target="_blank" rel="noopener">explained</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Here we show based on the new ‘expanding hole’ illusion that the pupil reacts to how we perceive light - even if this ‘light’ is imaginary like in the illusion - and not just the amount of light energy that actually enters the eye.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The illusion of the expanding hole prompts a corresponding dilation of the pupil, as it would happen if darkness really increased.”</p> <p dir="ltr">After having tested the illusion using holes of varying colours - including blue, cyan, green, magenta, red, yellow and white - the team found the illusion was most effective when it was black.</p> <p dir="ltr">They also discovered that a black hole would cause the pupil to dilate, while coloured holes would result in the eye constricting.</p> <p dir="ltr">The study, published in the journal <em><a href="https://doi.org/10.3389/fnhum.2022.877249" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Frontiers in Human Neuroscience</a></em>, shows that these kinds of illusions are more than just gimmicks, with researchers in the field of psychosociology studying them to better understand how the complex system that allows us to see and make sense of the world around us works.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-5dc1df7e-7fff-afc7-25e8-cbff597458d3"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Supplied</em></p>

Mind

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Uber driver slammed for refusing guide dog

<p>An Uber driver in South Australia is being slammed for refusing to let a vision impaired woman bring her guide dog in the car.</p> <p>Born with low vision, Ellen Fraser-Barbour relies on her guide dog Inca for safety and sight.</p> <p>But on Wednesday when she was trying to catch an Uber home, Ms Fraser-Barbour says she was told Inca was an unwelcome passenger.</p> <p>She was able to capture footage of the exchange between herself and the Uber driver.</p> <p>"This is an assistance dog, a guide dog," Ms Fraser-Barbour can be heard telling the driver.</p> <p>"No. No. No. I can't do it. Sorry," he replied.</p> <p>"It's an assistance dog, you can't refuse by law," Ms Fraser-Barbour added.</p> <p>But the driver still refused, claiming he was not obliged to accept the ride, leaving Ms Fraser-Barbour on the curb.</p> <p>She says the experience is one that is common for people with a disability.</p> <p>"I have a lot of blind friends and they all tell me about distressing experiences that they've had of being left on the curb. It's a really rampant issue," Ms Fraser-Barbour said.</p> <p>Since the incident she has made a report to Uber and received an apology. Ms Fraser-Barbour says it should never have happened in the first place and is now calling for stricter penalties.</p> <p>"For example being able to fine drivers if they refuse," Ms Fraser-Barbour said.</p> <p>In a statement Uber said a first offence will see a driver's account temporarily deactivated while they receive further education.</p> <p>A second strike could see them permanently banned from the platform.</p> <p>"Taking someone off the platform temporarily doesn't say zero tolerance approach. That says we'll give you another chance," Ms Fraser-Barbour said.</p> <p><em>Image: Nine News</em></p>

Family & Pets

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How much colour do we really see?

