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Father pens emotional tribute two years after daughter's tragic death

<p><span>A father of a girl whose body was found in the dunes of a Queensland beach over two years ago has penned a beautiful and emotional letter.</span><br /><br /><span>Troy Cordingley wrote a tribute for his daughter Toyah on the second anniversary of her unsolved murder.</span><br /><br /><span>Toyah was last seen when she took her dog on a walk before she vanished.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Cordingley went on to discover his daughter's body on Wangetti Beach as a search party who were looking for the young woman after she failed to return home on the evening of October 21, 2018.</span><br /><br /><span>"Two years … it seems like yesterday … it seems like one hundred years," Mr Cordingley wrote on Facebook.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838394/famiyl-dad.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/32154b8510ee4edc9d0bc112dd304ff3" /><br /><br /><span>"I had a million things to say, but now I don't seem to be able to.</span><br /><br /><span>"I miss you more than life itself, I would trade places with you in an instant.</span><br /><br /><span>"I am now half the person I used to be, you are my world.</span><br /><br /><span>"You are all the love, joy, and happiness I have ever known, you taught me to be a better person.</span><br /><br /><span>"Without you, everything seems pointless.</span><br /><br /><span>"I love you Toyah, my Brighteyes, my world.</span><br /><br /><span>"Daddio xoxo."</span><br /><br /><span>There have been no arrests made over Toyah’s murder.</span><br /><br /><span>There is one person of interest, Innisfail nurse Rajwinder Singh, wbu travelled to India not long after Toyah's body was found and has not been located.</span></p>

Family & Pets

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Karl Stefanovic's mother finally meets her granddaughter Harper

<p>He’s previously spoken about his heartache that his mother, Jenny, has been unable to meet his baby daughter, Harper, due to the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>But on Thursday, Karl Stefanovic was finally able to introduce his little bundle of joy to his mother Jenny, 70.</p> <p>Taking to Instagram to share the heartwarming snap, Karl wrote: “My mum lives in Cairns. Covid stopped her from seeing our baby Harper.”</p> <p>“She was scared to come down initially. She didn't want to get it. She didn't want to fly. But last week she drove 2,500 kilometres to be with us. She's had enough.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGpMGKepT8R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGpMGKepT8R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">My mum lives in Cairns. Covid stopped her from seeing our baby Harper. She was scared to come down initially. She didn’t want to get it. She didn’t want to fly. But last week she drove 2500 kilometres to be with us. She’s had enough. A fierce beautiful magnificent independent vulnerable spiritual woman. Here she is presenting her grand daughter with my grand mother’s favourite flower. She is my mum. I love her. @jennypenny_49</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/karlstefanovic_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> karl stefanovic</a> (@karlstefanovic_) on Oct 22, 2020 at 4:08am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“A fierce beautiful magnificent independent vulnerable spiritual woman,” he gushed.</p> <p>“Here she is presenting her grand daughter with my grandmother's favourite flower -  She is my mum. I love her,” he concluded.</p> <p>In the photo, Harper can be seen sitting on her grandmother’s lap, while another shared by Karl’s wife Jasmine, shows the proud nan holding her up.</p> <p>Karl previously revealed that his mother was unable to see baby Harper due to the COVID-19 pandemic.</p>

Family & Pets

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Princess Mary’s whirlwind week of style

<p>Crown Princess Mary is known for her work ethic, and this week is no exception.</p> <p>Making five personal appearances, the Danish royal  has gone everywhere, and she managed to pull everything off seamlessly.</p> <p>Earlier in the week, the Danish royal palace’s official Instagram account shared an update about Mary’s meeting with Executive Director for World Food Programme (WFP), David Beasley.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGh_tTeAD-m/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGh_tTeAD-m/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">I dag fik jeg besøg af Executive Director for World Food Programme (WFP) David Beasley og udviklingsminister Rasmus Prehn. Under besøget ønskede jeg WFP tillykke med modtagelsen af Nobels Fredspris 2020, som organisationen har fået for sin indsats for at bekæmpe hungersnød, for at skabe bedre betingelser for fred i konfliktramte områder og for sit arbejde for at forhindre, at sult bliver brugt som våben i konflikter. Under mødet blev jeg chokeret over at høre om de dystre forventninger de kommende år til, hvor mange mennesker, der vil blive ramt af hungersnød, bl.a. på grund af konflikt og menneskeflugt. At høre om WFPs strategiske planer og arbejde, som støttes af Danmark, gjorde dog, at jeg kan forblive optimistisk. Men som med alle store udfordringer kræver denne også, at verden står sammen.⁣ ⁣ 🖌 Today, I had the pleasure of meeting with David Beasley, Executive Director for World Food Programme (WFP) and Rasmus Prehn, Danish Minister for Development Corporation and had the opportunity to congratulate WFP on being awarded this years’ Nobel Peace Prize. WFP was recognised for its efforts to combat hunger, to create better conditions for peace in conflict-affected areas, and for its work to prevent hunger from being used as a weapon in conflicts. During our meeting, I was choked to hear how many millions of people are forecast to face extreme food insecurity in the coming years, primarily due to conflict and migration. Thankfully, learning more about WFP’s strategic plans and work, which is strongly supported by Denmark, helps in remaining optimistic. However, overcoming such a huge and complex challenge, will require the world to stand united.⁣ ⁣ 📸 Martin Sylvest, Ritzau Scanpix©️⁣</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/detdanskekongehus/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> DET DANSKE KONGEHUS 🇩🇰</a> (@detdanskekongehus) on Oct 19, 2020 at 9:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>In a rare personal statement, Mary wrote of the event: "During our meeting, I was choked to hear how many millions of people are forecast to face extreme food insecurity in the coming years, primarily due to conflict and migration."</p> <p>She continued: "Thankfully, learning more about WFP's strategic plans and work, which is strongly supported by Denmark, helps in remaining optimistic. However, overcoming such a huge and complex challenge, will require the world to stand united.⁣"</p> <p>Shortly after, Mary was pictured once again out and about as she attended the launch of World Hour 2020 at Copenhagen City Hall.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGm9owTAYTb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGm9owTAYTb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Verdenstimen arbejder for at lære børn og unge om FN’s verdensmål for bæredygtig udvikling ved at udbrede kendskabet til verdensmålene på skoler og ungdomsuddannelser.⁣ ⁣ I dag deltog Hendes Kongelige Højhed Kronprinsessen i lanceringen af Verdenstimen 2020 på Københavns Rådhus. Her præsenterede københavnske skoleelever løsninger på verdensmålene, og hele salen spillede Verdensmålsfodbold med Global Goals World Cup.⁣ ⁣ Verdenstimen, der er en årlig begivenhed arrangeret af Verdens Bedste Nyheder, er en del af den globale kampagne The World’s Largest Lesson.⁣ ⁣ 📸 Lasse Bak Mejlvang ©</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/detdanskekongehus/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> DET DANSKE KONGEHUS 🇩🇰</a> (@detdanskekongehus) on Oct 21, 2020 at 7:23am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Then came another event, which was held outdoors.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGndusEjfrw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGndusEjfrw/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">I dag for 50 år siden indviede Frederik 9. Den Nye Lillebæltsbro. Her på jubilæumsdagen deltog Hendes Kongelige Højhed Kronprinsessen i fejringen af den 1.700 meter lange hængebro, der forbinder Fyn og Jylland. ⁣ ⁣ Arrangementet fandt både sted til lands og til vands, da Kronprinsessen først med skibet Aventura sejlede under Den Nye Lillebæltsbro. Efterfølgende kørte Hendes Kongelige Højhed i veteranbil over broen. ⁣ ⁣ 📸 Claus Fisker og Frank Cilius, Ritzau Scanpix ©️</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/detdanskekongehus/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> DET DANSKE KONGEHUS 🇩🇰</a> (@detdanskekongehus) on Oct 21, 2020 at 12:04pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Mary pulled up to the suspension bridge that connects Funen and Jutland in Denmark to celebrate 50 years since Frederik IX inaugurated the connecting bridge.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGpLroDgxg3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGpLroDgxg3/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">I dag blev der afholdt møde i WWF Verdensnaturfondens præsidium, som jeg for nylig er tiltrådt som præsident for. Under mødet fik vi indsigt i noget af den nyeste viden om natur, dyreliv og biodiversitet, og hvad der skal til for at mindske den trussel, vi ser i øjeblikket, mod dyrearter og biodiversitet. Vi kan ikke fortsætte med at bruge naturens ressourcer på den måde, vi har gjort hidtil - vi skal finde den rigtige balance. Og det et fælles projekt for alle.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/detdanskekongehus/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> DET DANSKE KONGEHUS 🇩🇰</a> (@detdanskekongehus) on Oct 22, 2020 at 4:04am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Mary then attended a meeting with the WWF, where she discussed nature, wildlife and biodiversity with the workers of the organisation.</p> <p>And last but not least, Mary visited a children’s swimming pool where she spoke to children about bullying.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGqABbVgIQ4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGqABbVgIQ4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">I Helsingør Svømmeklub satte Hendes Kongelige Højhed Kronprinsessen med @mary_fonden i dag fokus på bekæmpelse af mobning i børnesvømning 🤽🏻🏊🏻‍♀️⁣ ⁣ I svømmeklubben bruger man initiativet Antibulli Svømning, der er udviklet af Mary Fonden i samarbejde med Dansk Svømmeunion og TrygFonden.⁣ Antibulli Svømning er et redskab, der gør det nemt for svømmetrænere at styrke fællesskabet og forebygge mobning i børnesvømning og består af konkrete råd og øvelser til træningen. Ved svømmehallens bassin viste børn fra Helsingør Svømmeklub øvelserne ”find tre forandringer” og ”kryds og bolle”. Hendes Kongelige Højhed overværede øvelserne og hilste på børnene.⁣ ⁣ 📸 Steen Brogaard ©⁣</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/detdanskekongehus/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> DET DANSKE KONGEHUS 🇩🇰</a> (@detdanskekongehus) on Oct 22, 2020 at 11:42am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The club has a special initiative in line with Mary's self-titled foundation, The Mary Foundation, which aims to combat bullying among children in swimming clubs.</p> <p>And that concludes Mary’s whirlwind week of style.</p>

Beauty & Style

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Nicole Kidman raves about co-star Hugh Grant: “He is just very easy to be around”

