Retirement Life

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“She’s chucking it in”: Denise Drysdale responds to claims she has quit Studio 10

<p>New claims have emerged that Denise Drysdale is walking away from the breakfast TV show,<em> Studio 10. </em></p> <p>During a radio segment on <em>The Kyle and Jackie O Show</em>, entertainment journalist Peter Ford revealed that the 69-year-old is “chucking it in”.</p> <p>Denise’s departure follows a recent string of exits on <em>Studio 10</em>, with the recent resignation of Ita Buttrose and Jessica Rowe.</p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black;">“<span style="letter-spacing: -.1pt;">She's quitting the <em>Studio 10 show</em>. She's chucking it in,” Peter told Kyle Sandilands and Jackie "O" Henderson. </span></span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white; min-height: 0px; orphans: 2; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px;" class="xxmol-para-with-font">Peter then went on to suggest the possible reasons for her departure, saying: “She's now got the house all built on the Gold Coast. She's got a new baby [a dog] on the way. She's adopted a dog.”<span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">Following the segment, a spokesperson for Network Ten said that Denise would address Peter’s claims that morning. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">On-air this morning, Denise revealed that she won’t be leaving the show, but she will be taking a break. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">She said: “I have been touring for 54 years in this job and I am sick of the travel and sick of sleeping in other people's beds."</span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white; min-height: 0px; orphans: 2; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px;" class="xxmol-para-with-font">She continued, “I spoke to our executive producer and said, 'I need to go'. I had a meeting and they said, ‘We don't want you to go. Have a break. Then come back’. So I am lucky to still be working at my age and have an opportunity to have a little break.”<span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">In 2016, Denise transitioned from being a fill-in presenter to a permanent host on the breakfast TV show. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">Throughout her time on <em>Studio 10</em>, Denise faced rumours of tensions between her and former co-host Ita Buttrose, 76. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">The speculation was heightened after Denise threw a brussels sprout at Ita in an on-set incident last November. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">Fans were also quick to comment on the pair’s relationship during Ita’s farewell segment in April, when Denise stayed noticeably silent. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">However, in a statement to <a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk"><em><strong><u>Daily Mail Australia</u></strong></em></a><u>,</u> Network Ten denied the claims there was a rift between the two, labelling the allegations “offensive”. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">Ita’s departure came a month after Jessica Rowe told viewers on-air that she was resigning to spend more time with her family. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bg7xS9BBoIC/?utm_source=ig_embed" data-instgrm-version="9"> <div style="padding: 8px;"> <div style="background: #F8F8F8; line-height: 0; margin-top: 40px; padding: 36.94444444444444% 0; text-align: center; width: 100%;"> <div style="background: url(data:image/png; base64,ivborw0kggoaaaansuheugaaacwaaaascamaaaapwqozaaaabgdbtueaalgpc/xhbqaaaafzukdcak7ohokaaaamuexurczmzpf399fx1+bm5mzy9amaaadisurbvdjlvzxbesmgces5/p8/t9furvcrmu73jwlzosgsiizurcjo/ad+eqjjb4hv8bft+idpqocx1wjosbfhh2xssxeiyn3uli/6mnree07uiwjev8ueowds88ly97kqytlijkktuybbruayvh5wohixmpi5we58ek028czwyuqdlkpg1bkb4nnm+veanfhqn1k4+gpt6ugqcvu2h2ovuif/gwufyy8owepdyzsa3avcqpvovvzzz2vtnn2wu8qzvjddeto90gsy9mvlqtgysy231mxry6i2ggqjrty0l8fxcxfcbbhwrsyyaaaaaelftksuqmcc); display: block; height: 44px; margin: 0 auto -44px; position: relative; top: -22px; width: 44px;"></div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Bg7xS9BBoIC/?utm_source=ig_embed" target="_blank">A post shared by Studio 10 (@studio10au)</a> on Mar 29, 2018 at 9:26pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt; background: white;">“After much soul searching and discussions with my family, it is with a heavy heart that I have decided to leave Studio 10,” Jessica said. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">The resignations have also impacted <em>Studio 10</em>’s ratings, with the show only averaging 63,000 viewers a day in April this year.</span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p style="background: white;" class="xxmol-para-with-font"><span style="color: black; letter-spacing: -.1pt;">In January 2014,<em> Studio 10</em> was averaging more than 90,000 viewers a day across Australia. </span><span style="font-size: 12.0pt; color: black;"></span></p> <p>Would you be sad to see Denise Drysdale leave <em>Studio 10?</em> Tell us in the comments below.  </p>

Retirement Life

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War widow kicked out of home after 20 years

