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Here’s what happens to your body after you have a soft drink

<p>Half an hour after finishing a can of soft drink, your blood sugar has spiked.</p> <p>So you're probably feeling pretty good. Your cells have plenty of energy, more than they need.</p> <p>Maybe that soft drink had some caffeine as well, giving your central nervous system a kick, making you feel excitable, suppressing any tiredness you might have.</p> <p>But a<span> </span><a href="https://baker.edu.au/news/media-releases/soft-drink-metabolic">clever new study</a>, published on Monday, nicely illustrates that while you're feeling good, strange things are going on inside your blood vessels – and in the long run they are not good for you.</p> <p>For this study, 28 obese or overweight young adults agreed to sit in a lab for a whole day while having their blood continuously sampled.</p> <p>The volunteers ate a normal breakfast, lunch and dinner. At morning tea and afternoon tea, researchers from Melbourne's Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute gave them a can of soft drink.</p> <p>Their blood samples revealed exactly what happened next.</p> <p>Sugar from, say, a chocolate bar is released slowly, as your digestive system breaks it down.</p> <p>With a can of soft drink, almost no break-down time is needed. The drink's sugar starts to hit your bloodstream within about 30 minutes. That's why you get such a big spike.</p> <p>Your body responds to high levels of blood sugar by producing a hormone called insulin.</p> <p>Insulin pumps through the bloodstream and tells your cells to suck in as much sugar as they can. The cells then start burning it, and storing what they can't burn.</p> <p>That quickly reduces the amount of sugar in the blood, and gives you a burst of energy. So far, so good.</p> <p>But the sugar keeps coming. High levels of blood sugar will quickly damage your blood vessels, so the body keeps making insulin.</p> <p>In fact, just having two cans of soft drink meant the volunteers' insulin stayed significantly higher than usual - all day.</p> <p>After lunch, and another soft drink for afternoon tea, their sugar and insulin levels spiked again.</p> <p>And, once again, over the next few hours blood sugar dropped but insulin levels stayed stubbornly high – right through to late afternoon, when the study finished.</p> <p>The study demonstrates that two cans of soft drink is all it takes to give your pancreas – the crucial organ that produces insulin – a serious workout, says Professor Bronwyn Kingwell, the study's senior author.</p> <p>"If you did this day in, day out, your pancreas would be under considerable stress – and this is how diabetes can develop," says Kingwell. "Having a little can of soft drink in the morning is going to have lasting effects throughout the day."</p> <p>If your diet has too much sugar in it, forcing your body to keep your insulin high all the time, eventually your cells will grow insulin-resistant. That forces the pancreas to make even more insulin, adding to its workload. Eventually, it will burn out.</p> <p>But something else interesting is happening inside your body as well. Insulin tells your body to burn sugar, but it also tells it to stop burning fat.</p> <p>Normally, the body burns a little bit of both at once. But after a soft drink, your insulin stays high all day – so you won't burn much fat, whether you're on a diet or not.</p> <p>One of the study's participants, Michelle Kneipp, is now trying as hard as she can to kick her soft-drink habit.</p> <p>She's switched soft drinks for flavoured sparkling water. "It still tastes like soft drink, and it's still got the fizz," she says.</p> <p>"But it's hard, because sugar's a very addictive substance."</p> <p><em>Written by Liam Mannix. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Stuff.co.nz.</strong></span></a>  </em></p>

Body

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Raspberry cranachan

<p>This traditional Scottish dessert is quick and easy to put together, and the nutritious combination of cream, fromage frais, oats and fresh fruit makes a superb sweet course for a special occasion meal. The whisky not only adds a taste of Scotland but gives a fantastic kick to the flavour.</p> <p><strong><u>Serves:</u></strong> 4</p> <p><strong><u>Preparation</u></strong>: 15 minutes, plus 15 minutes cooling<br /><strong><u>Cooking:</u></strong> About 5 minutes</p> <p><strong><u>Ingredients:</u></strong></p> <ul> <li>¾ cup (75g) medium oatmeal</li> <li>150ml whipping cream</li> <li>⅔ cup (160g) fromage frais or Greek-style yoghurt</li> <li>2 tablespoons honey</li> <li>2 tablespoons whisky</li> <li>400g raspberries</li> <li>400g raspberries</li> </ul> <p><strong><u>Method:</u></strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat the grill to high.</li> <li>Line the rack of the grill pan with foil and spread the oats over the foil.</li> <li>Toast under the grill for about 3 minutes, stirring once or twice, until the oats are golden.</li> <li>Set aside to cool for about 15 minutes.</li> <li>Roughly chop the oats or transfer to a food processor and blitz until roughly chopped.</li> <li>Put the cream and fromage frais or yoghurt in a bowl and whip together until thick.</li> <li>Stir in the honey and whisky, then fold in half of the toasted oats.</li> <li>Reserve a few raspberries for the decoration.</li> <li>Layer the remaining raspberries with the cream mixture in 4 glass serving dishes, starting with raspberries and ending with a layer of the cream mixture.</li> <li>Decorate each dessert with a sprinkling of the remaining toasted oats and the reserved raspberries.</li> <li>Serve immediately (or keep in the refrigerator for up to 1 hour before serving).</li> </ol> <p><br /><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/recipes/raspberry-cranachan">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Food & Wine

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5 travel hacks to stretch your holiday budget

<p>Unless you’re a trust fund kid or you have a bottomless bank account, you need to keep to a budget while travelling. Here are 5 hacks to help you stretch your holiday budget.</p> <p><strong>1. Buy travel insurance</strong></p> <p>When you’re planning a trip, you will look at all the ways you can save money, such as not paying for additional baggage or looking for low-cost carriers.</p> <p>However, you should never, ever scrimp on travel insurance.</p> <p>Travel insurance will save you money should you encounter any emergencies while overseas.</p> <p>For example, if you have a medical emergency while travelling, you can seek treatment at the hospital without worrying if you can afford it as you will be able to claim part of the cost.</p> <p>Buy the best travel insurance you can afford and make sure you read the terms and conditions to understand what it covers.</p> <p>Ensure you <u><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/tips/Top-5-Travel-Insurance-Tips">read the small print carefully</a></u>.</p> <p><strong>2. Make use of free Wi-Fi</strong></p> <p>Unless you need to constantly be on call (and let’s be honest, that kind of defeats the purpose of a holiday), you don’t need to pay for a roaming phone plan or even a local SIM card.</p> <p>You can just rely of free Wi-Fi that’s provided at most cafes and restaurants, and at your accommodation.</p> <p>With apps like FaceTime and WhatsApp for texting and making calls, you don’t have to spend any money to keep in touch with people back home.</p> <p>Check out our tips and tricks for helping stretch your <u><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/money/How-to-Manage-Your-Phone-Data-Use">mobile phone dollar further</a></u>.</p> <p><strong>3. Look for free or cheap activities</strong></p> <p>You don’t have to book expensive tour packages to enjoy your vacation.</p> <p>Instead, look for cheap or free activities.</p> <p>This is especially easy to do in larger cities.</p> <p>London, for example, has over 23 free museums, such as the Tate Modern, British Museum and the Victoria and Albert Museum.</p> <p>And the Museo del Prado in Madrid, Spain, offers free entry for the last two hours of every day.</p> <p>Search online for more such options.</p> <p>And there’s no better way to really get to know a place than to explore its streets.</p> <p>You can check online for free walking tours that are usually organised by experienced guides.</p> <p>You are free to tip the guide any amount you want at the end of the tour.</p> <p>If money is no object, check out these <u><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/diet/10-leisure-activities-burn-more-calories-you-realise">10 holiday activities that burn calories fast</a></u>. </p> <p><strong>4. Book accommodation with a kitchen</strong></p> <p>This is especially useful in cities where it’s expensive to eat out, such as Paris or London.</p> <p>Even eating in just one meal a day can save you a significant amount of money.</p> <p>The moment you settle in, go for a grocery run to buy ingredients for the duration of your stay.</p> <p>Ingredients like milk, juice, eggs, bread and sandwich meats can help you put together a great and satisfying breakfast.</p> <p>Planning a family trip or solo holiday anytime soon?</p> <p>You may have booked your plane tickets and accommodation, but that doesn’t mean you’re all set to go.</p> <p>Go through this travel checklist to make sure <u><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/avoid-pre-holiday-anxiety-our-travel-tip-checklist">you’ve got everything planned</a></u>.</p> <p><strong>5. Download apps for good deals</strong></p> <p>If you do want to have a little splurge while on holiday, use apps that can help you locate good deals.</p> <p>Sick of homemade sandwiches for lunch?</p> <p>Treat yourself to a great meal in London by using <span><a href="https://www.bookatable.co.uk/">Bookatable</a></span> by Michelin.</p> <p>The app lets you find good value set meals from popular restaurants and even those owned by celebrity chefs.</p> <p>For example, you can enjoy a meal at a Michelin Bib Gourmand restaurant for under £28 (AUD$50), which is a steal!</p> <p>Do some research before you reach your destination to find more such apps.</p> <p>Check out these 5 clever mobile travel apps that will assist you on <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/tips/Useful-Travel-Apps">your next big adventure</a></span>.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in </em><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/5-travel-hacks-stretch-your-holiday-budget?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></em></strong></span><em>. For more of what you love </em><em>from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><strong><em><u><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></u></em></strong><em>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Travel Tips

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Have a healthier relationship with your phone

<p>If you find yourself checking your phone several dozen times a day, don’t worry, it’s not quite your fault.</p> <p>Lots of apps and programs, especially social media apps, have been designed to capture your attention and make it difficult for you to put your phone down.</p> <p>Unfortunately, though, there’s a down side to all this connectivity.</p> <p>A study released last year showed that people with a longer average screen time, and those who used their phones close to bedtime, had poorer sleep quality.</p> <p>Another recent study, released in the journal The Lancet, revealed that the use of your phone in the wee hours of the morning could increase the chances of developing psychological issues such as depression, bipolar disorder and neuroticism.</p> <p>While the phone is undoubtedly important in our daily lives, we can all agree that we shouldn’t have to pay such a steep price for it in terms of compromising our health. It’s time to take some steps to cultivate a healthier relationship with our phones.</p> <p>Here are a few dos and don’ts: </p> <p><strong>DO</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Turn off app notifications</strong></li> </ul> <p>Every time a notification goes off, it serves as a trigger for us to immediately pick up our phones.</p> <p>Turning off notifications will ensure that we don’t constantly feel pressured to check what’s going on.</p> <p>If you must, just leave notifications on for chat functions so you don’t miss important messages.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Go grayscale</strong></li> </ul> <p>Setting your phone to grayscale can help you reduce the number of times you check it.</p> <p>This piece of advice comes from Tristan Harris, a former design ethicist at Google who co-founded The Center for Humane Technology.</p> <p>The reason behind this is that certain colours used by the apps, such as red and bright blue, subconsciously excite us and entice us to check our phones.</p> <p>By going grayscale, you lose such triggers.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Leave your phone behind</strong></li> </ul> <p>Spend some time physically apart from your phone.</p> <p>Start small by first leaving your phone in your bag when you work out at the gym, and work towards leaving your phone at home when you have a jog around the neighbourhood.</p> <p>After a while, you may get more comfortable with the idea of spending more time apart.</p> <p><strong>DON'T</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong>Charge your device in the bedroom</strong></li> </ul> <p>Alternatively, make sure your phone is out of reach or placed at the other end of the room.</p> <p>This makes sure that you don’t check it first thing in the morning before even getting out of bed.</p> <ul> <li><strong>Place your favourite app shortcuts on your home screen</strong></li> </ul> <p>With such quick access to these apps, you’ll be tempted to constantly check in.</p> <p>Instead, keep only important tools on your home screen and relegate the other apps to the back pages.</p> <p>This way, you have to type the app name and do a search whenever you want to launch it, which just might be enough to discourage you from using it.</p> <p><em>Written by Siti Rohani. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/have-healthier-relationship-your-phone?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Technology