<p>Nicole Kidman have been friends for years, and now fans will see them standing side by side in a new mini-series as man and wife.</p> <p>Starring alongside eachother in <em>The Undoing,</em> Nicole Kidman gushed about her special bond with the British actor, 60.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/nicole-kidman-on-hugh-grant-ahead-of-new-series-the-undoing/news-story/99277e70b93a68c765a72eaf9c243b89" target="_blank">The Daily Telegraph</a>, the 53-year-old said: “I have known Hugh for a long time now. He knows my sister and he is just very easy to be around.</p> <p>“We have to make it look like we’ve been married for 10 years and I think just having that same sense of humour and having that history together, we were able to bring some of that to the screen.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838403/nicole-kidman-hugh-grant.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b1f2e154db974ae8a7d37a4353807a51" /></p> <p><em>The Undoing</em> is based on the 2014 novel You Should Have Known by Jean Hanff Korelitz.</p> <p><em>The Undoing</em> follows Grace (Kidman) and Jonathan Fraser (Grant), whose beautiful life comes to a roaring halt when a violent death close to their family sets off a chaotic set of events.</p> <p>The six-episode limited series also stars Edgar Ramirez as Detective Joe Mendoza, Noah Jupe as Henry Fraser, Jonathan and Grace's precocious and artistic 12-year-old son and Lily Rabe as Sylvia Steinetz.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838401/nicole-kidman-hugh-grant-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/aff330a3256942d9a79a8d5bb6631c2d" /></p> <p>The six-episode limited series was written by David E. Kelley and directed by Susanne Bier.</p>

Movies

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13 of the funniest obituaries that really exist

<p><strong>Tickled to death</strong><br />Gosh, people really do just stop in their tracks to be quietly amazed and entertained by the people they love, and then file that image away to later craft into funny obituaries and eulogies capable of bringing down the house. Some of these are so pithy they should be written in stone (and some of them were – to make the funniest tombstones that actually exist).</p> <p><strong>“It pains me to admit it, but apparently I have passed away.”</strong><br />“Everyone told me it would happen one day, but that’s simply not something I wanted to hear, much less experience,” Emily DeBrayda Phillips goes on to explain. Emily DeBrayda Phillips’ obituary is hilariously self-written and self-aware about her existence and end: “If you want to, you can look for me in the evening sunset or with the earliest spring daffodils or among the flitting and fluttering butterflies. You know I’ll be there in one form or another. Of course, that will probably be comfort to some while antagonising others, but you know me…it’s what I do.” She concludes with simple instructions: “If you don’t believe it, just ask me. Oh wait, I’m afraid it’s too late for questions. Sorry.”</p> <p><strong>“Her last words were ‘tell them that check is in the mail.’”</strong><br />Jean Larroux III and Hayden Hoffman decided to honour their mother, notable Waffle House patron (and library fine-avoider) Antonia “Toni” Larroux, with an obituary that reads like a standup set. “We started to write a normal [obituary],” Larroux III told HuffPost, before realising “mum would be so ashamed.” Some of its greatest hits include, “She conquered polio as a child, contributing to the nickname ‘polio legs,’ given by her ex-husband. It should not be difficult to imagine the reasons for their divorce 35+ years ago,” and, “She considered Aaron Burrell a distant grandson (not distant enough).” However, the siblings rounded out the seemingly blithe memorial with a rather moving annotation: “On a last but serious note, the woman who loved her life and taught her children to ‘laugh at the days to come’ is now safely in the arms of Jesus and dancing at the wedding feast of the Lamb. Anyone wearing black will not be admitted to the memorial. She is not dead. She is alive.” Who is cutting onions in here?</p> <p><strong>“Bill Brown finally stopped bugging everybody.”</strong><br />Rabblerouser Bill Brown’s obituary details his lifelong commitment to mischief, all the way up until he roused his last rabble in October 2013. Notable rabble: “Right to the end, he would do things like racing to beat other oldsters to empty chairs,” and meeting his wife, Ruth, while “trying to scare neighbour kids by acting like a barking dog when he threw open the front door, only to find himself barking at the Avon lady.”</p> <p><strong>“Your father is a very sick man.” “You have no idea.”</strong><br />There is no better legacy than a laugh – and Joe Heller and his daughters all know it. When Heller was born, his daughters note, “God thankfully broke the mould.” The daughters go on to profile the lifelong jester: “His mother was not immune to his pranks as he named his first dog ‘Fart’ so she would have to scream his name to come home. … The family encourages you to don the most inappropriate t-shirt that you are comfortable being seen in public with, as Joe often did.”</p> <p><strong>“Faced with the prospect of voting for either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton, Mary Anne chose to pass into the eternal love of God.”</strong><br />A regular Jane like me or you, Ms Mary Anne Alfriend Noland passed just six months before the 2016 election, to which her obituary references an extreme aversion. She was born, raised, and now rests in Virginia, USA – a swing state.</p> <p><strong>“Jesus had a backache only the world’s greatest chiropractor could fix.”</strong><br />Well, it appears Jesus had what could only be described as an unholy kink in his back, and Dr Mark Flanagan was there to make a house call. Not only was Dr Flanagan described as the “world’s greatest chiropractor,” but he also had “more dolphin paraphernalia than a gift shop at one of those places with actual dolphins.”</p> <p><strong>“Take magazines you’ve already read to your doctor’s office. Do not tear off the mailing label, ‘Because if someone wants to contact me, that would be nice.’”</strong><br />This is less the funniest obituary you’ll ever read and more the sweetest obituary you’ll ever read. Mary “Pink” Mullaney’s obituary is chock-full of advice from both the most lovable and loving soul to grace God’s green Earth, apparently: “If a possum takes up residence in your shed, grab a barbecue brush to coax him out. If he doesn’t leave, brush him for 20 minutes and let him stay. Go to church with a chicken sandwich in your purse. Give the chicken sandwich to a homeless friend after mass. Go to a nursing home and kiss everyone. Put picky-eating children at the bottom of the laundry shoot, tell them they are hungry lions in a cage, and feed them veggies through the slats.”</p> <p><strong>“First Church of God, which she attended for 60 years in spite of praise music and A/V presentations.”</strong><br />Betty Jo Passmore passed away in 2014, and her obituary recounts her love of her family, mystery novels, and dark chocolate – and her absolute ire for praise music and A/V presentations. That Ms Passmore used her final stamp on this earthly world to drag out a lifelong beef just a little longer is hilarious and iconic.</p> <p><strong>“Who the h*** taught her to fly?”</strong><br />Lois Ann Harry’s obituary exposes her as a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. Originally from Idaho Falls – or is she?—Harry’s last confirmed sighting reports her departure from the Homestead wearing dark glasses and an ushanka. “Authorities are baffled by the disappearance of the 88-year-old woman, how she gained access to the aircraft, and who the h*** taught her how to fly,” the obituary reads. Even more baffling are her children’s contradictory assertions of her life: some swear she’s a pastry chef and freelance food critic, a professional gambler and race car driver, a square dancer, a botanist who ran a chain of recreational marijuana dispensaries in Washington state, and more. Ever a woman of mystery, she “loved her life, family, and friends but would prefer that you not follow her to Bermuda.”</p> <p><strong>“She wants her gold teeth back from the dentist that yanked them – those were HERS to keep.”</strong><br />This is exactly the kind of witticism you would expect in the obituary of someone who also requested “Another One Bites the Dust” be played at her funeral. Even more charming, Karen Short was affectionally referred to as “Hot Dog Lady” by the students who frequented her hot dog stand. Give Hot Dog Lady her gold teeth back! But overall, it’s actually a very moving, very touching obituary.</p> <p><strong>“She loved [her family] more than anything else in the world…except cold Budweiser, room temperature Budweiser, mopeds, fall foliage, the OJ chase and the OJ trial.”</strong><br />Jan Lois Lynch of Massachusetts was a woman of eclectic interests and sublime taste. Her aforementioned life’s loves sound like all the ingredients of an ideal Thursday afternoon. Plus, Ms Lynch’s sons note, “Dangling her feet over a 5,000-foot cliff at the edge of the Grand Canyon so she could ‘see what it felt like to feel the fear,’ taught us all the really good things in life are beyond the ‘Do Not Enter’ signs.” This is a woman after my own heart.</p> <p><strong>“Doug died”</strong><br />Douglas Legler of Fargo, North Dakota passed away in June 2015, but not before penning his own obituary, a testament to the adage “brevity is the soul of wit.”</p> <p><strong>“‘Triple Gemini!’ she shrieked. ‘How do you cope?’”</strong><br />When longtime Rolling Stone editor Harriet Fier passed in 2018, an obituary in the Washington Post chronicled her colourful and interesting life. It even included a brief anecdote about her unique Woodstock experience: “I spent the whole next morning picking up garbage because I felt bad about leaving a big mess.” However, the most entertaining part of her obituary is in reference to her landing at Rolling Stone: “As Ms Fier told friends, she had no firm direction after college and might well have attended law school if she had not joined Rolling Stone, where getting a job in the early 1970s required little more than a certain alignment in the stars. Interview paperwork asked for an applicant’s sun, moon and rising signs. ‘I didn’t know the difference, so I wrote Gemini on all three,’ Ms Fier recounted. Her answer was apparently good enough – although she startled the woman who took her form. ‘Triple Gemini!’ she shrieked. ‘How do you cope?’”</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Caroline Fanning. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/humour/13-of-the-funniest-obituaries-that-really-exist?pages=1"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p>

Mind

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Serena Williams gives rare look into beautiful home

<p><span>Serena Williams has given an update on her daughter Olympia from the comfort of her glamorous walk-in-wardrobe.</span><br /><br /><span>The star revealed she had signed her little girl up for tennis lessons on Thursday in an Instagram video, while perched behind her was her clothing and handbags.</span><br /><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838404/serena-williams-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4a2be5edc8404957b4262881273fa370" /><br /><span>The 39-year-old's items could be seen neatly placed in sectioned compartments, and fans could also see the room's lush wooden flooring.</span><br /><br /><span>As she walked around the stunning space, Serena explained: "I signed Olympia up for tennis lessons. Don't even start with me, because I'm not giving her tennis lessons.</span><br /><br /><span>“I signed her up for some, but the lady has no idea that it's my daughter.</span><br /><br /><span>“So we'll see how that goes. I'm not a pushy mum, but I know how I like techniques. I wanna make sure she's good."</span><br /><br /><span>The stars personalised show space for bag’s was also showing behind her along with a select few pairs of expensive footwear.</span><br /><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838407/serena-williams.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/884ac43e24eb48048271c17b81e88277" /><br /><span>Serena is reportedly living in her stunning mansion that she has owned for over two decades, in Palm Beach, Florida.</span><br /><br /><span>The star is living with her husband Alexis Ohanian and daughter Olympia.</span></p> <p><span><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838406/serena-williams-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/26fcf5e316064b6b9c3ca64b40b9c807" /></span></p>

Real Estate

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"How were the oysters?" Sydney model booed for delaying flight