<p>A war widow has been left to fend for herself after being told that she was getting kicked out of the apartment she had lived in for 20 years.</p> <p>Up until a year ago, Ila Harvey lived in a small, low-rise complex owned by the War Widows Guild at Drummoyne, in Sydney’s inner-west.</p> <p>When Ila lost her soldier husband, who had served on the Kokoda Track and at Milne Bay in New Guinea, she found herself friends in her local area and hobbies that kept her busy. </p> <p>However, this time last year, she was told the complex was being sold because the Guild had run out of funds, and the sale would help better serve the Guild’s four thousand members.</p> <p>Ila said the Guild suggested she move to a nursing home, but she felt there was still plenty of living to do, reported <a href="https://www.9news.com.au"><strong><em><u>Nine News</u></em></strong></a>.  </p> <p>After contacting a nearby MP, Ila and her family members started lobbying for support from the government.</p> <p>Her situation was eventually passed on to the Better Regulations Minister Matt Kean, who made an interesting discovery.</p> <p>Mr Kean found that under the Retirement Villages Act, the Guild was obliged to provide Ila with support to find similar accommodation.</p> <p>However, as the Guild have sold seven similar properties in their possession since 2002, the chances of her finding accommodation were slim.</p> <p>But, when the NSW branch of the RSL heard her story, they stepped in to help the widow.</p> <p>A new place in Cherrybrook was found for Ila through its aged accommodation arm RSL Life Care and state president James Brown.</p> <p>After months of uncertainty, Ila is celebrating her new home with the people who helped her get it. </p> <p>Meanwhile, the Guild wrestles with what to do with their Drummoyne site after Canada Bay Council’s independent planning and assessment panel rejected the proposal to demolish Ila’s old complex. </p>

Retirement Life

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The heartwarming moment hero tradesman pays for pensioner’s meal

<p>A tradie, who was filmed paying for a pensioner’s meal at McDonald’s in Bendigo, Victoria, this week has said that he only did what all Australians should do after noticing the elderly man fumbling with a handful of change.</p> <p>Dave Love, 42, generously offered to pay for the meal on Tuesday and the good deed was secretly recorded and has since gone viral.</p> <p>The elderly man who was the recipient of the act of kindness, Bert, is a widower who recently lost his daughter.</p> <p>“When I looked at that man I saw my dad, who has passed away. I just had to help him,” Dave told <em><u><a href="http://www.dailymail.co.uk"><strong>Daily Mail Australia</strong></a>.</u></em></p> <p>“Pensioners need our help. I just hope people who see the video remember to do a similar thing in the future.”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Flangleyfamily%2Fvideos%2F10155685354745814%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=267" width="267" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>The video was secretly captured by Melanie Langley, Dave’s partner, who explained that he regularly does kind things for strangers.</p> <p>“He has the best heart - he always puts himself last and would do anything for anyone,” Melanie, 39, said.</p> <p>Dave’s eldest daughter, Eliza, said she was proud of her dad.</p> <p>“He does this stuff all the time, one day he was really broke but saw an old lady needed some money for food at the supermarket and gave her the rest of the money he had til payday,” she said.</p> <p>Dave offered to pay for Bert’s meal alongside his own coffee at a McDonald’s in Bendigo, Victoria.</p> <p>Bert initially resisted Dave’s offer but eventually accepted it, saying: “Thank you very much… you're a gentleman, thank you.”</p> <p>In the video, Bert can then be seen moving away from the counter with his order number.</p> <p>Dave then handed him a $20 note, saying: “That's for your next coffee.”</p> <p>Since the video was shared online, Dave has received many messages praising his kindness.</p> <p>“It's not about me - it is about helping people out. I didn't do this for attention but I'm glad it has made people realise how far a little kindness can go,” he said.   </p> <p>“These people built our country so we can live the lives we have today - for my generation and the generation after us,” he said. </p> <p>“If I was prime minister tomorrow I would fix the pension.”</p> <p>Bert has since been given a year’s supply of McDonald’s.</p>

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20 years ago and now: Top toys compared

<p>A lot has changed in the world of toys in the past 20 years, but one item maintains its hold on children's hearts: the Hot Wheels car.</p> <p>"They are a simple toy but they are a fabulous toy," says Warehouse toy buyer Lonnica Van Engelen, of the classic collectible, which features in the toy department's top 10 sellers now, as it did 20 years ago.</p> <p>Also wildly popular in the late 90s were Tamagotchis, Polly Pockets and the boardgame Operation. While Operation is still around and Polly Pockets are due to make a return to shelves later this year, Tamagotchis have been superseded by technology. </p> <p>Children who once would have spent hours tending their virtual pet will now spend hours on the iPad.</p> <p>Van Engelen says the market for collectible toys, driven in part by the YouTube craze for unboxing videos, has grown "exponentially" in recent years. Children watch their favourite YouTubers build massive collections of toys, and they want to do that too. </p> <p>The most popular of these young superstars is American 7-year-old Ryan of ToysReview, who has been opening and playing with toys in front of a camera since he was three. He now makes an estimated $16 million a year, and his last name and location are kept secret to protect him. </p> <p>Ryan has reviewed Hot Wheels twice in the past year, racking up 3.4 million views for a post from two months ago, and 13 million views for a video posted seven months ago.</p> <p>Many of his most popular videos (the ones snagging up to 890 million views) feature the word "surprise" in the title. </p> <p>Sonya Brooks, a toy buyer and owner of Toy Fest in Christchurch, says surprise is a key element of a toy's success. The same delight that previous generations got from lucky dips is ignited in children who open an LOL Surprise, Smooshy Mushy Mystery Pack or Lost Kitties Blind Box – all top sellers, and all popular YouTube searches.</p> <p>"Even a year ago we didn't have this many collectibles in the top 10," says Van Engelen. "I think it comes down to children at a party. Children love to watch other children open presents. They are learning different ways to play."</p> <p>Brooks has also noticed a return to quality toys that will be passed from one generation to the next, possibly a reaction to all the plastic that comes with toys. Toys that inspire role play, like dolls and prams, are riding a wave of popularity.</p> <p>Of Hot Wheels she says, "You can't go past good old cars. I remember the first time my son picked up a car and put it on the floor and went vroom. He'd never had a vehicle, it's innate."</p> <p><strong>TOP TOYS 2018</strong> (in no particular order)</p> <ul> <li>Pomsies </li> <li>Zuru 5 Surprise Ball</li> <li>LOL Surprise Confetti Pop</li> <li>Hot Wheels basic cars</li> <li>LEGO Millennium Falcon</li> <li>Play-doh single tub</li> <li>Smooshy Mushy Mystery Pack</li> <li>Lost Kitties Blind Box</li> <li>Monopoly Here and Now</li> <li>Zuru Schnooks Plush Series 2</li> </ul> <p><strong>TOP TOYS 1998</strong> (in no particular order)</p> <ul> <li>Brick Game 9 in 1</li> <li>Chatter Rings</li> <li>Pro Yo II</li> <li>Tamagotchi</li> <li>Hot Wheels basic cars</li> <li>Barbie Picnic Van</li> <li>Super Soaker</li> <li>Polly Pocket</li> <li>Operation</li> <li>Magna Doodle</li> </ul> <p><em>Source: The Warehouse</em></p> <p><em>Written by Eleanor Black. Republished with permission of <a href="http://www.stuff.co.nz"><strong><u>Stuff.co.nz.</u></strong> </a></em></p>

