Food & Wine

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Latest changes to Coles and Woolies restrictions

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Coles has announced a raft of new measures in response to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis.</p> <p>In a letter to customers, CEO Steven Cain explained that there are new and tougher guidelines in place regarding cleaning and sanitation in stores.</p> <p>“We know that health and safety is front of mind for lots of our customers at the moment, and we want to let you know that we’re working closely with the Department of Health to ensure the most effective protection for both you and our team members in our stores during the COVID-19 situation,” Mr Cain wrote, according to <em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/business/retail/coronavirus-coles-strict-new-rules-woolworths-may-bring-back-free-bags/news-story/9646108ac7b2947029076399a404a0eb" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em>.</p> <p>He also explained that customers are not to enter the store if they’re unwell as well as the company adding “extra cleaning and sanitisation” to high contact areas of the stores.</p> <p>“We ask all customers not to enter a store if they are unwell, to wash or sanitise their hands before entering stores, and to remind everyone to not touch their face unless your hands have been sanitised,” Mr Cain said.</p> <p>Shoppers must now pack their own bags to “minimise both handling and close contact time” as well as discouraging cash transactions.</p> <p>“When paying, we recommend card payments instead of cash, and we encourage you to use tap and go to make checking out as easy as possible,” Mr Cain said.</p> <p>Coles is also making changes to the bakery section, with single item bakery goods to be individually pre-wrapped.</p> <p>“Finally, we’ll be regularly rotating our teams on checkouts throughout the day to help keep everyone safer,” Mr Cain said.</p> <p>“Please respect the guidelines we’re putting in place as your health and safety remains a priority for us.”</p> <p>Meanwhile, Woolworths boss Brad Banducci explained to the ABC this morning that the chain had considered bringing back the option of free bags. However, there is not enough stock to make this option possible.</p> <p>“Look, we are working through that in New Zealand and you will have noticed Coles decided to get customers to pack their own bags and the issue we have in terms of giving bags away which we are open to, is the number of bags we have in stock,” Mr Banducci said on air.</p> <p>“The team are working through that issue as we talk and we will make further announcements over the weekend, but we are listening to our team and taking the advice seriously."</p> </div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Jamie Oliver to the rescue with easy homemade bread recipe

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Jamie Oliver has impressed fans with an easy guide on how to make homemade bread with just three ingredients in his new cooking show ‘Keep Cooking and Carry On’.</p> <p>The new series aims to help viewers during the coronavirus pandemic by offering easy recipes and cooking tips on items usually found in a person’s cupboard.</p> <p>The first episode was met with praise, as viewers called it “Helpful, resourceful and creative” as many people struggle to find basics in their local supermarket due to panic buying from the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>Oliver, 44, revealed how you can make bread in just two hours using water, yeast and flour as shoppers are struggling to find any in supermarkets.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-IDQi8FSO6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-IDQi8FSO6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Jamie Oliver (@jamieoliver)</a> on Mar 24, 2020 at 11:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Cooking can be good for the soul and making bread is such a rewarding, therapeutic, tactile thing – you’ll be so proud of yourself when you’ve cracked it,” Oliver says on his<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.jamieoliver.com/recipes/bread-recipes/easy-homemade-bread/" target="_blank">recipe to make the bread</a>.</p> <p>From one simple bread recipe like this, there’s a million things you can do – big ones, small ones, in a tin, on a tray, get creative. There are also loads of lovely flours you can experiment with – wholewheat, rye, spelt, using a blend of a couple of different ones. Plus, making bread is a great thing to do with the kids – they'll love it. ”</p> <p>Fans on Twitter were quick to praise Oliver for being innovative in times of crisis.</p> <p>“Can I just say a huge thank you Mr Oliver. I was feeling somewhat overwhelmed, low in energy and unenthused about cooking and your recipes perked me up and for a brief moment I felt the stress slip away, plus some yummy food! I for one really appreciate your help x”</p> <p>“Cooking nutritious meals for yourself and your loved ones has never been more important,” Oliver said in a statement for the show.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Can you get coronavirus from takeaway food?