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A Byron Bay model has fought back after being heckled by the media and fellow Jetstar passengers for being late to board a flight.</p> <p>Ruby Tuesday Matthews was due to fly from Ballina to Sydney but her flight was delayed due to technical issues and was rescheduled to fly at 7:45pm.</p> <p>After being told the flight was delayed, she shared a picture to her Instagram story of her eating oysters, saying "Flight delayed, f*** my life".</p> <p>However, after an engineer assessed the aircraft, the take-off time was pushed forward to 6:20pm.</p> <p>After Matthews boarded the plane at around 6:50pm, she was booed by other passengers on the flight.</p> <p>Frustrated travellers yelled at the model “how were the oysters?” and “what a good day to be pretty”.</p> <p>She has since hit back at passengers, saying she didn't hear the announcement.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGj01xjBNGV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGj01xjBNGV/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">regular mum ?</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/rubytuesdaymatthews/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> RUBY TUESDAY MATTHEWS</a> (@rubytuesdaymatthews) on Oct 20, 2020 at 2:08am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I didn’t hear that, I swear to god, I wouldn’t have left the airport,” she said.</p> <p>“I’m not a d***head, I do have respect for everyone else.”</p> <p>She has also lashed out at criticisms saying she was "entitled".</p> <p>“You failed to mention the other passengers that were actually another 30 minutes later than me and copped no verbal abuse,” she said, regarding an article about the incident.</p> <p>“After a 5 pm flight change we were given a time of 7.45 takeoff that then changed with no text update.”</p> <p>She has said that she received no support from airline staff when she was being yelled at and have said that her children were threatened.</p> <p>“I was abused, followed and my children were threatened,” she said.</p> <p>Jetstar has not commented on the incident.</p> </div> </div> </div>

News

News

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Greg Norman on Trump: "He's done a phenomenal job"

<p>Greg Norman has spoken out in support of Donald Trump, saying he believes the president can win a second term in November.</p> <p>Despite the “quiet support” for him, the golfing legend gave his full endorsement of the controversial President while speaking with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theaustralian.com.au/" target="_blank"><em>The Australian. </em></a><br /><br />“(From) my business perspective, he’s done a phenomenal job,” Norman said.<span> </span><br /><br />“He has ­pretty much stuck to all his promises he made when he was elected.<br /><br />“Very few people who are elected as president follow through on their promises.<br /><br />“Yes, he is bombastic; yes, he has a different style; but to see him actually commit to his word about what he wants to do is actually pretty impressive.<br /><br />“And it’s having a domino effect on the American economy, it has a domino effect on people I employ.”<br /><br />Norman said he had also met Democrat candidate Joe Biden, who had impressed him by asking to hear his views on “golf and on life”.<span> </span><br /><br />He went on to say however that “the people around him” are “potentially giving him advice”.<br /><br />Norman and Trump have been familiar with each other since the sportsman first became a prominent figure in the golf word.<span> </span><br /><br />He was also involved in brokering a meeting between the US President and then-Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull a few years ago.<span> </span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838387/donald-trump-greg-norman-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/712a997db9b74dcbb6fb68c846c68bc9" /></p> <p><em>Greg Norman and his wife Kirsten Kutner arrive for the State Dinner at The White House honouring Australian PM Scott Morrison on September 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. (</em><br /><br />Norman also would attend a state dinner back in 2019 at the White House to honour current Prime Minister Scott Morrison.<span> </span><br /><br />“It was very, very classy. You read about all of the (stuff) that people are saying, there’s two sides to everything. It was by far the best event I’ve ever been at my entire life,” Norman said in 2019.<br /><br />“It was truly showing the great respect that Big Brother has for Little Brother, which is the United States to Australia,” Norman added.<span> </span><br /><br />“Donald and the First Lady just couldn’t have been nicer, very engaging.<span> </span><br /><br />“We were fortunate to sit at the head table with them and my prime minister I met for the first time that week is a very, very polished guy, a very great speaker. I’m extremely impressed with him and his wife.”</p>

News

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Queen allegedly throws shoes and a racket at Prince Philip

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Despite the stoic front that is put on by members of the Royal Family, it appears that the Queen herself has a bit of a temper.</p> <p>In a newly released biography called <em>Prince Philip Revealed</em>, author Ingrid Seward shares an argument between the Queen and husband Prince Philip while they were touring Australia in 1954.</p> <p>According to the book, a camera operator was horrified to see Philip charging out of the couple’s chalet, “followed by a flying pair of tennis shoes and a racket and a very angry Queen shouting for him to come back. Then the indignant Queen grabbed hold of her husband and dragged him back inside.”</p> <p>The pair were awarded a weekend off, but were still being followed by a camera crew who were filming a documentary about their tour. </p> <p>The book continues, saying there was a "stunned silence" before the royal press secretary said that the crew was to shut off their cameras or they would be arrested.</p> <p> The offending film was reportedly handed over and given to the monarch.</p> <p>The Queen reportedly came out to meet the crew and thanked them for the film.</p> <p>“I am sorry for that little interlude,” she said, according to the book. “But as you know it happens in every marriage. Now, what would you like me to do?”.</p> <p>The incident was also shown in an episode of the Netflix series <em>The Crown</em>.</p> <p>Author Seward writes that the couple has had their squabbles over the years despite being married for a shocking 73 years.</p> <p>Philip could be “very tough” on the Queen and frequently called her a “bloody fool and accused her of talking rubbish,” Seward claims.</p> <p>The Queen, perhaps used to being diplomatic, “seldom answered back but would change the subject and started talking in riddles that would divert him as he tried to figure out what she was talking about,” the book says.</p> </div> </div> </div>

News

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Woman charged with murder of Jarrad Lovison

<p><span>A 24-year-old woman has been charged with the murder of a Victorian man whose body was found left in bushland east of Melbourne.</span><br /><br /><span>Jarrad Lovison was last seen alive more than six months ago before his body was found discarded in dense bush land at Moondarra.</span><br /><br /><span>The man was found 29 kilometres from his Newborough home on May 23.</span><br /><br /><span>On Tuesday, Samantha Grace Guillerme was arrested and charged with his murder.</span><br /><br /><span>The young woman’s Facebook page says she was employed at a cafe called Eat Live Fresh in Trafalgar.</span><br /><br /><span>On Instagram, her bio simply reads: “work hard, dream big, invest in yourself”.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838359/murder.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/6553c5743bf94a03859db61c271ffac3" /><br /><br /><span>Three more people were also arrested on Wednesday morning after detectives executed warrants at properties in the Gippsland area in eastern Victoria.</span><br /><br /><span>The first man, 28, was arrested at a home in Tooronga Road, Willow Grove.</span><br /><br /><span>A second man, 47 from Moe, and a 44-year-old Trafalgar woman were also arrested at a property in March Street.</span><br /><br /><span>A third warrant had also been executed at a property in Anzac Road in Trafalgar.</span><br /><br /><span>The trio remain in custody, and the investigation is ongoing.</span><br /><br /><span>Missing persons detectives have been putting the pieces together to figure out Mr Lovison’s last movements since he went missing on April 16.</span><br /><br /><span>Earlier this September, police revealed they were getting closer to arresting those they believed responsible.</span><br /><br /><span>The 24-year-old woman was arrested on Tuesday morning when VIC police raided a house in Coalville Road, Moe.</span><br /><br /><span>Leading Senior Constable Natalie Dean said the woman remained in custody while the investigation is continuing.</span><br /><br /><span>A white Toyota has also been seized during the search warrant, and is set to be forensically examined in the coming days.</span><br /><br /><span>Detectives returned to the spot where Mr Lovison was last seen alive in early October to appeal for people to come forward with any information they had.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Lovison was last traced to be on his green mountain bike on the Moe-Walhalla Road about 3 am on April 16.</span><br /><br /><span>It is said he met with an associate near the La Trobe River bridge about 350m north of Prudens Track.</span><br /><br /><span>Police believe Mr Lovison was sitting on his bicycle looking at his mobile phone.</span><br /><br /><span>Detective Sergeant Graham Hamilton said at the time it was not yet known how long after Mr Lovison was last seen that he was killed.</span><br /><br /><span>His deceased was found on May 23 at Moondarra State Park, which is around 18km north of where he was last seen.</span><br /><br /><span>His green bike was found two days later propped against a tree on Becks Bridge Road just north of Adam View Court in Tanjil South at around 2.30 pm on April 18.</span><br /><br /><span>However it was then reportedly collected by a white wagon about two hours later and is still to be found.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Lovison’s distraught dad John pleaded for information earlier this month.</span><br /><br /><span>“We just want to know who did this to our son and why,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>Police are urging anyone with information to contact Crime Stoppers on 1800 333 000 or submit a confidential crime report online.</span></p>

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Victoria Police respond to "anti-Dan" Andrews sticker on patrol car

<p>Locals in Melbourne were shocked after they spotted a police patrol car driving around with an anti-Dan sticker on the back.</p> <p>The sticker, which was placed on the car's back window, showed Victorian Premier Dan Andrews with a red line across his face and the caption "Make Victoria Great Again", which is a play on words for President Donald Trump's slogan "Make America Great Again".</p> <p>The Victorian Police have gone on Facebook to clear up the issues, saying that the driver of the patrol car was not anti-government.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838334/police-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/de7b0126e235444d96ae0d6a0f68a893" /></p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>“Hi everyone. We’re aware of a photo going around on social media of a Victoria Police vehicle with a sticker on its rear window,” the post begins.</p> <p>“The vehicle had been left unattended for a short time in Yarra Glen when an unknown person affixed the sticker on the vehicle.</p> <p>“Unfortunately, it was driven to Lilydale before the sticker was noticed and immediately removed.</p> <p>“We would just like to state for the record that we think Victoria is already great but would urge members of the public to refrain from putting stickers on our vehicles. Thank you.”</p> <p><em>Photo credits: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/news/vic/victoria-police-responds-after-anti-dan-andrews-sticker-seen-on-patrol-car-c-1416085" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">7News</a></em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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Travel

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Coronavirus reinfection cases: what we know so far – and the vital missing clues

