Food & Wine

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Woolies customer reveals shopping hack that'll help you save

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A Woolworths customer has revealed her trick to help her save on her weekly shopping trip to the supermarket.</p> <p>Mum Biance shared the information on a popular Facebook page, explaining that she "always reads the fine print" on supermarket labels to compare the unit price. </p> <p>“If you’re trying to get the biggest bang for your buck, then shop by the unit price,” explained Bianca on the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/mumswhobudgetandsave" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Mums Who Budget &amp; Save</a> group.</p> <p>“Read the fine print on the ticket and see how much the item costs per 100g or whatever they break it down into.</p> <p>“Then compare it with a different brand or similar item.</p> <p>“Even though an item may seem cheaper as a whole, often you can save by buying something that’s a little bit more expensive but lasts longer or gives you more.</p> <p>“Good example is Coke.</p> <p>“When the 1.25L bottles are on ‘special’ they are still usually always more expensive than the 2L bottles are [at] full price if you look at the dollar per litre.</p> <p>“At a glance, you’d think you’re getting a deal with the ‘special’ but you’re really not.</p> <p>“Unless you specifically need a 1.25L bottle than you’re better off getting the 2L.”</p> <p>Many shoppers agreed that it was the best way to save money on your bill.</p> <p>“Yes! Taught my partner the same principle - things aren’t always as cheap as they appear!” said one.</p> <p>Added another: “This is a great way to save money in the long run.”</p> <p>Said a third: “My partner had never heard of this until I explained it. Either had my mum!”</p> <p>Bianca pointed out that it's important to keep your family's needs in mind while shopping.</p> <p>“Obviously this is only if you’re wanting to get the most out of the item,” she wrote.</p> <p>“Otherwise it may suit your lifestyle more to buy the smaller but cheaper item, paying more upfront but replacing the item more often.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Baked breakfast mushrooms stuffed with spinach, feta and egg

<p><span>Prep / cook time: 25 minutes</span></p> <p><span>Serve: 2 mushrooms per person</span></p> <p> </p> <p><strong><span>Ingredients:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span>4 large flat mushrooms (large Portobello mushrooms also work well)</span></li> <li><span>1 big handful of baby spinach leaves</span></li> <li><span>1 1/2 tbsp marinated creamy feta cheese </span></li> <li><span>4 medium free-range eggs</span></li> <li><span>2 thyme sprigs</span></li> <li><span>Cracked pepper to taste</span></li> <li><span>Sea salt to taste</span></li> <li><span>1 tbsp parsley, roughly chopped, to serve</span></li> </ul> <p><span> </span></p> <p><strong><span>Method:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span>Pre heat the oven to 180</span>°<span></span></li> <li><span>To clean the mushrooms, brush the skin with a dry paper towel to remove any dirt.</span></li> <li><span>Using a small paring knife, remove the stems.</span></li> <li><span>Fill the base of the mushrooms with the baby spinach leaves, ripping larger leaves into smaller pieces. </span></li> <li><span>Carefully crack an egg into each mushroom on top of the spinach.</span></li> <li><span>Add a spoonful of marinated feta cheese as well as a drizzle of the feta marinating oil on top of the cracked egg.</span></li> <li><span>Add a pinch of salt and pepper and sprinkle a few leaves of the fresh thyme on top.</span></li> <li><span>Bake in the oven for 18-20 minutes or until the mushroom has softened and the egg is still soft inside.</span></li> <li><span>Serve straight away topped with parsley.</span></li> </ul> <p>This recipe has been published with permission from Australian Mushrooms.</p>

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Aussie favourite Freddo undergoes a makeover