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>As coronavirus continues its rapid spread across the world, many are being advised to practice social distancing. This means gatherings of people are limited to a specific number, and it also means no hanging out with your friends at restaurants.</p> <p>Home delivery has therefore become more popular, with many getting takeaway or ordering supplies to their door.</p> <p>However, the rise in home deliveries has led to concerns as to whether or not coronavirus can be contracted from touching packages.</p> <p>Experts in the US and the UK are adamant that having items delivered is a low-risk activity.</p> <p>"It's very unlikely it can be spread through things like packages or food," reports the UK's <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coronavirus-covid-19/" target="_blank" title="National Health System website's coronavirus page">National Health System website's coronavirus page</a>.</p> <p>Dr. Ian Williams, chief of the Outbreak Response and Prevention Branch of the US <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html" target="_blank">Centers for Disease Control and Prevention</a> echoed the sentiment in a recent information webinar.</p> <p>"There is no evidence out there that, so far with [Covid-19], that it's foodborne-driven or food service-driven," Williams said.</p> <p>"This really is respiratory, person-to-person. At this point there is no evidence really pointing us towards food [or] food service as ways that are driving the epidemic."</p> <p>Delivery services such as UberEats have adapted to the threat of coronavirus and offer options such as having deliveries left in a designated area. Companies are also practicing social distancing amongst delivery partners.</p> <p>However, some companies are taking the initiative to close as countries escalate their lockdowns worldwide, including McDonalds.</p> <p>Here are a few things to be mindful of while ordering packages or deliveries to your door.</p> <p><strong>Practice social distancing</strong></p> <p>Social distancing involves minimising contact with people and keeping a distance of over one metre between you and others. You should avoid public transport and limit non-essential traveling during this time. This includes contact with your delivery driver.</p> <p><strong>Wash your hands</strong></p> <p>As soon as you’ve brought the package inside, wash your hands immediately. If you’ve ordered food, wash your hands before and after eating.</p> <p><strong>Put the packaging in the rubbish ASAP</strong></p> <p>Although there is little evidence that supports the notion that COVID-19 can be transmitted through food and packaging, coming into contact with any surface that carries the virus can put you at risk.</p> <p>For your safety, throw away the packaging your delivery comes in and wash your hands straight after.</p> <p>With food deliveries, use your own plates and cutlery instead of eating right out of the container it came in. It’s also good practice to disinfect your countertops and tables before eating.</p> </div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Satay chicken jacket potato

<p>Caught in a pinch with just the basic ingredients? This satay chicken jacket potato dish can keep your dinner exciting with flavoursome spices and sauces that you should already have in the pantry. Pre-cut, frozen and pre-packaged vegetables can also easily take the place of fresh ingredients and herbs where needed.</p> <p>For those with peanut allergy, replace the peanut butter with the equally tasty tahini.</p> <p><strong><span>Ingredients:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span>2 large sweet potatoes</span></li> <li><span>1 tablespoon coconut oil</span></li> <li><span>400g chicken mince</span></li> <li><span>2 cloves of garlic, crushed</span></li> <li><span>1 teaspoon ginger</span></li> <li><span>2 tablespoon tamari</span></li> <li><span>4 tablespoon Mayver’s <a href="https://mayvers.com.au/product/mayvers-dark-roasted-smooth-peanut-butter/">Dark Roasted Peanut Butter</a>or <a href="https://mayvers.com.au/product/mayvers-hulled-tahini/">Tahini</a></span></li> </ul> <p><strong><span>To serve:</span></strong></p> <ul> <li><span>2 spring onions, thinly sliced</span></li> <li><span>1 chilli, thinly sliced (optional) </span></li> <li><span>Micro herbs to garnish</span></li> </ul> <p><strong><span>Method:</span></strong></p> <ol> <li>Preheat oven to 200°C and line a baking tray. Cook the potatoes whole, for 60 minutes or until tender and soft when cut with a knife.</li> <li>When there is 20 minutes to go, start making the chicken satay.</li> <li>Heat the coconut oil in a fry pan and brown the chicken mince. Add the garlic, ginger, tamari and peanut butter or tahini and mix to combine. Allow to simmer on low heat for 10 minutes. If your mince is getting a little bit dry, add a splash of chicken stock to help keep the moisture in.</li> <li>Cut the sweet potato in half and add half the satay to each potato. Garnish each with half the spring onion, half the chilli and half the micro herbs.</li> </ol> <p> </p> <p><em><span>Recipe by Monica of <a href="https://www.instagram.com/monicayateshealth/">@monicayateshealth</a>.</span></em></p>

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Supermarket’s genius plan to stop panic buying