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8 magical reasons to visit Ireland

<p><strong>1. Blarney Castle</strong></p> <p>In County Cork, it is famous for the Blarney Stone – kiss it for the gift of eternal eloquence, legend says. Visitors literally bend over backwards to smooch this fabled rock set into the castle’s wall. The 15th-century castle also offers gardens, caves and battlement views.</p> <p><strong>2. The Guinness Storehouse</strong></p> <p>At the St James’s Gate Brewery in Dublin welcomes over a million visitors each year to the on-site stout-producing plant. The Guinness Storehouse gives a behind the scenes look into the brewing process – over three million pints are brewed here daily. At the end of the brewery tour, visitors can relax with a pint while taking in the stunning 360-degree views of Dublin from the Gravity Bar.</p> <p><strong>3. Brú na Bóinne in County Meath</strong></p> <p>Is a Neolithic site of henges, standing stones and burial chambers, built about 3200 BC. Immensely popular year-round, Brú na Bóinne gets extra attention during winter solstice when, for a few dawns in late December, a beam of sunlight pierces a mysterious opening in one passage tomb, Newgrange, illuminating its chamber for a few minutes. So great is the demand to see the winter solstice sunrise at Newgrange that an annual lottery is held for chamber access.</p> <p><strong>4. The Rock of Cashel</strong></p> <p>(Or St Patrick’s Rock) in County Tipperary dates to the 12th and 13th centuries. The formidable fortress boasts a round tower, cathedral and chapel with priceless Celtic art and medieval architecture. In the fifth century, legend has it that St Patrick converted Aengus, the King of Munster, to Christianity at this very spot.</p> <p><strong>5. Experience the Festivals</strong></p> <p>From St Patrick’s Day to Galway International Arts Festival, Ireland has hundreds of cultural celebrations every year. The most anticipated is St Patrick’s Festival (around St Patrick’s Day, March 17), when parades and a carnival atmosphere will leave you spellbound.</p> <p><strong>6. Visit Dublin</strong></p> <p>The capital of the Republic of Ireland, Dublin buzzes with lively pubs, beautiful architecture and fine museums. A Dublin Pass will gain you entry to more than 30 top Dublin attractions, plus discounts for restaurants, shops, theatre, tours and transportation (and a free guidebook).</p> <p><strong>7. Revel in Irish Folklore</strong></p> <p>The World Heritage-listed Giant’s Causeway on the coast of County Antrim in Northern Ireland was, legend says, built by a giant, Fionn Mac Cumhail (Finn McCool), to keep his feet dry while walking to Scotland. Geologists suggest volcanic activity 60 million years ago created the 40,000 interlocking basalt columns that amaze visitors today.</p> <p><strong>8. Dine on Irish Cuisine</strong></p> <p>Traditional dishes such as Irish stew, soda bread, farmhouse cheese, and colcannon (cabbage/kale and potatoes) are still on the menu, but the new wave of Irish cooking focuses on fresh local ingredients and the catch of the day. Seafood options include wild Atlantic salmon, oysters, scallops and lobster, Dublin Bay prawns, chargrilled swordfish and grilled sole. The Galway International Oyster &amp; Seafood Festival celebrates this bounty every September.</p> <p><em>Written by Jackie Middleton. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/8-Magical-Reasons-to-Visit-Ireland">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

International Travel

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Coles customer finds needle in mango

<p>As authorities continue to warn Aussies to cut up their fruit amidst the tampering scandal, a customer has discovered a needle embedded inside a supermarket-bought mango.</p> <p>On Monday, the customer purchased the mango at a Coles supermarket in West Gosford on the NSW Central Coast.</p> <p>Chief Inspector Nigel Webber said the customer had the mango for two days before cutting it up and finding the small needle wedged inside.</p> <p>The shopper immediately reported the discovery to local police.</p> <p>“Police have seized the needle for forensic examination. No persons were injured,” he told the <a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/central-coast/needle-found-in-mango-bought-at-coles-west-gosford/news-story/b4886ecdb2c375d5fc48a05250b2af2d?utm_source=DailyTelegraph&amp;utm_campaign=EditorialSF&amp;utm_medium=Facebook&amp;utm_content=SocialFlow"><strong>Central Coast Gosford Express Advocate</strong></a>.</p> <p>A Coles spokeswoman said the supermarket giant takes “food safety seriously and this matter is being investigated”.</p> <p>“Health authorities have advised people should cut their fruit before they consume it,” she said.</p> <p>The discovery follows more than 100 reports of needles being found in strawberries, apples and bananas around the country.</p> <p>New South Wales Acting Assistant Police Commissioner Stuart Smith revealed that a <strong><u>12-year-old girl confessed</u></strong> to inserting needles into strawberries in what is believed to be a copycat prank.</p> <p>The school student allegedly inserted the needles into the strawberries and then showed her friends in her school located in the Blue Mountains.</p> <p>One of the students informed staff and the police were immediately contacted.</p> <p>When the police interviewed the girl at her home, she eventually confessed to planting the needles herself.</p> <p>“Obviously, in the last few days we found a young person has admitted to a prank, including putting needles in strawberries,” Mr Smith told reporters in Sydney.</p> <p>Meanwhile, farmers selling their produce at markets have invested in metal detectors to prove their fruit is untampered with.</p> <p>However, Liz Jarman from Berry Sweet farm in Queensland said the small conveyor belt is as pricey as a small car.</p> <p>“They are installed at the end of pack benches, they are like miniature versions of the metal detectors at the airport,” she said.</p> <p>Ms Jarman said the precautionary is working, revealing that she was one of the many farmers who sold all of their strawberries hours before the market closed. </p> <p> </p>

Legal

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A day in the life of a luxury cruise ship passenger

<p><strong>1. Rise and shine</strong></p> <p>Everyone wakes up on a cruise to find themselves floating blissfully somewhere between vast seas and even vaster skies.</p> <p>While you slumbered, your floating hotel travelled through the night. Come morning, just outside your window is a completely new world and destination waiting for you to discover. What a way to start your day!</p> <p><strong>2. Breakfast club</strong></p> <p>Early risers can catch sunrise from the deck with a steaming cup of coffee and warm French pastries before heading to breakfast, while later risers can take in the views and the fresh sea air before heading downstairs to breakfast. Cruise restaurants offer banquets fit for a king. Choose from fresh fruit, omelettes, pancakes and, of course, ­a traditional full English breakfast.</p> <p><strong>3. Ease into your day</strong></p> <p>Energise your morning with a gentle yoga class, stretching your body and relaxing your mind on the top deck, or doing a few laps of the pool. For something a little more invigorating, hit the gym. If that sounds like too much action, simply spend your morning lounging by the pool or getting lost in a book, perhaps engrossing yourself in the history, culture and legends of your next port of call.</p> <p><strong>4. Port action</strong></p> <p>If it’s a port day, you might want to head out straight after breakfast to fit in all the sights. Maybe you have a tour lined up to see the local attractions; a boat trip to view a coral reef; or a sightseeing tour from high up above a rainforest canopy.</p> <p>From tropical island paradises of the South Pacific to the majestic ice-scapes of Scandinavia and Alaska and the bustling Mediterranean, where you can take a nostalgic trip back in history and visit ancient monuments and ruins, the world is your oyster as far as cruise travel is concerned.</p> <p>You can also choose to whittle the afternoon away in a quaint restaurant and watch the world go by.</p> <p><strong>5. Me time</strong></p> <p>If you spent the previous day exploring on land, a day on board allows you to unwind and soak in the delights of ship life, such as a day of spa treatments and pampering, sunbathing by the pool, or simply afternoon tea on deck.</p> <p>For a bit more excitement, try the surfing and skydiving simulators.</p> <p>Or if you want to learn something, take a cookery class, or learn to dance the tango. Whatever your poison, what is not to be missed is watching the sun going down from the deck with a glass of Happy Hour bubbles in hand.</p> <p><strong>6. Make a night of it</strong></p> <p>An array of Broadway shows, cabaret spectaculars and concerts are on offer after dark. And if you want to party like it’s 1999, head to the nightclubs and chic lounges where everyone’s party can carry on late into the night.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/cruising/day-life-luxury-cruise-ship-passenger?items_per_page=All">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Cruising

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Sally Field opens up about her controlling relationship with Burt Reynolds

<p>Sally Field is revealing more about her one-time relationship with the late Burt Reynolds in her new memoir, <em>In Pieces</em>.</p> <p>Released on Tuesday, the book exposed the pair's tumultuous relationship as Field described the actor – who she dated for several years since the beginning of 1977 – as controlling and distant.</p> <p>“By the time we met, the weight of his stardom had become a way for Burt to control everyone around him, and from the moment I walked through the door, it was a way to control me. We were a perfect match of flaws,” she wrote. “Blindly I fell into a rut that had long ago formed in my road, a pre-programmed behaviour as if in some past I had pledged a soul binding commitment to this man.”</p> <p>Reynolds, who first met Field on the set of <em>Smokey and the Bandit</em>, told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.vanityfair.com/hollywood/2015/11/burt-reynolds-on-career-bankruptcy-regrets" target="_blank">Vanity Fair</a> </em>in 2015 that Field was the “love of my life".</p> <p>“I was always flattered when he said that,” Field told Diane Sawyer on <em>Good Morning America</em>. “But he was a complicated man.”</p> <p>Field has previously spoken to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/11/books/sally-field-burt-reynolds-in-pieces-memoir.html" target="_blank"><em>The New York Times</em></a>, saying she was “glad” Reynolds wasn’t around to read her book. Reynolds died on September 6 at the age of 82.</p> <p>“This would hurt him,” she said in the interview last week. “I felt glad that he wasn’t going to read it, he wasn’t going to be asked about it, and he wasn’t going to have to defend himself or lash out, which he probably would have.”</p> <p>Field opened up about her dark past in her book as she revealed that she had been molested by her stepfather during her childhood, something that later on affected the relationship she shared with Reynolds.</p> <p>She told <em>The New York Times</em> that her time with Reynolds was “confusing and complicated, and not without loving and caring, but really complicated and hurtful to me.” </p>