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Is ageism affecting you?

<p><em><strong>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</strong></em></p> <p>Yah, we made it! We got old! Now we are ageing in the millennial world, which we have played a part in creating.</p> <p>Is ageism affecting you? Ageism is simply discrimination against older people in the workforce, in the media, in advertising, and in the social scene.</p> <p>One of the major areas where ageism is evident, is in the employment of older workers. Older workers can provide years of experience, life skills, and be great mentors to younger workers. But nearly a third of the officially unemployed workers are aged 45-65 years old. If someone loses their job at this age, they may never gain more than a casual, part-time position. These are the vital years pre-retirement, when employees build up savings and superannuation for their golden years.</p> <p>Basically, many employers do discriminate against hiring older workers from their candidates. Some unemployed older worker can retrain, but may battle an overlooked prejudice, the ageism of the potential employer. These retrained workers may never gain employment. If they do, they may have only 5-10 years of working life remaining. Many employers prefer to hire someone younger.</p> <p>Ageism is also evident in the media. For instance, no weather girl on the television is an old, grey, fat woman. Weather girls are anorexic, beautiful, blonde bimbos who can barely read an autocue. Maybe old, fat, grey women don’t want to be weather girls. That’s okay. Maybe they do, and the employers in television land hire young, attractive babes. That is ageism.</p> <p>On the other hand, ageism can factor in a reverse situation. An older, more experienced nurse, doctor, allied health professional, or a teacher, can still attract job opportunities. Society regards their experience as both valid and valuable. In my personal experience, as a teacher/tutor for 42 years, I receive part-time job offers as a tutor, several times per week. Nice to be asked.</p> <p>Moreover, seniors have discounts on travel fares, a senior’s card discount on purchases, and some concessions with their pensions. But is the level of the senior’s pension, a sign of ageism itself? Most household budgets are eroded by the cost of food and bills.</p> <p>What are your experiences? Is ageism affecting you?</p>

Retirement Life

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Is ageism affecting you?

<p><em><strong>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</strong></em></p> <p>Yah, we made it! We got old! Now we are ageing in the millennial world, which we have played a part in creating.</p> <p>Is ageism affecting you? Ageism is simply discrimination against older people in the workforce, in the media, in advertising, and in the social scene.</p> <p>One of the major areas where ageism is evident, is in the employment of older workers. Older workers can provide years of experience, life skills, and be great mentors to younger workers. But nearly a third of the officially unemployed workers are aged 45-65 years old. If someone loses their job at this age, they may never gain more than a casual, part-time position. These are the vital years pre-retirement, when employees build up savings and superannuation for their golden years.</p> <p>Basically, many employers do discriminate against hiring older workers from their candidates. Some unemployed older worker can retrain, but may battle an overlooked prejudice, the ageism of the potential employer. These retrained workers may never gain employment. If they do, they may have only 5-10 years of working life remaining. Many employers prefer to hire someone younger.</p> <p>Ageism is also evident in the media. For instance, no weather girl on the television is an old, grey, fat woman. Weather girls are anorexic, beautiful, blonde bimbos who can barely read an autocue. Maybe old, fat, grey women don’t want to be weather girls. That’s okay. Maybe they do, and the employers in television land hire young, attractive babes. That is ageism.</p> <p>On the other hand, ageism can factor in a reverse situation. An older, more experienced nurse, doctor, allied health professional, or a teacher, can still attract job opportunities. Society regards their experience as both valid and valuable. In my personal experience, as a teacher/tutor for 42 years, I receive part-time job offers as a tutor, several times per week. Nice to be asked.</p> <p>Moreover, seniors have discounts on travel fares, a senior’s card discount on purchases, and some concessions with their pensions. But is the level of the senior’s pension, a sign of ageism itself? Most household budgets are eroded by the cost of food and bills.</p> <p>What are your experiences? Is ageism affecting you?</p>

Retirement Life

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Why you should learn one new thing every day in retirement