<p>Freddo Frog has been given a major upgrade as it celebrates its 90th birthday, with the Aussie favourite to go 3D.</p> <p>Similar to a Yowie or Kinder Surprise, the chocolate frog will now have a hollow inside filled with little animal-shaped lollies.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 335.8862144420131px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838053/screen-shot-2020-09-25-at-104714-am.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/39aa64c111f94aacb384cb84fa81dc60" /></p> <p>Cadbury made the announcement on Wednesday, saying the change will also be kinder to the environment.</p> <p>The new Freddo is wrapped with recyclable foil packaging, with the new design intended to bring “colourful fun” without the added plastic.</p> <p>Cadbury’s marketing manager Kate Watson said the change was an “exciting new chapter” for the beloved treat.</p> <p>“For 90 years, Freddo has given generations of Australians shared moments of wonder and joy,” she said.</p> <p>“During what’s been a challenging time for us all, Freddo 3D Adventure encourages us to be free-spirited and adventurous, urging us to embrace our curiosity and appreciate the world around us.”</p> <p>Freddo will be dressed in four new looks, including space suits, snorkels and swimmers.</p> <p>And every year, the chocolate will explore a new part of the world, with themes expected to change his costumes and the shape of the candy animals inside.</p>

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10 foods you should never reheat in a microwave

<p>Some 30 years ago, domestic kitchens received the gift of the microwave and quickly became dependent on it for lightning-fast heating. Younger generations can’t even imagine making porridge, hot chocolate or popcorn without it. And yet so many of us are using the microwave incorrectly for reheated foods. Sure, we know to never zap aluminium foil, metal, or plastic, but there are equally dangerous risks involved in nuking certain foods. For starters, a microwave does not cook food evenly, which often means that any bacteria present in the reheated foods will survive. Then there’s the problem of microwave blasts directly contributing to the production of carcinogenic toxins. To minimise the microwave risks, don’t use it to cook or warm these ten foods:</p> <p><strong>Hard-boiled eggs</strong></p> <p>Shelled or unshelled, when a hard-boiled egg is cooked in a microwave, the moisture inside creates an extreme steam build-up, like a miniature pressure cooker, to the point where the egg can explode! Even scarier, the egg won’t burst inside the microwave while it’s being heated, but afterward, which means the scalding hot egg can erupt in your hand, on your plate, or even in your mouth. To avoid turning your egg into a steam bomb, cut it into small pieces before reheating, or better yet, avoid putting it in the microwave altogether.</p> <p><strong>Breast milk</strong></p> <p>Many new mothers freeze and store their breast milk for later use, which is great, as long as it’s not reheated in a microwave. In the same way that microwaves heat plates of food unevenly, they can also warm a bottle of breast milk unevenly, creating ‘hot spots’ that can severely burn a baby’s mouth and throat. Then there’s the carcinogen hazard that comes with reheating plastic. It’s recommended that breast milk and formula be thawed and reheated in a pot on the stove, or using hot tap water. As a workaround, you could heat a cup of water in the microwave and then drop the bag or bottle of breast milk in it to thaw.</p> <p><strong>Processed meat</strong></p> <p>Processed meats often contain chemicals and preservatives extend their shelf lives. Unfortunately, microwaving them can make those substances worse for your health. In microwaving processed meats, we might unknowingly be exposed to chemical changes such as oxidised cholesterol in the process, according to research in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. A study in the journal Food Control suggests that reheating processed meats with a burst of microwave radiation contributes to the formation of cholesterol oxidation products (COPs), which have been linked to the development of coronary heart disease. Compared to other meal-prep methods for reheated foods, microwaving processed meats is far more likely to introduce COPs into your diet.</p> <p><strong>Rice</strong></p> <p>Rice, really? Well, according to the Food Standards Agency, microwaving rice can sometimes lead to food poisoning. The issue with rice involves the common presence of a highly resistant bacteria called Bacillus cereus. Heat kills this bacteria, but it can have produced spores that are toxic, according to findings in the International Journal of Food Microbiology – and surprisingly heat resistant. A number of studies confirm that once rice comes out of the microwave and is left out at room temperature, any spores it contains can multiply and cause food poisoning if you eat it. (The humid environment of the warm rice makes it an ideal breeding ground.) As is explained on the U.S. government website Food Safety: ‘B. cereus is a type of bacteria that produces toxins. These toxins can cause two types of illness: one type characterised by diarrhoea, and the other, called emetic toxin, characterised by nausea and vomiting. Sources: a variety of foods, particularly rice.’ To avoid contaminated rice, heat it to near boiling and then keep it warm (above 60 degrees C) to keep it food safe.</p> <p><strong>Chicken</strong></p> <p>The most important thing to realise about microwaves is that their heat does not always kill bacteria, because microwaves heat from the outside in instead of the inside out. As such, certain bacteria-prone reheated foods will have higher risk of causing sickness when these bacterial cells survive. Bearing this in mind, you can see why chicken, which is at risk of salmonella contamination, could be a dangerous food to microwave. Before eating chicken, you have to cook it thoroughly to eliminate all present bacteria. Since microwaves don’t fully or evenly cook all parts of the meat, you’re more likely to be left with surviving bacteria such as salmonella. In one study, out of 30 participants who reheated raw meat, all 10 who used a microwave became ill, whereas the 20 who used a frying pan were fine. This goes to show how much bacteria can survive in meat when microwaved, compared to other cooking methods.</p> <p><strong>Leafy greens</strong></p> <p>If you want to save your celery, kale, or spinach to eat later as leftovers, plan to reheat them in a conventional oven rather than a microwave. When blasted in the microwave, naturally occurring nitrates (which are very good for you on their own) may convert to nitrosamines, which can be carcinogenic, studies show.</p> <p><strong>Beetroot</strong><br />The same chemical conversion that happens to spinach holds true for reheating nitrate-rich beetroot and turnips! Good thing they’re just as delicious cold.</p> <p><strong>Chillies</strong></p> <p>When chillies are reheated in the microwave, capsaicin – the chemical that gives them their spicy flavour – is released into the air. Airborne, the chemical can burn your eyes and throat. In fact, one US apartment building was evacuated after a microwaved chilli caused residents to start coughing and have trouble breathing.</p> <p><strong>Fruit</strong></p> <p>Microwaved grapes won’t make raisins, but they will make plasma, which is a form of matter that’s created when gas is ionised and lets electricity flow. In a video, Stephen Bosi, PhD, physics lecturer at the University of New England, shows nuking two pieces of a plain ol’ grape in a microwave can create enough plasma to melt a hole through a plastic container. Plasma might not be produced from other fruits, but you could still be left with a mess. Whole fruit traps steam under the flesh, meaning it could burst while it’s heating.</p> <p><strong>Potatoes</strong></p> <p>Thankfully, you’re still safe to nuke a raw spud for a quick and easy side dish. The danger comes when you try reheating cooked potatoes. Cooking potatoes in aluminium foil protects the bacteria C. botulinum from the heat, meaning it can still thrive if the potato stays at room temperature too long, and potentially cause botulism. Popping that contaminated tatie in the microwave won’t kill the bacteria, either, so play it safe by cooking them on a baking sheet instead of wrapped in foil and refrigerating leftover potatoes as soon as possible. Did you know Queen Elizabeth II refuses to eat potatoes, microwaved or otherwise? Find out what other foods the Queen will never eat here.</p> <p> </p> <p class="p1">This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/kitchen-tips/10-foods-you-shouldnt-reheat-microwave"><span class="s1">Reader’s Digest</span></a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><span class="s1">here’s our best subscription offer</span></a>.</p>