<p>To date, there have been six published cases of COVID-19 reinfection, with various other unverified accounts from around the world. Although this is a comparably small fraction of the millions of people known to have been infected, should we be concerned? To unpick this puzzle, we must first consider what we mean by immunity.</p> <p><strong>How immunity works</strong><br />When we are infected with any pathogen, our immune system quickly responds to try to contain the threat and minimise any damage. Our first line of defence is from immune cells, known as innate cells. These cells are not usually enough to eliminate a threat, which is where having a more flexible “adaptive” immune response comes into play – our lymphocytes.</p> <p>Lymphocytes come in two main varieties: B lymphocytes, which make antibodies, and T lymphocytes, which include cells that directly kill the germy invaders.</p> <p>As antibodies are readily measured in blood, they are often used to indicate a good adaptive immune response. However, over time, antibodies levels in our blood wane, but this doesn’t necessarily mean protection is lost. We retain some lymphocytes that know how to deal with the threat – our memory cells. Memory cells are remarkably long-lived, patrolling our body, ready to spring into action when needed.</p> <p>Vaccines work by creating memory cells without the risk of a potentially fatal infection. In an ideal world, it would be relatively easy to create immunity, but it’s not always that straightforward.</p> <p>Although our immune system has evolved to deal with a huge variety of pathogens, these germs have also evolved to hide from the immune system. This arms race means that some pathogens such as malaria or HIV are very tricky to deal with.</p> <p>Infections that have spilled over from animals - zoonotic diseases - are also challenging for our immune system because they can be completely novel. The virus that causes COVID-19 is such a zoonotic disease, originating in bats.</p> <p>COVID-19 is caused by a betacoronavirus. Several betacoronaviruses are already common in the human population – most familiar as a cause of the common cold. Immunity to these cold-causing viruses isn’t that robust but immunity to the more serious conditions, Mers and Sars, is more durable.</p> <p>Data to date on COVID-19 shows that antibodies can be detected three months after infection, although, as with Sars and Mers, antibodies gradually decrease over time.</p> <p>Of course, antibody levels are not the only indication of immunity and don’t tell us about T lymphocytes or our memory cells. The virus causing COVID-19 is structurally similar to Sars, so perhaps we can be more optimistic about a more durable protective response – time will tell. So how worried then should we be about reports of reinfection with COVID-19?</p> <p><strong>How worried should we be?</strong><br />The handful of case reports on reinfection with COVID-19 don’t necessarily mean that immunity is not occurring. Issues with testing could account for some reports because “virus” can be detected after infection and recovery. The tests look for viral RNA (the virus’s genetic material), and viral RNA that cannot cause infection can be shed from the body even after the person has recovered.</p> <p>Conversely, false-negative results happen when the sample used in testing contains insufficient viral material to be detected – for example, because the virus is at a very low level in the body. Such apparent negative results may account for cases in which the interval between the first and second infection is short. It is hugely important, therefore, to use additional measures, such as viral sequencing and immune indicators.</p> <p>Reinfection, even in immunity, can happen, but usually this would be mild or asymptomatic because the immune response protects against the worst effects. Consistent with this is that most verified cases of reinfection reported either no or mild symptoms. However, one of the latest verified cases of reinfection – which happened just 48 days after the initial infection – actually had a more severe response to reinfection.</p> <p>What might account for the worse symptoms the second time round? One possibility is the patient did not mount a robust adaptive immune response first time round and that their initial infection was largely contained by the innate immune response (the first line of defence). One way to monitor this would be to assess the antibody response as the type of antibody detected can tell us something about the timing of infection. But unfortunately, antibody results were not analysed in the recent patient’s first infection.</p> <p>Another explanation is that different viral strains caused the infections with a subsequent impact on immunity. Genetic sequencing did show differences in viral strains, but it isn’t known if this equated to altered immune recognition. Many viruses share structural features, enabling immune responses to one virus to protect against a similar virus. This has been suggested to account for the lack of symptoms in young children who frequently get colds caused by betacoronaviruses.</p> <p>However, a recent study, yet to be peer-reviewed, found that protection against cold-causing coronaviruses did not protect against COVID-19. In fact, antibodies recognising similar viruses can be dangerous – accounting for the rare phenomenon of antibody-dependent enhancement of disease (ADE). ADE occurs when antibodies enhance viral infection of cells with potentially life-threatening consequences.</p> <p>It should be emphasised, though, that antibodies are only one indicator of immunity and we have no data on either T lymphocytes or memory cells in these cases. What these cases emphasise is a need to standardised approaches in order to capture the critical information for robust evaluation of the threat of reinfection.</p> <p>We are still learning about the immune response to COVID-19, and every piece of new data is helping us unpick the puzzle of this challenging virus. Our immune system is a powerful ally in the fight against infection, and only by unlocking it can we ultimately hope to defeat COVID-19.</p> <p><em>Written by Sheena Cruickshank. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-reinfection-cases-what-we-know-so-far-and-the-vital-missing-clues-147960">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

International Travel

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New Zealand travellers burst Australia's travel bubble

<p>Travellers arriving as part of the newly minted international arrangements with New Zealand have left state authorities scrambling after taking internal flights to jurisdictions outside of the travel bubble.</p> <p>Under the original arrangements, passengers from New Zealand were permitted to enter New South Wales and the Northern Territory.</p> <p>But on Friday night, it was revealed that a few trans-Tasman arrivals took connecting flights to Melbourne.</p> <p>Authorities in Victoria have now spoken to all 55 people who were gearing up to arrive in the state to explain local coronavirus rules.</p> <p>The Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) released a statement saying some of the travellers were in family groups, with most of them staying in private homes.</p> <p>Three of the travellers expected to enter the state remained in NSW.</p> <p>And one who was in Victoria returned to NSW on Sunday.</p> <p>"Twenty-one of the 55 travellers arrived at Melbourne Airport … the remainder arrived using other modes of transport," the statement said.  </p> <p>"DHHS authorised officers continue to meet incoming flights at Melbourne Airport and provide information to arriving passengers."</p> <p>Authorities in West Australia have also confirmed 23 people, including a child, all from New Zealand, are currently in hotel or home quarantine after flying into Perth overnight. </p> <p>WA has a hard border and Premier Mark McGowan said the Federal Government needed to provide more support.</p> <p>"We would like further assistance from the Commonwealth, in particular, about making sure that those people who come on aircraft into WA that we get proper manifests and proper advice as to those people that are coming so we can deal with these situations," he said.</p> <p>Unlike Western Australia, Victoria does not have restrictions on incoming arrivals, but Premier Daniel Andrews has issued criticism over the way events unfolded.</p> <p>He said his government had repeatedly requested to be excluded from the arrangement.</p> <p>"We were asked, 'Do you want to be in the bubble?' and we said no," Mr Andrews told reporters on Sunday, as he announced easing of restrictions in the state.</p>

Travel Trouble

Health

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7 silent signs of high-functioning anxiety

<p><strong>What is high-functioning anxiety?</strong><br />When we talk about people with high-functioning anxiety, we are talking about people who, at least on the surface, seem successful at school, work, or home, explains clinical psychologist Dr Inna Khazan. On the inside, however, they are experiencing a near-constant state of anxiety. “People with high-functioning anxiety push themselves to get things done, with anxiety constantly holding a ‘stick’ over their heads,” she says. “Fear of what might happen if they don’t move forward keeps them moving forward. And because these people are often high-achieving, no one thinks that there is anything ‘wrong’ with them.”</p> <p><strong>You worry excessively</strong><br />It’s normal to ruminate over things and have brief periods of worry. But if this is the mental state you experience 15-plus days a month for six months or more, you have an anxiety disorder, says psychotherapist Annie Wright. Specifically, this could signal generalised anxiety disorder. Wright explains that such worries can run the gamut from your love life to your retirement savings. “And, often, the amount and intensity of the worry you have are likely disproportionate to the event itself. In other words, everything feels like a really big deal when perhaps it isn’t.”</p> <p><strong>You can’t control your anxiety (but nobody realises this)</strong><br />Even if you know all the calming tricks – deep breaths, magic phrases to clam yourself down, jotting down your thoughts – you still live with your worries on a daily basis. Despite your self-care practices, your anxiety may still get the better of you because you simply cannot control it, says Wright. And while you’re aware of these feelings, chances are, others might not be. “People who experience it do not look like what we expect a highly anxious person to look like – frozen, unable to make decisions, failing to get things done,” she says. “Also, people with high-functioning anxiety rarely allow themselves to ask for help or admit that there is anything wrong.”</p> <p><strong>Nothing is ever good enough</strong><br />People who have anxiety disorders often feel a constant pressure to perform at top-notch standards across all areas of life. But after a while, this can wear on you. Generally, a person who we might classify as having high-functioning anxiety is ambitious, perfectionistic, and set in their way of doing things,” says Khazan. Interestingly, she explains that anxiety is often about feeling unsafe. “These structured rituals and certain ways of doing things provide people with high-functioning anxiety with a sense of safety,” Khazan says. “They may become quite upset if they are knocked out of their routine because the lack of familiar structure feels overwhelmingly unsafe.”</p> <p><strong>Your anxiety is interfering with your daily life</strong><br />You may be aware that it’s becoming harder to feel secure and competent at work and in your relationships with partners, relatives, and friends, says Wright. In other words, you appear calm and in control on the surface, but it’s a different story on the inside. As Wright puts it, “inwardly, you’re living out a high-drama movie each day and it’s starting to wear on your quality of life.”</p> <p><strong>You can’t sleep</strong><br />It’s not uncommon to have trouble falling or staying asleep, or to have a restless sleep. “You may rely on a glass or two of wine or paracetamol to mask it temporarily, but basically, you have sleep issues,” warns Wright. In addition, because your nervous system is in overdrive, you may also have a heightened startle response. This means you may jump or startle easily, such as when ambulance sirens go off or a door slams shut. Neither paracetamol nor wine are long-term solutions and may even worsen your sleep issues. Some people find taking melatonin helps with their nighttime anxiety, but ultimately you should talk to a medical professional about solutions for the long haul.</p> <p><strong>You can’t concentrate</strong><br />Concentration issues go hand-in-hand with anxiety, says Wright. For example, it may be hard to focus at work or you may have to re-read a page of a book several times because your mind wandered. Instead of concentrating on what’s happening in front of you right now, you may find yourself worrying about the future. Or, you might feel as though your mind is blank.</p> <p><strong>You’re irritable and tense</strong><br />Living with anxiety means living with a low capacity for stressors, says Wright. In other words, you sweat the small stuff, your patience is thin, and you feel grumpy. But it’s not just your mind that’s tense; many people with anxiety disorders experience tightness, constricting, and general tension in their muscles. “If you’re emotionally and mentally wound up in knots, your body is likely holding onto the tension, leading to a general feeling of physical tightness,” explains Wright.</p> <p><strong>How to get help</strong><br />Make sure you do indeed take care of yourself. “People often think they are fine because they get praise and approval from others about their leadership or accomplishments,” explains marriage and family therapist. “But ignoring it can cause burnout and increase your risk of physical health issues, sleep problems, relationship problems, anger, irritability, depression.” Individual or group therapy, along with medication, can help treat anxiety. You’ll learn to replace worrisome thoughts and behaviours with more beneficial coping strategies. Therefore, you’ll start to feel comfortable about things that previously left you anxious, she explains.</p> <div class="share-buttons"> <div class="addthis_inline_share_toolbox" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/7-silent-signs-of-high-functioning-anxiety" data-title="7 silent signs of high-functioning anxiety | Reader's Digest Australia" data-description="Your anxiety may be affecting your life – and your general health – more than you realise. Here are the warning signs."> <div id="atstbx" class="at-resp-share-element at-style-responsive at-mobile addthis-smartlayers addthis-animated at4-show" aria-labelledby="at-2c7a604c-a5b4-4c9a-99ad-f2b49444aed8"><em>Written by Claire Gillespie. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/7-silent-signs-of-high-functioning-anxiety">Reader’s Digest.</a> For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></div> </div> </div>

