Legal

Placeholder Content Image

The traffic light rule you've probably broken – and it could cost you $448

<p>Are you doing the right thing when the traffic light turns from green to yellow?</p> <p>The law around the country states clearly that you can be booked for running a yellow light.</p> <p>The Queensland Government website states: “You must stop on a yellow light, unless it is unsafe to do so.</p> <p>“The yellow light is not the end of the green light phase—it is the beginning of the red light phase.”</p> <p>The South Australian government explains: “You must not enter the intersection unless you are so close to the stop line that you are unable to stop safely without entering the intersection or risking a rear-end crash with vehicles following you.”</p> <p>A pamphlet released by Transport for New South Wales revealed ten of the road laws most misunderstood in the state.  </p> <p>“A yellow (amber) traffic light or arrow means stop,” the pamphlet read.</p> <p>“A driver approaching traffic lights showing a yellow traffic light must stop if the driver can stop safely before reaching the stop line or traffic lights. </p> <p>“Penalties apply for drivers who fail to stop at a yellow light, unless it is unsafe to do so.”</p> <p>So what are the penalties if you fail to stop at a yellow light?</p> <ul> <li>Queensland – three demerit points and $391 fine</li> <li>NSW – three demerit points and $448 fine</li> <li>Victoria – three demerit points and $396 fine</li> <li>Tasmania – three demerit points and $122.25 fine</li> <li>South Australia – three demerit points and $464 fine</li> <li>Western Australia – four penalty units and two demerit points</li> <li>Australian Capital Territory – three demerit points and $474 fine</li> <li>Northern Territory – $100 fine</li> </ul> <p> </p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Motorist cops parking ticket – but can you spot the errors?

<p>A motorist who received a parking ticket for leaving his car too close to a police officer’s vehicle has shared a copy of the fine online.</p> <p>The man’s friend shared the photo to Reddit, however, users were quick to point out a number of inconsistences with the fine, questioning whether it was legitimate or not.</p> <p>Can you spot the errors on this parking ticket?</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/45bd108b53174f2682d51a923bf920ad" /><img style="width: 483.2317073170732px; height: 500px;" src="/media/7820350/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/45bd108b53174f2682d51a923bf920ad" /></p> <p>On the top left corner of the infringement notice, the word ‘district’ is spelt incorrectly, with the fine reading: ‘Monaro Police Dsitrict’.</p> <p>The suspicious fine also leaves the ‘officer’ field blank, as well as the ‘COPS Event No’ and time and date of the report.</p> <p>The postcode of Jindabyne is also incorrect as it is 2627, not 2726.</p> <p>Commenters were questioning the legitimacy of the fine because of the errors, with one person suggesting that someone had “bodgied up some fake cards”.</p> <p>One user said it was unusual for infringement notices to not be completely filled out as “police must fill in paperwork correctly”.</p> <p>Constable Naomi Nemec from Jindabyne police station told the <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;"><u>Daily Mail Australia</u></em></strong></a> that the notice was likely fake as it did not contain a vehicle registration number.</p> <p>However, motorists should still be careful not to park too close to another car as it is an offence to park within one metre of another vehicle, according to NSW Transport’s Road and Maritime Services. </p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Kyle Sandiland's new TV show: "It’s just like Judge Judy but it’s me instead of Judy"

<p>Kyle Sandilands news TV show <em>Trial By Kyle</em> is one of eight new shows that will air as part of Channel 10’s Pilot Week, which kicks off this Sunday night.</p> <p>As Sandilands puts it, the show is “just like <em>Judge Judy</em> but it’s me instead of Judy”.</p> <p>He is joined by <em>The Bachelor </em>winner Anna Heinrich, a criminal lawyer, who will assist Sandilands in analysing evidence in each case.</p> <p>“The thing that’s great about it, apart from me and Anna, is the Australian problems are very different from the American problems,” Sandilands said.</p> <p>“On <em>Judge Judy</em> they’re always arguing about someone owing someone some money for some meth … but ours are real problems, like boobs jobs, paparazzi fights, friends falling out over loan money. We have different problems but they’re really quite interesting.”</p> <p>Just like <em>Judge Judy,</em> if Sandilands decides that someone owes money to another person the show will cover the costs.</p> <p>“Screentime Australia (which produces the show) covers the costs,” Sandilands confirmed.</p> <p>“But I was a real stinge. We had quite a big budget but I would only give what felt right. I don’t want to give you money if I think you’re a f***ing idiot. Just because I’ve got a budget doesn’t mean I’m going to use it.”</p> <p>Only one episode of the show will go to air before Channel 10 chooses which show gets picked up and aired in full next year.</p> <p>But Sandilands has already declared he doesn’t care if his TV pilot gets picked up or not.</p> <p>“I think everyone hopes it will go (ahead) but I also don’t give a f**k if it doesn’t,” the KIIS FM host told news.com.au.</p> <p>“I’m not going to cry and be on Xanax or anything. I don’t care.”</p> <p>Sandilands says there’s already interests from other networks for his show.</p> <p>“I got the international rights and people are already interested in buying it,” he said. “So that’s my only interest. I’m only motivated by money and fame,” Sandilands said, before laughing.</p> <p>Asked where he’ll be watching his new show, he quipped: “At home, in bed, in my undies.”</p> <p><strong><em>Trial By Kyle</em> is set to air next Thursday, August 23, at 8.30pm </strong></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Aussie drivers hit with new 30km/h speed limit

