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It may be macabre, but dark tourism helps us learn from the worst of human history

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/dr-neil-robinson-1312179">Dr Neil Robinson</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-salford-878">University of Salford</a></em></p> <p>Dark tourism has become a much more well-covered pasttime in recent years, in which a macabre fascination lead tourists to travel to various places not served by Thomas Cook: the sites of battles and genocides, war cemeteries, prisons, and even <a href="http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2014/07/the-rise-of-dark-tourism/374432/">current warzones such as Syria</a>.</p> <p>The 20th century alone has provided such a <a href="http://www.therichest.com/expensive-lifestyle/location/10-great-places-to-visit-for-dark-tourism/">long list of places</a> at which catastrophes or great loss of life and suffering has occurred. Sites visited range from the spot from which JFK was assassinated, to prisons such as Alcatraz in San Francisco, through to battlefields of the World Wars, or the vestiges of genocides such at Auschwitz in Poland or Tuol Sleng in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. It’s not everybody’s cup of tea, but we shouldn’t condemn those for whom this is an interest.</p> <p>Dark tourism appears to be a manifestation of our media-rich society through which information found online may persuade us to see historical sites in person. But its origins can be traced back much further than the fascination with death and disasters of the 19th and 20th century. In the 11th century, people and pilgrims often visited places with religious significance such as Jerusalem, where the location of Christ’s crucifixion is a popular attraction; tourists visited Gettysburg, the site of the bloodiest battle of the American Civil War in 1863; and in more recent centuries, the Grand Tour offered an opportunity for the wealthy to experience Europe, with sites such as the classical ruins of the Colosseum in Rome – which in the name of entertainment saw execution, torture and death – one of the must-see attractions.</p> <p>Today, in parallel with the growth in popularity of dark tourism is the enormous growth of social media and the 24-hour news economy. The ease of access to such blanket coverage through the web, Facebook and Twitter has increased people’s awareness of, and fascination for, these historical sites of war, conflict and catastrophe. For example, the last decade has brought a surge in visitor numbers to <a href="https://theconversation.com/from-fiction-to-gallows-humour-how-chernobyl-survivors-are-still-coping-with-trauma-57923">Chernobyl</a>, where guides take visitors around the abandoned city of Pripyat (radiation levels permitting) which has been deserted since the nuclear power plant explosion on April 26, 1986. The 30th anniversary this year has in itself <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-3526271/Chernobyl-tourists-pose-photos-eerie-sites.html">added to interest in visiting</a> the overgrown and crumbling city.</p> <p>As with tourism of any kind, this greater footfall brings benefits. In this case, not just the economic boost but also as a tool of education and even conflict resolution. For example, the <a href="http://www.belfasttours.com/package/belfast-political-mural-tour">taxi tours of Belfast’s murals</a>, which document Northern Ireland’s Troubles, offer visitors a way to understand the history and provide the communities involved a means to reflect and move on from the conflict. This model is <a href="http://www.h-net.org/reviews/showpdf.php?id=25852">viewed with interest</a> and hope by moderates on both sides of the Arab-Israeli divide searching for a peaceful solution for the long term.</p> <p>The tours of <a href="http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/916">Robin Island prison</a> in South Africa, where Nelson Mandela spent 18 years incarcerated among many others, starkly present how those imprisoned by a corrupt and discriminatory political regime can later engage in peace and reconciliation. The <a href="http://www.bruisedpassports.com/africa/5-reasons-you-must-go-for-a-township-tour-in-south-africa">Soweto township tours</a> in Johannesburg have acted in part as a means through which generations of South Africans can better understand their country’s dark past and help to establish truth and reconciliation for the future.</p> <p>Dark tourism should not in my opinion by viewed as unethical, repugnant or even a self-indulgent activity. Certainly some dark tourists may engage in their pursuits for all the wrong reasons, seeing death and destruction as a commodity to be consumed with little thought for those who caught up in its wake. But others visit such sites to pay their respects, to better understand the magnitude of death and destruction, and to inform the outside world of the details of terrible events – even in some case offering to help. These are positive effects that may come from so much pain and suffering.</p> <p>We should strive to better understand the origins of the terrible events of human history to be more able to prevent us repeating them. In this regard, that more people visit sites associated with dark tourism and learn about them should be seen as a positive.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/60966/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/dr-neil-robinson-1312179">Dr Neil Robinson</a>, Lecturer in Business, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-salford-878">University of Salford</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/it-may-be-macabre-but-dark-tourism-helps-us-learn-from-the-worst-of-human-history-60966">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Travel Trouble

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"Worst nightmare”: Great-grandma confronts violent home intruder

<p>A distraught great-grandmother has recounted the "nightmare" she endured when her home was targeted during a violent home invasion. </p> <p>Stella, 85, was woken up at midnight on Wednesday by a light shining from the kitchen of the Perth home where she has lived with her husband for close to 30 years.</p> <p>She got out of bed to inspect the noise and was met face-to-face with an intruder. </p> <p>Stella said she threw a radio at the stranger to defend herself and called out to her husband, who had not heard the commotion because his hearing aids were not in and he was sleeping in another room.</p> <p>“I got the long handle brush and ... I pushed it into him and that’s when he must’ve thought I better get out of here,” Stella told <em><a href="https://7news.com.au/news/shaken-grandmother-relives-nightmare-alleged-mandurah-home-invasion-c-15243511" target="_blank" rel="noopener">7News</a></em>. </p> <p>During the terrifying ordeal, Stella was both threatened and punched in the face, and is now nursing a cut, bruising and swelling.</p> <p>The great-grandmother said she was still shaken over her “worst nightmare”, saying, “We’ve been here since 1995. This is the first thing that has ever happened.”</p> <p>The canine squad was called in and arrested an 18-year-old male who was found under a car in a neighbour’s front yard.</p> <p>Police allege the teenager broke into Stella’s son’s caravan, which is parked at the back of her property, between 6.30pm and 7pm on Wednesday before coming back hours later and forcing his way into her home.</p> <p>The accused has been charged with home burglary and commit, stealing, aggravated home burglars, aggravated robbery, possession of stolen or unlawfully obtained property and unlicensed possession of ammunition.</p> <p><em>Image credits: 7News</em></p> <p class="css-1n6q21n-StyledParagraph e4e0a020" style="box-sizing: border-box; overflow-wrap: break-word; word-break: break-word; margin: 0px 0px 1.125rem; line-height: 25px; font-size: 1.125rem; font-family: HeyWow, Montserrat, 'Helvetica Neue', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; caret-color: #292a33; color: #292a33;"> </p>

Legal

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EV driver slammed for worst piece of parking you'll ever see