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Coles addresses Christmas food shortage fears

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Supermarket giant Coles has reassured customers that there will be no food shortages around the festive season.</p> <p>As there's only 99 days until Christmas, supermarket bosses held crucial talks with Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews to ensure that the hard lockdown won't lead to food shortages around the nation.</p> <p>Coles' Chief Operating Officer Matthew Swindells told <em>Today</em> that the company is prepared for the Christmas boom.</p> <p>"(There's) lots of work still to do, we are not through it all yet, but things are looking very promising," Swindells told <em>Today.</em></p> <p>"We are all very much aligned and playing as a team to make sure we can do two things; The first is keep our customers and team members safe. The second is maintain food supply through to the community. </p> <p>"We just need to plan for that and continue to work together."</p> <p>The company's current concern is making sure food comes down the right supply channels.</p> <p>Lockdown and coronavirus has complicated things as Coles starts preparing for the festive season six months in advance.</p> <p>"It's a big logistics challenge. The team are up for it, they do a great job every year," he said.</p> <p>"There is a large amount of fresh food, as you can imagine, we all like turkey, hams, we want them as fresh as possible, we want the best food in front of our families. </p> <p>"Whilst this will be a different Christmas, a COVID-safe Christmas, I think everyone is really looking forward to celebrating."</p> <p>Swindells has urged customers to use online shopping and click-to-collect methods to ensure that they don't miss out on the items they need.</p> <p>"Don't leave it to the last minute," he said.</p> <p>"Try and pick quieter times to do shopping, maybe don't pick Saturday or Sunday afternoon.</p> <p>"There is a way in which we can all work together and make sure we get through this and all celebrate Christmas in a COVID safe way."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Lyndey Milan’s simple chocolate fudge cake