<p><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.megangiles.com/" target="_blank">Megan Giles</a></span>, Retirement Transition Consultant, supports those approaching retirement to successfully transition and create a retirement they will love to live!</strong></em></p> <p>Learn one new thing in retirement, you say? Why on earth would I want to do that, you muse to yourself. I’ve worked hard over the years and now it is finally time to kick back, relax and enjoy the fruits of my labours.</p> <p>Why is it important to keep learning, especially in retirement? There are a number of reasons.</p> <ol> <li><strong>Curiosity is fantastic for ensuring strong social connections in retirement.</strong> People who are interested in others tend to be perceived as interesting themselves. As social beings we tend to gravitate towards people who are interesting and have a sense of energy about them. The friendships established during our working life start to (naturally) drift away as routines change in retirement and so this becomes all the more important.</li> <li><strong>As the saying goes ‘use it or lose it’.</strong> The most effective way to keep your mind sharp and prevent mental decline is to keep using it!</li> <li><strong>Set yourself up for success.</strong> Learning requires us to challenge what we thought we knew and be willing to try different things. This in turn makes us more adaptable to new situations and more confident in how we step into the world. In acknowledging that retirement can be a time of transition and upheaval, wouldn’t it be great to know you were stepping into it on the front foot.</li> </ol> <p>What is that one thing that you muse over and think ‘I’d love to learn that, if only I had time…’. Why not make the time? Rather than thinking of learning as an arduous journey, such as a three year (full time!) university degree or learning a language fluently, why not start small and commit to learning just one thing each day. Perhaps learn just one new Spanish word each day (and practice using it!) or read one article about a topic you are passionate about. Imagine what you can learn over the course of a year!</p> <p><strong>After ideas for one new thing you could learn each and every day? </strong></p> <p>Here are 20 ideas to get you started!</p> <ul> <li>The name of your neighbours (particularly if you’ve recently moved)</li> <li>The one thing your grandchildren enjoyed most at school today</li> <li>Your significant other’s greatest wish for retirement</li> <li>How to take better care of your health (and ensure you are able to live out your retirement dreams)</li> <li>A new recipe for dinner</li> <li>How to compost</li> <li>How to grow your own vegetables</li> <li>The names of the plants in your garden</li> <li>Trace your family tree</li> <li>The history of your local area, particularly the indigenous history</li> <li>First aid</li> <li> How to SnapChat or tweet (and keep up with the grandkids!)</li> <li>How to blog</li> <li>Join a bookclub</li> <li>How to stand-up paddle board / yoga/ cycle</li> <li>How to drive a 4X4</li> <li>To play the ukulele</li> <li>To sing (why not head along to one of the many Pub Choirs popping up around the country!)</li> <li>Build your own pizza oven</li> <li>Creative writing</li> <li>Up-cycling furniture (and update your home to reflect your new lifestyle in retirement)</li> </ul> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p><strong>Where to start?</strong></p> <p>There are fantastic interest groups and classes both in your community and online. Browse the web or pick up a copy of the local paper and see what’s on near you.  </p> <p>You don’t need to spend the whole day learning, or even one hour. Commit to just 15 mins of focused learning each and see where that takes you.</p> <p align="center"><em>‘You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream’ – C.S. Lewis</em></p>

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Remembering all the sports we played in our childhoods

<p><em><strong>Barbara Binland is the pen name of a senior, Julie Grenness, in Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. She is a poet, writer, and part-time English and Maths tutor, with over 40 years of experience. Her many books are available on Amazon and Kindle.</strong></em></p> <p>Let’s reminisce, about sports. Now the baby boomers can gaze at sport on colour television practically any time of day or night. Or we can participate in seniors’ golf, or gyms that never used to exist, or walking or cycling. Or we can join in any physical activity that we like, depending on our age, our physical capabilities, and our finances.</p> <p>Let’s reminisce...Once, when we were young, most of us learnt to swim. It is still Australia’s most popular sport, for folk of any age. If people lived near the beach, they soon learnt to swim. For suburbanites, such as our family, there was a river nearby. Our parents drove us there in a hot car. Air conditioning was winding down the windows. No seatbelts, no heated pools, no lifeguards, or swimming coaches. Mum would say, “Go and swim.” She would read a book, with a thermos of tea. Our dad said, “Don’t come back if you drown.” He would promptly go to sleep, and snore all afternoon. So we did not drown, and always came back at 4 pm. At our schools, teachers took us swimming in the council pool, cold, deep, outdoors, whatever the weather. Boy, did we swim and survive!</p> <p>Then, there was football. In Melbourne, it was, and still is, Australian Rules Football. I guess things were similar in rugby states. There was no live or delayed football telecast on television. All games were played on Saturday afternoons only. The matches were played at suburban parochial grounds, sort of like tribal warfare. Yes, Saturday afternoons in cold, grey Melbourne, still evoke golden memories of radio broadcasts blaring football across the suburban large backyards. It was all accompanied by lawnmowers, and the inhalation of new mown grass. Let’s reminisce…</p> <p>Indeed, many people, football tragics or not, still support their old family football club. They bring their children and grandchildren up to follow them too. But, these days, it is a professional, televised, corporate game, too many umpires, a corporate exercise. Football is played now at massive, expensive city stadiums, many kilometres away. Some might regard the modern players as overpriced, drugged up individuals, underemployed ‘superstars’.</p> <p>Maybe we long for the days when there was only one umpire, when it was all about the team, the guernsey, and the lure of the premiership flag. In those ‘good old days’, boys learnt football skills playing kick to kick until dusk, in suburban backyards, or in the quiet streets. They played with their brothers, their dads, or their mates. Years later, when I was teaching primary school, the boys played football kick to kick on a gravel playground. Did it make them better footballers? A lot of football supporters now turn to local suburban football clubs, to gain the camaraderie of the days when men played like men.</p> <p>Let’s reminisce, about cricket. When we were growing up, somewhere in middle Australia, our dad, a former sporting champion, taught us to play cricket. Endless summer afternoons of continuous cricket, ‘tip and run’, also popular for sport at school. The eternal arguments over decisions, usually won by the senior sibling. We had no helmets or padding, no third umpire. Little boys all wanted to be captain of Australia, and win the Ashes before lunch on the first day, off their own bat. Some things never change!</p> <p>Let’s reminisce… Way back when, Australia reached the pinnacle of tennis excellence. In suburbia there were outdoor grass courts, for children to practise their skills. We admired the Greats- Rosewall, Laver, John Newcombe, Margaret Court, among others. But, for us, our tennis equipment was two second hand racquets, plus a tennis ball attached to a long elastic string. This was tied to a brick. If the elastic string snapped, the ball sailed over the back fence—end of tennis!</p> <p>We did play other team sports, as young girls. Cross ball was a favourite. It was a fun way to learn about playing for the team. Skipping ropes were also popular. Before netball, girls played its ancestor, called basketball, which was different from modern basketball.</p> <p>So, the baby boomers did not have much current equipment, or uniforms. But neither did most of our sporting heroes. Test cricketers wore no helmets. Footballers worked in full time jobs, and played the game on Saturdays, after limited training in all types of weather, with few facilities. Yet some of the records and standards are only now being superseded in the 21st century. After all these years, would you say that they were better, tougher, sporting men and women? Or is nostalgia a place that does not really exist?</p> <p>Let’s reminisce… What are your memories of sport?</p> <p><em>Image credit: Pinterest</em></p>