<p>An Australian electric vehicle driver in Tasmania has been slammed online for their "unbelievable" parking. </p> <p>In a picture shared on Facebook, the BYD was seen parked horizontally across two separate charging spaces in Howrah, Hobart. </p> <p>Not only did they hog two charging spots, but their vehicle also parked over two nearby motorbike bays. </p> <p>"Congratulations to this person yesterday who managed to connect to the charger on the right, while parking sideways across the charging bay on the left, AND a couple of bonus motorbike parking bays," a frustrated driver wrote online, after witnessing the scene. </p> <p>This prompted an outpouring of frustration from both EV drivers and Australians who dislike the  "electric vehicle community in general".</p> <p>"They should put cameras on the charger and if they park like this it starts to drain the battery instead of charging it," one wrote. </p> <p>"Give me a crack at parking, I'd do better — even with my cane," another commented. </p> <p>"I officially give up trying to defend the EV community," a third added. </p> <p>"I honestly have no words," wrote a fourth.</p> <p>EV etiquette has been a popular topic of debate recently, with drivers frequently being photographed for their questionable parking skills. </p> <p>Just a few months ago, a Tesla driver was mocked for their <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/entitled-as-tesla-driver-mocked-for-creative-parking" target="_blank" rel="noopener">"entitled as"</a> parking, after taking up two spots in a shopping centre to park their vehicle. </p> <p><em>Image: Facebook</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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"Worst nightmare": Teen dies one day after flu diagnosis

<p>William Jones was complaining of a sore throat and cough last month and when his mum called the doctor, they were told that it was most likely the flu. </p> <p>However, the following morning when Rebecca Rollason went to check on her 16-year-old son, he was found unresponsive in his bed in their Wellington home. </p> <p>"We ask ourselves how what started as a sore throat, snotty nose and a cough on Tuesday to no longer with us three days later,"  the grieving mum told the <em>NZ Herald</em>. </p> <p>"No one understands, we don't know what happened... it feels like the worst nightmare that we cannot wake from."</p> <p>Rollason explained that her family have to "wait for results" in hopes of understanding what happened and how the teenager, who was barely sick, passed away so suddenly. </p> <p>"We just don’t understand how this can happen to a boy who was barely ever sick and was very healthy," she said.</p> <p> "It is an incredibly hard and devastating time for us."</p> <p>A family friend has helped set up a <a href="https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/rebecca-lost-her-son-william-last-friday" target="_blank" rel="noopener">fundraising page</a> to help relieve the financial pressure on her and William's two brothers while they grieve. </p> <p>"It is every parents worst nightmare and a shocking tragedy to lose a healthy child from a sudden and brief illness," a statement from the fundraising page read. </p> <p>"The money will help the family with funeral costs and ease Financial burden while they grieve and come to terms with Williams passing." </p> <p>On July 1 they shared an update on the fundraising page, saying: "Rebecca and family would like all to know that are incredibly grateful for all the support and kindness." </p> <p><em>Image: Givealittle </em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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Pilot reveals area with worst turbulence

<p>Pilot and former <em>Bachelor Australia</em> star Jimmy Nicholson has revealed which area in the world has the worst turbulence in a viral video. </p> <p>Nicholson, who has over five years of experience, took to TikTok to explain the areas where pilots can expect the worst turbulence and how he believes that the recent Singapore Airlines <a href="https://www.oversixty.co.nz/travel/travel-trouble/victim-identified-after-plane-hits-deadly-turbulence" target="_blank" rel="noopener">horror flight</a> did not actually experience a "sudden drop". </p> <p>In the clip, he explained that pilots can expect the worst turbulence around the equator in what is called the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ). </p> <p>“This is where the winds with the northern hemisphere often converge with the winds of the southern hemisphere often causing bad weather and turbulence,” he said. </p> <p>He added that the ITCZ changes throughout the year, with it affecting different areas between January and July. </p> <p>“As you can see here, this is the approximate location of the convergence zone on the 21st of May,” he explained using a graph that showed an area that was “the exact area of where the [Singapore Airlines] incident happened." </p> <p>“As you can see from flightradar, the flight was tracking from Singapore to London and then made a left turn and ended up diverting into Bangkok," he added. </p> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; font-size: 16px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #323338; font-family: Figtree, Roboto, 'Noto Sans Hebrew', 'Noto Kufi Arabic', 'Noto Sans JP', sans-serif; background-color: #ffffff; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; border-style: initial; vertical-align: baseline; width: 573px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7371614320200830226&display_name=tiktok&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40jimmy_nicholson%2Fvideo%2F7371614320200830226&image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2FowREoIPwwA1lAs31IifkpzBASmJt4iCODZ0sBN%3Fx-expires%3D1716962400%26x-signature%3D%252BkhZRFhuPeWTiEKTMAFYLK0EcTU%253D&key=5b465a7e134d4f09b4e6901220de11f0&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> <p>He said that the 6000 foot drop was not a "sudden" drop as a result of severe turbulence, but a controlled descent. </p> <p>“The plane descended from 37000 feet at six minutes past the hour, down to 31000 feet at 12 minutes past the hour,” he said. </p> <p>“This is not a sudden drop due to turbulence, this is a controlled descent likely because the plane needed to divert into Bangkok, or because they were descending out of the turbulence.</p> <p>“This is a very sad and very rare event,” he continued. “But it is important to remember that these things don’t happen very often." </p> <p>He added that pilots do their best to avoid turbulence, but sometimes it does happen unexpectedly. </p> <p>“This is why pilots always say on the PA when you’re seated make sure you seatbelt is fastened in case we experience an unexpected turbulence.”</p> <p><em>Image: TikTok</em></p>

Travel Tips

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The worst country for pickpockets revealed

<p dir="ltr">When it comes to travelling abroad, there are always different rules to abide by in order to have a stress-free holiday experience. </p> <p dir="ltr">Common sense is a huge key player in staying safe while travelling, with holiday goers often taking extra precautions to keep themselves and their belongings safe in foreign countries. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, there will always be sneaky people who prey on tourists, with these pickpockets having the power to turn a holiday potentially disastrous. </p> <p dir="ltr">While lots of savvy travellers will share their stories about a particular city and a close call they encountered on their journeys, a new survey has proven which European cities are the worst for pickpocketing. </p> <p dir="ltr">Travel insurance experts at <a href="https://www.quotezone.co.uk/presszone/european-pickpocketing-index-top-tourist-destinations-to-watch-out-for">Quotezone</a> have compiled a list of the top 10 cities tourists (as well as locals) are likely to be pickpocketed while travelling around Europe, based on customer feedback and complaints. </p> <p dir="ltr">Italy has come in at the top spot, with the major cities reporting the biggest number of theft complaints in comparison to any other European countries. </p> <p dir="ltr">Tourists named hotspots such as the Colosseum, Trevi Fountain and the Pantheon in Rome, as well as the Duomo di Milano in Milan and the Gallerie Degli Uffizi in Florence as places they were targeted by pickpockets. </p> <p dir="ltr">Coming in at second place was France, with major tourist hotspots in Paris all being named as places to be wary of pickpockets. </p> <p dir="ltr">Greg Wilson, Founder and CEO of Quotezone.co.uk, said that unfortunately this new research shows that thousands of people have complained about pickpockets in Europe while experiencing the best that European holiday destinations have to offer.</p> <p dir="ltr">He said, “Theft can happen anywhere and tourist hotspots are convenient places for criminals to target holidaymakers’ wallets and purses whilst they are busy taking in the sites.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“It is essential always to remain vigilant, leave valuables, like expensive jewellery, in a safe in the hotel and always travel with a secure cross-body bag with zips to secure phones and wallets or even a money belt.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Check out the entire top ten list of destinations with the highest pickpocketing rates below. </p> <p dir="ltr">10. Poland</p> <p dir="ltr">9. Ireland </p> <p dir="ltr">8. Turkey </p> <p dir="ltr">7. Portugal </p> <p dir="ltr">6. Spain </p> <p dir="ltr">5. Greece</p> <p dir="ltr">4. Germany</p> <p dir="ltr">3. The Netherlands </p> <p dir="ltr">2. France </p> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">1. Italy</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p> </p>