Movies

News

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The weird thing spotted on PM Scott Morrison's desk

<p>Scott Morrison, who became the 30th Prime Minister of Australia after a recent Liberal Leadership spill, appears to be proud of his past as the former immigration minister.</p> <p>In an article published by the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/15/opinion/columnists/trump-finally-makes-a-friend.html"><em><strong><u>New York Times</u></strong></em></a> earlier this week, it was revealed that the Prime Minister’s office "features a model migrant boat bearing the proud declaration 'I Stopped These'."</p> <p>The claim generated a stir online, with many surprised Mr Morrison would be so proud to remind himself of the “stop the boats” campaign which saw thousands placed into Pacific Island detention camps and the controversial turn-back of boats.</p> <p>Others were curious to see the alleged model as it had not been widely reported by other journalists.</p> <p>However, on Wednesday the photo of the model was captured by AAP photographer Lukas Coch to confirm that it does exist.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Goodness me. <a href="https://t.co/OySZEn9smi">pic.twitter.com/OySZEn9smi</a></p> — Pat Caruana (@patbcaruana) <a href="https://twitter.com/patbcaruana/status/1042231747188912128?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 19, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The photo appears to show a laser-cut block of metal depicting an Asian fishing boat riding over a wave, with the words: “I stopped these”.</p> <p>“His office features a model migrant boat bearing the proud declaration ‘I Stopped These,’ and a cabinet adorned with a Jesus shrine and a biblical proverb to ‘Trust in the Lord',” the Times journalist wrote.</p> <p>The trophy drew criticism online with one person saying: “It looks like a novelty bottle-opener.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">It looks like a novelty bottle-opener <a href="https://t.co/aqe9gYChoV">https://t.co/aqe9gYChoV</a></p> — James Jeffrey (@James_Jeffrey) <a href="https://twitter.com/James_Jeffrey/status/1042239043772149760?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 19, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>In an interview with Channel Nine, Mr Morrison revealed how he got the trophy. </p> <p>“It was given to me by a mate down in the Shire who runs a sign business. He loved the fact that we did that,” Mr Morrison said.</p> <p>“It has been sitting in my office, by the way, for about five years. I don’t think that there is anything terribly new about it.”</p> <p>The Prime Minister regularly mentions the “stop the boats” campaign, making reference to it three times during his first major speech as a leader.</p> <p>On Wednesday he told the chamber: "The Australian people know about me, that they can trust me on the borders and they can trust me on the budget, because that's my record."</p>

News

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Strawberry farming families in crisis: "Within three days we lost it all"

<p>A strawberry farm has been forced to shut down its season early and destroy hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of produce following the national contamination scare.</p> <p>Suncoast Harvest, a small farm on the Sunshine Coast, laid off 100 workers weeks ahead of schedule as sales plummeted after the needle scare.</p> <p>“We have decided it is best to pull out of growing strawberries for the rest of this year... and begin spraying out healthy paddocks of luscious, juicy berries,” the farm said.</p> <p>“Imagine how many millions of punnets of strawberries are going into landfill this week? Sad day for the environment too.”</p> <p>The company is one of many strawberry farms that have been forced to throw out produce as customers refuse to buy the fruit.</p> <p>Suncoast Harvest was not one of the six growers whose produce was sabotaged with needles and razor blades, but the whole industry is suffering.</p> <p>The contamination frenzy was heightened after supermarkets pulled all strawberries from shelves, with ALDI only putting them back on Monday.</p> <p>The strawberry farm owner hit back at those who complained about the contaminated fruit to social media, sparking fear about the safety of all strawberries.</p> <p>“There are proper channels to report these things to so they can be substantiated before causing fear and/or harm. Have a care, people,” they said. </p> <p>“Thumbs down to the various government departments who mismanaged this into an international scare campaign. They need to be held accountable.”</p> <p>The person responsible for the contamination is yet to be identified.</p> <p>Queensland Premier Anastacia Palaszczuk issued a $100,000 reward for information leading to the capture of the saboteur, who could face up to 10 years jail.</p> <p>“Hopefully, they find out who has committed this awful crime against our industry and our favourite fruit and against Australian consumers and farmers,” Suncoast Harvest said.</p> <p>“Food tampering carries maximum penalties for good reason. We all enjoy safe, clean food in this country and on that reputation, we have export markets across the globe.</p> <p>"Whoever has jeopardised that reputation and our confidence in the foods we eat need to be severely dealt with.”</p> <p>Earlier this week, the Queensland Strawberry Growers Association warned that a dozen growers could out of business even if their strawberries had not been contaminated.</p> <p>The situation was even worse for the growers whose berries were tampered with.</p> <p>The daughter of the couple who runs Donnybrook Berries, one of the brands that were tampered with, shared a heartbreaking video of harvested fruit being dumped.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fsteph.chheang%2Fvideos%2F972927732890744%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=269" width="269" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>“This is no doubt the worst thing to ever happen to my family. This is worth more than you could ever imagine and within three days we lost it all,” Stephanie Chheang said, referring to her mother and stepfather’s business.</p> <p>“We have to throw them out because the markets wouldn't take our strawberries due to the needle scare,” she said.</p> <p>“They put all their money and effort in to build such a successful business. They work hard to make the money for our family and to have these selfish individuals destroy it is just so upsetting.</p> <p>“My mum works day through to the night, controlling the shed and her 250 employees, making sure her strawberries are packed to perfection.”</p> <p>Berry Obsession, Berry Licious and Donnybrook Berries have recalled their strawberries nationwide.</p> <p>Police are also investigation contamination of fruit sold by Delightful Strawberries, Love Berries and Oasis in NSW, Queensland, Victoria and the ACT.</p>

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Roger Federer breaks silence on Serena Williams sexism saga

<p>Tennis superstar Roger Federer has opened up about the Serena Williams US Open sexism debacle, saying the game could use the incident as a catalyst for change.</p> <p>Williams caused worldwide controversy after claiming umpire Carlos Ramos displayed sexist behaviour and racism during her US Open final loss to Naomi Osaka.</p> <p>Tennis stars and the sporting community were divided by her comments, as some agreed that Williams anger was justified, while others believed that it was poor sportsmanship.</p> <p>Federer, who has had his own fair share of conflicts with umpire Fergus Murphy dating back to 2009, remained neutral when stating his views on the scandal.</p> <p>“It’s interesting but I think it’s important to look at it,” Federer told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.kvue.com/" target="_blank">KVUE</a></em>.</p> <p>“Every umpire has their own style, it’s just how it is in any sport.</p> <p>“In tennis, you might have an umpire that gives more coaching violations and another guy goes more to time violation.</p> <p>“You might get one guy who knows that this guy misbehaves quite often so I’ll give him a warning quicker or I’ll be more lenient with a guy because he’s a nice guy and just can’t control himself. I think it really depends on the situation.”</p> <p>While the champion tennis player believes that mistakes occurred on the court, the 20-time grand slam champion hoped that sexism had nothing to do with it.</p> <p>“I hope it’s not the case (that there is gender bias) but I think what happened, obviously there were mistakes along the way and there should be more discretion sometimes.</p> <p>“At the same time, they have to do their job, that’s what we want them to do.</p> <p>“It’s been tricky but a really interesting case to study."</p> <p>A report from the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/14/sports/tennis-fines-men-women.html" target="_blank">New York Times</a></em> revealed that male tennis players are three times more likely to be punished or fined for racquet abuse.</p> <p>Male players were fined 1517 times compared to women who were fined 535 times, according to data compiled by officials at Grand Slam tournaments for the period covering 1998 to 2018.</p> <p>However, Williams who spoke on <em>The Project</em> for the first time since the incident, refused to back down with her argument.</p> <p>“I just don’t understand … if you’re a female you should be able to do even half of what a guy can do,” she told <em>The Project</em>.</p> <p>“I feel it’s really important to stand up for what you believe in.</p> <p>“Especially if it can affect the future and affect a lot of people in the future. That’s what it’s all about.</p> <p>“Really it’s just about having a great team and rolling up your sleeves and hard work.</p> <p>“I work really, really hard at my game. And then I work super hard at my fashion business. And I’m working incredibly hard at being a mom.”</p> <p>Do you agree with Serena's views? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

News

Travel

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Cathay Pacific's embarrassing blunder

<p>Whoever is in charge of branding Cathay Pacific Airways should probably look into spell check after the award-winning airline let one of its new jets fly the skies with the name “Cathay Paciic” painted on its side.</p> <p>The airline was immediately contacted after travellers at Hong Kong International Airport spotted the sign-writer's blunder.</p> <p>Airline officials responded to the mishap with good humour.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Oops this special livery won’t last long! She’s going back to the shop!<br />(Source: HKADB) <a href="https://t.co/20SRQpKXET">pic.twitter.com/20SRQpKXET</a></p> — Cathay Pacific (@cathaypacific) <a href="https://twitter.com/cathaypacific/status/1042252802917953536?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">19 September 2018</a></blockquote> <p>“Oops … She’s going back to the shop!” a social media staffer from the company joked on Twitter.</p> <p>The users were quick to respond, gathering mixed reactions of amazement and amusement.</p> <p>While some people found the mistake to be hilarious, others used the example to highlight declining standards across the industry.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Fixed it. <a href="https://t.co/c8NtP9asRs">pic.twitter.com/c8NtP9asRs</a></p> — Willie Montgomery (@shoxdude) <a href="https://twitter.com/shoxdude/status/1042443023769104384?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">19 September 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">If they can get this obviously wrong makes you wonder about the more important engineering on the plane!</p> — HK Phil (@london_phil09) <a href="https://twitter.com/london_phil09/status/1042253263578382336?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">19 September 2018</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">No one gives a F anymore, not even the painters!</p> — -.. . .- -. (@thesmartpirate) <a href="https://twitter.com/thesmartpirate/status/1042263511756361729?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">19 September 2018</a></blockquote> <p>While the airline defended its error by stating it was a simple and genuine oversight, many weren’t buying it.</p> <p>“The spacing is too on-point for a mishap,” an engineer for Haeco, a sister company of the airline, told the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.scmp.com/frontpage/international" target="_blank">South China Morning Post</a>.</p> <p>“There should be a blank gap in between letters if it was a real mistake I think.”</p>

International Travel

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The $9 Kmart hack that Aussie travellers swear by