<div> <div class="copy"> <p>Colour awareness has long been a puzzle for researchers in neuroscience and psychology, who debate how much colour observers really perceive.</p> <p>A new US study probably raises more questions than it answers.</p> <p>In a series of trials, researchers from Amherst College, MIT and Dartmouth College found that observers routinely failed to notice when colour vanished from the majority of their view. They had surprisingly limited colour perception in their peripheral vision.</p> <p>Counter-intuitive as it may sound, the study used virtual reality to ensure the participants had a 360-degree, real-world view of the world.</p> <p>Each wore a head-mounted display fitted with eye-trackers, allowing them to tour historic sites and watch a street dance performance or a symphony orchestra rehearsal simply by turning their heads.</p> <p>The researchers knew exactly where an observer was looking at all times and could make changes so that only the areas where the person was looking were in colour. Other areas were desaturated, right down to black and white.</p> <p>But most people didn’t notice. In the most extreme case, almost a third didn’t realise that less than 5% percent of the entire visual field was presented in colour.</p> <p>While a human’s visual field extends about 210 degrees, which is similar to if your arms are stretched out on your left and right, the study’s results showed that most people’s colour awareness is limited to a small area around the dead centre of their visual field.</p> <p>In a separate study participants were asked to identify when colour was desaturated in the periphery – and the results were similar. Many people failed to notice when the peripheral colour had been removed.</p> <p>“We were amazed by how oblivious participants were when colour was removed from up to 95% of their visual world,” says Dartmouth’s Caroline Robertson, senior author of a <a href="https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/06/02/1922294117" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">paper</a> in the journal <em>Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences</em>.</p> <p>The obvious question is how this can be. The researchers say they cannot offer a definitive answer but do suggest possibilities worth exploring.</p> <p>“One possibility is that as observers spend time in an environment, their brains are able to eventually ‘fill-in’ the colour of many items in the periphery,” they write.</p> <p>“Of course, providing direct evidence for this explanation is challenging since it is extremely difficult to differentiate between scenarios where a subject knows the colour of an object (i.e., ‘I know the tree behind me is green even though I currently cannot see the color green’) from instances where the subject is experiencing the colour of that object online (i.e., ‘I can see the colour green at this very moment’).</p> <p>“Alternatively, some would argue that there is no need for a filling-in mechanism at all and the intuition of a rich perceptual experience is simply misguided.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em><!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=101757&amp;title=How+much+colour+do+we+really+see%3F" width="1" height="1" data-spai-target="src" data-spai-orig="" data-spai-exclude="nocdn" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></em></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/how-much-colour-do-we-really-see/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">cosmosmagazine.com</a>.</em></p> </div> </div>

Art

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Why we lose our hearing and vision as we age