Travel Trouble

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"Worst experience of our lives": Aussies break silence after being stranded by cruise ship

<p>An Australian couple have spoken out about how their dream holiday turned into a nightmare after they were abandoned by their cruise ship and left stranded in Africa. </p> <p>Violetta and Doug Sanders were two of eight travellers on the Norwegian Dawn cruise ship who took off on a private tour not organised by the cruise while they were docked on the small African island of São Tomé. </p> <p>After their <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-trouble/the-key-decision-that-led-to-cruise-passengers-being-abandoned-by-ship" target="_blank" rel="noopener">private tour ran late</a>, the Aussie pensioners and their fellow travellers were unable to rejoin the cruise as the ship was ready to disembark from the port, and were left stranded. </p> <p>Doug and Violetta are still attempting to rejoin the cruise in Senegal to be reunited with valuables such as their passports to finish out their journey. </p> <p>The couple spoke to <em>Sunrise</em> on Wednesday, detailing their nightmarish experience in the foreign country. </p> <p>“It’s been the worst experience of our lives to be abandoned like that in a strange country, can’t speak the language — Portuguese or an African (language),” Violeta said.</p> <p>“We have no money, our credit cards aren’t accepted.”</p> <p>The group of stranded travellers have been racing through six African countries to get to where the ship is docking in Senegal in time, but US travellers Jill and Jay Campbell have cast doubt on whether they will re-board the ship.</p> <p>“We believe that it was a basic duty of care that they have forgotten about — although there are a set of rules, they have followed them too rigidly,” Jill told US media overnight.</p> <p>The group, which included four elderly people, a pregnant woman, a quadriplegic and a person with a heart condition, were set to rejoin the ship last Sunday in The Gambia, however, low-tide meant the ship couldn’t dock at the African port.</p> <p>The Campbells have been using their credit card to look after the entire group, spending more than $5,000 USD so far.</p> <p>Norwegian Cruise Lines has said it is up to guests to be back on time.</p> <p>“Guests are responsible for ensuring they return to the ship at the published time, which is communicated broadly over the ship’s intercom, in the daily communication and posted just before exiting the vessel,” it said.</p> <p>The cruise line later said it was in contact with passengers and had been “working closely with authorities” to allow the guests to re-join the ship.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Sunrise </em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Jackie O reveals the "worst diagnosis of my life"

<p>Jackie O Henderson has shared the "worst diagnosis of my life", announcing that she found a lump on her breast. </p> <p>The radio host was joined live on air by the show's resident medical expert Dr Sam Hay, explaining her situation and asking for advice. </p> <p>“There is a small lump there but it doesn’t look like cancer. I think it’s a seborrheic keratosis,” Hay told her after examining the area.</p> <p>“What do I do with it?” she asked him.</p> <p>“That one you can leave and if it’s continuing to get bigger, doctors will freeze it with liquid nitrogen,” he said.</p> <p>While discussing their medical concerns, Jackie O's co-host Kyle Sandilands shared a worry of his own with Dr Hay, asking for advice on a lump that had arisen on his cheek that was “the size of a pea”.</p> <p>“I have a feeling it’s exactly the same thing. It could be a viral wart,” the doctor told Sandilands.</p> <p>“I didn’t want to say that to Jackie but they’re called geriatric warts,” Kyle said.</p> <p>Henderson appeared horrified at this comment, asking, “Do I have a wart?”</p> <p>“This is the worst diagnosis of my life. I’m going to get it frozen off as soon as possible,” she said.</p> <p>It's not the first time Jackie O has discussed a health scare live on air, as in November last year, she was <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/health/caring/they-checked-the-lungs-jackie-o-rushed-to-hospital-mid-show" target="_blank" rel="noopener">rushed to hospital</a> during an episode of the <em>Kyle and Jackie O Show</em>.</p> <p>Returning to the radio studio in the days after, she shared that while her symptoms were similar to that of a heart attack, she was suffering from an infection that she was treated for at Sydney's Royal North Shore Hospital. </p> <p><em>Image credits: KIISFM</em></p>

Caring

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How baby boomers are benefiting from Australia's "worst financial mistake"

<p>A financial expert has explained how baby boomers have remained largely unscathed by the ongoing housing crisis in Australia. </p> <p>ABC finance guru Alan Kohler described the crisis as Australia's "worst financial mistake", as Adelaide has now become the country's second least affordable city. </p> <p>The South Australian capital, which has long been known as one of the more affordable places in the country to live, has skyrocketed in price, as the median price for houses and units in Adelaide was $721,376 in January, which is 7.9 times higher than the state's average full-time salary of $91,026.</p> <p>"There are a couple of things that might surprise you: Adelaide became the second, least affordable Australian city last year," Mr Kohler explained.</p> <p>"Adelaide has just taken over from Hobart in second place."</p> <p>"What's going on: put simply, incomes in Adelaide, Hobart and Brisbane are not keeping up with house prices, which are being pushed up by fast-rising population and by first-home buyers."</p> <p>Mr Kohler, a baby boomer, noted that when he and his wife bought their first home in Melbourne for $40,000 in 1980, he was earning $11,500 as a journalist, meaning his home cost just 3.5 times his income before a mortgage deposit.</p> <p>"When my wife and I bought our first house in 1980, the average house price was 3.5 times average income," he said. "Now, it's 7.5 times and rising."</p> <p>"That didn't have to happen: it's Australia's worst, economic mistake."</p> <p>Mr Kohler said parents were increasingly propping up the mortgage deposits of first-home buyers, as first-home buyer subsidies from the federal government only pushed up property prices.</p> <p>"Despite rising prices and crushing interest rates, first-home buyers were the fastest-growing type of borrower," he said.</p> <p>"The Bank of Mum and Dad coughing up early inheritances and politicians showering them with grants and concessions, desperate to appear to be doing something about affordability while actually making it worse."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock / ABC</em></p> <p class="mol-para-with-font" style="font-size: 16px; margin: 0px 0px 16px; padding: 0px; min-height: 0px; letter-spacing: -0.16px; font-family: graphik, Arial, sans-serif;"> </p>