Retirement Life

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Grandparents forced to sell homes and use super to care for their grandchildren

<p>Grandparents who have custody of their grandchildren – often amid concerns of domestic violence, drug abuse or neglect by the children’s parents – are struggling to make ends meet with many forced to sell their homes or dip into their superannuation just to ensure their grandchildren have a home to grow up in.</p> <p>As grandparents are classified as kindship carers, they are not formally recognised for financial support from the NSW Government as they took custody of the children without the involvement of the state's Department of Family and Community Services (FACS).</p> <p>If they had, grandparents would receive the same assistance as foster carers — worth between $484 and $733 a fortnight per child, depending on the child's age — and could apply for extra financial support.</p> <p>Now support groups and not-for-profits are calling for a change in the law to treat grandparents the same as foster carers, noting that there is a growing number of families left without enough support.</p> <p>"Mirabel know of more than 500 families across NSW and 300 of those at least are in the Hunter region, the Greater Hunter Region and I would say 300 of those are not receiving the allowance from the state agency," Mirabel Foundation support worker Karen Lizasoain told <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-18/grandparents-dipping-in-superannuation-to-care-for-grandkids/9692742">ABC News.</a> </strong></span></p> <p>"We don't know how many families it is exactly, because no-one is getting those statistics of how many families are not being attended to by FACS.</p> <p>"Often, the grandparents are retired or close to retirement age and many of them are living on an aged pension, some on [a] disability pension."</p> <p>Ms Lizasoain believes the under-resourcing and funding of FACS is part of the problem as it forces grandparents to take matters in their own hands.</p> <p>"If grandparents are concerned about their grandchildren and they report it to FACS, they report multiple times, they keep reporting, but nothing is done, and the children remain in danger," Ms Lizasoain said.</p> <p>"Then they go in and they take the children into a safe place. If this happens, the state agency says that's good, the children are safe now, and they just leave that family alone with no help whatsoever."</p> <p>In a statement, FACS said they do not have a role in informal arrangements.</p> <p>"FACS does not have a role in informal family arrangements or Family Court orders where there are no child protection concerns," the department said.</p> <p>"It is not appropriate for state child protection agencies to regulate family arrangements for the purpose of financial assistance.</p> <p>"Providing financial support to families is the responsibility of the Australian Government via Centrelink."</p>

Retirement Life

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Pensioners retiring overseas because they can’t afford to live in Australia