<p>Packing a suitcase is a task that can prove to be quite challenging as you struggle to fit in all your essentials.</p> <p>However, Aussie travellers are now singing the praises of a $9 Kmart product that they claim is their secret trick to organising their suitcase before they travel.</p> <p>Kmart shoppers are encouraging others to purchase ‘packing cubes’ so they can save both time and space when they prepare their luggage for a trip.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 306px; height:254px;" src="/media/7820902/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c9d743d8ec7b4c67a075b4558d4152b1" /></p> <p>The light-weight zip-up bags come in a set of three and allow travellers to compartmentalise their essentials inside a suitcase.</p> <p>Many travellers have revealed how much space the packing cubes saved in their suitcases.</p> <p>“I took this travel opportunity to use the $9 packing cubes and I have to say, I am gobsmacked. So impressed with how much I can fit in my suitcase using them,” a woman, who runs Kmart Styling Facebook page, said.</p> <p>“I love the idea of these cubes – I know where all my things are, they’re easy to access and put back and the best news of all … I still have plenty of room left in my suitcase so I can shop and buy some more stuff to bring back home.”</p> <p>Another said: “Great for organising and can fit so much when clothes are rolled or folded correctly.”</p> <p>One shopper explained that they use their cubes in various circumstances, including organising their nappy bag essentials.</p> <p>“Love love them! Use them for everything and have three sets. I use the smallest pouch to organise my little ones nappy bag essentials,” she wrote.</p> <p>The cubes have also helped travellers keep their belongings neat and tidy once they arrive at their destination.</p> <p>“We found the packing cubes meant NO MORE searching for anything and having to re-pack and re-sort continually. Very much like a suitcase filing cabinet,” one person told <a href="https://www.escape.com.au/"><strong><em><u>Escape</u></em></strong></a>.</p> <p>Another revealed: “My suitcase has never been so neat, compact and organised. Group together items; seasonal, dirty, underwear. Packs can be placed straight into the hotel wardrobe for easy access and then pop back into the bag quickly and easily.”</p> <p>What is your best packing trick? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Travel Tips

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Iconic Aussie pubs you cannot afford to miss

<p>It would be un-Australian to not bend your elbow at one of these iconic Aussie pubs if you are passing through. </p> <p><strong>1. The Prairie Hotel, SA</strong></p> <p>Voted Australia’s Number 1 Outback Hotel by <em>Australian Geographic</em> magazine in 2016, the Prairie Hotel in Parachilna draws thousands of visitors each year for its stunning Flinders Ranges location, artisan accommodations and highly unusual menu.</p> <p>While the gourmet bush foods change seasonally, the signature dish, available year-round, is the FMG – feral mixed grill – and basically means if you can kill it, they’ll grill it. Kangaroo, wallaby, emu, goat, camel, rabbit … are expertly complemented by locally sourced native ingredients such as quandongs, native limes and bush tomatoes.</p> <p>For a truly unique Australian pub food experience, what could be more adventurous? </p> <p><strong>2. The Ettamogah Pub, NSW</strong></p> <p>When Australian cartoonist Ken Maynard scratched out his first doodles of the Ettamogah Pub in the late ’50s – an oddly top-heavy construction full of chain-smoking dogs and rural ruffians with a flat-bed truck parked precariously on the roof – he could not have imagined that half a century later four such pubs would exist in the real world.</p> <p>A brick and mortar tribute to his comic strip that ran in the weekly Australasian Post from 1958 until its final issue in 2002, the first Ettamogah Pub opened in 1987 in Albury, NSW, where Maynard was born.</p> <p>This award-winning family-friendly hotel has since been renovated to add a sports bar, cocktail lounge and other distractions such as a jumping castle and rock-climbing wall for the kids.</p> <p>The original red-roofed timber building with its unique slanted walls true to Maynard’s cartoon vision has been preserved as a permanent tourist attraction. </p> <p><strong>3. The Cherry Bar, VIC</strong></p> <p>Any ‘favourite gig joint’ straw poll of local or international rock acts will likely include this hardcore underground bar, the only business located along the aptly named ACDC Lane in Melbourne’s CBD.</p> <p>The tiny 200-capacity live music venue is a standard fixture for touring legends, who like to pop in for a drink or play a set in between huge theatre or arena shows.</p> <p>Guns N’ Roses front man Axl Rose loved the place so much, he once whiled away six hours there; Oasis guitarist Noel Gallagher famously tried to buy it during a 2002 tour down under; and when Lady Gaga wanted to host her 4th of July party there in 2012 she was turned away because The Cherry refused to bump an existing booking for local band Jackson Firebird.</p> <p>Now that’s rock ‘n’ roll.</p> <p><strong>4. The Daly Waters Pub, NT</strong></p> <p>Looking for an Aussie outback pub dripping with character?</p> <p>The Daly Waters Pub, around 600km south of Darwin along the Stuart Highway to Alice Springs, claims to have “witnessed murders, shoot-outs in the main street, cattle stampeding through town and the odd drunken brawls”.</p> <p>It’s also haunted by the ghost of a woman named Sarah who was murdered by her husband.</p> <p>Oh, and female visitors are invited to ‘leave their mark’ by removing their bra and hanging it from the ceiling, a tradition that began in the early ’80s over a lost bet and continues to this day.</p> <p>It’s not limited to just ladies’ undergarments. Literally anything can be left pinned to any available surface.</p> <p>Half the fun of a Daly Waters Pub stopover (besides the swimming pool and the superb ‘beef ‘n’ barra’ dining option) is to browse through the memorabilia of thousands of previous visitors.</p> <p>What will you choose to leave behind?  </p> <p><em>Written by Greg Barton. This article first appeared in <span><a href="http://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/destinations/iconic-aussie-pubs-you-cannot-afford-miss">Reader’s Digest</a></span>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <span><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestsubscribe?utm_source=readersdigest&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;utm_medium=display&amp;keycode=WRA85S">here’s our best subscription offer</a></span>.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Domestic Travel

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$4.6 million payout over cruise nightmare

<p>A man has been awarded a $4.6 million compensation from Norwegian Cruise Lines after a simple trip to the cruise doctor turned into hell.</p> <p>Ilija Loncar, 30, who was formerly employed as a waiter on the cruise ship the Norwegian Breakaway, made a trip to the ship’s doctor after he developed flu-like symptoms, including nausea.</p> <p>The doctor onboard, Sebastian Campuzano, had been hired by the cruise line a few months prior and was described as a “young, inexperienced, Columbia-trained physician”.</p> <p>To treat the mild symptoms, Dr Campuzano prescribed the antihistamine promethazine, which was injected by nurse Marco Oracion in a “huge” dose over a short period of time.</p> <p>This error led to an “intense” reaction that plunged Mr Loncar into a detrimental situation that resulted in his arm being amputated.</p> <p>Loncar’s lawyer, Thomas Scolaro, alleged in a Florida court that the medication wasn’t suitable for the worker’s illness and that the anti-nausea drug Zofran would’ve been a better treatment.</p> <p>The drug was also injected intravenously into Mr Loncar’s arm, instead of intramuscularly in his buttocks, which is the recommended technique.</p> <p>“(Dr Campuzano) gave the wrong medication, the wrong dosage by the wrong route through the wrong injection site, and it was administered over the wrong time and by the wrong method,” Mr Scolaro said.</p> <p>“They gave (Mr Loncar) the most dangerous type of medication they could give to treat this very simple, common problem that can be treated with a very light and easy medication — Zofran. It’s all they needed to do."</p> <p><span style="font-style: inherit; font-weight: inherit !important;">It was also claimed that the 25-milligram dose that was administered was well above the usual amount prescribed.</span></p> <p>The <a href="https://www.law.com/dailybusinessreview/2018/09/10/miami-attorney-helps-secure-3-3m-for-man-whose-arm-was-amputated-after-seeking-care-for-flu-like-symptoms/?slreturn=20180818215235"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Miami Daily Business Review</u></em></strong></a> reports: “All the medical data out there strongly suggests six and a quarter milligrams is a perfectly therapeutic dose. Campuzano orders it by intravenous injection when there is a pill, there’s a suppository, there’s a syrup.</p> <p>“ … He orders it by IV injection into the vein when — if you are going to order this medication through the injectable method — there’s a FDA black box warning on IV promethazine, which says the preferred route is deep intramuscular, which is a shot in the tush.”</p> <p>Even when Mr Loncar reported a reaction to the medication, the medical staff did not respond.</p> <p>“As soon as the medication went in he immediately reported burning,” Mr Scolaro said. </p> <p>“All the warnings out there say when there is a reported burning, you stop.”</p> <p>A few hours later, Mr Loncar’s right forearm turned black and blue.</p> <p>Instead of immediately evacuating the employee to a hospital, the medical staff massaged the area for 24 hours until the ship reached the next dock.</p> <p>Due to the extreme negligence and human error, Mr Loncar developed Compartment Syndrome, where pressure builds up due to internal bleeding and swelling.</p> <p>Once he arrived at a hospital, it was too late to save his gangrene-infected arm.</p> <p>After emergency operations, Mr Loncar’s arm was amputated at the elbow.</p> <p>The former employee suffered mental anguish, loss of capacity for the enjoyment of life, loss of future earning capacity, aggravation of pre-existing conditions, inconvenience, humiliation, scarring and disfigurement.</p> <p>Mr Scolora alleges that this is all because of “wilful, wanton, and outrageous violations” in the form of medical errors and the failure to evacuate Mr Loncar.</p> <p>Mr Loncar was awarded AU$4.6 million for past and present pain, medical expenses and loss of earning capacity.</p>

Cruising

Health

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The pain of being misdiagnosed with Alzheimer's