<p>Time to prepare <em>65 mins</em> |Serves <em>8</em></p> <p>Ready to discover the best chocolate cake ever?</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>150g butter</li> <li>¾ cup (165 g) brown sugar an</li> <li>150g dark chocolate</li> <li>1/3 cup condensed milk</li> <li>½ cup sour cream</li> <li>2 eggs</li> <li>¾ cup (110g) self-raising flour</li> </ul> <p><strong>To serve</strong></p> <ul> <li>2 tablespoons dark cocoa powder</li> <li>2 x 125g punnets fresh raspberries</li> <li>Melted white chocolate for drizzling</li> <li>Thick cream (optional)</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat oven to 170°C (150°C fan-forced). Place a 23cm (aprox) round silicone dish (<u><a href="https://gifts.com.au/brands/lyndey-milan">from the Lyndey Milan range</a></u>) on a baking tray. Or lightly grease a 23cm round cake tin and line base with baking paper.</p> <p>2. Melt the butter in a medium saucepan and add sugar, chocolate and condensed milk. Cook over a low heat, stirring occasionally, until the mixture thickens slightly and the sugar dissolves. Remove from the heat and cool slightly.</p> <p>3. Whisk together sour cream and eggs in a large mixing bowl. Add cooled chocolate mixture and flour and mix well. Pour into dish and bake for 45 - 55 minutes or until cooked. Stand in dish for 10 minutes before turning onto a wire rack to cool.</p> <p>4. To serve, place cake on serving plate, sieve cocoa over the top of the cake. Add the raspberries and drizzle with the melted white chocolate. Serve with thick cream if desired.</p> <p><em>Recipe provided by <a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/71095/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fsearch.ep%3Fauthor%3DLyndey%2520Milan">Lyndey Milan</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lyndey-milans-simple-chocolate-fudge-cake.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Furious ALDI shoppers call for buying limits

<p>An ALDI shopper’s behaviour has sparked a furious response on social media after he was caught trying to sell five of the prized $149 air fryers at almost twice the price - just four days after the Special Buys favourite sold out nationwide.</p> <p>The man’s ad for five ALDI 16L Multifunction Air Fryers was shared on the Facebook group ALDI Australia Buy, Swap &amp; Sell on Sunday, priced at $279.</p> <p>"Brand new in box un open, 5 available [sic]," the ad description reads.</p> <p>A screenshot of the ad was later posted to the Facebook group ALDI Mums, with many ALDI fans dubbing the man as a “jerk” and a “price gouger”.</p> <p>"Appalling. Should be illegal!" one commentator wrote.</p> <p>"What a jerk," another agreed, with a third asking: "What is wrong with people!"</p> <p>Many called for the German supermarket to apply customer limits to prevent this from happening. </p> <p>"Aldi should limit per customer each!" one wrote.</p> <p>"Special electronic buys should be restricted to one per customer. It's a no brainer."</p> <p>Another shopper thought two seemed fair: "Aldi should just have a 2 per person limit on special buys."</p> <p>But some disagreed and said the man did nothing wrong.</p> <p>"He's paid for it. He has the right to do whatever he wants with it. If someone is silly enough to pay that much for it then nothing to get worked up about."</p> <p>ALDI have previously said they’re not in the practice of restricting the volume of items sold to customers.</p>