<p>As senior Aussies struggle to manage with the increased cost of living and property prices, more retirees are relocating overseas.</p> <p>In 2016, 11,660 Australians aged over 55 relocated overseas – a significant jump from the 7,910 who moved in 2005, according to ABS data.</p> <p>The destinations that most retirees are choosing to move to include New Zealand, Italy, Greece and Spain.</p> <p>If an Aussie pensioner lives abroad, access to their pension is reliant on several factors including the length of their time away, whether their assets or income have change and whether the pension is delivered through a social security agreement with another country.</p> <p>Australia has <a href="https://www.dss.gov.au/about-the-department/international/international-social-security-agreements/overview-international-social-security-agreements" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">31 agreements</span></strong></a> with countries such as Italy and Spain that overcome barriers to pension payment.</p> <p>However, if a pensioner returns to Australia after living abroad, and they travel outside the country for six weeks within two years of returning, they could receive payment cuts.</p> <p>It is important for pensioners to log their travel plans through Centrelink’s <a href="https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/centrelink/centrelink-online-accounts" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">online portal</span></strong></a> if they are planning on going overseas for more than six weeks.</p> <p>"When looking at the aged pension it's always good advice to sit down with a financial planner before moving overseas permanently as everyone has different access rights and you may find yourself stranded," says Ryan Cullinan, an international financial adviser for Compare Return told the <a href="http://www.abc.net.au/news/2018-05-16/pensioners-retiring-overseas-because-they-cant-afford-australia/9762418" target="_blank"><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;">ABC.</span></strong></a></p> <p>Aussies who live abroad for more than five years, and permanent residents living overseas for more than a year, also forfeit the right to Medicare and don’t have to pay the Medicare levy.</p> <p>In 2013, Norah Ohrt relocated to the Spanish town of Mortas. She lives in a three-bedroom loft and has breathtaking views of the old cobbled city.</p> <p>With the reduced cost of food, council rates and water, Norah relies on her pension to cover all her bills.</p> <p>She renovated her $65,000 home using her superannuation and is just one of the many Aussies who are tempting their Aussie friends to spend their retirement in another country.</p> <p>"If you're on an Australian pension and struggling, I would strongly suggest that you look to alternatives, particularly if you have a second language that you can use," Norah told ABC News. </p> <p>Have you considered relocating and retiring in another country? Let us know in the comments below. </p>

Retirement Life

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Life in retirement: Why it’s never too late to start a business

<p><em><strong><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><a href="http://www.megangiles.com/" target="_blank">Megan Giles</a></span>, Retirement Transition Consultant, supports those approaching retirement to successfully transition and create a retirement they will love to live!</strong></em></p> <p>Think you’re too old to start a business? Think again. The 55+ age bracket is the fastest growing demographic for launching a new business and proves that age is no barrier to entrepreneurship. A recent US study found that almost 40% of Baby Boomer respondents indicated they were interested in starting a business or not-for-profit in retirement. And why not! Retirement provides a wonderful opportunity to pursue your passion on your own terms and earn an income in the process.</p> <p><em>As Jill says, “I love being over 60 and just figuring out my new career. So many wonderful things still to come”</em></p> <p>Why kick back in the recliner if you would rather be doing something else?</p> <p><strong>How a business can help realise your purpose in retirement</strong></p> <p>There are a number of motivators for starting a business after stepping away from one’s ‘real’ career. It might be that you developed a specific or highly desirable skill set during your career and don’t want your skills to lose currency.  It might be that you have a hobby and are excited to purpose it with passion, or that you are an empty nester with more time on your hands and want to do something meaningful with your days. Whatever your motivation, why not give it a go! Remember that there is nothing wrong with making money by serving and delivering great value to others.</p> <p><strong>The unique contribution that Baby Boomers have to offer</strong></p> <p>One of the most powerful points of difference that retirees have to offer is the ability to identify with, and respond to, the needs of a fast growing consumer demographic – the Baby Boomers themselves.</p> <p>According to the <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="http://www.abs.gov.au/ausstats/abs%40.nsf/94713ad445ff1425ca25682000192af2/1647509ef7e25faaca2568a900154b63?OpenDocument" target="_blank">ABS</a></strong></span>, at least 15% of the Australia population in 2017 were 65 or older, which accounts for 3.4 million people! Baby Boomers constitute a significant part of the consumer market and are inclined to do business with other Baby Boomers because they ‘get’ them. They think to themselves ‘you’ve been where I’ve been and you understand what I need’.</p> <p><em>As Ange* reflects “I’m 67 and most of the women I work with are baby boomers too. One of the things I realised is that women of a certain age come from a place of wisdom. We’ve lived, we’ve learned, we synthesise so much…And we’re truly experts on what we do because we have that deeper knowledge that goes beyond textbook knowledge”</em></p> <p>Challenge the stereotypes that retirees are past it and out of touch. Your experience, networks and resilience are just three valuable qualities you will bring to the entrepreneurial world.</p> <p><strong>Setting off on the right foot - Key actions to take when starting a business in retirement</strong></p> <p><strong>1. Do market research.</strong> For the greatest chance of success it is important to ensure you are solving a problem in a marketplace. Who is your ideal client? Can you describe them – what they like doing, how they spend their time, and what is important to them. Do you know someone who fits this description? Chat to them and find out if what you want to offer will appeal to them? Test and refine. Find some more people to speak with. Test and refine again.</p> <p><strong>2. Stop and reflect.</strong> Take a moment to stop and reflect on your strengths, your proudest moments, the challenges you have overcome and what you are truly passionate about. This will provide a positive foundation to build your business on. Remember that you don’t need to compete with the 20-somethings in this digital age. Offerings do not have to be tech-based to succeed.</p> <p><strong>3. Plan.</strong> Identify the problem or opportunity and assess if you have the right skills to respond. If there are any gaps consider if you need to bring in some expertise, be that coaching, outsourcing or upskilling. Don’t be afraid to use your connections and embrace technology. Determine how much money you are willing to outlay, how many items/sessions you need to sell to break even (and better yet earn a profit) and then make that one of your goals.</p> <p><strong>4. Set ground rules.</strong> Make the distinction between work and personal time. Remember, retirement is about lifestyle – you don’t want your business to become all-consuming. Set these expectations early and hold yourself to account!</p> <p><strong>One bonus tip</strong> – it is not worth losing a friendship over a business. Before you launch a venture with a friend, ensure that your skills are complementary and create some ground rules about how the two of you are going to work together and speak up when things are not going as anticipated.</p> <p><em>After a long and successful career in recruitment, Lisa* established a personal image business. Through her career she frequently advised on creating a high impact first impression and recognised the importance of feeling good in one’s skin. She also had an amateur interest in styling with friends regularly asking ‘what should I wear to that important dinner’ or ‘what shoes go with this outfit’. Not surprisingly she created a business supporting women approaching retirement to transition from a corporate wardrobe to a more relaxed style. She appreciated that women (like herself) still want to look smart but reflect a new energy in retirement.</em></p> <p><em>Lisa has built her business via word-of-mouth, some networking and an online presence. She is conscious of the number of clients she takes on each week as she wants her business to be a joy, not a burden. To her, business is about pursuing something that lights her up (and being rewarded for it!).</em></p> <p>The Baby Boomers have always been the ones to break the rules and to challenge the social norms. Why should that be any difference in retirement? Why retire in the traditional sense of the word if you’re excited to be doing something else?</p>