<p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__intro sics-component__story__paragraph">Martin can recall, all too clearly, the day he received the devastating diagnosis of advanced Alzheimer's. He left the consultant's office, trying to understand how profoundly his life was going to change.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It is 10 years since Martin, who "does not want to use my full name in case people who do not know me well start wondering if I really am all right", had become anxious enough about his forgetfulness and short-term memory loss to go to his GP.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He was referred to the dementia clinic under a consultant at a London teaching hospital and in 2010 began two years of regular brain scans, while a psychiatrist performed detailed yearly cognitive tests.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He was reassured by the knowledge that if something serious was taking place it would be identified. But during this time, Martin, 74, and his wife agree, his memory and cognitive ability did not seem to deteriorate.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">The consultant who had been monitoring his condition said she wanted to put Martin on galantamine, medication that is supposed to slow the progress of Alzheimer's, but is not a cure. In order to do this she had to give a formal diagnosis: "She said my hippocampus was riddled with sticky plasma of the kind indicating Alzheimer's, and I felt I had to trust her judgment."</p> <div class="sics-component__ad-space sics-component__ad-space--storybody "> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Martin and his wife asked to see the scans showing how the disease had progressed so they could understand. The consultant said she did not have the equipment to show them. At this point, Martin said he wanted a second opinion, but, while he waited for a referral, his wife remembers he "became depressed and withdrawn; neighbours commented on it, too. I can see now what a profound effect the diagnosis had on him psychologically."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He adds: "From the moment I saw myself as an Alzheimer's patient, I began to dismantle my life and my dreams of the future."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He retired from publishing three years early and cut back on plans he had made, from voluntary work to adventurous holidays.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It was several months before his first appointment with consultant neurologist Dr Catherine Mummery at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery in London – when things changed quite dramatically. "She spent an hour talking with me, discussing a range of topics, and asking other testing questions. At the end, she said she did not believe I had Alzheimer's."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">As the hospital's clinical lead for dementia services, Mummery "quite regularly" sees people who have been misdiagnosed with dementia. Alzheimer's, she explains, is only one form of brain disease causing dementia and globally there is misdiagnosis of between 20 and 30 per cent of dementia cases.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Alzheimer's can be a complex condition to diagnose and there are no clear national figures on misdiagnosis," says Mummery. "Nor is there such a thing as a 100 per cent test. Martin was given a diagnosis on the basis of a PET scan of his brain; however, there are a number of conditions from menopause to depression or schizophrenia, where changes may take place in brain metabolism, so caution is needed.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"If someone comes to me with an Alzheimer's diagnosis, I believe in doing my own tests and making my own judgment," she says. "Individuals will often not question the diagnosis they are given, as they expect the doctor to be accurate, due to their expertise. I would estimate that we see several cases a month where the diagnosis [should be] of another dementia, or where we have to retract the dementia diagnosis [altogether]."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">In Martin's case, she says: "I saw him three times and there were no changes, so I felt confident telling him categorically he did not have Alzheimer's. I continue to see him and there are no changes six years after the initial diagnosis."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Unhelpfully for those living in the shadow of the disease, post-mortem diagnosis is still the "gold standard for providing definitive evidence of Alzheimer's", Mummery explains. Yet, as no cure or effective treatment for the disease exists, early diagnosis is essential because some drugs can delay its progress and help preserve quality of life for as long as possible.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Dr Sara Imarisio, head of research at Alzheimer's Research UK, says that with "only 60 per cent of those estimated to be living with dementia having a formal diagnosis, and rates varying across the UK, it's important that healthcare professionals understand the signs. Memory tests, brain scans and spinal fluid samples taken by lumbar puncture can reveal changes linked to the early stages."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It is estimated that by 2025 there will be one million people in the UK with dementia, and it is the thing over-60s fear most, which means the importance of investment into improving diagnosis of Alzheimer's cannot be overstated, says Dominic Carter, senior policy officer at the Alzheimer's Society.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"We have made big progress in getting accurate diagnosis, but there are not enough of the best clinical tools for getting the most accurate information," he says. "And further research is needed into how we approach misdiagnosis with all the distress it causes."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">In 2016, researchers from St Michael's Hospital in Toronto, Canada, revealed the results of a preliminary study of inconsistencies between clinical and autopsy diagnoses in more than 1000 people listed in the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"Even with all the latest diagnostic methods, the discrepancy between the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and the pathological diagnosis is about 20 per cent," said adjunct scientist Dr David Munoz, the senior researcher.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">He and his colleagues found that 78 per cent of the patients they studied had a correct diagnosis in the clinic, which was confirmed in an autopsy of the brain. Nearly another 11 per cent didn't have a formal Alzheimer's diagnosis, yet were found to have had the disease. Roughly the same percentage of those diagnosed with Alzheimer's in the clinic did not actually have the disease.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">A false positive diagnosis can occur when, for instance, someone has depression and exhibits symptoms very similar to Alzheimer's. Others may have brain markers of Alzheimer's but never go on to develop the disease.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">Distress doesn't begin to describe the despair Martin felt at his diagnosis, but nor, he says, did having it revoked instantly make everything all right. "In one sense it was a relief, of course, but in another I just didn't know what to think. Could I really trust that Dr Mummery had it right?" he says.</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">"I felt very bewildered, unsure of everything and my mood remained low, which is not like me. I've always been very upbeat, busy, interested by life."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">When Martin's confusion and sense of being psychologically displaced did not lift, Mummery referred him on to a clinical psychologist, with whom he has rebuilt his confidence and faith in a good future. "She helped me see that when something like my diagnosis happens, you have to regain the ability to be the person you were before."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">It was tough for his wife as well: "I felt a sense of relief but I had also had to adjust to the idea that Martin would become less and less of the man I knew. A diagnosis like that is such a weight to bear."</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph">A weight that has been lifted sufficiently, at least, for the couple to be taking a special holiday next month. A full stop at the end of an ordeal, it is, they say delightedly, "a celebration of getting back a life we thought had been taken away".</p> <p class="sics-component__html-injector sics-component__story__paragraph"><em>Written by Angela Neustatter. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/life-style/well-good/teach-me/107159531/the-pain-of-being-misdiagnosed-with-alzheimers">Stuff.co.nz</a>. </em></p> </div>

Mind

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Cadbury vows to change packaging after death of 9-year-old in Australia

<p>Confectionary giant Cadbury has promised to implement changes to its packaging, following the death of a 9-year-old girl due to unclear labelling.</p> <p>Isabel Marrero died from an anaphylactic reaction in March this year after her mother gave her what looked like her favourite biscuit.</p> <p>Helen Marrero has been buying Cadbury choc chip cookies for years without problems, until recently. Helen had accidentally picked up the wrong variety of biscuit because the packets were almost identical.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/media/7820894/e7019d47a79957e7de1106fa40717094-79612.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7e109f9f5aa24b309b611fe9e8bc9d41" /></p> <p>“They both look like choc chip cookies to me even when you open them up they look pretty identical, but one has the allergen egg and one doesn’t,” she said.</p> <p>After her daughter’s tragic death, Ms Marrero went head on with food manufacturers in the hope to strengthen allergen labelling laws.</p> <p>Now, Cadbury has responded to the heartbroken family, promising to change its packaging so it’s easy to distinguish which biscuit is which.</p> <p>The company said it would add additional colour and descriptions to help separate the packets.</p> <p>“The aim is to highlight further that the products are different,” the company said in an email to the family.</p> <p>But it will take a while for the final product to reach our shores, as the new product is expected to hit Australian shelves next year.</p> <p>“As mentioned previously, the product is made overseas and shipped to Australia, so it does take some months to make it here,” Cadbury said.</p> <p>Ms Marrero still struggles with the loss of her daughter to this day, saying it’s a difficult feeling to describe. For her, life without Isabel “has been very hard, just every second thinking about her and trying to implement change so this doesn’t occur again".</p> <p>She asks all parents to remain vigilant and to always check the ingredients list before purchasing products.</p> <p>“Please, which I have learnt now, please read every single time you have purchased a product, even if you’ve been buying it for five years.”</p>

Caring

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“Truly disgusting”: Would you eat this? The food inside aged care facilities

<p>An investigation looking into the meals served to some of the most vulnerable people in Australia has uncovered a sickening reality.</p> <p>Food that wouldn’t be served to dogs is sadly being plated up as meals for elderly people living in Australia’s nursing homes, as budgets for aged care is slashed.</p> <p>Four thousand people involved with aged care wrote to the ABC as part of its investigation into the system, with the first of the two-part series airing on <em><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif;">Four Corners</span></em> last night.</p> <p>Concerned friends and family members sent in photographs of cheap and unhealthy meals, which included hot dogs with tomato sauce and watery soup.</p> <p>Aged care worker Nicole* described one common dish, known as minced moist, as “truly disgusting” with a “horrible” smell.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">As you sit down to dinner before watching part one of our <a href="https://twitter.com/4corners?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@4corners</a> collaborative investigation into <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/agedcare?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#agedcare</a> in Australia tonight, ask yourself: Would you eat this? <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/AgedCareRC?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#AgedCareRC</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Royalcommission?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Royalcommission</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/4Corners?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#4Corners</a> <a href="https://t.co/LE0yamOIT7">pic.twitter.com/LE0yamOIT7</a></p> — 🦄 Flip Prior 🦄 (@FlipPrior) <a href="https://twitter.com/FlipPrior/status/1041540319538343937?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">17 September 2018</a></blockquote> <p>Elizabeth*, who is an aged care worker in Melbourne spoke of undercooked vegetables, hard carrots and potatoes and tough meat.</p> <p>“Sadly, because of cutbacks it’s hard to retain good staff and resident meals suffer because no one really cares,” she said.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Would you eat this? <br />Take a look at the food served inside Australian <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/agedcare?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#agedcare</a> facilities before tonight's landmark investigation on <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/4Corners?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#4Corners</a> <a href="https://t.co/NuUupDE4In">pic.twitter.com/NuUupDE4In</a></p> — 4corners (@4corners) <a href="https://twitter.com/4corners/status/1041547844375572480?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">17 September 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The photographs showed meals that looked like unidentifiable blobs. Given the title “texture-modified meals”, the dish is for those who have trouble swallowing their food, the ABC reported.</p> <p>“My mother has dementia but still knows she is fed up with this meal and doesn’t like it,” one daughter told the broadcaster.</p> <p>While some meals looked healthy and nutritious, this was a rare case.</p> <p>Cherie Hugo, a dietitian who has looked after over 800 Australian aged care facilities, found that they were spending a mere $6.08 a day on food per resident.</p> <p>That’s $2 less than prison inmates and drastically less than what an average adult would spend, at $17 a day.</p> <p>Dr Hugo told the program that one of her biggest concerns was that the amount spent on aged care food had dropped by 31 cents per person per day in a year, while the figure spent on supplements had risen by 50 cents.</p> <p>Health Services Union national secretary Gerard Hayes has called it a “disgrace.”</p> <p>These findings come after Prime Minister Scott Morrison announced a royal commission into the aged care sector on Sunday following what he called an “alarming and disturbing” spike in elder abuse and poor standards.</p> <p><em><span style="font-family: 'Calibri',sans-serif;">*Names changed to protect identities.</span></em></p>

Caring

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Essential reading to get your head around Australia’s aged care crisis