<p>As the baby boomer generation begins to age, the prevalence of both eye and ear disease will rise exponentially, as there is a strong correlation between vision loss, hearing loss and ageing.</p> <p>The <a href="http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs282/en/">World Health Organisation estimates</a> that 285 million people worldwide are visually impaired, with 82% of people with blindness aged 50 and above. Australia alone will have 800,000 people aged 40 or over with low vision or hearing loss by 2020.</p> <p>As people age, they often experience a number of changes in their physical, mental and social health. Among these are eye and ear changes, and diseases that usually result in vision and hearing loss. Changes to our eyes and ears occur as a result of disease, genetic factors, “wear and tear” and environmental factors.</p> <p><strong>What happens in our eyes as we age?</strong></p> <p>There are a range of changes in our eyes that occur as a result of age. For example, over time the whites of the eyes, or “sclera”, undergo changes due to exposure to ultraviolet light.</p> <p>These changes include a yellowing or browning of the white of the eye due to fatty or cholesterol deposits in the conjunctiva – the mucous membrane that covers the eye – also related to ageing and exposure to ultraviolet light.</p> <p>Over time, changes also occur in the conjunctiva, such as a thinning of the membrane. This often results in dry eye, a condition caused mainly by reduced production of tears and reduced mucous from the conjunctiva.</p> <p>As we age, we often experience a decrease in the strength of our muscles. This is no different in the eye, and the muscles in our eyelids can become weaker over time. Reduced tone in the muscle that gives shape to our lens, as well as stiffening of the natural lens with age, causes presbyopia (inability to see near objects), necessitating the use of reading glasses.</p> <p>Eye disorders that commonly occur in older adults include:</p> <ul> <li> <p><strong>macular degeneration</strong>. This terms describes <a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-what-is-age-related-macular-degeneration-59889">damage to the pigmented oval</a> in the centre of the retina resulting in decreased central vision and seeing fine detail. This happens as we age because of deposits of fine grains that build up in the retina.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Cataracts</strong>. This is a <a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-what-are-cataracts-63699">clouding of the lens</a> that covers the eye. These are thought to be caused by breakdown and degradation of lens proteins, and are considered a part of the normal ageing of the lens.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Diabetic retinopathy</strong>. This is damage to the retina resulting from diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is age related and the duration and control of blood glucose levels often determine whether or not diabetic retinopathy does or does not develop.</p> </li> <li> <p><strong>Glaucoma</strong>. When <a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-what-is-glaucoma-the-sneak-thief-of-sight-64807">glaucoma</a> occurs, the optic nerve is progressively damaged resulting in loss of the peripheral visual field.</p> </li> </ul> <p>Among older Australians, cataract is the most common eye disease and cause of visual impairment (over <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/internet/main/publishing.nsf/Content/D1A5409787D800F2CA257C73007F12F3/%24File/eyehlth.pdf">70% of people in Australia</a> aged 80 years and over have cataracts), followed by age-related macular degeneration (occurring in <a href="http://www.aihw.gov.au/media-release-detail/?id=6442464587">3.1% of older people</a>).</p> <p><strong>What happens in our ears as we age?</strong></p> <p>As we get older, we experience changes all over our body, including the ears. Commonly, people’s ears (outer ears, that is) become bigger, earwax accumulates more easily and there is more cartilage in the external ear canal.</p> <p>There is also often a stiffening of the eardrum and <a href="https://www.nursingtimes.net/roles/older-people-nurses/exploring-the-anatomy-and-physiology-of-ageing-part-6-the-eye-and-ear/1840889.article">changes to the neural</a> (nerve) system.</p> <p>These changes contribute to older people suffering from hearing loss and central <a href="https://theconversation.com/is-your-child-having-trouble-learning-they-may-have-auditory-processing-disorder-62491">auditory processing disorders</a>, in which the ear cannot properly process sounds.</p> <p><strong>How these changes affect daily life</strong></p> <p>As a result of these numerous eye and ear changes and diseases, older people typically have vision and hearing problems that include sensitivity to light and difficulty visualising distant objects or reading print.</p> <p>Hearing problems include difficulty with perceiving and discriminating sounds (including speech), understanding speech (particularly in poor listening situations such as when there is high background noise or echo), and processing auditory information.</p> <p>These difficulties interfere with older adults’ everyday functioning and participation in activities. People with sensory loss may have difficulty performing independent activities of daily living such as bathing and shopping. This means they’re more at risk of problems with <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1448344/">mental health and social interaction</a>.</p> <p>One of the most disabling effects of vision and hearing loss is decreased ability to communicate with others. People with severe vision loss (low vision or legal blindness) have difficulty lip reading or perceiving non-verbal cues (such as facial expression or gestures).</p> <p>Those with hearing loss have communication difficulties including difficulty perceiving sounds or following a conversation. For people with loss of both senses, communication difficulties are much worse. They can’t adequately receive a verbal message and <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4030176/">frequently misunderstand conversation</a>.</p> <p><strong>Management of sensory loss</strong></p> <p>Management of sensory loss requires assessment by professionals (such as optometrists and audiologists) who will recommend the appropriate management plan that may include the use of a visual or hearing device.</p> <p>Speech pathologists also play a role, with programs including speech perception training or communication programs for clients and carers.</p> <p>Early identification and intervention can help those with vision and hearing loss so the effects of these sensory losses can be minimised, improving their quality of life.</p> <p><em>Acknowledgement: Dr Julian Sack (Ophthalmologist) for his input. </em><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/chyrisse-heine-313009">Chyrisse Heine</a>, Speech Pathologist/Audiologist Senior Lecturer, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/la-trobe-university-842">La Trobe University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-we-lose-our-hearing-and-vision-as-we-age-67930">original article</a>.</em></p>

Body

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Vision in red! Princess Mary is all class and grace at special celebration

<p>One of Australia’s favourite royal members, the Crown Princess of Denmark, was a vision in red as she attended a special celebration on Saturday, which honoured 800 years of the Danish flag.</p> <p>The proceedings were attended by many of the Danish royal members who all looked resplendent and graceful, however Princess Mary stole the show with her classy look.</p> <p>For the event, the 47-year-old went with a splash of colour, wearing a deep burgundy dress with a pair of matching stiletto heels.</p> <p>Red seemed to be the colour of the day, with Queen Margrethe looking beautiful and elegant in a bold red jacket and matching hat.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Byvt3mLn_xo/" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Byvt3mLn_xo/" target="_blank">A post shared by World Royal News (@worldroyalnews)</a> on Jun 15, 2019 at 2:31pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Princess Mary added a beige floral hat to sit atop a chic side bun and an extra touch of glamour with diamond earrings and a matching beige clutch.</p> <p>The Tasmanian-born royal member attended the celebration alongside her husband Prince Frederik in Vordingborg, Denmark. However, multiple locations paid tribute to the special moment, including Copenhagen and Estonia.  </p> <p>The myth says Denmark’s flag fell from the sky during the battle between Danish king Valdemar and the local chieftains in Estonia in the year 1219.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see Princess Mary’s gorgeous celebration outfit.</p> <p> </p>