Money & Banking

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To avoid the worst of climate change we have to change how we travel

<p>In September last year I embarked on a 5 week trip throughout Italy and France.</p> <p>We swam in the waters of Cinque Terre, ate the best pizza we’d ever had in Naples, and walked blisters into our feet through the streets of Paris.</p> <p>The marvels of modern aviation meant I completed my 32,000 km round trip in roughly 24 hours each way.</p> <p>But while I budgeted for the monetary costs associated with the trip, I neglected to consider another crucial one – the carbon cost.</p> <p>Humans are changing the Earth’s climate. It is estimated our activities have caused about 1°C of additional  atmospheric warming since the industrial revolution. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says <a href="https://www.ipcc.ch/sr15/chapter/spm/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">crossing a 1.5°C threshold</a> will unleash devastating climate change impacts on human life and ecosystems.</p> <p>To keep global warming to below 1.5°C, as called for in the <a href="https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Paris Agreement</a>, emissions must peak before 2025 at the latest, halve by 2030, and reach net-zero as soon as possible before 2050. The <a href="https://www.unwto.org/the-glasgow-declaration-on-climate-action-in-tourism" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Glasgow Declaration on Climate Action in Tourism</a>, launched at <a href="https://www.un.org/en/climatechange/cop26" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">COP26</a>, commits the tourism sector to these goals.</p> <p>So, what will global tourism look like as it begins to decarbonise? Will it necessitate changing the way I approach travel in the coming decades?</p> <p>Paul Peeters, a professor of sustainable transport and tourism at Breda University of Applied Sciences in the Netherlands is one of the principal authors of a report released last year that seeks to <a href="https://pure.buas.nl/ws/portalfiles/portal/27136592/Peeters_Papp_EnvisionTourism_report.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener"><em>envision tourism in 2030 and beyond.</em></a></p> <h2 class="wp-block-heading">Tourism and emissions: how big of a contributor is it?</h2> <p>Tourism is a major contributor to climate change. According to Peeters, at least 5% of global CO<sub>2</sub> emissions come from tourism and travel, with some estimates as high as 8-11% if you include indirect (supply chain) emissions.</p> <p>These emissions are inequitable, about half of the global tourism footprint is caused by travel between the richest countries.</p> <p>If global tourism continues unchanged, it’s predicted to increase emissions by 73% by 2050, compared to 2019. In this scenario, the sector will use over 66% of the world’s remaining carbon budget between 2023 and 2100.</p> <p>Peeters says this is not a viable way forward. But it doesn’t mean that tourism will cease to exist, or that we must stop flying altogether.</p> <p>Instead, the modelling he presents finds there is a plausible decarbonisation pathway that allows tourism to continue with similar levels of growth in global revenue, trips, and guest nights compared to 2019, while also achieving net-zero emissions, by 2050.</p> <p>This model is called the Tourism Decarbonisation Scenario (TDS) and it requires us to re-think how we travel.</p> <h2 class="wp-block-heading">How do you put tourism emissions into a holding pattern?</h2> <p>“If you look at the division of the [emissions from] different parts of travel, then in general… transport takes about 75-80%, 20% goes to the accommodation sector,” says Peeters.</p> <p>That 20% also includes activities, like visiting museums or amusement parks.</p> <p>“And then within transport, you see that about more than half of the emissions come from aviation, while at the same time aviation serves about a quarter of all trips,” he says.</p> <p>Each country party to the Paris Agreement – a legally binding international treaty on climate change – is required to establish a <a href="https://www.un.org/en/climatechange/all-about-ndcs#:~:text=Simply%20put%2C%20an%20NDC%2C%20or,and%20adapt%20to%20climate%20impacts." target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Nationally Determined Contribution</a> (NDC). An NDC is an action plan to cut emissions and adapt to climate impacts, updated every 5 years.</p> <p>Most of tourism – like accommodation and on-ground transportation – falls within the Paris Agreement and these NDCs and will decarbonise through changes already happening in the legislation of each country. For instance, the transition to electrified forms of travel and accommodation powered by renewable energy. So, as a tourist, I won’t need to change my behaviour there.</p> <p>“But it’s not true for aviation. And the problem is that aviation, in terms of governance, has got an exemption,” says Peeters. Aviation emissions are much harder to reduce.</p> <p>The International Civil Aviation Organization  – ICAO – governs international aviation. It has a long-term aspirational goal for net-zero carbon emissions by 2050, and to achieve these goals is pursuing improvements to <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/science/engineering/hydrogen-fuelled-planes/">aircraft technology</a>, <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/energy/from-refinery-to-biofuel-reactor/">sustainable aviation fuels</a>, and <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/earth/climate/carbon-offsetting-right/">carbon offsets</a>.</p> <p>But Peeters’ modelling says this won’t be enough.</p> <p>“The final technology is low or zero emission aircraft technology,” he says.</p> <p>“But that takes decades to develop and then decades to replace the whole fleet – you are not buying a new aircraft every year like a car.</p> <p>“That technology will come […] much faster actually than 10 years ago, but still it’s at a pace that we will have it by the end of the century fully implemented, not before.</p> <p>“We need an international body that governs the growth of aviation that actually stops it for the next couple of decades, to create a timeframe for the technology we need.”</p> <p>So until sustainable aviation technology can be fully implemented, the key is to slow the rate of growth of aviation.</p> <h2 class="wp-block-heading">Further does not equal better</h2> <p>In 2019, nearly all long-distance travel over 16,000 kms return trip was by air. These trips, equivalent to flying return Shanghai to Sydney or further, made up just 2% of all trips in 2019. But they were the most polluting – accounting for 19% of tourism’s total carbon emissions.</p> <p>My roundtrip from Australia to Europe sits in this bracket. I estimate my seats on those planes probably came with a carbon footprint of about 6.4 tonnes of CO<sub>2</sub> altogether. To put that in perspective, the average Australian emits 15 tonnes per year, according to <a href="https://ourworldindata.org/co2/country/australia" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">ourworldindata.org</a>, and I emitted almost half that in just 48 hours.</p> <p>Failing to curb the growth of these longest-haul trips means they will make up 4% of all trips but account for a massive 41% of tourism’s total emissions by 2050. To prevent this, the TDS says we need to cap them at 2019 levels – about 120 million return trips per year.</p> <p>In this scenario, shorter distance trips up to 900km return – that’s roughly equivalent to flying from Rome to Milan in Italy – and those by car, rail, coach, and ferry, would increase to 81% of all trips by 2050.</p> <p>Longer distance trips (return journeys of more than 7,000km, roughly equivalent to return flying Sydney to Perth and further) would also grow less quickly than current rates and account for 3.5% of all trips by 2050 (down from 6.0% in 2019).</p> <p>This could have flow-on benefits, especially for local tourism.</p> <p>“So, you keep the number of trips, and you keep the number of nights – you could even increase that a little bit as a compensation maybe for not being able to travel so far, then you can travel deeper. And that means the total revenues in the sector can grow as we are used to because the number of trips and the number of nights generate most of the revenues,” explains Peeters.</p> <h2 class="wp-block-heading">What curbing the aviation industry could look like</h2> <p>So, what will this mean for my travel habits in the coming years, if further isn’t better?</p> <p>It will likely involve a switch in mindset to consider whether an alternative, less carbon intensive mode of transport exists to reach the destination I have in mind.</p> <p>According to Peeters, even 1 fewer person sitting in an aircraft’s seats can measurably change its emissions.</p> <p>“Aircraft are quite lightweight, half of the weight of an aircraft taking off is not its structure. But it means that if you remove 100 kilograms, even off an Airbus A320, you can measure the difference in fuel consumption. It will save, I calculated it for flights, just a 1,500 km flight, already up to 10 kilograms of CO<sub>2</sub>,” says Peeters.</p> <p>Compare that to a different mode – adding an additional person to an already incredibly heavy train will add perhaps half a kilogram in emissions at most, probably less.</p> <p>It’s a little embarrassing to admit that I’ve never considered the idea of an interstate road trip, taking the car across the border or opting for a coach or train instead of flying, as a viable option for domestic travel in Australia.</p> <p>But it has for other people. <a href="https://flightfree.net.au/about/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Flight Free Australia</a> encourages us to stop flying, and people have already taken their pledge to swear off air travel – whether for the next 12 months or until it’s ‘climate safe’ to do so again.</p> <p>As for Europe… Well, Peeter’s report predicts that ticket prices will increase, with the cost of flying increasing to 0.18 $/pkm in 2050, from 0.06 $/pkm in 2019, caused mainly by mandates for sustainable aviation e-fuels.</p> <p>Entire families have event attempted to make it from one end of the world to another without setting foot on a plane – a months-long journey ultimately <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2023-12-22/british-family-travel-australia-without-flying-carbon-footprint/103256280" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">foiled</a> by cyclones north of Darwin.</p> <p>Whether the changes outlined in the <em>Envisioning Tourism in 2030 and Beyond </em>report are made to the aviation industry, already my perspective on flying is changing. Why would I reduce my carbon footprint in other areas of my life, but turn around and negate those efforts by jumping on a plane?</p> <p>It doesn’t mean that I have to give up travel, just change my perspective on what makes a worthy destination.</p> <p>“You see a growing number of people, particularly young people, that say, ‘I stopped flying, whatever happens, I never go anymore’,” says Peeters.</p> <p>“And it makes your life so much easier. You don’t have to choose every time ‘should I fly?’. No, if you can’t get there by train, car, or whatever, you don’t go. And then you go somewhere else, of course, you’re not sitting at home. And you discover that somewhere else is also beautiful.”</p> <div> <p align="center"><noscript data-spai="1"><img decoding="async" fetchpriority="high" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-198773" src="https://cdn.shortpixel.ai/spai/q_lossy+ret_img+to_auto/cosmosmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/11/Cosmos-Catch-Up-embed_728x150-1.jpg" data-spai-egr="1" alt="Sign up to our weekly newsletter" width="600" height="154" title="to avoid the worst of climate change we have to change how we travel 2"></noscript></p> </div> <p><!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --></p> <p><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=294884&amp;title=To+avoid+the+worst+of+climate+change+we+have+to+change+how+we+travel" width="1" height="1" loading="lazy" aria-label="Syndication Tracker" data-spai-target="src" data-spai-orig="" data-spai-exclude="nocdn" /></p> <p><!-- End of tracking content syndication --></p> <div class="share-syndicate-wrapper margin-top-1"> <div class="article-sharing"> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> </div> </div> <div id="contributors"> <p><em><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/synergy/to-avoid-the-worst-of-climate-change-we-have-to-change-how-we-travel/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/imma-perfetto/">Imma Perfetto</a>. </em></p> </div>