Mind

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“Get the tissues out!“: Overwhelming reunion for couple kept apart for 215 days

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>An elderly couple who have been married for 60 years tearfully reunited at an assisted living home.</p> <p>Due to residing in the USA, the pair had been separated for 215 days, apart from a few emotional visits through a window. </p> <p>The pair are living at Rosecastle at Delaney Creek and the heartwarming reunion was uploaded to Facebook by the assisted living home.</p> <p>“We got to witness these two resident love birds see and hug each other for the first time since the pandemic,” the Rosecastle at Delany Creek’s Facebook post said.</p> <p>“Get your tissues out!”</p> <p>The post says that Joseph was in rehab after a surgery and the pandemic prevented the pair from seeing each other while Joseph recovered.</p> <p>“With just phone calls and a few window visits - they persevered,” the post said.</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?height=476&amp;href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Frosecastleatdelaneycreek%2Fvideos%2F705069423756227%2F&amp;show_text=false&amp;width=357" width="357" height="476" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe> <p>The video shows Joseph's wife, Eve, sitting at a table while Joseph is being wheeled over to where she's sitting.</p> <p>“Who’s waiting for him over here?”</p> <p>“Look Miss Eve, who’s here?” the person off camera says.</p> <p>The pair embrace and start to cry, as they're overwhelmed with emotion.</p> <p>"I sure missed you," Joseph cries behind his face mask.</p> <p>"I didn't think I'd ever get over here."</p> <p>“You’re alright, I love you so much. For sixty years I’ve done something right," Eve said to try and calm him down.</p> <p>The life enrichment coordinator at Rosecastle, Clary Abreu said Eve was very excited to see her husband.</p> <p>“[Eve] was so excited that she paced probably all night and she sat out in the dining room waiting for him,” she said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

Caring

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Peter Overton meets his littlest fan with a heart condition

<p>9News presenter Peter Overton has met his littlest fan, a one-year-old called Mason who suffers from a rare heart defect.</p> <p>He was born with Hypoplastic Left Heart Syndrome, which means half of his heart didn't form in utero.</p> <p>However, Mason just "melts" at the sound of Overton's voice, and he loves watching the news.</p> <p>His parents, Mick and Michelle, say that Mason lights up whenever he watches Overton on the nightly news, waving and smiling at the television.</p> <p>The pair wrote into 2GB's radio presenter Ray Hadley, hoping to arrange a meet-and-greet between their son and Overton.</p> <p>"I'm absolutely obsessed with my son he is the centre of my world and I would do anything to make him happy," Michelle said in her letter.</p> <p>As soon as Overton heard about Mason, he organised for him and his family to visit the Sydney studio to say hello.</p> <p>"As soon as I saw it, I got straight in touch," Overton told 9News.com.au.</p> <p>Mason, much to Overton's delight, recognised him straight away.</p> <p>"I met Mason in reception and he lit up, he came straight to me," Overton said.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838368/body-overton.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/cff1d308cdfa431796e784b1836e3885" /></p> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>"He is the most beautiful kid, we spent a lovely hour together."</p> <p>Overton also spoke to Ray Hadley and shared how the visit went.</p> <p>"I wish my children lit up but Mason does.</p> <p>"He's a brave little fella and I saw the scars he had from his last operation and he's got another one coming up.</p> <p>"For everyone at 9News who met Mason, it reminded us all of how lucky we are."</p> </div>

Caring

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Teenager leads discovery in finding COVID-19 cure

<p>Scientists across the globe are on a race to find a treatment for COVID-19, however the standout in all of this is a teenage girl. </p> <p>Anika Chebrolu, a 14-year-old from Frisco, Texas, has just won the 2020 3M Young Scientist Challenge and a whopping A$35,230 prize for a discovery that could give a potential therapy to COVID-19.</p> <p>Anika's invention that won the prize uses in-silico methodology to uncover a lead molecule that can bind to the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus.</p> <p>The teen submitted her project while she was in the 8th grade, but she admitted her goal was not initially to find a cure for COVID-19. </p> <p>Her original intention was to use in-silico methods to identify a lead compound that could bind to a protein of the influenza virus. </p> <p>"After spending so much time researching about pandemics, viruses and drug discovery, it was crazy to think that I was actually living through something like this," Anika said.</p> <p>"Because of the immense severity of the COVID-19 pandemic and the drastic impact it had made on the world in such a short time, I, with the help of my mentor, changed directions to target the SARS-CoV-2 virus."</p> <p>Anika revealed she was inspired to find potential cures to viruses after learning about the 1918 flu pandemic. </p> <p>"Anika has an inquisitive mind and used her curiosity to ask questions about a vaccine for COVID-19," Dr Cindy Moss, a judge for the 3M Young Scientist Challenge, told CNN.</p> <p>"Her work was comprehensive and examined numerous databases. She also developed an understanding of the innovation process and is a masterful communicator. Her willingness to use her time and talent to help make the world a better place gives us all hope."</p> <p>Anika said winning the prize and title of top young scientist is an honour, but her work is not completed. </p> <p>Her next goal is to research and work alongside scientists and researchers who are fighting to "control the morbidity and mortality" of the pandemic. </p> <p>She will aid in developing her findings into an actual cure for the virus.</p> <p>"My effort to find a lead compound to bind to the spike protein of the SARS-CoV-2 virus this summer may appear to be a drop in the ocean, but still adds to all these efforts," she said.</p> <p>"How I develop this molecule further with the help of virologists and drug development specialists will determine the success of these efforts."</p> <p><em>Image Credit: NIAID-RML (AP/NIAID-RML)</em></p>

Caring

Lifestyle

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"Vile anger": Cafe owner cops abuse over Dan Andrews coffee tariff

<p>A café owner from Melbourne’s South-east announced he would be removing his “tongue in cheek” sign that said Daniel Andrews’ supporters would be charged extra for coffees after he received a wave of abuse and threats.</p> <p>Acrobar co-owner Franz Madlener told <em>Today </em>that police visited the business on Wednesday night and “strongly suggested” he remove his sign as it was inciting anger.</p> <p>Mr Madlener added he felt forced to hire security guards after people threatened to throw rocks at the business because of the sign.</p> <p>The café owner had the sign on the counter for three weeks before it received criticism after going viral on social media on Wednesday.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838371/coffee-melbs-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/25c176b8226c47d2a143a19cc70cdc6a" /></p> <p>“Initially it was fine, we had about 30 people see the humour in it and put $1 into the tip jar,” the café owner told hosts Karl Stefanovic and Allison Langdon.</p> <p>“But in the last 24 hours, I guess since this sign’s gone viral, the level of abuse and vile anger and personal attacks on the business, me and the staff yesterday, was completely over the top.”</p> <p>Mr Madlener said they received a call that threatened to have their windows smashed with rocks and spray paint, just as it had been done to Premier’s office.</p> <p>He said the police’s grave warning encouraged him to remove the “light-hearted” sign.</p> <p>“If you’ve had the police ask you to take the sign away, of course,” Mr Madlener said.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838372/coffee-melbs-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/671ba6c54dcc47e994e04cc344720d98" /></p> <p>“My main concern is for our staff, to keep the staff safe. We don’t want people coming in and using that to create more anger against the staff.</p> <p>“Up until now we’ve been fighting lockdown and now we’re fighting these absolute extremists out there full of absolute hate towards the business.”</p> <p>The café owner says the sign was not meant to be political but instead was supposed to be a “light-hearted” protest to counter comments about how they should feel grateful and lucky about the government lifting strict COVID-19 restrictions.</p>

Food & Wine

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Wiggles star shares stunning photographs of newborn twins

<p>Dana Stephensen and Lachy Gillespie have shared an adorable new pic of their newborn twins, along with a heartfelt update on life with their two new additions.</p> <p>Dana took to Instagram to share the stunning shot by photographer<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bridgetwoodphotography/" target="_blank"> Bridget Wood</a>, which showed her and her famous partner cradling their new arrivals.</p> <p>"It was so precious to stop and breathe in these moments and to now have such special photographs before life with twins really took off," she wrote in a caption.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CE_nL4fjrf1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CE_nL4fjrf1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Lachy_Wiggle (@lachy_wiggle)</a> on Sep 11, 2020 at 4:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Dana also thanked other "twin mamas" who had shared advice and encouragement with the pair as they adjusted to life with their new babies.</p> <p>She also paid tribute to Lachy.</p> <p>"It's certainly very full, busy, relentless and overwhelming at times and I have utmost respect to any multiple parents out there!," she continued. </p> <p>The couple shared the news of the twins' birth last month in an Instagram post.</p> <p>"Oh Lulu and Lottie, your mummy and daddy love you with all we have - you are both so beautiful - and I would love to sing to you both forever,” Lachy wrote.</p> <p>Their family also includes the girls' big brother Jasper, five, who helped the couple propose to one another in April.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-6QADuDEZb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-6QADuDEZb/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Lachy_Wiggle (@lachy_wiggle)</a> on Apr 12, 2020 at 10:58pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The couple met in late 2018 when The Wiggles teamed up with the Australian Ballet to film the music video for The Wiggles' Big Ballet Day!. </p>

Family & Pets

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Pope Francis shows support for same-sex marriage for the first time

<p>Pope Francis has defended the right of gay couples to enter into a legally recognised civil union in a documentary that premiered at the Rome Film Festival on Wednesday.</p> <p>In the film, Fransesco by Evgeny Afineevsky, the religious leader says that gay people have the right to be in a family.</p> <p>“These are children of God, they have the right to a family,” Francis says in the film, speaking in Spanish.</p> <p>“What we have to create is a law of civil union, they have the right to be legally protected. I have defended that.”</p> <p>According to biographer Austen Ivereigh, the future pope backed civil unions for gay couples while he was still the archbishop of Buenos Aires and known as Jorge Bergoglio.</p> <p>But Francis has been vocal about his stance of gay marriage in the past, saying that marriage should only be between a man and a woman.</p> <p>“‘Marriage’ is a historic word,” he told French sociologist Dominique Wolton in a 2017 book of interviews. “Always among human beings, and not only in the Church, it has been between a man and a woman. You can’t just change that like that.”</p> <p>“Since the beginning of the pontificate the Pope has spoken of respect for homosexuals and has been against their discrimination,” Vatican expert Vania de Luca told RaiNews.</p> <p>“The novelty today is that he defends as pope a law for civil unions.”</p> <p>After becoming pope in 2013, Francis welcomed homosexuals with his now famous phrase, “Who am I to judge?” and has invited gay couples to the Vatican on multiple occasions.</p> <p>The two-hour documentary looks back at the last seven years pf his pontificate and travels.</p> <p>One of the most heartfelt moments in the film os when the Pope called a gay couple, parents of three young children, after they sent him a letter saying they felt ashamed to bring their children to the parish.</p> <p>Francis invited them over regardless, saying to not be concerned of other people’s judgements.</p> <p>In the past, he has regularly said gay people should be accepted in their parishes and urged parents not to reject their gay children.</p> <p>Chilean Juan Carlos Cruz, an activist against sexual abuse within the Church, accompanied the director to the film screening on Wednesday.</p> <p>“When I met Pope Francis he told me he was very sorry about what happened. Juan, it is God who made you gay and he loves you anyway. God loves you and the Pope loves you too,” says Cruz in the film.</p>

Relationships

Finance

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Despite more than 30 major inquiries, governments still haven’t fixed aged care. Why are they getting away with it?