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Sweet and tangy lemon and blueberry cheesecake

<p>Time to prepare 1 hr 10 mins |Serves 10</p> <p><strong>Lemon and blueberry cheesecake</strong></p> <p>Bringing together sweet blueberries and tangy lemons, this simple cheesecake is light but luscious. It’s the perfect end to a lazy summer meal!</p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>Melted butter, extra, to grease</li> <li>375g cream cheese, at room temperature, cubed (see Tips)</li> <li>3 eggs, at room temperature</li> <li>185g (3/4 cup) sour cream</li> <li>125ml (1/2 cup) thin (pouring) cream</li> <li>165g (3/4 cup) caster (superfine) sugar</li> <li>1 tablespoon finely grated lemon zest</li> <li>2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice</li> <li>200g fresh or frozen blueberries (see Tips)</li> <li>Icing (confectioners’) sugar, to dust</li> </ul> <p><strong>Biscuit base</strong></p> <ul> <li>100g plain sweet biscuits</li> <li>60g butter, melted</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Preheat the oven to 150°C. Line the base of a 20cm spring-form cake tin with baking paper. Brush the side of the tin with a little melted butter to grease.</p> <p>2. To make the Biscuit base, process the biscuits in a food processor until finely crushed. Add the butter and process until well combined. Sprinkle the mixture over the base of the tin and use the back of a metal spoon or the base of a glass to press down to cover evenly. Put the tin on a baking tray and place in the fridge.</p> <p>3. Clean the food processor bowl and process the cream cheese until smooth. Add the eggs and process until smooth. Add the sour cream, thin cream, sugar, lemon zest and juice and process until well combined and smooth, scraping down the side and base of the bowl when necessary. Pour into the tin over the base. Scatter the blueberries over the top.</p> <p>4. Bake for 1 hour 10 minutes or until the cheesecake is just set but the centre trembles slightly when the tin is shaken gently. Turn off the oven, use a wooden spoon to keep the oven door ajar and leave the cheesecake in the oven for 1 hour (this helps prevent the cheesecake from cracking). Transfer the cheesecake, still in the tin, to the fridge and chill for at least 3 hours or until well chilled. Dust with icing sugar and serve.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>Having the cream cheese at room temperature means it will easily become smooth and creamy in the food processor. If you use it straight from the fridge it will take longer and you’ll need to scrape the side and base of the food processor frequently so that no lumps are left after processing.</p> <p>If using frozen blueberries, use them straight from the freezer – do not thaw.</p> <p><strong>Variations</strong></p> <p><strong>Orange &amp; Raspberry Cheesecake</strong> – Replace the lemon zest and juice with orange zest and juice. Replace the blueberries with fresh or frozen raspberries.</p> <p><strong>Blueberry &amp; White Chocolate Cheesecake</strong> – Replace the lemon zest and juice with 1 1/2 teaspoons natural vanilla extract or essence. Melt 180g good-quality white chocolate and cool to room temperature. Add to the bowl of the food processor just before transferring the mixture to the tin and process until just combined.</p> <p><strong>Individual Lemon &amp; Blueberry Cheesecakes</strong> – Line a 12-hole 80ml (1/3 cup) capacity muffin tin with paper cases. Divide the biscuit base, cream cheese mixture and blueberries evenly among the cases. Bake at 160°C for 30 minutes. Cool as per the recipe, then chill in the fridge for at least 1 hour before removing the paper cases and serving.</p> <p>Recipes and images from Bake Class by Anneka Manning ($39.99, Murdoch Books).</p> <p><em>Republished with permission <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/lemon-and-blueberry-cheesecake.aspx">of Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Pear upside-down cake