Travel Trouble

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Radio stars reveal their worst on-air moments

<p>In celebration of 100 years of Australian radio, the who's-who of the Aussie airwaves have shared their most awkward interview moments.</p> <p>Ben Fordham, Amanda Keller and Fifi Box were among the radio presenters who recalled their worst on-air moments to <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/radio/celebrity-interview-derailed-by-radio-stars-bulge/news-story/056c130ab09f85c3c9e14a0fdeb5587b" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a></em>, with the memorable moments ranging from mispronouncing a guest's name, to announcing the death of a celebrity who was very much still alive. </p> <p><em>2GB</em>'s Ben Fordham revealed one of the more outrageous moments from his radio show, recalling when a caller asked him about classic Aussie TV show Simon Townsend's <em>Wonder World</em>.</p> <p>"I said, 'yeah, that was a great show. Sadly we lost Simon Townsend recently,' and then people started calling in saying, 'are you sure Simon Townsend is dead?'" he said. </p> <p>It turned out that Fordham had made an error, as it was actually Townsend's dog Woodrow who had died. </p> <p>He said, "When I came out of the ad-break I had to do a mop up job. It was pretty ugly."</p> <p>Amanda Keller from WSFM's <em>Jonesy and Amanda</em> shared a story about accidentally mispronouncing Weird Al Yankovic's name, despite her co-host trying to help her.</p> <p>"Jonesy (my co-host) kept telling me to pronounce his surname 'Yankovick', and I said, 'no, excuse me, it's pronounced 'Yankovich'."</p> <p>During the entire interview with the musician, Keller introduced the singer with her mispronunciation, and was eventually corrected by the singer when the time came for him to record a promo for the radio network. </p> <p>"It was humiliating," she said. </p> <p>Fifi Box recalled an experience back in 2013 when her then co-host Jules Lund blindfolded her and took her to a secret location for their show's 'Blackout Challenge.'</p> <p>"I was pregnant at the time, and basically found myself lying on a bed in a dark room being serenaded by the one and only David Hasselhoff!" she said.</p> <p>"The Hoff then decided it was funnier to take his pants off for an added extra surprise. Also, being heavily pregnant made the whole scenario a lot more awkward."</p> <p>Rounding out the awkwardness was <em>KIIS FM</em>'s Will and Woody who had an uncomfortable interview with pop star Jennifer Lopez.</p> <p>"We overheard Jennifer Lopez screaming at her publicist about needing to do an interview with us. We were both dressed as Santa and had to go through the whole interview knowing that she really didn't want to be there," Will said.</p> <p>"Suffice to say that the interview wasn't one of our best."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Music

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“Our absolute worst nightmare”: Nine reporter reveals devastating family diagnosis