<p>It is fair to say the findings have been highly critical of the way aged care is run in this country. Many of these concerns have been brought to light again — along with new issues raised — in the ongoing Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety.</p> <p>Yet, as the royal commission has noted, successive Australian governments have shown a “lack of willingness to commit to change”.</p> <p>Responses often come years after the review and recount what has been done in an almost tangential way.</p> <p>Even the establishment of the royal commission was not based on previous inquiries or recommendations, but in response to media exposés of the appalling conditions in some aged care facilities.</p> <p>From these dysfunctional circumstances, three questions arise.</p> <p>First, what are the ongoing issues with aged care in Australia?</p> <p>Second, why have successive governments been comfortable making do with piecemeal solutions rather than truly “fixing” aged care, once and for all?</p> <p>Finally, and most perplexingly, why have Australian voters let them get away with it?</p> <p><strong>What’s the problem?</strong><br />It is important to emphasise that aged care is predominantly a federal government responsibility. The 1997 Aged Care Act is the main law covering government-funded aged care. This includes rules for funding, regulation, approval of providers, quality of care and the rights of those in care.</p> <p>Since 2019, the federal Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission Act regulates complaints, sanctions and enforcement, but has been criticised for lacking teeth.</p> <p>The 1997 act diluted many preexisting regulatory protections, such as strict financial accreditation and staffing requirements, and opened the sector up to privatisation. At the time, concerns were raised the new regime could compromise standards of care in aged care facilities and disadvantage older people on lower incomes.</p> <p>The concerns were raised again and amplified in subsequent years. For example, in 2011, a Productivity Commission report noted Australia’s aged care system needed a “fundamental redesign”.</p> <p>Here is a brief summary of the recurring issues raised in multiple reports:</p> <ul> <li>the huge difficulty people have navigating the aged care system, including finding accurate information about facilities</li> <li>failure to meet the needs of vulnerable older people</li> <li>poor quality care, especially for those with dementia and other disabilities</li> <li>the use of chemical or physical restraints</li> <li>inappropriate staff ratios and poor training</li> <li>the rising cost of care, especially in light of an ageing population</li> <li>adherence to accreditation standards</li> <li>ineffective complaints mechanisms.</li> </ul> <p><strong>Why haven’t these problems been fixed?</strong><br />One of the major hurdles to real reform is the relationship between the aged care industry and the federal government.</p> <p>The government funds the sector and provides a relatively “light-touch” oversight, while the providers attend to the day-to-day running of the facilities.</p> <p>However, there is concern this alignment has meant successive governments are not as involved as they should be and proposals for change are diluted by the influence of industry lobbyists.</p> <p>Another reason for governments’ reluctance to intervene is many of the providers are “too big to fail”. A facility’s licence and government funding can be withdrawn if standards are not met. Yet this rarely happens.</p> <p>Why? Because if a licence is revoked, residents need somewhere to go. The issues here can be seen in the closure of the Earle Haven nursing home in July 2019. Here, 68 elderly people were left homeless and had to be moved to hospitals and other aged care facilities.</p> <p>As a further example, Bupa, one of Australia’s largest providers, continues to operate, despite sanctions or failing fundamental assessments.</p> <p><strong>Why isn’t aged care a vote winner?</strong><br />After so many inquiries and so many horror headlines, the problems in aged care are well and truly common knowledge. But do Australians care enough about aged care for it to influence their vote — and so, influence the way governments respond?</p> <p>If we cast our minds back to the 2019 federal election campaign, the hot button issue concerning older people was the potential demise of franking credits and negative gearing.</p> <p>In-home and residential aged care barely rated a mention in the campaigns of the major parties.</p> <p>Even now, despite the publicity surrounding the royal commission, if an election was held today, would this issue actually influence voting intentions? Sadly, it seems unlikely.</p> <p>During the July 2020 Eden-Monaro byelection, a survey of nearly 700 voters showed while 84% believed the aged care system was “in crisis”, this influenced the vote of less than 4% of respondents. It also ranked last in a list of seven issues of importance.</p> <p>When heartfelt concern does not translate to winning votes, there is little incentive for the federal government to provide meaningful solutions to well-documented problems.</p> <p>We only need to look to the record spending in the 2020 Budget, which provided only 23,000 extra home care packages and deferred consideration of funding for residential aged care until the royal commission’s final report next year.</p> <p><strong>It comes back to voters</strong><br />Why does concern for the plight of people in aged care fail to generate public action?</p> <p>We suggest it is because many Australians consciously or unconsciously have ageist attitudes — that older people are inherently not important. On this front, look no further than arguments made by prominent commentators about the fate of older people during COVID-19.</p> <p>Yes, most fair-thinking Australians care about our older citizens, yet until either we or our family members are directly impacted, we do not prioritise it.</p> <p>If we don’t care enough or care about other things more, nothing will change. And, while this remains the case, the government will have no reason to do more than just tinker with an unsatisfactory status quo.</p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Eileen Webb, Christie M. Gardiner and Teresa Somes. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/despite-more-than-30-major-inquiries-governments-still-havent-fixed-aged-care-why-are-they-getting-away-with-it-147736">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

Retirement Income

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Gladys responds to savage attack from Jodi McKay

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>The NSW Parliament resumed for the first time after NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian’s ex-partner, former Wagga Wagga MP Daryl Maguire, finished giving evidence to ICAC.</p> <p>The ICAC probing was whether or not he abused his parliamentary power <span>for personal gain.</span></p> <p><span>This was not left unnoticed by Labor leader Jodi McKay, who hammered the NSW Premier during question time.</span></p> <p><span>McKay asked Berejiklian the following:</span></p> <p><span>“In July 2018, you knew ICAC was investigating Daryl Maguire’s dealings with Country Gardens and his commissions from property developers. We now know he told you about Country Garden, and we now know he told you about the commissions. Why did you not report this to ICAC as you were legally required?”</span></p> <p><span>The Premier responded: “I reject the imputations of the question, and secondly, she asked me the same question last week.”</span></p> <p><span>“And thirdly, we should allow the integrity body to do the work it needs to do while I do the work the people of NSW expect me to do: have the best COVID recovery plan in the nation, have the best and strongest economy and the best health administration.”</span></p> <p><span>The heated question time session came after a scathing tweet from McKay.</span></p> <p><span>“For the last year, I’ve looked (the Premier) in the eye when I’ve asked questions – believing she too wanted politics to be the best it can be. I respected my opponent. Today I’ll see a woman who has diminished the role of Premier &amp; set an impossibly low standard. All respect is gone,” she wrote.</span></p> <p><span>The Labor MPs have also seized on comments made by the Premier to radio host Ben Fordham, saying she didn't take any interest in Maguire's business deals as MPs are allowed to make money from side deals.</span></p> <p><span>“That’s the key thing, rightly or wrongly. MPs are allowed to do deals and make money, as long as they disclose it in the right way,” the Premier said on the 2GB program.</span></p> <p><span>Deputy Opposition Leader Yasmin Catley said that the Premier's comments on 2GB amounted to saying that corruption was "acceptable".</span></p> <p>“It is quite clear that she feels there is nothing wrong with members of this parliament receiving sales commissions from property developers,” Ms Catley said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

Legal

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Confusing road rules question strikes again

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A confusing question posted by Queensland's Department of Transport has had drivers fighting with each other in the Facebook comments.</p> <p>The Department of Transport posted a graphic of a car entering a roundabout and challenged social media users to "prove they know their road rules".</p> <p>"The driver of the blue car is turning right at the roundabout. Which of the following is the correct way to indicate so that the other drivers know what they intend to do?" the Department asked.</p> <iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FTMRQld%2Fphotos%2Fa.295748123801411%2F3465883320121193%2F&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=552&amp;height=659&amp;appId" width="552" height="659" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe> <p>The quiz had four options, with option A saying no indicating was needed, option B saying that you don't indicate when entering the roundabout but you indicate left before exiting, option C was indicating right while approaching and entering the roundabout and indicate left before indicating and finally, option D was indicating right while approaching, entering and exiting the roundabout.</p> <p>The answer to the question is option C, but he quiz quickly turned into drivers harassing other drivers for their refusal to follow basic road rules. </p> <p>“C, although cars in Bundaberg don’t come fitted with indicators,” one quipped.</p> <p>“We all know C is the correct answer, but A and B is how most people drive these days,” another weighed in.</p> <p>Others mused how “amazing” it was how few people knew their road rules.</p> <p>“Interesting statistics here, all comments 100 per cent correct, only one per cent will do the right thing …” another said.</p> <p>"All the ones that say C, do you actually do it?" one questioned.</p> </div> </div> </div>

Legal

Entertainment

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Jessica Rowe shows off incredibly toned figure

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Jessica Rowe, 50, made a guest appearance on <em>Studio 10</em> for Breast Cancer Awareness Month.</p> <p>Rowe was promoting the fundraiser Burpees4Boobs.</p> <p>She quit the show two years ago to spend more time with her family and has seemingly been working on her fitness as well.</p> <p><em>Studio 10</em> host Sarah Harris complimented Rowe on her "good rig" and asked her to take off her shirt and demonstrate a burpee on live television.</p> <p>Rowe didn't mind, as she joked about Harris "convincing her" to take her top off for the show.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGoFn0BJbpS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CGoFn0BJbpS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Okay @whatsarahsnapped convinced me to get my @camillawithlove top off for @sydneybreastcancerfoundation today! 💕💕💕 Thank you @studio10au @matthewdavidjohnson @richardcrookesconstructions @concrite_life (concrete vans 🤣) for all getting behind #burpees4boobs ! #craphousewife #breastcancerawareness #fundraising #concretevans</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/jessjrowe/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Jessica Rowe</a> (@jessjrowe) on Oct 21, 2020 at 5:52pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“IF I HAD ABS LIKE THAT AFTER TWO KIDS I’D BE WEARING CROP TOPS ON THE REG. You fit girrrrrrrrl,” Harris responded in the comments.</p> <p>It's not the first time Rowe has wowed people with her figure, as she stunned fans after she appeared on <em>The Real Dirty Dancing</em>.</p> <p>She explained to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/fitness/inspiration/jessica-rowe-reveals-how-she-maintains-a-fit-and-healthy-lifestyle/news-story/a8777ad299f2b2cc2d01565e98911743" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>news.com.au</em></a><em> </em>that she had been surprised by the reaction.</p> <p>“I never thought about my tummy like that before,” she said.</p> <p>“In the show I had nice, firm stockings on which were hiding and holding a number of things together,” she added with a laugh.</p> <p>“I think the point is, is that I have got cellulite on my bum, I have got stretch marks – that’s what women’s bodies are, and I think it’s important we embrace what we have.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