Beauty & Style

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5 age-related vision problems older drivers need to be aware of

<p><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="https://plus.google.com/115326292314291480106" target="_blank">Aaron Barriga</a></span> is the online marketing manager for Insight Vision Center, an <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.insightvisioncenter.com/" target="_blank">Ophthalmology Center in California</a></span>. With a knack for understanding medical procedures, and an interest in eye and vision health, Aaron loves to share what he knows and what he learns.</strong></em></p> <p>Are you concerned about your safety when behind the wheel?</p> <p>What is the most important sense that you need to drive? Well, you guessed it right, the <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.driversalert.com/your-vision-and-its-impact-on-driving-safety/" target="_blank">impact of vision on driving</a></strong></span> is second to none. But unfortunately, your vision can deteriorate as you get older which makes it more difficult for you to see movements, people and oncoming traffic.</p> <p>Ageing affects your driving skills and your body’s reaction time so don’t put yourself as well as others at risk if you feel this way. Have a word about your eligibility to drive with your ophthalmologist.</p> <p>Here are some age-related eye and vision problems that you may face:</p> <p><strong>1. Age-related macular degeneration</strong></p> <p>This is an eye disease that harms the macula which is the center of the light sensitive retina in your eye and leads to loss of central vision. Your macula is the part of our eye that allows us to see in color and in detail. Everyday tasks like driving require the use of good central vision which is provided by the macula. Macular degeneration can reduce your central vision but doesn’t affect your side or peripheral vision.</p> <p><strong> 2. Diabetic retinopathy</strong></p> <p>This condition usually occurs with people who suffer from diabetes. This is a result of the progressive damage to the small blood vessels that sustain your retina. These damaged blood vessels then seep blood and other fluids that make the retinal tissue swell and cloud your vision. The longer the person has had diabetes, the higher the risk of developing diabetic retinopathy which can lead to blindness according to its severity.</p> <p><strong>3. Dry eye</strong></p> <p>This is a physical condition that prevents a person from releasing too little or bad quality tears. Tears help in maintaining the health of the front surface of your eyes and provides clear vision. Dry eye is a common and often chronic problem which usually occurs in older adults.</p> <p><strong>4. Cataracts</strong></p> <p>Cataracts are cloudy and opaque areas that occur in the usually clear lens of your eyes and cause blurry vision. This can be very inconvenient as it leads to decreased contrast sensitivity, increased sensitivity to glares which can make reading road signs a bit difficult. <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.insightvisioncenter.com/service/cataract/" target="_blank">Cataract eye surgery</a></strong></span> is the only way to get rid of cataracts.</p> <p><strong> 5. Glaucoma</strong></p> <p>This is a group of eye diseases which are usually defined by the damage to the optic nerve which leads to a loss of vision. People who have a family history of glaucoma, older adults and African Americans stand a higher chance of developing Glaucoma. Glaucoma is usually painless but you can lose your peripheral side vision over time.</p> <p>Here are some safety tips to consider:</p> <p><strong>1. Have an annual eye test</strong></p> <p>The American Optometric Association recommends getting an annual eye test if you are above 60. By having regular eye tests done, your ophthalmologist can ensure that your eyes don’t suffer from any serious eye-related changes like macular degeneration.</p> <p><strong>2. Get rid of the reflections in your eyeglasses lens</strong></p> <p>Reflections in your eyeglass lenses can cause glares and hamper your vision, especially when driving at night. You can opt to avoid the hassles of wearing glasses altogether by investing in eye surgery but make sure to speak to your ophthalmologist before you do so.</p> <p><strong>3. Drive defensively</strong></p> <p>A study conducted by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, about 40% of the fatal collisions of people that are 70 and above tend to happen at intersections which involve other vehicles. The common reason for these accidents was the failure to give way, particularly when taking a left turn.</p> <p><strong> 4. Avoid driving on unfamiliar routes</strong></p> <p>Research by the National Safety Council discovered that the traffic death rates are a lot higher at night as compared to daytime. A lot of ageing Baby Boomers are still driving, exposing them to the danger of getting into accidents which only increases as they age. Avoid driving in areas that you are unfamiliar with, especially if they have poor lighting, irregular twists and lack of signs.</p> <p>Are you worried about not being able to get around like you used to? You as responsible drivers and citizens need to work proactively towards ensuring your own safety as well as that of others by recognizing a drop in your ability to drive safely and seek the advice of your ophthalmologist.</p>