<p>Melbourne drivers will be the first in the country to trial a new road rule that forces motorists to slow down to 30km/h in residential areas, to improve road safety for pedestrians and cyclists.</p> <p>The 12-month trial of the new speed limit will be enforced on residential streets in Collingwood and Fitzroy from September.</p> <p>Led by the Yarra Council, if the trial is successful the road rule may be introduced to other parts of Melbourne– as well as other major cities.</p> <p>Yarra Mayor Daniel Nguyen told <em>news.com.au</em> that the new speed limit is about making the roads safer for everyone who uses them.</p> <p>“This trial is about improving safety. From 2012-2017 there have been more than 100 crashes in the trial area, resulting in more than 30 serious injuries,” he said.</p> <p>“90 per cent of these crashes have involved pedestrians, cyclists and motorcycle riders.”</p> <p>Research from Monash University found that lowering a 40km/h speed zone by 10km/h reduces by half a pedestrian’s chance of dying when hit by a car.</p> <p>According to the World Health Organisation, just a 1km/h decrease in a car’s speed could lead to a 3 per cent reduction in road crashes.</p> <p>The council said they took this approach which focuses on making the roads safer by adjusting people’s behaviour, rather than using expensive infrastructure like speed bumps to force people to slow down.</p> <p>“We want to make livelier, healthier streets that everyone can enjoy, whether they are walking, driving or riding,” Mr Nguyen said.</p> <p>“We hope that this trial will help reduce the number of serious injuries, and also bring other benefits including reduced congestion and encouraging more people to choose active transport options, like cycling and walking.”</p> <p>Chairman of the Pedestrian Council of Australia, Harold Scruby, said something needs to be done about the country’s rising pedestrian death toll.</p> <p>“Most of Europe now … they are all 30km/h in areas of high pedestrian activity and it works,” he told <em>ABC Radio</em>.</p> <p>“We have right around Australia this phenomenon where the pedestrian death toll is going back up through the roof.</p> <p>“In Brisbane, 92 per cent of the road users will be pedestrians, 6 per cent vehicles and 2 per cent cyclists. Why is the whole CBD controlled by vehicles?”</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Urgent safety recall: Harvey Norman bunk bed could trap kids

<p>A bunk bed sold at Harvey Norman at Mascot, NSW,  has been recalled due to the risk of entrapment. The Domino bunk bed was being sold at the south-east Sydney branch without the required infill on the top bunk side panel.</p> <p>The company has taken the measures to recall the bunk bed as it runs the risk of injuring children. The bed supplied by Dixie Cummings Enterprises Pty Ltd is a wooden bunk bed intended for children.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="/media/7820280/bunk-bed.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/73b88395803e4817bac8f200a74d251a" /></p> <p>The <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.productsafety.gov.au/recall/dixie-cummings-enterprises-pty-ltd-domino-bunk-bed" target="_blank">Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC)</a></em> has published a recall notice on its website saying the product "does not comply with the mandatory standard Trade Practices Act 1974".</p> <p>As stated on the <em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.productsafety.gov.au/recall/dixie-cummings-enterprises-pty-ltd-domino-bunk-bed" target="_blank">ACCC’s</a></em> website, customers who have purchased the bed will be contacted by Harvey Norman via phone or mail, to organise a new timber panel and label that will be supplied and installed free of charge.</p> <p>Consumers can get in touch with the Aftersales Administrator by emailing <a rel="noopener" href="mailto:aftersalessupport@dixiecummings.com.au" target="_blank">aftersalessupport@dixiecummings.com.au</a> or via phone on (03) 9762 2988.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Lisa Marie Presley to testify against estranged husband in bitter divorce case

<p>Lisa Marie Presley will testify against her estranged husband when their bitter divorce trial goes to court on Monday.</p> <p>Presley split with musician Michael Lockwood in 2016 after 10 years of marriage. They share nine-year-old twin daughters, Finley and Harper.</p> <p>She says that her estranged husband has been trying to claim a share of the inheritance left to her by her late father, rock 'n' roll legend Elvis Presley.</p> <p>According to legal documents, the 50-year-old is set to take the stand to testify that her husband had "assured her that he was not that guy" after she told him prior to their 2006 wedding that she "would not marry someone who would come after her for her money."</p> <p>Presley, once worth a staggering $87 million, asked Lockwood to sign a post-nup for peace of mind after their marriage. The post-nup was signed by both parties and stated that neither would pursue the other for support "at any time, regardless of the circumstances."</p> <p>"So much for assurances," Presley's attorney, Gary Fishbein, said of Lockwood, who is now contesting the post-nup with Presley.</p> <p>Lockwood, 57, is arguing the document be void because he was coerced into signing it, and his lawyer at the time, who has since died, failed to properly explain the terms of the agreement.</p> <p>"Lockwood cannot now complain that he's sorry he entered the agreement because he doesn't like the terms," said Fishbein. "He knew what he was signing, was represented and cannot invalidate the agreement because he has a case of sour grapes."</p> <p>In her count documents, Presley has claims that she is $22 million in debt, with $14 million owed in back in taxes. However, Lockwood refutes this, claiming Presley earns around $5.8 million every year, or $480,000 a month, thanks to a trust set up by her father.</p> <p>The trial is expected to last four days.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