TV

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#KochiesNipples: Why the hilarious hashtag was trending on Twitter

<p>Sunrise host David “Kochie” Koch’s nipples are trending online.</p> <p>The bizarre trend came after The Chaser Twitter page tweeted that there was no exciting news happening and asked their followers to get Kochie’s nipples trending.</p> <p>And it worked. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">News cycle is boring so tonight's mission is to see if we can get <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/KochiesNipples?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#KochiesNipples</a> trending just to confuse the hell out of the guy</p> — The Chaser (@chaser) <a href="https://twitter.com/chaser/status/1318830155544940544?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 21, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>The request kicked off on Twitter with plenty of users jumping on board.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">I've heard that <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/kochiesnipples?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#kochiesnipples</a> are bigger than the Cash Cow's.</p> — Brett Debritz (@debritz) <a href="https://twitter.com/debritz/status/1318833039623942144?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 21, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">And do you think <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/kochiesnipples?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#kochiesnipples</a> give out skim milk or full cream ?</p> — Just_Some_Bloke (@Just_SumBloke) <a href="https://twitter.com/Just_SumBloke/status/1318831705948520448?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 21, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Come on Australia . <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/KochiesNipples?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#KochiesNipples</a> are way more entertaining and informative than the Bachelorette <a href="https://t.co/K9KOgOZiEL">pic.twitter.com/K9KOgOZiEL</a></p> — Just_Some_Bloke (@Just_SumBloke) <a href="https://twitter.com/Just_SumBloke/status/1318836972769615872?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 21, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>In 2013, the Sunrise Facebook page posted a photo of Kochie having his chest looked at by Samantha Armytage, with the caption: “Does Kochie have a third nipple? Some of our Sunrise viewers got more than they bargained for when they joined us on Hamilton Island for a VIP dinner!”</p> <p>But this isn’t the first time Kochie has become a viral sensation, as a video of the morning show host took off on TikTok. </p> <p>The video showed how the 64-year-old’s appearance hasn’t changed at all since 2010, with no wrinkles visible despite his age.</p> <p>“Here is a photo of David Koch earlier this year, seems pretty reasonable,” said Swaré, the video maker.</p> <p>“Here is a photo of David Koch 10 years ago, hmmm, looks exactly same! He’s 64 by the way, or so he says …”</p> <p>“Still don’t believe me? Well, look up Koch Media. What do they make? Movies about vampires!” Swaré added.</p> <p>Koch media is a video game developer and have no association with David Koch.</p> <p>In 2018, the journalist hooked himself up to a lie detector machine where he answered a question about plastic surgery.</p> <p>“Have you had any cosmetic surgery done?” he was asked while being strapped to the polygraph.</p> <p>“No,” the host replied – however the machine ruled that his answer was false.</p> <p>Koch was left baffled by the result of the test.</p>

TV

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Guy Sebastian slams SAS Australia's violence against women

<p>Guy Sebastian has called out Channel 7’s <em>SAS Australia</em>, saying he felt “sick” after he tuned in to Monday night’s episode.</p> <p>In the episode, the 17 celebrity recruits were challenged to fight one another in a boxing fight.</p> <p>AFLW player Sabrina Frederick picked Nick ‘Honeybadger’ Cummins, which shocked her fellow contestants and those watching at home.</p> <p>Honeybadger did not hold back, and Sebastian came on to Nova 93.7’s <em>Nathan, Nat &amp; Shaun</em> show on Thursday morning to speak about the confronting scene.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838373/sas-guy-sebastian-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1770343db2e749c2938ebcd79e504fce" /></p> <p>“My wife and I run a foundation where we deal with domestic violence,” he said on radio.</p> <p>“I thought that was pretty p**s poor, if I’m being honest.</p> <p>“I think it makes it very difficult to tell your kids, to tell your boy, ‘You never hit a girl! It doesn’t matter what the circumstance is, you just never, ever hit a girl. Violence against women is always wrong.’</p> <p>“I felt quite sick if I’m being honest, watching that,” Sebastian continued.</p> <p>The Australian Idol winner made it clear that he was not “having a crack at Nick (Cummins)”, but rather “whoever is in charge of the show”.</p> <p>A fierce debate erupted regarding Monday night’s episode and whether it was right for Cummins to agree to the challenge.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/sport/afl/nick-cummins-boxes-aflw-player-leaving-people-in-tears-c-1414088" target="_blank">7 News</a>, <em>SAS Australia </em>chief instructor Ant Middleton said: “The hand-to-hand combat task was the ultimate test of character and bravery.</p> <p>“Sabrina had the luxury of choosing her enemy and she chose a tough opponent, showing true strength of character and how much she wanted to test herself and get the absolute most out of this experience.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838374/sas-guy-sebastian-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/bef74f62933d4737a84a0ab5ea5f484a" /></p> <p>“Nick did exactly what was asked of him,” Middleton added.</p> <p>“They both held a good and correct account of themselves.”</p> <p>Frederick spoke to Seven News about the incident and revealed why she wanted to challenge Cummins.</p> <p>“I volunteered first and I picked Nick for two reasons,” she said.</p> <p>“Firstly, I wanted to select the person I thought was the biggest challenge. Secondly, I knew our respect was mutual and he would give me a fair fight, regardless of my gender.</p> <p>“In battle, the enemy doesn’t care about your gender or size and we had to think like soldiers to get through each and every task.</p> <p>“Yes, I was scared but that’s the whole point of SAS selection – not letting the fear consume you and instead harnessing it to empower you.</p> <p>“I am truly grateful for Nick and for that experience.”</p>

Music

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11 everyday expressions you didn’t realise were sexist

<p><strong>Words matter</strong><br />As humans, we speak approximately 16,000 words each day. That’s a lot of talking. Unless we’re learning a new language, by the time we’re adults, we do a lot of it without thinking. There are so many factors contributing to why we use the words, phrases and expressions that come out of our mouths on a daily basis, including differences in generation, geographic location, culture and education. Sometimes you may find yourself using a certain word or expression that now, in 2020, may seem archaic or insensitive. And though there is likely no malintent behind your word choice, it might have questionable origins or applications that you’re completely unaware of – like these 12 common expressions that have surprisingly dark origins.</p> <p>Considering that much of western culture and civilisation was built upon the assumption (by men) of male superiority, it makes sense that our language reflects that. For centuries, words and phrases have been used as a way to control women and dictate their behaviour. Here are 12 everyday expressions you didn’t realise were sexist.</p> <p><strong>Hysterical/in hysterics</strong><br />Have you ever described someone as being “in hysterics” or crying “hysterically”? Now, it’s just part of our everyday vocabulary, but its origin story is probably the best example of the multiple ways women have been silenced and dismissed throughout history. It starts with the ancient Greeks, who thought that a woman’s uterus could wander throughout the rest of her body, causing a number of medical and psychological problems, including, but not limited to weakness, shortness of breath, fragility, fainting and general “madness.”</p> <p>Centuries later, Victorian doctors (who were, of course, almost exclusively male) really latched onto the idea that the uterus was the source of essentially any health or psychological problems a woman may face. The diagnosis? Hysteria, based on “hystera,” the Greek word for womb. Female hysteria, as it was known, was a catch-all term for anything men didn’t understand or couldn’t manage relating to women, and was a valid excuse for institutionalising them. There is so much more to this story, but even though “female hysteria” was discredited as a condition – which, by the way, didn’t happen until 1980 – the word and its variations continue to be used to refer to someone who displays extreme and exaggerated excitement or behaviour. “Hysteria” can also mean a period where people are extremely crazed about something, not unlike the coronavirus panic buying earlier this year.</p> <p><strong>Feisty</strong><br />According to Karla Mastracchio, PhD, a rhetorician specialising in gender, politics, and language, the etymology of some words – like feisty – may not include a connection to gender, but the cultural history of the word shows that it has been used almost exclusively along gender lines. “A lot of the words that are particularly gendered have animalistic connotations – feisty being one of them,” she tells Reader’s Digest. “It’s usually used to talk about two things: an unruly animal, or an unruly woman.” But, it’s unlikely to hear an unruly man referred to as being “feisty,” Mastracchio explains, because the word has feline connotations, and it’s typically women who are associated with cats.</p> <p><strong>Career woman</strong><br />A good way to check whether a word or expression is inherently sexist is to ask whether a male equivalent of the word exists. Two of the most prominent examples are “career woman” and “working mother.” Ever heard of a “career man” or “working father”? Of course not. This harkens back to the Victorian ideology of “separate spheres,” meaning that a woman’s domain is the home, while men are in charge of the rest of the world and society, including working. So even 100 years later, when women ventured outside of the home to work, it was considered the exception, not the rule. And of course, if a woman has a career, there was the assumption that she cared about it more than having a family. Remarkably, the expression is still with us today, despite the vast number of women in the workforce.</p> <p><strong>Bubbly</strong><br />In addition to animals, women are also associated with carbonated or otherwise fizzy beverages – usually in reference to their personality. According to Mastracchio, the use of the word “bubbly” to describe women began in the 1920s during the flapper era and Prohibition. Though a popular beverage of the time, champagne – thanks to its bubbles – was seen as frivolous, light and not something that is taken seriously (despite actually having a relatively high alcohol content of 12 percent). As women were making social gains during the era (everything from shorter haircuts and hemlines, to voting rights), referring to them as “bubbly” was a seemingly endearing (though clearly sexist) way of diminishing their intelligence. And as Mastracchio points out, “bubbly” is also used to describe the sound of a woman’s voice, while men’s voices were “booming,” “deep,” or “rich.”</p> <p><strong>Perky</strong><br />As long as we’re on the topic of cute-sounding names that are only applied to women as a method of keeping them in their place, let’s talk about “perky.” Beginning in the 1930s, “perky” was a vulgar term used to describe the physical characteristics of a woman’s breasts, Mastracchio explains. From there, the word evolved to describe someone with a “lighthearted, young, plucky” personality (which, naturally, only applied to women). Interestingly, Mastracchio points out that both “plucky” and “perky” – along with other words like “chirpy,” “perch,” and, of course, “chick” – are examples of using bird imagery to describe women. Although there are both male and female birds in the wild, they are almost exclusively feminised in language and culture.</p> <p><strong>Shrew</strong><br />Most famously used in the Shakespearean play, The Taming of the Shrew, a shrew is a small rodent with a pointy snout which it uses to gnaw things like wood. But men couldn’t resist another opportunity to use an animal to describe women, and the word later came to mean a “peevish, malignant, clamorous, spiteful, vexatious, turbulent woman,” according to a 1755 dictionary written by Samuel Johnson. The reason for this association is thought to be the belief that shrews (the rodent) had a venomous bite, which played a role in various superstitions. A woman considered a “shrew” may also be described using another term reserved for women: shrill.</p> <p><strong>Frigid</strong><br />Yes, “frigid” means “cold,” but there’s a lot more to the story. As Mastracchio points out, this is another example of the Victorian perception of women as being frail and fragile beings, because as a woman, if you got cold, it means you’d be seen as particularly weak. “It’s gendered in the sense that you would never call a male ‘frigid,’ because being cold is not something that is detrimental to one’s masculinity,” she explains. On top of that, “frigidity” was formerly the medical term for a woman who has no interest in being intimate with her husband, or any other type of dysfunction (real or perceived) in that area.</p> <p><strong>Ditzy</strong><br />Though the exact origin of the word “ditzy” remains unknown, it’s another one that is exclusively used to describe a woman’s perceived intelligence (or rather, the lack thereof). “It’s another example of this intrinsic idea that women have their head somewhere else,” Mastracchio says. “You wouldn’t call a man ‘ditzy,’ because men are not categorised in those kinds of boxes. So it’s tapping into the idea that a woman’s physical head is not necessarily always on her shoulders.” Interestingly, the word “ditz” to describe someone who is ditzy, didn’t enter our vocabulary until 1982. Calling someone a “ditz” or “ditzy” immediately frames them as someone who is scatterbrained and not very smart.</p> <p><strong>Hussy</strong><br />Although the word “hussy” has always referred to women, it’s the change in connotation over time that makes it problematic today. Originally, “hussy” was a neutral term used to describe a female head of the household. This makes sense, given that it is a deformed contraction of the Middle English word “husewif,” which, you guessed it, is “housewife.” Traditionally, it was pronounced “huzzy,” but by the 20th century, the pronunciation shifted to match the spelling of the word. And while it started out meaning a housewife, soon “hussy” was used to describe any woman or girl. By 1650, the term was narrowed even further, and used primarily to mean a woman who engages in questionable behaviour.</p> <p><strong>Spinster</strong><br />In yet another example of inequivalent words for men and women in the same position, we have “spinster.” Unmarried adult women are pitiful “spinsters,” while unmarried adult men are eligible “bachelors.” As the name suggests, a “spinster” is a person who spins thread, and originally, it applied to both men and women in that profession. Eventually, it evolved to refer to an unmarried woman who had to occupy her time or financially support herself by spinning thread or yarn. In fact, it became the official legal term for a single woman starting in the 1600s. This remained the case in England and Wales until 2005, when they also retired the word “bachelor” for a single man, according to a 2017 article in Smithsonian Magazine.</p> <p><strong>Governess</strong><br />Hearing the word “governess” may conjure images of the classic 1964 movie, The Sound of Music, and Julie Andrews, who played a nun-turned-governess in the musical. This context – a governess as a woman who takes care of children – is actually pretty sexist when you look back at its origins. Unsurprisingly, it is the female equivalent of a “governor,” or someone who rules or governs over a place or group of people. At least it was in the 15th century. But as time went on, the domain of a governess went from having authority a territory or jurisdiction (in the geographic and political sense) to supervising and caring for children. Yet again, it reinforces the idea that women can be in charge of children and household duties, while men oversee everything else.</p> <p><em>Written by Elizabeth Yuko. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/our-language/11-everyday-expressions-you-didnt-realise-were-sexist?pages=1">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</em></p>