Body

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Cruise horror: teenager loses sight in one eye

<p>When 15-year-old Riley Adams boarded a cruise to New Zealand with his family and a group of friends on January 12, it was supposed to be a fun holiday before school started back.</p> <p>However, the trip turned to horror when, on the first night of the 10-day cruise, the young Queenslander was stuck with a headache. The next morning, his life had changed forever.</p> <p>“What was just a headache when he went to bed that night and then awoke Saturday morning to a golf ball size bulge from his left eye, was confronting to us all,” Riley’s parents, Jason and Jodi Adams, wrote on a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/riley-adams-loss-of-sight-in-1-eye" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">GoFundMe page</span></strong></a> to raise money towards their son’s medical costs, which has so far raised over $17,000.</p> <p><img width="600" height="400" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7267316/27024144_15161629070299_funddescription.jpg" alt="27024144_1516162907.0299_funddescription" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;"/></p> <p>“After being seen by the on-ship doctors and still being out at sea for another 24 hours, panic did start to creep in.</p> <p>“Once arriving at Dunedin Hospital and having a CT scan done our nightmare began.”</p> <p>A specialist told the family Riley would need immediate surgery to reduce the swelling around his eye. They were told he had contracted sinusitis, which had blocked the drainage holes, leading to a massive inflammation in the eye known as orbital cellulitis. As a result, he lost his sight in that eye.</p> <p>“Devastatingly the outcome we all had to face was that Riley’s optical nerve has been damaged in the time the infection took hold, and now our beautiful, charismatic, outgoing 15-year-old son has lost his sight in his left eye. It's a lot for a family in a foreign country to take in.”</p> <p>Even after the operation, Riley’s eye was still infected, and he was given strong doses of antibiotics and steroids to prevent him contracting meningitis.</p> <p>“Our lives feel like they are just spinning around as we try to take it all in ... As parents we are just so sad for our beautiful boy at 15 to have lost his sight in one of his eyes – this tragedy is devastating at any age but at 15 it breaks our hearts.”</p> <p>In an update published eight hours ago, however, the family finally received some good news – Riley can finally go home after nine days of horror.</p> <p>“As happy as we all are about this, I think we are all a bit apprehensive about leaving our safety net in this Hospital, where we have received the best care imaginable,” Jason and Jodi wrote. “But the three of us embrace it with open arms and realise what is waiting at home for Riley.</p> <p>“From the bottom of our hearts thank you for every donation made and every comment posted. Positivity is definitely the best medicine one can have.”</p>

Travel Trouble

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Caring for someone who is vision impaired