<p>The internet may be laughing at people hoarding items such as toilet paper in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic, but a Danish supermarket has found a genius way to combat people from stocking up on items unnecessarily – in particular, hand sanitiser.</p> <p>Using a simple yet brilliant pricing trick, the supermarket has put an end to bulk buying.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">A supermarket in Denmark got tired of people hoarding hand sanitizer, so came up with their own way of stopping it.<br /><br />1 bottle kr40 (€5.50)<br />2 bottles kr1000 (€134.00) each bottle.<br /><br />Hoarding stopped!<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/COVID19?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#COVID19</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/coronavirus?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#coronavirus</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Hoarding?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Hoarding</a> <a href="https://t.co/qaJb7UZwLr">pic.twitter.com/qaJb7UZwLr</a></p> — 𝙎𝙘𝙝𝙪𝙚𝙧𝙢𝙖𝙣𝙣 🕯️ 🇪🇺🇩🇰🇩🇪🇸🇬 (@_schuermann) <a href="https://twitter.com/_schuermann/status/1239294777452974080?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 15, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Rotunden supermarket in Denmark consider themselves to be the country’s most prestigious supermarket, aiming to create an exclusive experience for each shopper that walks through their doors.</p> <p>Keeping their customer’s busy lifestyles in mind, they also make sure to not just sell as much as possible, but to get their products out to as many people as possible.</p> <p>The store is selling one bottle of sanitiser for 40 DKK ($4.09) while two bottles cost 1,000 DKK ($95).</p> <p>Similar to other supermarkets around the world, they recently experienced people attempting to hoard certain items and took it upon themselves to do something about it. Which is why they came up with the unconventional pricing idea.</p> <p>The business took to Facebook to explain their motivation behind the pricing.</p> <p>“Dear customers, we have a great responsibility to keep the business running, and we can only do that with everyone’s help and understanding. I can help in the following way: We ask all customers to respect the distance between each other and our co-workers; Sprinkle (likely sanitise or wash) hands off at the entrance and use gloves; If you are a family, please allow only one person to purchase the purchases if possible; There may be times when we limit how many customers we accept in the store at one time. We will keep you informed about any operating changes on Facebook. Take care and thank you for your understanding,” they state in the letter.</p> <p>The decision quickly went viral, with people all over the globe praising the supermarket for their decision.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none"> <p dir="ltr">Brilliant. Simple yet innovative. We need more innovative ideas to prevent the current empty shelves. Are our complacent supermarkets taking note? <a href="https://twitter.com/sainsburys?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@sainsburys</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/asda?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@asda</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/Tesco?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Tesco</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/waitrose?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@waitrose</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/AldiUK?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@AldiUK</a></p> — savvytraveller #FBPE #RejoinEU (@wineexpert1968) <a href="https://twitter.com/wineexpert1968/status/1240055854772215808?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 17, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none"> <p dir="ltr">Magnificent idea! We should do this in UK (although the shelves are bare anyway 🤪) but we could apply it for toilet roll, cans of soup, pasta...the essentials lol 🧻💷🧻🧻💎<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/panicbuyuk?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#panicbuyuk</a></p> — kathryn f (@verdiKat) <a href="https://twitter.com/verdiKat/status/1239494910820126722?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 16, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-conversation="none"> <p dir="ltr">Brilliant idea. Instead of making multiples cheaper, or supermarkets should do this. That would stop the panic buying.</p> — Gary Cook (@orak100) <a href="https://twitter.com/orak100/status/1239638122092265472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 16, 2020</a></blockquote>

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Restaurant shock as diner leaves $16,000 tip to help pay staff

<p>A customer at a restaurant in Texas has made the restaurant owner’s day by leaving a very generous tip.</p> <p>It was left by a regular customer who had been dining at Houston’s Irma’s Southwest restaurant for the last 15 years and left a $9,400 tip on an order of shrimp tacos earlier this week.</p> <p>The tip equates to $16,700 AUD and was left with an instruction to the restaurant owner to “pay your guys over the next few weeks”.</p> <p>"Basically we are going to split that among the staff members, not management. So, about 30 people will split the $9,400 evenly," restaurant owner Louis Galvan<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.foxnews.com/food-drink/texas-restaurant-receives-9400-tip-coronavirus-outbreak" target="_blank">told</a><span> </span>Fox News.</p> <p>Galvan says the tip "reinvigorated" the restaurant. </p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835221/tips.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d8cb6aac8aaf45ec8cb34a21a8903e5a" /></p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>"Honestly, we were going to close, but now we're going to try and make the best out of this deal," he said. "We're going to make this thing work."</p> <p>"I think he came here just to [give that tip]. He came down here specifically to do that and wish us the best of luck. Everyone was amazed."</p> <p>The customer’s act of kindness inspired others to visit the restaurant.</p> <p>"Another regular customer came in and left a $100 tip on a $90 ticket after he saw the report," Galvan said. "He came in just to purchase lunch and leave another gratuity."</p> </div> </div> </div>