<p dir="ltr">Channel Nine reporter Hayley Webb has shared how she and her brother Lachlan have been struck down with a terrifying terminal illness. </p> <p dir="ltr">The siblings have spent their entire lives living with Fatal Familial Insomnia (FFI) lying dormant in their bodies. </p> <p dir="ltr">The devastating illness, which has already claimed the lives of three aunts and uncles as well as their mother, will eventually leave the siblings unable to ever fall asleep again. </p> <p dir="ltr">From there, symptoms progress to, but are not limited to, the inability to walk, loss of sight and speech and an eventual total shutdown of the body's ability to keep itself alive.</p> <p dir="ltr">Hayley and Lachie first discovered they had the gene in 2016, and decided to take part in a study of the disease in California to end the generational curse of the genetic disorder. </p> <p dir="ltr">But tragically, earlier this year, Lachlan began having symptoms at just 35 years old, and discovered his condition had rapidly worsened.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CycA3kxBDGi/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CycA3kxBDGi/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by thetodayshow (@thetodayshow)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">"The months leading up to it, I thought something was wrong - my memory was getting worse and I just knew something was different," Lachie told Karl Stefanovic on <em>Today</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I put it off for a month or two just in case it was something else, but once I got tested I realised my fears were confirmed."</p> <p dir="ltr">Lachlan was diagnosed in April, just one day after his son's first birthday, which Hayley described as “just our absolute worst nightmare”. </p> <p dir="ltr">The diagnosis triggered the disease's rapid shutdown of the mind and body, now Lachie struggles to sleep, requires a wheelchair to get around and his speech is starting to go as well.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Lach and I have always been so close - best mates our whole life," Hayley said. "The thought of not having him around is just too much to bear."</p> <p dir="ltr">Sitting in front of the pair, Hayley's heartbreaking admission brought Karl to tears.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I don't think I've ever done a story like this, and certainly never met anybody like you two in my life," the Today host said.</p> <p dir="ltr">With Lachie being officially diagnosed with the disease so young, Hayley has started to wonder about her own mortality. </p> <p dir="ltr">The disease has an average duration of 18 months, ultimately leading to death, making the siblings worry about their families and their futures. </p> <p dir="ltr">“It's just, like, been such a stark reality check that it's not a guarantee that we're gonna get to 60, it's not a guarantee we'll make it to 50,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I've got a three-and-a-half year-old and a baby on the way who I desperately want to see grow up.”</p> <p dir="ltr">While no doctor or test can predict how long Lachie has - his wife Claire and Hayley, who is expecting, have done something extraordinary, taking their family's fate into their own hands.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We both underwent IVF and through that process we were able to conceive children who won't have the gene, so the family curse stops here," Hayley said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Today</em></p>

Caring

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British expat cops backlash for calling Australia the "worst country in the world"

<p>British expat and former school teacher Sabrina "Bree" Collins, has faced backlash online after labelling Australia as the "worst country in the world". </p> <p>The former teacher, who is also a writer, went on an extensive rant on social media about her experience living in Queensland and why she hates it, and the video has since gone viral.</p> <p>"Australia has destroyed everything that I was before I came here and there's so much that's happened while I've here but it's not safe to go public with everything that's happened to me," she began her rant. </p> <p>Collins who moved to Australia from the UK, then shared her unsolicited advice for those hoping to migrate Down Under. </p> <p>"When you're a British woman on the other side of the world, you've really got to sit down and think was it worth it? </p> <p>"If you're a British person sat home in the UK and you're wondering about this fantastic life you could have in Australia, you need to know a few things first." </p> <p>She then went on to label Australia as "very sexist", "abusive", "isolated" and "behind".</p> <p>"The internet is like really behind, technology is behind.</p> <p>"When you are in Australia you feel really, really isolated. You feel like you're stuck in the 1980s, and if you're a woman it's even worse," she said.</p> <p>"And I know loads of people are going to contradict what I'm saying and say, 'I'm living a fantastic life in Australia, 'well look at me, look at my CV, look at all my accomplishments before I moved out to Australia, and look at the way I've been treated."</p> <p>The expat who has a masters degree in education, and more than five years experience as a teacher, has claimed that her career as a teacher was ruined due to the abuse she received.</p> <p>She claimed that as a result of the abuse, she now feels too frightened to set foot in a school in Australia. </p> <p>"And that's why I cannot see a purpose or reason to stay in Australia." </p> <p>She then went on to say that she hopes to move to a "more progressive country" like the US, and write a book about her experiences in Australia. </p> <p>Her video has not been well-received, with many telling her to leave clowning her for calling the US more progressive. </p> <p>"Please leave.. and don't trash my country. I've seen yours and you all come over for many reasons," one Aussie commented. </p> <p>"Don’t let the door hit you on your way out missy!! Bye Felicia," another wrote. </p> <p>"UK is far more worse than Australia mate. Have lived in both countries here is lot lot better," a third wrote.</p> <p>"Oh, boo hoo. Please move. As an American, it’s way more backwards than Australia," an American commented on her desire to move to the US. </p> <p>"You're going to exactly the right place for you. You’ll find the schools are really safe and the police...very safe country for women," another added sarcastically. </p> <p>Other's pointed out that she was living up to the British stereotype of a "whinging pom".</p> <p>Collins is not the only British expat to find issue with the way of life in Australia.</p> <p>A few months ago, another expat <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/travel/travel-trouble/please-don-t-be-mad-british-expat-s-bone-to-pick-with-australia" target="_blank" rel="noopener">went viral</a> for listing things she finds frustrating after living in Australia, although she pleaded for everyone's understanding.</p>

Travel Trouble

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Dave Hughes spills on worst celebrity interview

<p>Dave Hughes is the latest media personality to open up about his worst celebrity interview. </p> <p>The <em>2Day FM</em> breakfast host named and shamed the singer in an interview with <em>news.com.au’s Shock Jocks, </em>where radio hosts have to answer tough questions or be "electrocuted". </p> <p>“Avril Lavigne was a shocker,”  he said, referring to the pop-punk sensation, who peaked during the early 2000s. </p> <p>“She had a bad attitude, it was back around Sk8er Boi when she was at the height of her fame,” he added. </p> <p>“She wouldn’t look at any of us. I’m not saying I’m the most attractive person in the world, but you can just look at me once.”</p> <p>Hughesy's confession comes just over a week after Chrissie Swan revealed that former AFL legend <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/music/absolutely-the-worst-chrissie-swan-fires-up-on-sam-newman" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sam Newman was the worst interview</a> of her career.</p> <p>“It was terrible,” Swan said about Newman on Nova last week, “it was a terrible, terrible situation and so unusual in my career to feel so attacked.”</p> <p>The interview was so bad that Swan had to walk out, and the interview itself never aired. </p> <p><a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/entertainment/music/sam-newman-hits-back-at-chrissie-swan" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Newman hit back</a> in response to Swan's comments and said: “What a coward to ask someone to come in, then walk out of the studio about an opinion over a topic we were talking about.</p> <p>“I just gave my opinion and she walked out, how unprofessional. What a coward."</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

TV

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"His worst moment as a person": Sean Penn unleashes on Will Smith's Oscar's slap