Retirement Life

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Should the Country Women’s Association join the gender politics debate?

<p>The Country Women’s Association is renowned in our nation for promoting family values and traditional recipes for almost 100 years.</p> <p>But several motions put forward at the organisation’s recent annual state conference – including a push to make gender-neutral uniforms “mandatory” in public school across NSW – have divided members and the public.</p> <p>Sydney City Branch president Elizabeth Nash introduced a proposal that states: “The policy of CWA of NSW shall be to advocate for the NSW government to amend its School Uniform Policy so that gender-neutral uniforms are mandatory for all public schools.”</p> <p>“The NSW government leaves the school community to decide on its uniforms. This has resulted in an inconsistent approach in uniform policy across NSW,” Sydney members wrote.</p> <p>However, the proposal was defeated with the final tally showing 285 votes against and 192 votes in favour.</p> <p>Another CWA motion advocates decriminalising sections of the NSW Crimes Act concerning administering or supplying drugs to have an abortion, and a separate motion advocates for “protection against violence and assaults for all health employees”.</p> <p>NSW CEO Danica Leys said the CWA was not the “conservative” organisation it was often mistaken for.</p> <p>“One of the interesting things about CWA is it’s often thought about as being perhaps quite an old-fashioned, conservative organisation but the reality is far from that,” she said.</p> <p>However, the CWA’s recent forays into politically-charged issues has copped criticism with a <span style="text-decoration: underline;"><strong><a href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/rendezview/why-is-the-cwa-joining-the-gender-politics-crusade/news-story/582b063641bbe0f0ec18ee4826464722">The Daily Telegraph opinion piece</a></strong></span> asking: Why is the CWA joining the gender politics crusade?</p> <p>Louise Roberts writes in her piece: “Are we now at the level where there is not a single space ‘safe’ from gender debate?”</p> <p>She adds: “It’s outrageous to assume the CWA has a culture and an image that needs changing.</p> <p>Yes, the CWA will lobby for women and families and for the bush. They’ll also work quietly in the background, thanks all the same, and get on with helping whoever needs them.</p> <p>It’s like a thousand mums all with your best interests at heart.”</p> <p>She concludes: “Why do people feel the need to ‘fix’ this organisation like this? Why is ‘conservative’ a dirty word? It takes all kinds in this world. The CWA might not be a bunch of bra burners but that doesn’t mean they’re not a collective group of strong women who are making a difference.”</p>

Retirement Life

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“I still make my adult son’s packed lunch”

<p>Mother and business owner, Amanda, has confessed that she is still mollycoddling her son despite him being an adult.</p> <p>“I know he's 23 but I still struggle to see him as properly grown up," Amanda Pampel told the <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/lifestyle/life-and-relationships/i-still-make-my-adult-son-s-packed-lunch-20180418-p4zabq.html" target="_blank"><strong><em><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Sydney Morning Herald.</span></em></strong></a></p> <p>“He's perfectly capable, but as soon as he came back I wanted to mollycoddle him."</p> <p>Until her son Louis recently found a full time job, Amanda and her husband David supported him financially.</p> <p>They still don’t charge him rent and she makes him a packed lunch every day for work.</p> <p>"I know he could do it himself but it's just a nice thing to do," she said. </p> <p>Amanda knows that she is spoiling her son, but Louis is happy with the arrangement.</p> <p>Clinical psychologist Dr Chirag Gorasia says that there are benefits for practising tough love as a parent rather than just giving them endless amounts of support.</p> <p>"The concept of parenting has changed and both parents and children now find it difficult to let go," said Dr Gorasia.</p> <p>"Financial support can often mean a better quality of life for young adults. However, it can also mean that children end up less able to cope with challenges, as they've not had much experience of resolving their issues independently."</p> <p>In <em>The Lancet Child &amp; Adolescent Health</em> medical journal, an opinion piece suggested that adolescence now lasts until the age of 24, increasing from the previous age of 19.</p> <p>This shift coincides with high rent, fewer jobs and an increase in the median age for first marriages.</p> <p>Experts agree that it is vital for parents to set boundaries if their children move back into the family home to save for their future.</p> <p>"Having your children home again can be rewarding as you all develop a more adult relationship," said psychotherapist Ellie Roberts.</p> <p>"But most parents know that the appropriate developmental stage is for their children to move away from the home and establish themselves in relationships and work.”</p> <p>Roberts believes that the toll of modern education on children encourages helicopter parenting.</p> <p>"Education has become stressful for children and parents tend to compensate by offering a kind of butler service," she said.</p> <p>However, Roberts says that once their children’s education is over, parents need to learn to let go.</p> <p>Roberts also suggests to not keep tabs on your children on social media.</p> <p>"It has blurred the boundaries," she said.</p> <p>"If parents aren't careful, their anxiety about what their children are up to can drive them into becoming voyeurs. It can also lead to parents assuming they are 'friends' when it's more developmentally healthy for children that their parents remain parents.</p> <p>"Being supportive isn't the same as over-involvement," Roberts said.</p> <p>What is a bad idea, she explained, is "enmeshment – when the young person finds it difficult to separate and is constantly either appeasing the parents or rebelling against them."</p>