From $200K to $25 – Grieving widow shocked to find late husband’s super fund drained dry

<p>After Kim Garbutt’s husband, Craig, passed away 10 years ago, his family was expecting a cheque for more than $208,000 in death benefits from AMP – Craig’s superannuation fund. Instead, they received $25.09 13 days later.</p> <p>The grieving widow was shocked to find that the account had only a small sum of money when she was under the impression that her husband had left her with $208,000.</p> <p>“When the account arrived, I was a bit dumbfounded,” she told <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-08-13/widow-expected-$200,000-super-death-benefit-amp-paid-her-$25/10114662"><em>7.30</em></a>.</p> <p>“Sometime after that I spoke to them and they were saying basically the account had run dry. They went, ‘So sad that he’s died but too bad, the accounts got no money in it.”</p> <p>Ms Garbutt only discovered the account was $212 in arrears – and that AMP had cancelled the policy – five months before Craig’s death.</p> <p>Before his death in 2008, Craig had fought an alcohol addiction which put strain on his marriage with Ms Garbutt. Although the two split shortly after the wedding, they decided to stay legally married for the sake of their two children.</p> <p>Craig, who passed away at the age of 39, was described by Ms Garbutt as someone who was “super smart…he was funny, he liked to dress well.”</p> <p>“He wasn’t ostentatious, he was bombastic, he was just a nice friendly guy. He was well-liked, he was well-loved.”</p> <p>While he tried to seek help by attending rehab facilities, in the end, he couldn’t rid himself of his addiction. Before he passed away, Craig was using friends’ couches and his car to live out of after his business went bankrupt.</p> <p>“He was in debt to what we think is $300,000 to $400,000 to maybe six or seven creditors. Phones had been cut off,” said Ms Garbutt.</p> <p>After investigating, Ms Garbutt discovered that Craig had transferred $1621.93 into the account from his previous super fund in 2003, but in as little as 5 weeks, the amount was down to $1433.77 after he was charged over $188.16 in fees and premiums.</p> <p>Even though Craig had no further contribution to his account after the initial $1621.93, AMP continued to deduct fees and charges – many of which were hidden.</p> <p>AMP claims to have contacted Craig before his death to let him know that his account was low on funds and would be cancelled. They advised her that there was nothing more they can do.</p> <p>According to Ms Garbutt, AMP was not cooperative and refused to speak with her on compassionate grounds, and since Craig’s passing, she has been struggling to compete with the insurance company about Craig’s superannuation and insurance.</p> <p>Ms Garbutt reveals that while AMP sent her late husband letters regarding his fund, he was seriously ill and was not opening mail at the time.</p> <p>A spokeswoman from AMP said that the company “strongly rejects” the idea that Ms Garbutt had been uninformed throughout the process.</p> <p>“At no time were we informed that [Craig] was unwell, and we corresponded with him as early as seven months before his death that he was at risk of losing his valuable insurance,” said the spokeswoman.</p> <p>“We do allow customers to reinstate lapsed policies based on medical evidence, however, we do not allow this where the reinstatement is due to the customer now wishing to claim.”</p> <p>Ms Garbutt claims to have “begged and pleaded” with the insurance giant regarding where Craig’s money had gone, but AMP remained uncooperative.</p> <p>“It was ‘Nope, we told Craig it was going to be cancelled’,” she said.</p> <p>“I went, ‘Craig wasn’t functioning, we wouldn’t have read the letters’.”</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Can you spot the typo on this confusing parking sign?

<p>Australia is notorious for having confusing parking signs lining our busy streets.</p> <p>Now, one Sydneysider has spotted a confusing parking sign that has been made even more complicated by a typo.</p> <p>The parking sign was spotted by Sydney journalist Dean Nye, who came across the detailed instructions in the city’s inner west suburb of Leichhardt.</p> <p>Can you spot the typo?</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Jesus Sydney take a chill pill <a href="https://t.co/uJwfOhGFZH">pic.twitter.com/uJwfOhGFZH</a></p> — Dean Nye (@Dean_Nye) <a href="https://twitter.com/Dean_Nye/status/1028222616543215616?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 11, 2018</a></blockquote> <p>The photo shows four different parking signs nailed together, creating a very confusing list of rules.</p> <p>On the bottom-left sign, it incorrectly says that two hours of parking is allowed between 9.15 am and 2.45 am on school days. The sign should instead say 2.45pm.</p> <p>Motorists are also told from the signs that five-minute parking is only allowed on school days between peak drop-off and pick-up times, which are from 8 am to 9.15 am and 2.45 pm to 4pm.</p> <p>On school days, drivers can park there for two hours outside of the pick-up and drop-off times.</p> <p>Between Monday and Saturday on days that school isn’t on, drivers are told they can park on the street for two hours between 8 am and 6pm.</p> <p>On the same days, the parking goes up to four hours between 6 pm to 10pm.</p> <p>Finally, the drivers are told that on Sunday, four-hour parking applies from 8 am to 10pm.</p> <p>After the confusing signs were shared to Twitter, users were quick to share their thoughts on the parking rules.</p> <p>“Surely you can take that all in while still driving to avoid stopping in the middle of the road and blocking traffic,” one person said.</p> <p>Another added: “Pretty sure I would have received a ticket by the time I’d finished going though that and working out if I could park or not.”</p> <p>Did you spot the typo on the parking sign? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Australia's 'most hated woman' Kathleen Folbigg speaks for first time from jail