<p><em><strong>Marissa Sandler is the CEO and co-founder of <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.careseekers.com.au/" target="_blank">Careseekers</a></span>. Previously a social justice lawyer and researcher for over 15 years, Marissa is passionate about helping people live with dignity and finding innovative solutions to problems.</strong></em></p> <p>There are over 575,000 people who are blind or vision impaired currently living in Australia, with more than 70 per cent over the age of 65 and over 66,000 people who are blind.</p> <p>With stats like this it is highly possible that you may find yourself caring for a loved one whose vision starts to decrease and may unfortunately become legally blind. Here is some information that you will help you care for a person with vision loss from the beginning stages of their diagnosis.</p> <p><strong>Look for the symptoms of deteriorating eyesight</strong></p> <p>It is quite common that a person will hide their poor eyesight from loved ones, they may be embarrassed, in denial or are scared of losing their independence.</p> <p>Look out for physical symptoms including:</p> <ul> <li>Constant red eyes</li> <li>Pain in the eyes</li> <li>Blurring vision</li> <li>Sudden temporary loss of vision</li> <li>Floaters</li> </ul> <p><strong>Other symptoms could be a sign of vision problems including</strong></p> <ul> <li>Depression and anxiety</li> <li>Not wanting to go out, especially at night</li> <li>Nervous behavior in public or crowded places</li> </ul> <p><strong>Start with a conversation about sight</strong></p> <p>As soon as you think a loved one is having problems seeing it is very important that you start to talk about it.  You need to have conversations about their sight often as it will be constantly changing. Make sure you are aware of what they can and cannot see. Check in with them every few months to see what has changed.</p> <p><strong>Make the living environment as safe as possible</strong></p> <p>Use the <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://careseekers.respond.ontraport.net/safetychecklist" target="_blank">Careseekers Home Safety Checklist</a></strong></span> and do an audit on each room in the house. Specific things you should do in a home for someone with poor eyesight include:</p> <ul> <li>Making sure the home is free of clutter and unnecessary items, especially in thoroughfares.</li> <li>Make sure lighting is good throughout the house, especially on staircases.</li> <li>Light switches are at the top and bottom of the staircases.</li> <li>There are night lights, as well as easy to reach bedside lights in bedrooms.</li> <li>Arrangement of furniture and large items is consistent throughout the home, so that the layout is always familiar. The same for regularly used items in every room in the home.</li> </ul> <p><strong>A few more helpful tips</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.visionaustralia.org/" target="_blank">Vision Australia</a></strong></span> is the go to organization for information for anyone suffering vision loss. Here are some general tips from them for day to day interactions with people with vision loss.</p> <ul> <li>Address people who are blind or have low vision by their names so they know you are speaking to them. </li> <li>When entering a room let the person who is blind or have low vision know that you have arrived. </li> <li>Do not walk away from a person who is blind or have low vision without indicating that you are doing so - it is embarrassing and frustrating to talk to thin air. </li> <li>In dangerous situations say "STOP" rather than "LOOK OUT"</li> <li>Do not fill glasses or cups to the brim. </li> <li>When directing people use ordinary language and when describing be specific. Do not point, or say "over there". Direct people who are blind or have low vision to their left and right, not yours. </li> <li>When talking, don’t be embarrassed to use the words "look" and "see"; they are part of everyone's vocabulary.</li> <li>Describe the surroundings and obstacles in a person's pathway (remember to look up as well as down). Warn of the presence of over-hangs, such as kitchen cupboards, jutting side mirrors of cars, or trees. </li> <li>When seating people who are blind or have low vision, put their hands on the back of the chair and they will then be able to seat themselves.</li> </ul>

Caring

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The beautiful moment a blind man sees his wife for first time

<p>A radical eye surgery that has never been performed in the southern hemisphere has successfully restored the sight of a blind man.</p> <p>The beautiful moment the NSW man saw his wife for the first time in years was captured on camera.</p> <p>NSW man John Ings was left virtually blind by a childhood eye injury and a series of illnesses. He was entirely blind in his right eye and the vision in his left eye was “frosted”. He was only able to see blurry outlines.</p> <p>Gold Coast oral and maxillofacial surgeon Shannon Webber and Sydney ophthalmologist Greg Moloney performed the osteo-odonto keratoprosthesis procedure at the Sydney Eye Hospital.</p> <p>The operation has never been done in Australia and the risk meant John could have completely lost all his sight in his left eye.</p> <p>Channel Nine’s 60 Minutes caught the moment when John finally saw his wife again for the first time.</p> <p>"Getting good eyesight back was worth the risk of losing the little bit I had," John said.</p> <p>"You take your sight for granted.</p> <p>"You've got to lose it to really appreciate it."</p> <p>Dr Moloney and Dr Webber admitted they also got caught up in the emotional moment.</p> <p>"It's probably the first time I've shed a tear in my medical career," Dr Webber said.</p> <p>"The moment John saw his wife was very satisfying, very gratifying.</p> <p>"We were very relieved."</p> <p>Video credit: 60 Minutes Australia Twitter</p> <p> </p>