<p>Sean Penn has become visibly angry as he recalled the infamous moment at the 2022 Oscars ceremony when Will Smith stormed the stage to slap Chris Rock. </p> <p>Penn recalled the award ceremony moment as he reflected on the Academy's decision to not let Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskyy, speak at the ceremony. </p> <p>The actor has been a strong advocate for the people of Ukraine in their ongoing war against Russia, and even traveling to the war-torn region to help in their fight. </p> <p>Speaking to <a href="https://variety.com/2023/film/features/sean-penn-slams-will-smith-slap-ai-oscars-1235720417/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Variety</em></a>, Penn shared how frustrated he was that Zelenskyy was silenced, while Smith's actions were the real problem. </p> <p>“The Oscars producer thought, ‘Oh, he’s [Zelenskyy] not lighthearted enough.’ Well, guess what you got instead? Will Smith.”</p> <p><em>Variety</em> noted that the actor was visibly infuriated speaking on the subject, even turning red during the interview.</p> <p>“I don’t know Will Smith. I met him once,” Penn said. “He seemed very nice when I met him. He was so f***ing good in <em>King Richard</em>.”</p> <p>“So why the f**k did you just spit on yourself and everybody else with this stupid f***ing thing? Why did I go to f***ing jail for what you just did? And you’re still sitting there? Why are you guys standing and applauding his worst moment as a person?” the 63-year-old said, referencing his 1987 arrest and jail stint for punching a film extra in the face.</p> <p>“This f***ing bulls**t wouldn’t have happened with Zelenskyy,” Penn added. “Will Smith would never have left that chair to be part of stupid violence. It never would have happened.”</p> <p>Penn was so shocked and infuriated by the moment that he chose to destroy his two Oscars. </p> <p>"I thought, ‘Well, f**k, you know? I’ll give them to Ukraine. They can be melted down to bullets they can shoot at the Russians,’” he said.</p> <p>When visiting Zelenskyy in Ukraine last fall, Penn showed his support by giving the leader one of his Oscars.</p> <p>At the 2022 Oscar's ceremony, Will Smith stormed the stage and slapped comedian Chris Rock after he made a joke about his wife, Jada Pinkett-Smith. </p> <p>After returning to his seat, Smith shouted out, “Keep my wife’s name out your f***ing mouth!”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Movies

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"Absolutely the worst": Chrissie Swan fires up on Sam Newman

<p>Chrissie Swan has opened up on the most challenging celebrity she had to deal with during her career. </p> <p>The radio personality revealed that her interview with former AFL footballer Sam Newman was one of the worst encounters she had on the local front. </p> <p>“He was hands down the worst experience I’ve had in the media,” she said on her program <em>The Chrissie Swan Show</em>, on Monday afternoon. </p> <p>Anchor Jack Charles recalled that the interview was so bad that Swan had to walk out of their Melbourne studio. </p> <p>“I remember you walking out of the studio, out of the station, and I was like where’s Swanny gone?” he said and added that “We couldn’t even air the audio.”</p> <p>Swan replied that it was the most "terrible" experience she has had in her entire career. </p> <p>“It was absolutely the worst by far. By far. It was terrible. It was a terrible, terrible situation and so unusual in my career to feel so attacked. It was terrible. Terrible.”</p> <p>Before revealing that her interview with Newman was the worst experience she ever had, Swan also shared her disappointment after meeting her idols British rock band <em>Duran Duran </em>a few years ago. </p> <p>She said that it "was an excruciating interview. And two of the members were really rude to me. I just left there feeling like nothing.”</p> <p>To which Charles responded with the old adage,  “Never meet your idols." </p> <p>Swan agreed, but also added that it wasn't always the case. </p> <p>“It is true, isn’t it? Well, it can be true, because I have met other idols like Lily Tomlin and Gina Davis and Debbie Harry and Sarah Jessica Parker. And they were all wonderful, but Duran Duran, they really belittled me and I just felt like a big loser.”" </p> <p>The 49-year-old radio personality, added that the British rock band knew that she was a massive fan, which made the interaction  “even more unkind." </p> <p>Despite sharing how horrible some of these celebrity interviews made her feel, Swan also offered a sympathetic ear. </p> <p>“You know, harking back to what I said earlier, people are going through things and you just don’t know what." </p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Music

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Hard to watch! Paralympic champion given the worst gifts ever

<p>A Spanish Paralympic cyclist has been given the worst trophy gifts in history, with his calm and collected reaction making waves online. </p> <p>Ricardo Ten Argiles was last week crowned world champion in three separate events at the 2023 UCI World Championships in Glasgow, Scotland.</p> <p>During the post race ceremonies, he was presented with two gold medals, along with two very surprising gifts from the event's major sponsor: international watch company Tissot.</p> <p>The 47-year-old was gifted not one, but TWO watches in a fancy display case, despite having both his arms amputated at the forearm. </p> <p>A video of Ten keeping a straight face while being handed one of the watches has started to spread across the internet with more than 800,000 views.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Not a very well thought gift. <a href="https://t.co/hRhaTfnGsE">pic.twitter.com/hRhaTfnGsE</a></p> <p>— Cycling out of context (@OutOfCycling) <a href="https://twitter.com/OutOfCycling/status/1691136594747469836?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 14, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>One video shows Ten standing on the podium and exchanging some friendly words with an official as he holds the watch case tightly between his arms. </p> <p>Understandably, the mortifying moment has been met with outrage and black humour. </p> <p>The athlete himself has been laughing off the incident and has embraced the way his social media pages have exploded with comments.</p> <p>Many of the comments suggested that Ten regift the expensive watches at Christmas, while others wondered how officials at the event could've let the awkward gifts happen. </p> <p>Despite the outrage from fans, Ten responded to one news story about the “tactless blunder” by writing on Twitter, “I am very happy to have won two TISSOTs, one for each arm, but above all for what it means for Paralympic cycling, total inclusion of the sport at the highest level”.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Twitter</em></p>

Body

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Police reveal details of the online profile of Australia's worst ever paedophile