<p>Tonight ABC’s<span> </span><em><a href="https://tv.press.abc.net.au/who-cares-four-corners">Four Corners</a></em><span> </span>will air the first of a two-part investigation into the often shocking treatment of the elderly in aged care homes around Australia.</p> <p>The timing coincides with Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s weekend<span> </span><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-09-16/scott-morrison-announces-royal-commission-into-aged-care-sector/10252850">announcement of a royal commission</a><span> </span>into Australia’s aged care system. The prime minister said poor standards had led authorities to close one aged centre per month since the Oakden aged mental health home scandal.</p> <p>South Australia’s Oakden facility<span> </span><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-09-22/oakden-closed-as-last-two-residents-moved-out/8974156">closed nearly a year ago</a>, following revelations of abuse and neglect dating back a decade.</p> <p>While the terms of reference are yet to be determined, the royal commission will likely look into issues already raised by previous inquiries into the sector. These include the changing demands of Australia’s ageing population, staffing ratios, funding levels and the mental health, wellbeing and safety needs of nursing home residents.</p> <p>Below are five articles in which our experts have previously explored the complex aspects of Australia’s aged care system, drawing on research which has exposed where the problems are, and have been for some time.</p> <p><strong>Lack of medical care</strong></p> <p>Our ageing population, and the focus on helping the elderly stay at home for as long as possible, means by the time people enter aged care they are older and sicker than before. Around<span> </span><a href="https://www.gen-agedcaredata.gov.au/Resources/Factsheets-and-infographics/Care-needs-factsheet.pdf?ext=">half of people</a><span> </span>living in aged care today have dementia, depression, or another mental health or behavioural condition.</p> <p>In fact, the proportion of older people requiring high care for complex needs, which includes assistance with all activities of daily living such as eating and bathing, has quadrupled from 13% in 2009 to 61% in 2016.</p> <p>Yet there is no legal requirement for all aged care facilities to provide 24-hour registered nursing care. In the article below, Jane Phillips, David Currow, Deborah Parker and Nola Ries explore how today’s nursing home residents have minimal access to quality medical care.</p> <p><em><strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/australias-aged-care-residents-are-very-sick-yet-the-government-doesnt-prioritise-medical-care-88690">Australia’s aged care residents are very sick, yet the government doesn’t prioritise medical care</a></strong></em></p> <p>In a separate piece on health care in nursing homes, Sarah Russell has also written:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>nursing home providers looking to cut costs are bypassing registered nurses and employing less-skilled personal care attendants (PCAs) who aren’t adequately trained for the job.</em></p> </blockquote> <p><strong><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/heres-why-we-need-nurse-resident-ratios-in-aged-care-homes-59682">Here’s why we need nurse-resident ratios in aged care homes</a></em></strong></p> <p><strong>Funding for older Australians to stay at home </strong></p> <p>Research <a href="http://www.naca.asn.au/Age_Well/Blueprint.pdf">consistently shows</a> more people want to stay in their own homes as they age. In the <a href="https://www.budget.gov.au/2018-19/content/speech/download/budget_speech.pdf">2018-19 budget</a>, the government announced an extra A$1.6 billion over the next four years for an additional 14,000 <a href="https://www.myagedcare.gov.au/help-home/home-care-packages">Home Care Packages</a>. These deliver an agreed set of services to meet the specific needs of aged Australians who want to remain at home.</p> <p>The government also subsidises a number (currently<span> </span><a href="https://theconversation.com/australias-aged-care-residents-are-very-sick-yet-the-government-doesnt-prioritise-medical-care-88690">around 283,000</a>) of residential care places for older people unable to continue living independently.</p> <p>Aged care subsidies are allocated<span> </span><a href="https://agedcare.health.gov.au/sites/g/files/net1426/f/documents/08_2016/2016_report_on_the_funding_and_financing_of_the_aged_care_industry_0.pdf">through a ratio</a>, which aims to provide 113 subsidised care places for every 1,000 people aged 70 and over. This ratio will increase to 125 places for every 1,000 by 2021-22. Within the overall number of places, the government also sets sub-targets for the numbers of Home Care Packages and residential care places.</p> <p>The government is aiming to amend the ratio in favour of more home care packages. By 2021-22, the target for home care packages will increase from 27 to 45 per 1,000, while the residential target is to reduce from 88 to 78 per 1,000.</p> <p>But as Professor of Health Economics at University of Technology Sydney, Michael Woods has written, this still won’t be enough to meet demand.</p> <p><em><strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/there-is-extra-funding-for-aged-care-in-the-budget-but-not-enough-to-meet-demand-96403">There is extra funding for aged care in the budget, but not enough to meet demand</a></strong></em></p> <p><strong>Poor mental health</strong></p> <p>Older Australians living in nursing homes represent one of society’s most vulnerable populations. More than 50% of<span> </span><a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/aged-care/depression-in-residential-aged-care-2008-2012/contents/table-of-contents">residents in nursing homes</a><span> </span>suffer from depression compared to 10-15% of adults of the same age living in the community.</p> <p>Recent<span> </span><a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/gps.4862">research</a><span> </span>conducted by Briony Murphy and Professor Joseph Ibrahim from Monash University’s Health Law and Ageing Research Unit, found around 140 Australian nursing-home residents took their own lives between 2000 and 2013.</p> <p>The authors found nearly 70% of those who took their own life were male, 66% had a diagnosis of depression, and nearly 80% were experiencing one or more major life stresses, such as health deterioration. Around 43% were experiencing isolation and loneliness, and nearly 30% had trouble adjusting to life in a nursing home.</p> <p>They wrote:</p> <blockquote> <p><em>The small proportion of adults over 65 living with depression in the community shows that depression is not a normal part of the ageing process … the much larger figure of those suffering depression in nursing homes raises some serious questions.</em></p> </blockquote> <p><em><strong><a href="https://theconversation.com/too-many-australians-living-in-nursing-homes-take-their-own-lives-92112">Too many Australians living in nursing homes take their own lives</a></strong></em></p> <p><strong>Poor oral health</strong></p> <p>Stories of abuse and neglect in nursing homes have also highlighted the issue of poor nutrition and oral health. In November 2017, the dire state of this was shown in a report of a<span> </span><a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/push-for-inquiry-after-woman-found-with-maggots-in-her-mouth-at-nsw-nursing-home-20170509-gw0p1j.html">nursing home resident in NSW</a><span> </span>who was found with maggots in her mouth the day before she died.</p> <p>Researchers have long highlighted people living in aged care have substantially poorer oral health and three times the risk of untreated tooth decay than people living in the community.</p> <p>Bronwyn Hemsley, Andrew Georgious, Joanne Steel and Susan Balandin collated a list of ways family members can help ensure their loved ones’ oral health is adequately looked after. This includes visiting your family member around mealtimes ...</p> <blockquote> <p><em>… or helping the person to eat … Ask the resident permission to look into her (or his) mouth to check if she (or he) is swallowing or removing leftover food promptly.</em></p> </blockquote> <p><strong><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/the-shocking-state-of-oral-health-in-our-nursing-homes-and-how-family-members-can-help-77473">The shocking state of oral health in our nursing homes, and how family members can help</a></em></strong></p> <p><em>If you or someone you know is experiencing depression or another mental health problem, contact<span> </span><a href="http://www.lifeline.org.au/">Lifeline</a><span> </span>13 11 14,<span> </span><a href="http://beyondblue.org.au/">beyondblue</a><span> </span>1300 22 4636 or<span> </span><a href="http://www.sane.org/">SANE Australia</a><span> </span>1800 18 7263.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Sasha Petrova. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/essential-reading-to-get-your-head-around-australias-aged-care-crisis-103325">The Conversation</a>. </em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

Lifestyle

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The strict dress code Kate and Meghan have to follow at Princess Eugenie’s wedding

<p>Step aside Kate and Meghan, it’s Princess Eugenie’s time to shine as her long-awaited wedding on October 12 to Jack Brooksbank fast approaches.</p> <p>And while it’s not expected to be as popular as the Duchess of Cambridge or Duchess of Sussex’s big day, it is a royal wedding after all, and strict dress code rules apply.</p> <p>All female guests attending the wedding are required to wear a hat, according to <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.express.co.uk/news/royal/1018743/meghan-markle-kate-middleton-princess-eugenie-jack-brooksbank-royal-wedding-royal-family" target="_blank">The Express</a></em> – and no one is exempt, including Kate, Meghan and even the Queen.</p> <p>Women must also don a day dress for the special occasion, while men are expected to arrive in a three-piece morning suit.</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820916/gettyimages-809199808.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c1c5ee9db451454c9b0cc7eac43d9869" /></p> <p>Princess Eugenie and her older sister Princess Beatrice made headlines in 2011 when they showed up to Prince William and Duchess Kate’s wedding wearing unflattering headpieces.</p> <p>Eugenie broke her silence on the criticism last month when she admitted that the backlash really affected them.</p> <p>“There was a horrible article that had been written about Beatrice and she got really upset,” the 28-year-old told <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.vogue.co.uk/article/princesses-beatrice-eugenie-of-york-interview" target="_blank">Vogue</a></em>.</p> <p>“We were just about to step out and she had a bit of a wobble and cried. I was looking after her. And then about an hour later, I had a wobble and started crying and Bea was there for me.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/media/7820919/gettyimages-960100926.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/fd086b8fa5554d4eafcc630776823131" /></p> <p>The sisters made sure they didn’t repeat the same mistakes, as they arrived in more subdued attire for the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s wedding in May.</p> <p>Are you excited for Princess Eugenie’s upcoming wedding? Let us know in the comments below.</p>

Beauty & Style

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Palace announces another royal wedding

<p>Buckingham Palace has announced that another royal wedding is on its way after the engagement of Lady Gabriella Windsor and Thomas Kingston.</p> <p>Lady Gabriella is the daughter of Prince Michael of Kent, who is a first cousin of the Queen.</p> <p>Thomas, 41, proposed to Gabriella last month on an island in the southwestern English Channel, the Isle of Sark.</p> <p>The palace released news of the couple’s nuptials alongside a statement written by Gabriella’s parents.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 324.99999999999994px; height:500px;" src="/media/7820907/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4f59e8e7da174d45969108813c4d8e41" /></p> <p>“Prince and Princess Michael of Kent are delighted to announce the engagement of their daughter Lady Gabriella Windsor to Mr Thomas Kingston. The engagement took place in August; Mr Kingston proposed on the Isle of Sark,” the statement read.</p> <p>Gabriella, who is affectionately known as Ella, is a second cousin to the Queen and 50th in line to the throne.</p> <p>The 37-year-old works as a brand director while Thomas works in market investment and is the Director of Devonport Capital.</p> <p>The newly-engaged couple will reportedly schedule their wedding for Spring 2019.</p> <p>Although Gabriella shies away from the spotlight, she does appear with the main members of the royal family for significant events, including Trooping the Colour to celebrate the Queen’s birthday.</p> <p>Thomas, 41, was previously in a relationship with Duchess Catherine’s younger sister, Pippa, who married James Matthews in May last year.</p> <p>Thomas and Pippa dated in 2011 and were spotted attending the ATP Tennis finals together.</p> <p>Their relationship quickly fizzled out, but they remain close friends. </p>

Relationships

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The bizarre royal wedding rules Princess Eugenie has to follow