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Huge drop in prostate cancer testing a big concern for Aussie men

<p>Professor Tony Costello, a pioneer in mens prostate cancer treatment after performing the first open radical prostatectomy using robotic surgery in Australia in 2003, fears a dramatic increase in prostate cancer as testing levels bottom out with COVID-19 restrictions and delayed treatment. </p> <p>In the past six months PSA testing in Australia - a crucial marker for prostate cancer - has fallen dramatically by more than 15 percent, with a similar drop in the number of biopsies carried out compared to the same time period in 2019. </p> <p>Urologist Professor Tony Costello and Clinical Advisor of Maxwell Plus (maxwellplus.com) said many GPs are following current guidelines and not proactively discussing prostate cancer with patients, so many men are unaware they could be at risk. </p> <p>“Often doctors will only discuss prostate cancer when a patient specifically asks for testing and even then may advise against it - meaning too many Australian men are not being diagnosed with the fatal disease until it’s too late,” said Prof Costello. </p> <p>“If men have a blood test in their 40s to get a baseline PSA and then annually from the age of 50 they will have the best chance of detecting prostate cancer early,” he said. </p> <p>“Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Australian men, claiming nearly 3,500 lives last year, more than breast cancer, because of late diagnosis.” </p> <p>Maxwell Plus Founder and CEO Elliot Smith said doctors are embracing telehealth technology to help manage their patients’ risk of prostate cancer, especially during covid when people are reluctant to visit their GP unless it is an emergency. </p> <p>“We are also able to better serve rural and regional Australia - where men have a 21 percent higher mortality rate than men in capital cities.” </p> <p>“Ultimately, what we’re aiming to achieve is that every man who ends up with prostate cancer is diagnosed early enough that all options are in front of him, and men don’t need to go through unnecessary testing,” said Mr Smith. </p>

Downsizing

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Are you looking for love or friendship in an over 50s community?

<p class="p1"><em><strong>The heart-warming story of two downsizers who fell in love and then started a new life together in a retirement village has prompted OverSixty.com.au and Downsizing.com.au to launch a survey about romance and friendship in over 50s communities.</strong></em></p> <p class="p1">David and Anthea Yates, both in their early 70s, married in February 2020 and in the same month moved from their homes in the regional centre of Waikerie to Stockland Hillsview retirement village in Happy Valley, south of Adelaide.</p> <p class="p1">David and Anthea met around two years ago, after David - as a local men’s shed volunteer - helped Anthea move into her home at Waikerie. David had joined the men’s shed after the passing of his previous wife.</p> <p class="p1">“It blossomed into a love affair,” said David.</p> <p class="p1">The couple decided to get married, have their honeymoon and move into a retirement village - all in the same month. </p> <p class="p1">David and Anthea had several reasons to make their move, including to find better weather, be closer to family, meet new friends, reduce home maintenance and simply to leave the past behind.</p> <p class="p1">“We’ve both had heartaches during our lives and we needed to move away to be able to ease the hurt and the memories...not to completely forget but to ease the pain, and to start a new life together,” David said.</p> <p class="p1">For Anthea, it was important that she moved closer to her daughter and grandsons, and also meet new friends in a like-minded community.</p> <p class="p1">“I found that, in a small and very close community (such as Waikerie), and as someone who was a retiree who didn’t take children to school, that it was hard to meet people,” Anthea said.</p> <p class="p1">“I enjoy living here in the retirement village where everyone is in a similar age group and friendly.”</p> <p class="p1"><strong>Fill out our survey:</strong></p> <p class="p1"><em>OverSixty.com.au and Downsizing.com.au have <a href="https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2ZTNXG8">launched a survey on the subject</a>.  </em></p>

Downsizing

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The Block’s Scotty Cam weighs in on “identical bedrooms”

<p>After days of controversy on-air and online, <em>The Block</em> host Scott Cam has weighed in on contestants Luke and Jasmin’s “copycatted” bedroom.</p> <p>The TV host has determined the kids bedroom is “virtually identical” to the room they have been accused of ripping off.</p> <p>Cam couldn’t resist stirring the pot on Wednesday night’s episode, by making sure Luke and Jasmin’s competitors knew something was wrong, a day after judge Shaynna Blaze had visited the pair to confront the pair on-air.</p> <p>The WA couple received a perfect score of 30 for their kid’s bedroom and bathroom on Sunday’s episode.<br /><br />However eagle-eyed viewers found the winning room was incredibly similar to a kid’s bedroom at a popular Byron Bay Airbnb created by design company <em>The Designory.</em></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838121/dailies-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/59a4ddcd1a374b32bea6088e5e0387c0" /><br />Blaze confronted the two in Tuesday’s episode, informing them that there was a difference between “inspiration” and “completely taking someone else’s idea”.<br /><br />“Hey, did Shaynna come and visit you guys yesterday?” Cam asked the South Australian couple Daniel and Jade during his visit one episode later.<br /><br />“Because you know, it’s not always good news when Shaynna comes visiting. That’s all I’m saying. Alright, let’s go,” he said.<br /><br />A couple of houses down with Jimmy and Tam, Cam couldn’t play coy any longer.<br /><br />“Did you hear about Shaynna popping in next door? What’s your thoughts?” he asked the pair, who were aware of the reason for Shaynna’s visit.<br /><br />Jimmy and Tam showed their reluctance on speaking ill of Luke and Jasmin.<br /><br />“Umm … in all honesty, we’re not that worried about it. We know that other people might have a few issues about it. Jas did show me the image, and it does have a … very similar influence,” said Tam.<br /><br />Tam said she and Jimmy had “made sure” to keep their designs original.</p> <p><br /><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838122/dailies-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/5793ad5db94b471796679c047fbc7780" /><br />“I don’t really look at too much inspiration. I don’t have Instagram, I don’t have Facebook – I don’t want other people’s designs in our house,” she said.<br /><br />Luke and Jasmin told news.com.au that they were “blindsided” by Shaynna Blaze's visit, labelling her “insincere” and a “smart-arse.”<br /><br />The couple have since deleted their Facebook page and restricted comments on their joint Instagram account after being met with a heap of criticism from viewers.<br /><br />2019’s couple Mitch and Mark reached out to Luke and Jasmin with a message of “support and positive wishes”.<br /><br />“Hope you guys are doing OK &amp; know from our experience it all goes away,” the pair wrote in a comment on Luke and Jasmin’s latest Instagram post.<br /><br />“It’s definitely come as a surprise just how nasty the online world can be. We’ve never had people dislike us. So this is all new,” Luke and Jas said.<br /><br />“We’ve deleted Facebook so we don’t see anything on there. Staying positive about our beautiful home and focusing on the rooms left and the auction.”</p>

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