<p>One thing I love about social media is its ability to bring people together who share similar passions. I met Jess of <a href="https://www.instagram.com/jess_mycleantreats/">@jess_mycleantreats</a> on Instagram and after scrolling through her feed of healthy desserts I was dying to try them for myself.</p> <p>Jess doesn't follow any particular diet, she just loves food and prefers to make healthier choices. She particularly loves desserts, so much so that she says "I may have spent the previous year heaping 3 teaspoons of Nutella into my mouth every night before I went to sleep (and also heaping on 3 kilos while I was at it)." So she decided to start experimenting with creating her own healthier treats using natural ingredients. She shares her creations on her blog, My Clean Treats, and says "if you pair these treats with a healthy lifestyle of fresh meals and regular exercise, I’d say you’re on the right track." Agree!</p> <p>I tried out Jess's Pear &amp; Date Upside-Down Cake and it was delicious. Her original recipe included chopped dates, which would be really tasty but I left them out to make a Pear Upside-Down Cake (because I can't eat a lot of dates). I also used brown rice flour instead of wholewheat or spelt to keep the cake gluten-free and it worked out nicely! The recipe for my adapted version is below and you can check out Jess's original recipe here. I loved the mixture of pear and cinnamon.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients </strong></p> <ul> <li>4 pears</li> <li>6 x 20ml tablespoons coconut oil, melted</li> <li>1/2 cup rice malt syrup</li> <li>3 large free-range eggs</li> <li>1 tsp vanilla bean paste or pure vanilla extract</li> <li>1 2/3 cup brown rice flour</li> <li>2 tsp (gluten-free) baking powder</li> <li>1 tsp cinnamon powder</li> <li>1 cup unsweetened almond milk</li> <li>Extra cinnamon powder for dusting</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. Peel and core the pears and cut them into halves. Poach the pear halves in simmering water for about 30-40 minutes or until soft. Set aside to cool.</p> <p>2. While the pears are poaching, preheat your oven to 170°C (fan-forced) and line the base and sides of a 20cm circular cake tin with baking paper.*</p> <p>3. Drizzle 3 tablespoons of melted coconut oil over the base of the tin, then arrange the pear halves cut-side down to cover the base.</p> <p>4. Using an electric mixer, beat the remaining 3 tablespoons of melted coconut oil, rice malt syrup and vanilla together until creamy. Add one egg at a time to the mixture, beating until well combined.</p> <p>5. Sift the flour, cinnamon and baking powder over the liquid mixture, then gently fold everything together. Add the almond milk and beat lightly to combine.</p> <p>6. Pour the mixture over the pears, then bake in the preheated oven for 1 hour - 1 hour 20 minutes (mine took 1 hour). Allow to cool. To serve, flip onto a plate and dust over some extra cinnamon. Store in an airtight container in the fridge.</p> <p>Serves 8.</p> <p><strong>Tips</strong></p> <p>* I used a springform cake tin, which meant that the coconut oil dripped through the tiny gaps in the base while in the oven causing a bit of a mess. So I ended up wrapping the tin in two layers of foil to stop the dripping. I'd recommend doing this from the start or using a normal cake tin (without a removable base).</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/pear-upside-down-cake-ld.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Honey, whisky and saffron cheesecake

<p>An indulgent twist on a timeless classic, impress your guests tonight!</p> <p><strong>Ingredients</strong></p> <ul> <li>500g mascarpone</li> <li>A few saffron strands, steeped in 1 tablespoon boiling water for at least 1 hour</li> <li>160g caster sugar</li> <li>1 tablespoon leatherwood honey, warmed</li> <li>4 eggs</li> <li>50ml whisky</li> </ul> <p><strong>Sweet shortcrust pastry</strong></p> <ul> <li>190g plain flour</li> <li>90g cold unsalted butter, cut into 1cm cubes</li> <li>1 tablespoon caster sugar</li> <li>1 egg yolk</li> <li>2 tablespoons cold water</li> </ul> <p><strong>Directions</strong></p> <p>1. To make the pastry, rub the flour, butter and sugar between your fingertips until it resembles breadcrumbs. Alternatively, you can use a food processor to do this. Add the egg yolk and water, and mix until the dough comes together to form a ball. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and set aside in the fridge for at least 30 minutes to rest.<br /><br />2. Mix the mascarpone, saffron water, sugar, honey, eggs and whisky together in a large bowl. Set aside.<br /><br />3. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the pastry to about 4mm thick. Line a well-greased 23cm springform tin with baking paper and carefully place the pastry in the tin. Trim the edge of any excess pastry and return to the fridge to chill.</p> <p>4. Preheat the oven to 180°C. Line the pastry base with baking paper and weights, and blind bake for 15 minutes. Remove the weights and baking paper and bake the tart shell for a further 10 minutes.</p> <p>5. Pour the filling into the tart shell and bake for a further 30 minutes, or until set and golden on top. Allow to cool before serving.</p> <p>Serves 8.</p> <p><em>This is an edited extract from <a href="http://t.dgm-au.com/c/185116/69171/1880?u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.booktopia.com.au%2Fmilk-made-nick-haddow%2Fprod9781743791356.html">Milk. Made.</a> by Nick Haddow published by Hardie Grant Books RRP $55 and is available in stores nationally. Image © Alan Benson.</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/recipes/honey-whisky-and-saffron-cheesecake.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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Mum embarrassed by ALDI alcohol policy