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How to manage poor vision while on holidays

<p>Poor vision can have a huge impact on our day to day lives, but it doesn’t mean your next holiday should remain a pipedream. With planning, preparation and patience, it’s still possible to enjoy travel. Here are four tips for managing poor vision on holidays.</p> <p><strong>1. Don’t be afraid to ask for assistance </strong></p> <p>Whether you’re talking about hotel staff or airline crew, travel employees at various points of your trip will be able to provide assistance and help make life easier for you. Don’t be afraid to ask for help – it really is part of their job and they’ll be more than accommodating. Many activity companies also have measures in place to accommodate the visually impaired.</p> <p><strong>2. Make sure you’re packed and prepared</strong></p> <p>Write a list before you go of everything you need to manage your vision problems (such as contact lenses, cleaning solutions and medication) and make sure you pack two of every item. It’s generally a good idea to keep these in separate bags in case one goes missing.</p> <p><strong>3. Leave plenty of time to make your connections</strong></p> <p>Rushing through a crowded train station can be testing at the best of time, let alone when you’re managing vision problems. If possible, try to make your movements outside peak transit hours and make sure you’ve left plenty of time to make all your connections.</p> <p><strong>4. Don’t be afraid to be ambitious</strong></p> <p>While many people would think that vision problems could seriously impact the amount of activities you could take, don’t be afraid to be ambitious in your trip planning. Many travel companies offer ways the visually impaired can enjoy their popular attractions. </p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><a href="/travel/travel-tips/2016/08/the-thing-you-must-check-when-using-a-hotel-safe/" target="_blank"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>The one thing you must check when using a hotel safe</strong></em></span></a></p> <p><a href="/travel/travel-tips/2016/08/surprising-thing-to-kick-you-off-a-flight/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>The surprising thing that could get you kicked off a flight</strong></em></span></a></p> <p><a href="/travel/travel-tips/2016/08/healthy-snacks-you-can-actually-take-on-a-plane/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>6 healthy snacks you can actually take on a plane</strong></em></span></a></p>

Travel Tips

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Grandmother sees grandchildren for the first time in 10 years

<p>After being nearly blind for ten years, 72-year-old Solidea Hurst from Wales has finally regained her sight thanks to a breakthrough eye operation.</p> <p>Hurst began losing her sight at the age of 60, when she suddenly developed age-related macular degeneration. It was so bad, she couldn’t even make out the faces of her four grandchildren. “My left eye had completely gone, I had no sight,” she told <a href="http://www.walesonline.co.uk/news/wales-news/eye-operation-allows-woman-see-11663027" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Wales Online</span></strong></a>. “It had been good enough to drive with, but I was worried about having an accident, so sent my licence back […] I’d never forgive myself if I killed someone.”</p> <p>The grandmother had tried laser eye surgery to no avail and suffered severe headaches, finally being told there was nothing that could be done to save her vision. That is, until a breakthrough, world-first operation became available in London, which could implant an EyeMax Mono lens, which acts by sending a “widescreen” image behind the eye, compensating for the loss in sight.</p> <p>“Ten years ago I couldn’t see my grandchildren’s faces, now I can,” the thrilled grandmother says. “They’ve grown into beautiful children and it’s so nice to see that happen. I’m very excited by it all.”</p> <p>These days, Hurst is almost fully recovered and hopes to regain her drivers’ license – and her independence. “My granddaughter used to take me shopping and was always telling me to ‘watch my step’, worried I’d fall,” she explains. “Now we can go shopping together and enjoy some retail therapy.”</p> <p>What a wonderful story. Have you had vision-saving eye surgery before? Tell us about how it changed your life in the comments below.</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><a href="/health/hearing/2016/07/successful-people-living-with-hearing-loss/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>7 successful people living with hearing loss</strong></em></span></a></p> <p><a href="/news/news/2016/06/5-year-old-girl-walks-blind-father-to-work-every-day/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>5-year-old girl walks blind father to work every day</strong></em></span></a></p> <p><a href="/entertainment/technology/2016/06/facebook-will-help-describe-photos-for-the-blind/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong>Facebook will help describe photos for the blind</strong></em></span></a></p>