<p>In just under a month, the second royal wedding of the year will take place as Princess Eugenie says “I do” to Jack Brooksbank on October 12.</p> <p>The youngest child of Prince Andrew and The Duchess of York Sarah Ferguson is planning for her big day to be a royal wedding extravaganza, with the ceremony taking place at St George’s Chapel at Windsor Castle, just like her cousin Prince Harry.</p> <p>But before the 28-year-old can enjoy the lead-up to her big day, there is a royal wedding protocol checklist that she needs to make sure is met.</p> <p>According to <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Evening Standard</em>, there are 17 rules that Eugenie must follow on her big day.</p> <p>Some of the rules are quite standard, such as the bride having to wear a white dress and a tiara.</p> <p>However, one of the more peculiar rules is that her wedding bouquet needs to contain myrtle – a tradition that has been carried out by every royal bride, including Duchess Meghan, since Queen Victoria walked down the aisle.</p> <p>The royal bride is also expected to lay her bouquet at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior, although it is not known where this must occur before or after the reception.</p> <p>Another royal protocol is that the royal family must always sit on the right-hand side of the church and that the bride’s ring must be made of Welsh gold.</p> <p>Although many royal weddings have been televised over the years, it has been reported that BBC <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/the-bizarre-thing-prince-andrew-is-trying-to-do-for-princess-eugenie-s-wedding/"><u><strong>turned down the offer</strong></u></a> to cover her big day over fears the ratings would be low.</p> <p>“The BBC was approached because they have a special relationship with Buckingham Palace and a formula that works,” an unnamed source told the <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Mail on Sunday</em>.</p> <p>“But they turned it down because they don’t think enough people will tune in and that there isn’t enough support for the Yorks.”</p> <p>The palace is yet to confirm where Eugenie’s star-studded wedding will be televised.</p>

Relationships

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Barley, pea, mint and spinach risotto

<p>Fibre-rich barley lends a more toothsome bite to risotto than the traditional arborio rice, creating a hearty, comforting dish.</p> <p><strong>Serves:</strong> 4-6</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>3 cups frozen baby peas</li> <li>100g baby spinach leaves (any hard stems removed)</li> <li>2 cloves garlic, crushed</li> <li>2 tablespoons chopped mint, plus extra whole leaves for garnish</li> <li>3 tablespoons olive oil</li> <li>4-5 cups vegetable stock</li> <li>1 medium onion, finely sliced</li> <li>1 cup pearl barley</li> <li>½ cup white wine</li> <li>60g grated parmesan</li> <li>2 tablespoons lemon juice</li> <li>Extra olive oil and parmesan for garnish</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method: </strong></p> <ol> <li>Place peas in a pot of cold water with a little salt. Bring to the boil, cook for a minute then drain and run under cold water.</li> <li>Place spinach in a pan with a little water and cook until wilted. Drain and remove as much water as possible.</li> <li>Place 2 cups of the cooked peas in a blender or food processor with the spinach, crushed garlic, mint leaves and 1 tablespoon of the olive oil. Process until well blended. </li> <li>Place stock in a pot and heat to a low simmer. Heat remaining 2 tablespoons oil in a pot over medium to low heat, add onion and cook until transparent.</li> <li>Add barley and stir-fry 2 minutes. Add wine and cook until it evaporates. </li> <li>Add the hot stock about ½ cup at a time, stirring occasionally and simmering until the stock is absorbed before adding more. Continue until the barley is soft but still has some bite, about 40 minutes. The mixture should be slightly liquid.</li> <li>Gently stir in puréed pea mixture, reserved whole peas, parmesan and lemon juice. Set aside for 5 minutes before serving, drizzled with a little olive oil and garnished with shaved parmesan. </li> </ol> <p><em>Written by Bernadette Hogg. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz"><strong><u>Stuff.co.nz.</u></strong> </a></em></p>

Food & Wine

Finance

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Free $120 still up for grabs – have you received yours?

<p>The government has revealed that more than 1.3 million motorists from New South Wales still haven’t claimed their free $120 refund.</p> <p>More than $136 million has been refunded to 2.32 million people so far, but there is $50 million that is yet to be claimed from 1.3 million people.</p> <p>The suburbs with the highest number of unclaimed funds include Liverpool, Leumeah and Camden.</p> <p>The refunds are the result of reforms to the compulsory third party (CTP) insurance scheme that reduced CTP premiums by up to $172 a year.</p> <p>NSW motorists were previously subject to the most expensive CTP insurance in Australia, with an average premium costing $710.</p> <p>The refund scheme is available to four million NSW vehicle owners with policies starting before December 1, 2017.</p> <p>Last month, NSW Finance Minister Victor Dominello revealed the government extended the deadline for claiming the refund from September 30, 2018 to June 30, 2019.</p> <p>“There are so many families and households who could benefit from these refunds, which is why we are extending the deadline,” he said.</p> <p>“Claiming a refund is simple and easy and can be done via Service NSW either online, over the phone or in store. The new CTP scheme is a triple win for motorists who receive a cheaper Green Slip, a partial refund on what they paid last year and faster benefits should they be injured on the road.”</p> <p><strong>How to claim your refund</strong></p> <p>To claim your refund, go to the <a href="https://www.service.nsw.gov.au/transaction/claim-ctp-green-slip-refund"><strong style="font-style: inherit;">Service NSW website</strong></a> and login into your MyServiceNSW account. If you don’t have an account, you can create one <a href="https://my.service.nsw.gov.au/MyServiceNSW/Register"><strong style="font-style: inherit;">here</strong></a>.</p> <p>You can also claim your refund in-store or on the phone by calling 1300 287 733.</p> <p>The minimum refund amount is $10 and the maximum is $120. Each refund claim is subject to an administration fee of $7.87, which means you have to be eligible for $17.87 or more to get any money back.</p> <p>The refund will take up to 10 working days and will be transferred into your bank account. If you don’t claim your refund by the deadline, the money will go towards a reduction in the medical services levy next year.</p> <p><strong>Top suburbs for unclaimed refunds</strong></p> <ul> <li>Liverpool (2200)</li> <li>Leumeah (1600)</li> <li>Camden  (1500)</li> <li>Westmead  (1200)</li> <li>Cabramatta (1000)</li> <li>Baulkham Hills (1000)</li> <li>Kellyville (1000)</li> <li>Bossley Park (1000)</li> <li>Cecil Hills (966)</li> <li>Blacktown (964)</li> </ul> <p>Have you received your refund yet? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

Money & Banking

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Girl arrested: Confesses to needles in strawberries "prank"

<p>A 12-year-old has reportedly admitted to inserting needles into strawberries in what police believe to be a copycat prank.</p> <p>New South Wales Acting Assistant Police Commissioner Stuart Smith said the child was caught in recent days but refused to release any further details.</p> <p>While the youngster was reported as a male due to Mr Smith addressing the child as a “he” at a press conference, it is now discovered that the police commissioner misspoke.</p> <p>After inserting the needles into the strawberries, the girl then showed her friends at school in the NSW Blue Mountains, reported<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/" target="_blank">The Daily Telegraph</a></em>. One student informed staff and the police were immediately called to the scene. They reportedly interviewed the girl at her home and she eventually confessed.</p> <p>“Obviously, in the last few days we found a young person has admitted to a prank, including putting needles in strawberries,” Mr Smith told reporters in Sydney.</p> <p>Mr Smith said the child would be dealt with under the youth cautioning system.</p> <p>He further went on to say that while some may believe the behaviour could be “called a prank”, he warned that any copycat cases would be dealt with the full extent of the law.</p> <p>“What we’ve seen in the state (of NSW) we believe is the work of copycats and pranksters, we’ve got to deal with it though, the way we deal with any crime,” he said.</p> <p>The event comes as the Attorney-General said there have now been over 100 reported cases of sabotaged fruit across the country, with the scare initially starting in Queensland then spreading to Tasmania and Western Australia.</p> <p>The most recent incident occurred at a primary school in Newcastle today, where a student discovered a needle inside the banana that they packed for lunch.</p> <p>The child, a pupil at St Paul’s Primary School, alerted teachers after biting into the banana and finding the sharp object lodged inside.</p> <p>Detectives were sent to the school to investigate the incident and have removed the banana for further tests.</p> <p>A spokesman for NSW Police said authorities will not comment on individual cases as they had a “duty of care.”</p>

Legal

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New research shows bigger banks are worse for customers

<p><strong><em>Elizabeth Sheedy is an Associate Professor of Financial Risk Management at Macquarie University.</em></strong></p> <p>Yet again, the Hayne Royal Commission has brought disturbing news of misconduct toward customers of our largest financial institutions. This time <span><a href="https://www.afr.com/business/banking-and-finance/financial-services/cba-faced-157-million-penalty-over-super-breaches-20180814-h13xn0">super accounts have been plundered</a></span> for the benefit of shareholders.</p> <p>Recent <span><a href="https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3210206">research</a></span> from economists at the United States Federal Reserve suggests this problem is not unique to Australia. If true, this supports the argument that larger financial institutions should be broken up or face more regulatory scrutiny.</p> <p>The researchers found that larger banking organisations are more likely than their smaller peers to experience “operational losses”. And by far the most significant category (accounting for a massive 79%) within operational losses was “Clients, Products and Business Practices”.</p> <p>This category captures losses from “an unintentional or negligent failure to meet a professional obligation to specific clients, or from the nature or design of a product”. When a bank is caught out engaging in misconduct toward customers, it is required to make good to customers – the so-called process of remediation.</p> <p>It’s a category that perfectly captures the issues under review in the royal commission. Operational losses also include things like fraud, damage to physical assets and system failures.</p> <p><u><a href="https://www.afr.com/opinion/columnists/banking-royal-commission-nabs-playbook-for-repaying-super-fees-20180807-h13nkh">In recent weeks</a></u> we have heard a lot about Australian banks having to compensate customers. The cost to the bank is, however, far greater than the dollar value received by customers.</p> <p>The administrative costs of such programs are significant, and then there are legal costs and regulatory fines.</p> <p>While no-one feels sorry for banks having to suffer the consequences of their misconduct, regulators monitor these losses due to the possibility that they may increase the chance of bank failure.</p> <p>Another aspect of the Federal Reserve’s study is the size of the losses. One example is where the five largest mortgage servicers in the United States reached a <u><a href="https://www.reuters.com/article/us-mortgage-settlement/u-s-banks-agree-to-25-billion-in-homeowner-help-idUSTRE81600F20120210">US$25 billion settlement</a></u> with the US government relating to improper mortgage loan servicing and foreclosure fraud.</p> <p>In another example, a major US bank holding company paid out over US$13 billion for mis-selling risky mortgages prior to the 2008 crisis. Settlements of this size have simply not occurred in Australia.</p> <p><strong>Why larger banks?</strong></p> <p>One might assume that <u><a href="https://www.investopedia.com/terms/e/economiesofscale.asp">economies of scale</a></u> – reduced costs per unit as output increases – also apply to risk management. The larger the organisation, the more likely it has invested in high-quality, robust risk-management systems and staff. If this holds, then a large bank should manage risk more efficiently than a smaller one.</p> <p>The possibility of unexpected operational losses should then be reduced. Larger financial institutions might also attract greater regulatory scrutiny, which might help to improve risk-management practices and reduce losses.</p> <p>But the reverse seems to be true, <u><a href="https://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=3210206">based on the analysis of American banks from 2001-2016</a></u>.</p> <p>For every 1% increase in size (as measured by total assets) there is a 1.2% increase in operational losses. In other words, banks experience <u><a href="https://www.investopedia.com/terms/d/diseconomiesofscale.asp">diseconomies of scale</a></u>. And this is particularly driven by the category of Clients, Products and Business Practices.</p> <p>In this category losses accelerate even faster with the size of the bank.</p> <p>This could be the result of increased complexity in large financial institutions, making risk management more difficult rather than less. As firms grow in size and complexity, it apparently becomes increasingly challenging for senior executives and directors to provide adequate oversight.</p> <p>This would support the argument that some financial institutions are simply “<span><a href="https://www.afr.com/news/politics/national/royal-commission-banks-are-too-big-to-manage-20180421-h0z2b4">too big to manage</a></span>” as well as “too big to fail”. If bigger financial institutions produce worse outcomes for customers, there is an argument for breaking up larger institutions or intensifying regulatory scrutiny.</p> <p>Is the same thing happening in Australia as in the United States? The case studies presented by the royal commission suggest it could be, but it’s difficult for researchers to know exactly.</p> <p>Australian banks are not required to publicly disclose comprehensive data on operational losses. APRA may have access to such information, but any analysis the regulator may have done of it is not in the public domain.</p> <p>Perhaps this issue is something Commissioner Hayne should explore.</p> <p><em>Written by Elizabeth Sheedy. Republished with permission of <strong><u><a href="http://www.theconversation.com">The Conversation</a>.</u></strong> </em><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/101371/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-advanced" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p>