Retirement Life

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Millionaire leaves nothing to partner of 42 years in will

<p><span>Despite being together for 42 years, a millionaire landowner who died left nothing behind in his will for his partner.</span></p> <p><span>Wynford Hodge, who owned Parsonage Farm and Caravan Park in Wales, died after battling prostate cancer in 2017.</span></p> <p><span>Mr Hodge left behind more than $2,700,000 in funds and assets but the 92-year-old did not want his 79-year-old partner or his children to inherit any of his money.</span></p> <p><span>When Mr Hodge's health deteriorated, his partner Jane Thompson took on the role of his main carer.</span></p> <p><span>The High Court were told that Mr Hodge had made 10 wills before his death.</span></p> <p><span>In his final will, Mr Hodge left all of his wealth to his two tenants, Karla Evans and Agon Berisha, who worked at his properties.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img width="500" height="280" src="/media/7817779/1_500x280.jpg" alt="1 (127)"/></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Parsonage Farm and Caravan Park via Google Maps</em></p> <p><span>Mr Hodge said Ms Thompson was “financially comfortable” and didn’t need any of his money.</span></p> <p>MREC-TAG-HERE</p> <p><span>In reality, his partner had only been left with savings of about $4,500.</span></p> <p><span>Judge Milywn Jarman ruled that Mr Hodge failed to meet his responsibilities to his partner and awarded Ms Thompson a cottage on the estate wroth $410,000.</span></p> <p><span>She also received almost $346,000 to pay for the renovation of the cottage and to give her financial security.</span></p>

Retirement Life

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“We remember”: Auschwitz survivor and Vietnam vet on what ANZAC Day means to them

<p>Anzac Day means different things to different people. </p> <p>Frank Smolen, who turns 100 in October, survived Auschwitz. When Nazi Germany occupied his country, Frank joined the Polish Resistance. He spent about three years in this infamous concentration camp after the Gestapo discovered his allegiance to the resistance. </p> <p>Frank admires how Australians come together to remember the brave people who served their country in war. </p> <p>“Australians do it well. No other country in the world recognises their returned soldiers and diggers like that. They haven’t forgotten.”</p> <p>Frank moved from Poland to Australia after World War II. He met his future wife, Hedwig, on the boat trip to Australia and they enjoyed a happy life in Melbourne suburb, Footscray, before she passed away about 10 years ago. He has only recently started talking about some of his experiences.</p> <p>Today, he lives at VMCH aged care residence, St Bernadette’s in Sunshine. Frank’s family describe him as a treasure. </p> <p>“He’s just an adorable man and we love him to bits,” his daughter-in-law, Ina, says.</p> <p>While ANZAC Day was not something the family have been a part of in the past, Frank was moved when he was asked to be part of St Bernadette’s Anzac Day service last year.</p> <p>“St Bernadette’s asked him to lay the wreath for their Anzac Day service because he was the oldest one in the centre,” Ina, said. </p> <p>“He was so emotional and so proud. I really think that is the closest he’s ever come to somebody acknowledging what he’s been through.” </p> <p>Ina says Frank is in good health and the family hope to record his experiences during World War II to make sure his memories and important story is not lost. She sees parallels between his reasons for joining the Polish Resistance and what the ANZACs did. </p> <p>“We have asked him why did he do it? ‘Why were you part of the underground?’ He said, ‘I did it for Poland. I did it for the love of my country.’ That’s exactly how we look at our ANZACs and what they have been through at Gallipoli.  They just do it because it’s for their country,” she said.</p> <p>For Gary McNabb, 66, ANZAC Day is an important day to remember people who did not come back from war.  </p> <p>A Vietnam War veteran, Gary marches in the ANZAC Day Parade in Melbourne every year.</p> <p>“I can’t get over the amount of people there … all cheering. I am proud to march. But you still remember everyone that’s been your mates that are not with you anymore,” he says.</p> <p>Gary is a volunteer at St Bernadette’s. He started volunteering after his mum moved into St Bernadette’s about eight years ago. While his mum passed away a few years ago, Gary still volunteers. He loves to chat with residents and help out during the regular bingo games. </p> <p>Gary says he does not like to talk about his time during the Vietnam War. </p> <p>“I have locked it and thrown the key away,” he said. </p> <p>He says he only started marching in the Anzac Day parade in the ‘90s at the insistence of an aunt. But, now he enjoys the day and recalls the first time he joined the parade.</p> <p>“I met blokes I hadn’t seen in years and years. It felt fantastic.”</p> <p>It is the stories and sacrifice of people like Frank, Gary and countless others that continue to make days like Anzac Day so important to Australians.</p> <p>Lest we forget.</p>

Retirement Life