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Why squinting helps you see better

<p>If you ever had trouble with your eyesight you might have found yourself squinting in order to see something more clearly. Why do we do this though? And why does squinting work?</p> <p>The short answer: squinting changes the shape of your eye, allowing light to be focused better, and thus helping things appear more clearly.</p> <p>The long answer? We’ll let the expert Craig Benzine from Mental Floss explain the details of how the eyes changes shape above. It really is quite incredible when you think about it!</p> <p>Interestingly, Benzine debunks the popular belief that squinting damages vision.</p> <p>“It might give you a headache, but that’s because of the muscle contraction in your face,” he explains.</p> <p>Do you find squinting helps you see better? Share your experience with us in the comments below. </p> <p><strong>Related links: </strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/health/caring/2016/06/only-half-of-heart-attack-survivors-can-return-to-normal-life/"><em>Only half of heart attack survivors can return to a normal life</em></a></strong></span></p> <p align="left"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/news/news/2016/06/what-happens-when-you-ditch-carbs/"><em>What really happens to your body when you give up bread</em></a></strong></span></p> <p align="left"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="/health/body/2016/05/foods-to-eat-to-beat-bloating/"><em>10 foods to eat to beat bloating</em></a></strong></span></p>

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Facebook will help describe photos for the blind

<p>Facebook is training its computers to become seeing-eye guides for the blind and visually impaired.</p> <p>The feature, rolling out this week on Facebook's iPhone app, interprets what's in a picture using a form of artificial intelligence that recognises faces and objects. The iPhone's built-in screen reader, VoiceOver, must be turned on for Facebook's photo descriptions to be read. For now, the feature will only be available in English.</p> <p>The descriptions initially will be confined to a vocabulary of 100 words in a restriction that will prevent the computer from providing a lot of details. For instance, the automated voice may only tell a user that a photo features three people smiling outdoors without adding that the trio also has drinks in their hands. Or it may say the photo is of pizza without adding that there's pepperoni and olives on top of it.</p> <p>Facebook is being careful with the technology, called "automatic alternative text", in an attempt to avoid making a mistake that offends its audience. Google learned the risks of technology last year when an image recognition feature in its Photos app labelled a black couple as gorillas, prompting the company to issue an apology.</p> <p>Eventually, though, Facebook hopes to refine the technology so it provides more precise descriptions and even answers questions that a user might pose about a picture.</p> <p>Facebook also plans to turn on the technology for its Android app and make it available through web browsers visiting its site.</p> <p>The Menlo Park, California, company is trying to ensure the world's nearly 300 million blind and visually impaired people remain interested in its social network as a steadily increasing number of photos appear on its service. On an average day, Facebook says more than 2 billion photos are posted on its social network and other apps that it owns, a list that includes Messenger, Instagram and WhatsApp.</p> <p>Until now, people relying on screen readers on Facebook would only hear that a person had shared a photo without any elaboration.</p> <p>The vocabulary of Facebook's photo-recognition program includes "car", "sky", "dessert", "baby", "shoes", and, of course, "selfie".</p> <p>Tell us: What other changes do you think Facebook should implement to help make it easier for people with disabilities?</p> <p><em>Written by Michael Liedtke. First appeared on <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz/" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz</span></strong></a>.</em></p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><a href="/entertainment/technology/2016/05/tips-to-prolong-your-smartphones-battery-life/"><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Tips to prolong your smartphone's battery life</span></em></strong></a></p> <p><a href="/entertainment/technology/2016/05/how-to-avoid-facebook-scams/"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">How to avoid Facebook scams</span></strong></em></a></p> <p><a href="/entertainment/technology/2016/03/how-to-make-your-wifi-faster/"><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">4 ways to make your wifi faster</span></strong></em></a></p>

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