<p>Kathleen Folbigg, who was convicted of killing her four children, has spoken out about her incriminating diary entries that were a crucial part of her prosecution.</p> <p>Since she was found guilty by a New South Wales Supreme Court jury in May 2003 of the murder of her infant children Patrick, Sarah and Laura and the manslaughter of Caleb, the mother has maintained her innocence – saying that her offspring all died of natural causes.</p> <p>Ms Folbigg’s legal team lodged a petition for a judicial review of her case with the NSW Governor in 2015, which includes a new report from Professor Stephen Corner, a prominent forensic pathologist in Australia.</p> <p>The report casts doubt on the forensic evidence that played a major role in her prosecution case, ultimately leading to her conviction.</p> <p>In a phone call recorded by <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/austory/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><em style="font-weight: inherit;">Australian Story</em></strong></span></a>, Folbigg speaks out for the first time, discussing her incriminating diary entries.</p> <p>"You've got to understand that those diaries are written from a point of me always blaming myself," Folbigg said during the phone call.</p> <p>"I blamed myself for everything. It's just I took so much of the responsibility, because that's, as mothers, what you do."</p> <p>Folbigg claimed her entry which read, “She left. With a bit of help”, was talking about a higher power. </p> <p>"That quote, that was a reference to God or to some higher power or something going on that I didn't understand. I was thinking why was I not allowed to have the other three but now I've fallen pregnant again am I going to be allowed to keep this one?"</p> <p>During the call, she also talked about her regret of not testifying at trial. </p> <p>"I said [to my solicitors]: 'I don't think I'll cope with sitting up on the stand and having some bloke just attack me over them [the diary entries]. Now, 15 years later, I'm sort of gosh, I should've done it… I'm a totally different person, so, yeah, I would have the strength to sit up there and go: 'Wait a minute, what are you trying to do here?'"</p> <p>Folbigg’s trial was a case that shocked Australia and she was sentenced to 40 years in jail, which was later reduced to 30 years.</p> <p>"I often described it, especially when I was going through the trial, as like I was just hanging onto a cliff by one finger," Folbigg recalled.</p> <p>In 2013, Folbigg’s lawyers commissioned a report from Professor Stephen Cordner, who examined the medical evidence presented at the trial.</p> <p>"There is no positive forensic pathology support for the contention that any or all of these children have been killed," Professor Cordner wrote in his report.</p> <p><em style="font-weight: inherit;">Australian Story</em> found another forensic pathologist at Vancouver General Hospital, Associate Professor Matthew Orde, who agreed with the report.</p> <p>"Fundamentally, I'm in agreement with Professor Cordner, in that all four of these child deaths could be explained by natural causes," said Associate Professor Matthew Orde.</p> <p>However, New South Wales Director of Public Prosecutions at the trial, Nicholas Cowdery, disagrees.</p> <p>"I have looked at the petition that Mrs Folbigg has lodged. I've looked at the reports that have accompanied that petition. I remain of the view that the jury was correct," he said.</p> <p>Despite not agreeing with the report, Mr Cowdery said it was “concerning” the petition filed three years ago has not triggered a question of whether an inquiry should be held into Folbigg’s convictions.</p> <p>"I think this is an inordinate delay in dealing with this matter," he said.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Can you spot the glaring differences on this $50 note?