<p>A mum has sparked a fierce debate on social media after she shared her “embarrassing” experience at her local ALDI.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>Yahoo Lifestyle</em>, the woman said she never expected to rile up so many people after she shared her experience of being almost refused service when she tried to buy a bottle of wine in front of her kids.</p> <p>Taking to the ALDI Fan Facebook page, the mum said she was with her teenagers doing a quick shop when the manager came over as she tried to purchase a bottle of red.</p> <p>“While waiting in line I grabbed a bottle of alcohol to purchase, [and] the cashier said she needed to check with her manager if she could sell the alcohol as I had two children in uniform,” the post read.</p> <p>“She called the manager and was told that it was at the cashier discretion if she could sell it to me!’</p> <p>The mum told<span> </span><em>Yahoo</em><span> </span>that despite being allowed to buy the wine, she was mortified by the incident which took place in front of everyone in the store.</p> <p>“My kids were embarrassed, I was embarrassed,” she says. “I had people looking at me like I’m a sh** mother.”</p> <p>She says she doesn’t blame the cashier, but if ALDI has a policy in place then they should advertise it.</p> <p>In a statement, the retailer said their employees have the right to refuse service if they have concerns the person buying the items is a “risk”.</p> <p>“The sale of alcohol can be refused if a minor has handled alcohol that could be potentially purchased by an adult for the minor’s consumption,” a spokesperson says. “This also extends to a minor accompanying an adult purchasing alcohol, even if the minor has not physically touched an alcoholic product.”</p> <p>“It is the store’s responsibility to refuse any customer who presents a risk and ultimately it is at the discretion of the person serving to decline the sale should they have any doubts or concerns.”</p> <p>They also pointed to the hefty fines as a reason they take the rules so seriously.</p> <p>“There are severe consequences for breaching laws and policies set in place by the Australian government involving the sale of alcohol,” they say. As such ALDI faces heavy penalties should we sell alcohol to any customer who supplies to a person under the age of 18.”</p> <p>The post, which now has over 10,000 comments, have defended the cashier, saying she was just doing her job.</p> <p>“Anyone complaining needs to realise these people need to abide by RSA laws,” one woman wrote on the post.</p> <p>RSA laws in NSW do not restrict the sale of alcohol to an adult who has children with them, but the law does mandate that any person selling alcohol can refuse service if they think the buyer is buying the alcohol on behalf of a minor.</p> <p>But some believe the assumption she was providing alcohol to her children was farfetched.</p> <p>“I find this hilarious!” one wrote. “If you were buying for kids you wouldn’t bring them in with you, people are so stupid!!”</p> <p>“I get they’re doing their job but I defo understand the frustration of the original poster,” another wrote.</p> <p>It seems others have run into the same at other venues.</p> <p>“I was with my mum and they said they couldn’t sell it because I was with her,” one minor wrote.</p> <p>“Yup had this happen to me a few times,” another agreed.</p> <p>Others pointed out that workers get fined $11,000 for selling alcohol to a minor, so it shouldn’t be taken too personally.</p> <p>“She gets fined by authorities personally so don’t be offended,” one advised. “I get it. No Aldi job is worth a fine.”</p>

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