Money & Banking

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Barnaby Joyce hits back at sexual harassment claim: "It is not the truth”

<p>Former Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce has hit back at claims that he sexually abused a West Australian businesswoman back in 2016 but said he won’t be suing for defamation.</p> <p>Catherine Marriott appeared on ABC’s <em>7.30</em> in an <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/all-hell-broke-loose-barnaby-joyce-accuser-breaks-her-silence)">interview last night</a>, telling Leigh Sales that the complaint she lodged against Joyce was meant to remain confidential, and once it was released, she was haunted by the consequences.</p> <p>Ms Marriott alleges in August 2016 the former National Party leader sexually harassed her at a function in Canberra.</p> <p>The allegations were dismissed earlier this month, as the party claims there was “insufficient evidence".</p> <p>Joyce appeared on the <em>Today</em> show this morning and quickly denied Ms Marriott’s claim and said it was “defamatory".</p> <p>“I’m not going to start going through it, but I can – I have absolute clear recollection of everything from that day. I know the person very well. It is defamatory, and I will leave it at that,” he said.</p> <p>But although Joyce is frustrated by the claims, he said he has no plans to sue Ms Marriott for defamation.</p> <p>“What happens with defamation laws is when very rich people sue other very rich people because they have a big solicitor … I have tried that path before, all that happens is you get a very big bill,” he said.</p> <p>Joyce also shut down the claims on <em>Sunrise</em>.</p> <p>“It is not the truth and that’s probably the thing that annoyed me the most. I watched it last night and I’m no better informed now than I was at the start,” he said. </p>

Legal

Entertainment

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Breakfast battle: Today show ratings plummet to 10-year low

<p>The <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Today </em>show’s bleak ratings show no sign of improvement with viewer numbers now the lowest they’ve been since 2006.</p> <p>Overnight figures reveal that the Channel Nine breakfast show had 199,000 viewers across five metro markets on Tuesday, while rival Seven’s <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Sunrise</em> drew in 268,000 viewers.</p> <p>The gap between the two shows was heightened even more when regional ratings were included, with<em style="font-weight: inherit;"> Sunrise</em> pulling an audience of 445,000 people compared to <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Today’</em>s 320,000 viewers.</p> <p>The Channel Nine program hasn’t had ratings so low since 2006 when it drew in only 187,000 viewers.</p> <p>The ratings difference could have come down to how the breakfast shows covered the Emmy Awards, with <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Sunrise</em>’s Edwina Bartholomew delivering live crosses from the red carpet while Nine relied on its US news correspondent.</p> <p>However, some believe <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Today</em> is struggling to keep viewers because of the rumoured tension between co-hosts Karl Stefanovic and Georgie Gardner.</p> <p>Karl’s private life has also impacted the show’s viewership with ratings plummeting since he separated from his wife Cassandra Thorburn.</p> <p>Entertainment reporter Peter Ford said in April last year: “The <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Today </em>show ratings are bad ... they've done private market research at Nine into Karl and it's coming up that women have turned on him.”</p> <p>Peter FitzSimons, the journalist husband of former <em style="font-weight: inherit;">Today</em> co-anchor Lisa Wilkinson previously commented on the ratings struggle the Channel Nine breakfast show is going through.</p> <p>“Something will have to break. It cannot go on in the current form past [Christmas], surely,” FitzSimons tweeted, before swiftly deleting the post.</p> <p>Which morning show do you tune in to? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

TV

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Here’s why Burt Reynolds has left his only son out of his will

<p>One would think that Burt Reynolds would have left all his assets and prized possessions in the hands of his only son, Quinton Reynolds, but that isn’t the case.</p> <p>The late Hollywood actor has left his son's name out of his will, and named his niece, Nancy Lee Brown Hess, as the trustee of his estate.</p> <p>At the peak of his career, Reynolds used to demand an upwards of US$10 million per movie but at the time of his death on September 6, he was only worth a reported US$5 million.</p> <p>According to court documents released by<span> </span><em>The Blast</em>, Reynolds officially signed off on the will in 2011, putting all his life earnings into a trust which will be managed by Hess.</p> <p>But it wasn’t all doom and gloom for the actor's 30-year-old son, as his only child with ex-wife and actress, Loni Anderson, Quinton will still benefit from his father’s decision. The document states that the actor created the trust so that money will continuously be put aside for him. This is done to avoid estate taxes.</p> <p>“I intentionally omit him from this, my Last Will and Testament, as I have provided for him during my lifetime in my Declaration of Trust,” Reynolds stated in the legal document.</p> <p>The Hollywood actor tragically died after a heart attack in a Florida hospital earlier this month. The 82-year-old was surrounded by loved ones at the time of his death.</p> <p>“It is with a broken heart that I said goodbye to my uncle today,” Hess told Page Six in a statement at the time. “My uncle was not just a movie icon; he was a generous, passionate and sensitive man, who was dedicated to his family, friends, fans and acting students.”</p>

Movies

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Just married! MasterChef judge George Calombaris' lavish Greek wedding

<p><em>MasterChef </em>Australia judge George Calombaris and his girlfriend of 11 years Natalie Tricarico have tied the knot in Greece.</p> <p>George and Natalie exchanged their vows on Sunday in a Greek Orthodox church.</p> <p>The celebration gathered the greatest celebrity chefs from around the world, including Matt Preston, Gary Mehigan, Manu Feildel and Nigella Lawson.</p> <p>British chef Sat Bains shared a photo of the bride after the ceremony looking glamorous in her champagne-hued gown.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:500px;" src="/media/7820867/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/55d8406152de49a7988bcb69d15bb894" /></p> <p>In the photo, Natalie was standing next to the couple's five-year-old daughter Michaela, while George is seen in the background by the altar.</p> <p>The lavish reception is believed to have taken place at the Island Athens Riviera resort, which is known for its impressive views of the Mediterranean Sea.</p> <p>Another photo shared on social media by chef Travis McAuley showed a few of the culinary greats that celebrated George and Natalie on their big day.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height:332.01892744479494px;" src="/media/7820868/2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d3a3b2b8b820446892b0c751f58afda5" /></p> <p>In the snap, George can be seen with <em style="font-weight: inherit;">MasterChef</em> judges Matt Preston and Gary Mehigan, as well as guest judge Shannon Bennett.</p> <p>Other famous guests included British TV chef Nigella Lawson, <em style="font-weight: inherit;">My Kitchen Rules</em>’ judge Manu Feildel, <em style="font-weight: inherit;">The Living Room</em> host Miguel Maestre and restaurateur Matt Moran.</p> <p>Speaking to the <a href="https://www.heraldsun.com.au/"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Herald Sun</u></em></strong></a> earlier this year, George shared how excited he was to be marrying his long-time girlfriend.</p> <p>“I'm very privileged and lucky to have beautiful and healthy children, and Natalie has been an incredible backbone in everything in my life,” he said. </p> <p>“She's had to put up with a lot with me. I'm a very lucky man.”</p> <p>The couple met in 2007 following their respective divorces and share two children together, James, 7, and Michaela, 5.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see more happy snaps from their wedding day. </p>

TV

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Harsh new $337 road rule you need to know

<p>Harsh new laws that were introduced yesterday could see drivers being fined hundreds of dollars and possibly lose their license if they are caught touching their phone when driving.</p> <p>The new laws introduced across New South Wales on September 17 mean drivers will now lose five demerit points rather than four if they are caught using their phones.</p> <p>NSW motorists will also receive a $337 fine, making the state the strictest in the country for the offence.</p> <p>During double demerit periods, including public holidays and long weekends, those who touch their phone while driving can be penalised up to 10 demerit points.</p> <p>Drivers or motorcyclists with a Learner, P1 or P2 licence cannot use their phone under any circumstances while on the road.</p> <p>“These drivers may only use a mobile phone if their vehicle is parked,” a spokesperson for Transport NSW said.</p> <p>Under the stricter new laws, if a Learner or P1 is caught using their phone they will automatically incur a three-month driving suspension as they only have a threshold of four demerit points.</p> <p>P2 drivers will have three demerit points remaining if they are caught illegally using a mobile phone on the road.</p> <p>When NSW Roads Minister Melinda Pavey announced the increased penalties in July, she said a government survey showed that 74 per cent of the community supported further limiting in-car mobile use.</p> <p>“We all see it and the community has had enough,” Ms Pavey said.</p> <p>NSW motorists are only legally allowed to use their phone while driving for calls, music and navigation if it is secure in a cradle fixed to the car and doesn’t obscure a driver’s vision.</p> <p>Drivers can also only use their phones for the same purposes if they can activate it without touching it, such as through Bluetooth or voice activation.</p> <p>The only time a motorist can hold a phone is if they are passing it across to a passenger.</p> <p>A spokesperson for Transport NSW warned that using your phone legally can still be risky.</p> <p>“Drivers are reminded that using a mobile phone legally can still be distracting and should always consider the current road conditions before using a mobile phone while driving.”</p>

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