<p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">Police have warned people to check any notes they receive after counterfeit $50 bills were found in circulation.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">The ACT Police revealed that there were “quite distinctive” differences between the real notes and the fake ones.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">Can you spot the three obvious differences?</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: center; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><img style="width: 0px; height:0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7e5f0bef2a654f9ab90b3a45db795229" /><img style="width: 500px; height:375px;" src="/media/7820185/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7e5f0bef2a654f9ab90b3a45db795229" /></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">The most obvious difference is that the counterfeit note has blue Chinese characters printed where the clear window should be.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">The fakes also don’t have serial numbers and other security features that normal $50 bills have. </span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">There are also two lines that run through the zero in the top right of the bank note, which should not be there.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">The counterfeit notes appear to be training banknotes from overseas and are similar to those that were used across the country in 2017.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">ACT Policing Detective Acting Superintendent Jason Kennedy said it was important for people to get into the habit of checking their notes to make sure they are not fake.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">“If you don’t think a banknote you’ve been presented with is genuine, then don’t accept it,” he said.</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">“These notes in particular are easily detected as being fake from the briefest inspection, if you take the time to look at them.”</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">“If you do receive what you believe to be a counterfeit banknote, try to handle it as little as possible to preserve evidence. Note the description of the person who gave it to you and contact police on 131 444.”</span></p> <p style="margin-top: 0cm; background: white; vertical-align: baseline; box-sizing: border-box; font-variant-ligatures: normal; font-variant-caps: normal; font-variant-numeric: inherit; font-variant-east-asian: inherit; font-stretch: inherit; line-height: inherit; orphans: 2; text-align: start; widows: 2; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0px; text-decoration-style: initial; text-decoration-color: initial; word-spacing: 0px;"><span style="font-size: 11.5pt; font-family: 'Helvetica',sans-serif; color: black;">Have you ever received a counterfeit note? If so, tell us about your experience in the comments below. </span></p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

When not to keep left: The road rules which may surprise many motorists

<p>A video released by Transport for NSW has revealed the handful of exceptions to the keep left rule on motorways.</p> <p>According to Transport for NSW, drivers must stay in the left lane when the speed limit is 80km/h or more on NSW multi-lane roads.</p> <p>“If a ‘keep left unless overtaking’ sign is displayed, the requirement to stay in the left lane applies regardless of the speed limit,” the video said.</p> <p>Disobeying this rule when there is a ‘keep left unless overtaking’ sign can result in a hefty $337 fine in NSW.</p> <p>However, there are some exceptions to the rule.</p> <p class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/mFPMScli2-0" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>Drivers may leave the left lane when overtaking other cars or turning right.</p> <p>Another exception to the rule is when drivers need to avoid an obstacle or there is congested traffic.</p> <p>Vehicles in a special purpose lane are not required to keep left.</p> <p>Drivers may also leave the left lane when it is a ‘must turn left’ lane or left traffic arrow, and the driver is not turning left.</p> <p>Founder of road safety organisation the Sarah Group, Peter Frazer, said ignoring the important road rule can lead to disaster.</p> <p>Mr Frazer started the organisation in memory of his 23-year-old daughter, Sarah Frazer, who was killed in a road accident in 2012.</p> <p>“On a major highway, despite the fact that it may say keep left unless overtaking, people will often do as they please. That can cause aggression, and aggression can lead to incidents and crashes, the consequences of which can be serious injury and even death,” Mr Frazer said.</p> <p>“People are aware of the rule, but behaviour tends to be a bit more selfish on the roads,” he said.</p> <p>He urged motorists to not have a self-focused attitude while driving on the roads.</p> <p>“One of the common effects of flouting this rule is road rage. We’ve lost the concept of ‘sharing’ the road – people believe that they own the road, and that’s the key attitude now,” he said.</p> <p>“We have to educate people about road rules, then reinforce that. In many cases, it’s simply about common courtesy on the road,” he said.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

How a murderer was caught by his text messages

<p>A conman who murdered his lover and mutilated her body to cover his tracks has come undone over a single punctuation mark in a text message.</p> <p>In July 2013, British man David Ryan, 48, was found guilty of murdering Diana Lee, 54, before setting fire to her house in Cranage, Cheshire in August 2012.</p> <p>Ryan, who is married, cheated Lee out of £60,000 ($A105,000) to cover his "mountain of debts". Ryan never told Lee he had a wife.</p> <p>He spent the stolen cash on IVF treatment for his wife, and a number of luxuries for himself including a laptop, a puppy, Armani clothes and new luggage.</p> <p>But when Lee started asking questions about the money, Ryan decided to end her life.</p> <p>Lee was bludgeoned to death and found face-down in a wheelbarrow full of wood.</p> <p>Ryan then dragged her body to the garage, and set four fires around the house in an attempt to destroy the DNA evidence and cover his tracks.</p> <p>However, the fire failed to spread properly, and firefighters found remains of the woman’s naked body in a wheelbarrow after they were called to attend the blaze.</p> <p>It later emerged that Ryan had also tried to frame the victim’s lodger, Andrew Leese, by planting her underwear in his room and planting her blood on his antique German dagger.</p> <p>And he may have gotten away with it – if it hadn’t been for the fake text messages he sent to some of Lee’s clients right after killing her.</p> <p>In his latest book, <em>More Wordcrime,</em> leading forensic linguist John Olsson explains how an analysis of Lee’s text messages played an important role in revealing Ryan’s guilt.</p> <p>As Ryan attempted to clean up his murder, he sent messages from the victim’s phone to clients who were scheduled to visit Lee, telling them to stay away from the crime scene, <em><a href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/john-olsson-to-catch-a-killer-look-at-how-he-punctuates-his-texts-32qbbvdhr"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>The Times</strong></span></a></em> reported.</p> <p>But analysis showed how the messages were inconsistent with Lee’s usual method of texting. In particular, the fake texts featured two spaces after full stops and question marks, and no space after commas. This was in line with Ryan’s style of texting.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 400px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="/media/7820111/text-messege.jpg?width=500&amp;height=400" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e8bd84870f7f469ba4f86b88625e875a" /></p> <p>When police confronted Ryan, he initially denied their relationship, but later admitted they had sex on the night of her disappearance. He denied killing her, saying he was watching television at the time of her death.</p> <p>But police found a large amount of evidence against him, including bloodied footprints in Lee’s home matching the shoe brand worn by Ryan and his DNA was found on her body.</p> <p>According to the <strong><u><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-23455078">BBC</a></u></strong>, Mr Justice Henriques said Ryan had a history of borrowing cash from people with “no intention” of paying it back. The court heard he was bankrupt and had racked up £90,000 (A$158,000) in debts.</p> <p>“You literally bled her dry,” the judge said of Ryan’s relationship with Lee.</p> <p>“You suffer from the toxic combination of being work-shy and grossly extravagant. Your extravagance knew no bounds. As your friend said, you bought only the best, and then you met Diana Lee.”</p> <p>The judge concluded Ryan decided to kill Lee when she started questioning him about the money she lent him.</p> <p>“You killed Diana Lee to prevent your spectacular fraud upon her coming to light.”</p> <p>The judge rejected the defence claim that the killing was spontaneous, saying "if you could have strung her along indefinitely then you would have done so".</p> <p>Ryan was jailed for 34 years.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