<p dir="ltr">The former Queensland childcare worker who has been charged with sexually abusing dozens of children boasted in an online profile about his love of “meaningful experiences” with kids. </p> <p dir="ltr">The 45-year-old Gold Coast man was <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/unfathomable-former-childcare-worker-facing-1-623-child-abuse-charges" target="_blank" rel="noopener">charged</a> last week with 1623 child abuse offences, including 136 charges of raping pre-pubescent girls, with the alleged offences relate to 87 children in Australia and four overseas, and includes 110 counts of sexual intercourse with a child under 10.</p> <p dir="ltr">While the man cannot be named until his case is committed to trial, many parents of the victims have discovered an online profile for his previous employer in which the man boasted about his childcare experience. </p> <p dir="ltr">In it, the man talked about his professional skills and discussed how he helped children “develop their identities”, saying he was a “firm believer in play-based learning as well as inquiry”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I love engaging children in meaningful experiences that inspire their play and learning,” the post read. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I am particularly fascinated by how children use creative languages such as drawing, building, painting and music to express themselves and develop their identity.”</p> <p dir="ltr">He said “young children are natural inquirers” who “explore the world through their senses, seeking answers and building theories”, adding that “as an early childhood teacher I hope to share this journey, learning side by side with children and inspiring them”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Australian Federal Police Assistant Commissioner Justine Gough said the investigation into the man’s crimes and a larger paedophile ring is still ongoing.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Those charges carry life imprisonment. Once this man faces the AFP charges here in Queensland, we will be seeking his extradition,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This is one of the most horrific child abuse cases that I‘ve seen in nearly 40 years of policing.” </p> <p dir="ltr">“We are absolutely committed to prosecuting anyone who comes after our most vulnerable.”</p> <p dir="ltr">If the man is convicted of all his alleged crimes, he will be named the worst paedophile in Australian history. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: ABC</em></p>

Legal

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World’s worst places for pickpockets revealed

<p>When a bag containing my laptop and smartphone was stolen in London, it was something of a shock to me - but not to any locals.</p> <p>The bag, a simple library bag, was under the table in a Baker Street restaurant, comfortably at my feet, as there was nowhere else to leave it. The thieves, it seems, worked as a pair.</p> <p>One caused a distraction, even as I was engrossed in a conversation with friends. With all this happening, I certainly didn't notice his partner in crime snatching the bag from my feet. By the time I noticed, they had well and truly gone.</p> <p>As the restaurant was about to close, police offered to meet me at my accommodation. They finally arrived five hours later, at around 2am. After recent cutbacks, in which many stations have closed, the British police force is now spread very thin.</p> <p>Nonetheless, they took my report, and confessed that the problem was very common. "London's very lively," said one. "It's one of the cities in Europe most notorious for its thieves." The others, he suggested, were Rome, Barcelona and Prague.</p> <p>None of those have crime rates as bad as, say, Cape Town or Caracas - but while such places have high crime levels, they don't have especially high tourism levels.</p> <p>In most of the world, crime has decreased over the years. Throughout the US, for example, violent crime has fallen by 32 per cent since 1990 (and 64 per cent in the largest cities).</p> <p>But while violent crimes are down, you must guard against lesser (but still traumatising) crimes such as robbery.</p> <p>Among the cities adored by tourists, some are known for their distinctive crime scenes, among them:</p> <p><strong>1. Ho Chi Minh City</strong></p> <p><strong>The Motorised Bag-snatch:</strong> Two years ago, a colleague - travelling by motor-scooter on these scooter-heavy roads - had her purse snatched by a rider next to her, who immediately sped away. The next morning, our guide was calmly confident that he could retrieve her bag. He phoned the nearest police, and yes, it was at the station, complete with smartphone. "They just want the cash," he said. "They want nothing that can track them. Bags always end up at the station."</p> <p><strong>2. London</strong></p> <p><strong>The Sneak Attack:</strong> In Europe, it is often a more sophisticated operation, in which phones and laptops are flown abroad, erased and re-sold overnight. A day after my own bag was taken from the floor of a cheap restaurant, a woman told me that her handbag was once stolen from a chair at the Ritz - so nowhere is completely safe. However, the hot spots include Stratford (where the Olympic Village area remains busy) and the huge Westfield mall at Shepherd's Bush.</p> <p><strong>3. Rome</strong></p> <p><strong>The Pickpocket:</strong> Rome is infamous for its thieves, though an Italian friend thinks that it doesn't deserve such ill repute. "I can think of dozens of places in Italy that are far worse," he says, singling out Naples. Still, Italy's robbery rate is not as bad as, say, England or Wales. Robbery, however, involves physical confrontation - not pickpocketing, at which Roman thieves excel. Per capita, the world's worst crime nation is Vatican City, with 1.5 crimes per citizen - thanks to the thieves from across the border who congregate to relieve tourists of their wallets.</p> <p><strong>4. Prague</strong></p> <p><strong>The Conspirators:</strong> Prague is littered with signs saying "Beware of Pickpockets", car break-ins (don't leave your valuables on the seat), and gangs using clever diversions, including posses of sweet-faced schoolchildren. Tourist areas such as Wenceslas Square and Old Town Square are magnets for pickpockets.</p> <p><strong>5. Washington DC</strong></p> <p><strong>The Gangs:</strong> Among US cities, the Capital ranks 21st in violent crime. Its robbery incidents, however, are among the nation's worst, especially in the south-east of the city. For the record, San Francisco ranks 80th, and New York City is 96th.</p> <p>Of course, as you would have read, those cities are all worth visiting. When you are there (or anywhere else), it is worth taking a few precautions:</p> <ul> <li>Dress like a local, not like a tourist.</li> <li>Take out travel insurance. You probably won't use it, but take it anyway.</li> <li>A money belt might be a nuisance, but it is the safest place for your valuables. Don't pull out your wallet in public. If you must take a handbag, hold it close.</li> <li>Be especially careful on crowded trains, buses and subways.</li> <li>Make sure you take down your phone's IMEI number (as printed on the original packaging) and your computer's serial number. Police might be ineffectual, but it should still be reported.</li> <li>In some countries (e.g. France, the Czech Republic), visitors are required to carry their passport at all times. In such places, a photocopy of the passport, kept in your hotel, will make it easier to replace.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Mark Juddery. First appeared on <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Stuff.co.nz</span></strong></a>.</em></p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Ben Fordham spills on worst gift he ever gave his wife

<p dir="ltr">Coming up with a surprise is already a hard enough task, but Ben Fordham might’ve been a bit too creative when he planned this hilarious gift for his wife Jodie Speers.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 2GB radio host shamefully - and hilariously - spilled the tea on the "one-of-a-kind" gift he got for his wife on the latest episode of <em>He Said She Said</em> with Shelly Horton.</p> <p dir="ltr">Fordham recalled visiting a building site with their three children and letting them spray-paint parts of the building, including an old toilet.</p> <p dir="ltr">He then decided to bring the painted toilet home as a surprise, which ultimately, didn’t impress his wife.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Jodie didn't like it, and so she said, 'Get it out of the house,'" he told Horton.</p> <p dir="ltr">Fordham admitted that it stayed in the "corner of the backyard for about a year" before he got rid of it.</p> <p dir="ltr">He tried to hilariously justify his thought process, "I thought she'd think it was cute, it was painted by her children, her flesh and blood!"</p> <p dir="ltr">Horton quipped that this was "possibly one of the worst presents I've ever heard of."</p> <p dir="ltr">The radio host then shared that he and his wife usually "tip each other off" about the gifts that they want, but they occasionally try to surprise each other.</p> <p dir="ltr">Both hosts eventually came to the conclusion that "experiences" are excellent gifts for long-term couples who already have "everything."</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram/9Honey</em></p> <p> </p>

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