The alarming risks Aussies are taking on our roads

<p>Grabbing a bite to eat and checking a text message are among the riskiest things Aussies have done behind the wheel, finder.com.au’s <a href="https://www.finder.com.au/car-insurance/road-safety-statistics"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>Safe Driving Report 2018</strong></span></a> has revealed.</p> <p>The study of nearly 2000 Australian drivers found that 62 per cent of motorists admitted to engaging in potentially dangerous activities while operating a car, with the most common being eating takeaway food.</p> <p>Although it isn’t illegal to eat and drive, police can still fine you if they deem you don’t have full control of your car while eating.</p> <p>A <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/pdf/10.1080/15389588.2014.920953#.VPWawfmUetZ"><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong>2015 study</strong></span></a> by the Griffith Health Institute in Queensland found that eating behind the wheel is almost as distracting as texting.</p> <p>The study also found 31 per cent of drivers admitted to wearing thongs while driving, which runs the risk of getting the footwear caught under the foot pedals.</p> <p>Texting was the third most common dangerous activity, with one in five people admitting to it.</p> <p>This was followed by 14 per cent admitting to smoking behind the wheel.</p> <p>Other risky behaviour included reaching back to deal with children and holding the phone up to your ear when answering a call.</p> <p>“It’s concerning that so many Australians admit to risking their lives and those of others by engaging in these dangerous behaviours on the road,” finder.com.au’s Bessie Hassan said.</p> <p>“While eating takeaway or reaching into the back seat may seem harmless, the reality is that all distractions can be dangerous.”</p> <p>Other alarmingly risky but less common behaviour found in the survey included 9 per cent of respondents driving with their knees, 6 per cent having microslept and 5 per cent having put on make up.</p> <p>While the statistics are concerning the number of drivers texting dropped 14 per cent from last year.</p> <p>“It’s promising that the number of people admitting to texting and calling while driving has decreased since last year’s report, which indicates that Australians are listening to the statistics on how deadly this can be,” Ms Hassan said.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

This new road rule starts on September 1 – and comes with a hefty fine

<p>A new road rule designed to protect emergency service workers is coming in to effect from September 1 in New South Wales.</p> <p>Under the new law, drivers must slow to 40km/h when passing stationary emergency vehicles – which includes police cars, fire engines and ambulances – displaying red and blue flashing lights.</p> <p>Failure to comply with the rule will cost you $448 and three demerit points.</p> <p>The rule applies to drivers travelling in either direction unless the lanes are divided by a median strip.</p> <p>“The new road rule will provide extra protection for all emergency workers and volunteers who respond to crashes and other incidents on our roads,” said Bernard Carlon, head of the NSW Centre for Road Safety.</p> <p>“When you see the blue or red flashing lights on an emergency vehicle stopped on the road, safely reduce your speed so that you are not exceeding 40km/h when you pass.</p> <p>“Keep to 40km/h until you’ve safely passed all people and emergency vehicles.</p> <p>“We want to ensure that people protecting us on our road network don’t become casualties while doing their jobs. This rule will give extra protection and confidence that at the end of a shift they can go home safely to families and friends.”</p> <p>The new road rule will be trialled for 12 months before authorities decide whether or not to make the law permanent.</p> <p>Victoria, Western Australia and South Australia have similar rules in place whereas South Australia requires motorists to slow to 25km/h. Queensland has rejected calls for a similar road rule.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Jill Meagher’s husband’s emotional tribute 6 years after her death

<p>On what would have been their tenth wedding anniversary, the husband of rape and murder victim, Jill Meagher, has written an emotional letter to his wife.</p> <p>Tom Meagher shared the emotional tribute on his Facebook page, where he poured out his grief and heartache.</p> <p>“Ten years ago today, I was lucky enough to marry this incredible human,” Mr Meagher wrote alongside a photo of Jill on her wedding day.</p> <p>“When I woke up that day, continuously fumbling over the elusive art of tying a tie and nervously downing cheap white wine way too early in the morning, I imagined the seemingly endless stretch of time we would have together.”</p> <p>Mr Meagher said he had dreamed about what their life would be like together in five, 10 or 30 years into the future.</p> <p>“We never made it,” he wrote.</p> <p>“Four years later she was brutally and violently taken from this world.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Ffred.claus.9275%2Fposts%2F2350713765155190&amp;width=500" width="500" height="491" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>In 2012, 29-year-old Jill Meagher was killed by serial sex offender Adrian Bayley in Melbourne.</p> <p>Bayley was on parole when he brutally raped and murdered the ABC employee when she was on her way home from work drinks – a crime which was a catalyst for an overhaul of parole.</p> <p>At the time, the Victoria premier said the state’s new parole laws were now the toughest in Australia.</p> <p>Mr Meagher revealed that he still visits their wedding venue in remembrance of his wife.</p> <p>“Only five weeks ago I stood in the Wicklow mountains where we were married, looking up at the canopy in the woods behind the grounds, as I have done many times in the six years since her death.”</p> <p>Despite feeling like his words were too feeble to express his emotions, he said writing of his wife’s legacy still “unlocks something for me — an expanse, where the artificial separateness between me and her, between life and death dissolves effortlessly.”</p> <p>Mr Meagher also mentioned his wife’s killer in the letter, saying how him and Jill represent the extremities of good and evil.</p> <p>“The arsehole that took her from this world communicates with us through violence, misogyny, hatred and death,” he wrote.</p> <p>“His pallid shadow can never extinguish her light. I carry the scars of Jill’s death because that’s how I remember to carry her light inside me.</p> <p>“The polar contrast between Jill and her killer are so clearly bookends of the extremity of good and evil that it sometimes feels like an ancient tragedy played out in real life.”</p> <p>Mr Meagher also condemned violence against women, saying: “In the war on women, this man exemplifies the extremist wing of the hateful and pervasive ideology of male sexual terrorism, but it’s the everyday spectrum of male violence that disturbs me even more.”</p> <p>“In a culture where the deaths of most women are not newsworthy, are so commonplace that they are seen as incidental, expected and simply inevitable, he certainly does represent the extremist wing”</p> <p>Mr Meagher ended the emotional letter by saying his wife was a “warrior for love, life and liberation”.</p> <p>“Thank you for consistently and persistently teaching me how to live, how to think, how to embrace love wholly, and to bear witness to the fire you lit in me and so many others in your short time on this earth. You are loved at every moment of every day.”</p> <p>Bayley was sentenced to life in prison, with a 35-year non-parole period, for the rape and murder of Jill Meagher.</p> <p>Judge Geoffrey Nettle said Bayley subjected Meagher to a “savage and degrading” assault in Brunswick, Melbourne on September 22, 2012 and that his previous attacks on women demanded that he receive a lengthy prison sentence.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

This cheap household product can stop tap-and-go payment thieves

<p>An everyday household item can be used to prevent tap-and-go payment thieves.</p> <p>Security experts have long warned about the dangers of wireless wallet skimming.</p> <p>Although you can purchase expensive Radio Frequency Identification (RFID)-blocking wallets and purses to prevent scammers, there’s a very simple solution using a cheap household item.</p> <p>A layer of aluminium foil works just as well as custom-made security accessories, Mark Roberti, editor of RFID Journal, revealed.</p> <p><img id="i-ceffbfe64ec89049" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" class="blkBorder img-share b-loaded" src="https://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/newpix/2018/07/26/07/4E93654D00000578-5993865-Everyday_household_item_aluminium_foil_can_be_used_to_prevent_op-a-18_1532585788210.jpg" alt="Everyday household item, aluminium foil, can be used to prevent opportunist tap-and-go payment thieves " width="634" height="476" /></p> <p>A disturbing video posted on social media recently shows just how easy it is to be scammed without the victim even realising.</p> <p>Filmed at a store where an unsuspecting male customer is looking at magazines on a shelf, a staff member with an EFTPOS tap-and-go payment machine goes unnoticed as he scans the customer's wallet in the back pocket of his pants. The transaction is immediately approved with the customer none the wiser.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FFongWK%2Fvideos%2F10209713365669648%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=264" width="264" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>“Watch me, the victim doesn't know what I'm going to do,” the store employee explains in the video.</p> <p>“I've just tapped his a**, who's got a PayPass in his pocket and the transaction is approved. So be careful.”</p> <p>To avoid being scammed, <a href="https://www.finder.com.au/how-to-protect-yourself-from-card-skimming"><strong>Finder</strong></a> advises people keep their bank cards in sight at all times, check their bank card statements regularly and report any suspicious activity to their card provider and the police.</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Don’t get stung by this obscure $263 road rule

<p>Next time you are set to embark on a road trip with the family, you might want to think twice before jam-packing your car with everyone’s belongings.</p> <p>According to Transport for NSW, it’s an offence to overload a vehicle and exceed the maximum weight limit set by the manufacturer.</p> <p>A spokesman for Transport for NSW told <a href="http://www.news.com.au"><strong><u>news.com.au</u></strong></a> that the little-known rule was in place to prevent wear-and-tear on the roads as well as for safety reasons.</p> <p> “Overloading a vehicle, by exceeding the maximum weight set by the manufacturer, increases risk by affecting the vehicle’s stability and ability to brake safely,” the spokeswoman said.</p> <p>“It also significantly increases wear on the road pavement, which can cause potholes, cracking or damage to bridges or road culverts.”</p> <p>She explained that the Road Transport (General) Regulation introduced the rule for “light vehicles” such as cars, which means that “a person must not drive a vehicle if it is loaded in a manner that prevents the driver from viewing traffic or if the weight or dimensions of the load prevents the driver from safely driving or controlling the vehicle.”</p> <p>The penalty for breaking the rule is a $263 fine.</p> <p>If motorists also drive a vehicle with a load that makes the car unstable, they could face a $448 fine and lose three demerit points.</p> <p>The spokeswoman said the loading requirements for heavy vehicles were governed by the National Heavy Vehicle Law.</p> <p>NRMA spokeswoman Rebecca Page urged drivers to be mindful of the rule when loading up their cars.</p> <p>“Common sense plays a big role in how to most safely pack your car. At the NRMA we encourage members to make sure they’re not placing anything in the vehicle that can obscure their view: fluffy dice, oversized luggage or even an incorrectly placed GPS could all potentially create new blind spots,” she said.</p> <p>“When packing a vehicle make sure everything is secured — flying objects can be very dangerous if you need to break suddenly, and that includes pets.</p> <p>“There are various safety measures motorists can consider if they know they’re going to be packing a lot into the car. We encourage members to use cargo barriers where suitable and always make sure you don’t overpack a vehicle because it can affect the handling of the vehicle as well as create distractions for the driver.”</p> <p>To find out your car’s weight limits, look within the Owner’s Manual or contact your local dealership. </p> <p>Did you know about this road rule? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

Why you should always be wary of texts from numbers starting with 19

<p>More and more Aussies are being scammed by text messages, particularly premium service texts, according to <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.finder.com.au/">finder.com.au</a>.</strong></span></p> <p>Mobile premium service texts usually come from numbers that start with 19. They can be about anything from news to horoscopes, ringtones, adult services, competitions and games.</p> <p>Although some people may have signed up to these services, many people receive these unsolicited messages, and can be charged by scammers for just receiving the text.</p> <p>Alex Kidman, Tech Expert at finder.com.au, says scammers are smart and if their tactics work, they keep using them.</p> <p>“We may occasionally receive a nonsensical text that we read and then casually delete. What some people might not realise, is that a $4 or $6 charge appears on their bill later that month just for receiving it if it’s from a premium service you’ve unwittingly signed up for.”</p> <p>He added: “If you receive a text from a service you don’t recognise or don’t remember signing up to, chances are it’s a scam. Call your telco and ask for the number to be blocked. In fact you can get all premium service numbers blocked.”</p> <p>The ACCC ScamWatch data shows mobile premium service scams are on the rise, with Aussies already cheated out of $44,179 in 2018 alone.</p> <p>Since 2015, mobile premium service scams have robbed Aussies of $153,197.</p> <p>“Don’t be fooled by messages offering gift vouchers from well-known brands or competitions with great prizes. If it sounds too good to be true, it usually is,” said Kidman.</p> <p>“Always check your bill. If it’s higher than usual and not related to excess data charges or overseas calls, look out for premium service charges.”</p>

Legal

Placeholder Content Image

The little-known mobile phone driving rules that could land you huge fines

<p>While all motorists are aware that holding your phone while driving is illegal, some motorists are unaware of the other road rules surrounding mobile phones.</p> <p>Motorists in New South Wales will lose five demerit points if their mobile phone is found to be touching their leg while they are on the road.</p> <p>In February, NSW Transport released a video telling drivers of all the things they can and cannot do with their phones while driving.</p> <p class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/S5cskO-IahI" frameborder="0" allow="autoplay; encrypted-media" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>The video lets drivers know that they are only allowed to use their phone if it is “secured in a commercially manufactured and designed mounting that is fixed to the vehicle and doesn't obscure your view of the road”.</p> <p>Authorities also reminded motorists that it is illegal to “rest your mobile phone on your leg, be between your shoulder and ear, or any other part of your body”.</p> <p>This means that a phone cannot rest in a driver’s lap or under their leg.</p> <p>From September 2018, drivers can lose five demerit points for breaking the rule.</p> <p>Drivers will also be fined if they hold their phone before pulling over and turning the engine off.</p> <p>“Drivers can only use a hand-held mobile phone if their vehicle is parked in an authorised parking spot, with the engine turned off,” the video said.</p> <p>Drivers on their Learner, P1 or P2 license are to “not use any function of a mobile phone while driving or when the ignition is on”.</p> <p>Did you know about these rules? Let us know in the comments in the below. </p>

Legal