Food & Wine

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Quinoa pilaf stuffed white onions

<p>Who knew simple ingredients could make for a show-stealing side dish? Serve this gluten-free, vegetarian delicacy with your protein of choice for a delightful dinner.</p> <p><strong>Ingredients:</strong></p> <ul> <li>4 medium white onions, peeled and cut in half</li> <li>1 tablespoon extra virgin olive oil</li> <li>1/2 (80g) red capsicum, seeds removed, diced</li> <li>2 tablespoons finely chopped coriander</li> <li>2 tablespoons finely chopped parsley</li> <li>3/4 cup quinoa</li> <li>2 cups (500ml) vegetables stock</li> <li>1/4 teaspoon cinnamon</li> <li>100g feta</li> <li>2 tablespoon pinenuts, toasted</li> <li>2 tablespoons pomegranate seeds</li> <li>Extra herbs for garnish</li> </ul> <p><strong>Method:</strong></p> <ol> <li>Take each white onion half and trim a small portion from the base so you can push the inner layers through and out of the onion, leaving about 3 layers to create the onion cup to hold the pilaf. Do this with each white onion and set aside about 120g of white onion to dice for the pilaf.</li> <li>Set the rest of the inner white onion pieces aside to use in another recipe or pop in the freezer and store for when you need next.</li> <li>Add finely chopped white onion, extra virgin olive oil, capsicum and herbs so a small saucepan, place on medium heat and cook for 5 minutes, stirring frequently.</li> <li>Add quinoa, 1 cup (250ml) vegetable stock and cinnamon to pan, stir, cover to bring to boil then reduce heat to simmer and cook for 10-12 minutes, the pilaf at this stage will still be relatively loose in nature but the quinoa should be cooked.</li> <li>Heat oven to 180C, and pour the remaining 1 cup (250ml) vegetable stock into a shallow baking dish. Arrange white onion cups around the dish so they are snug, then fill each half way with the pilaf. Sprinkle about half the feta in each cup and repeat finishing with the feta on top.</li> <li>Cover with foil then place in oven to cook for 20 minutes, the stock from the base of the dish will steam the onion cups in this time.</li> <li>Remove the foil, change oven to grill and pop back under to make a little more golden on top for 5-6 minutes.</li> <li>Sprinkle pinenuts, pomegranate and extra herbs over the top and serve as part of a shared meal.</li> </ol> <p><em>Recipe by Jacqueline Alwill.</em></p>

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Coles receives 36,000 job applications in one day during coronavirus crisis

<p>After announcing a huge recruitment push, Coles received 36,000 job applications in one day, in what one politician described as a sign of the huge economic challenge the country faces during the coronavirus outbreak.</p> <p>Supermarkets have been under the pump these past few weeks as Australians attempt to stock up due to the COVID-19 pandemic, which is putting unnecessary demand on stores to restock.</p> <p>Footage of people fighting over toilet paper have emerged as well as heart-warming moments of shoppers sharing their groceries with the elderly and the disadvantaged, as shelves around the country are being stripped bare.</p> <p>As stores implement stricter rules, Coles announced it is recruiting 5,000 casual workers “to help us continue to offer the best possible service to customers during this busy time”.</p> <p>“This will allow us to serve more customers and replenish shelves faster, while offering employment opportunities for Australians working in other industries impacted by COVID-19,” Coles said on Monday.</p> <p>The next day, thousands of people registered their interest.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>10 daily</em>, a spokesperson from Coles revealed that they received 36,000 job applications on Tuesday alone. That’s about 45 times its average daily intake of 800 applications.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Just 1 indicator of the economic challenge we face <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/auspol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#auspol</a> 👇 <a href="https://t.co/8WBuSjm2Z4">https://t.co/8WBuSjm2Z4</a></p> — Jason Clare MP (@JasonClareMP) <a href="https://twitter.com/JasonClareMP/status/1240135686767939585?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 18, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Labor MP Jason Clare appeared on Sky News on Wednesday and said the huge uptake points to the size and scale of the country’s economic challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p>Clare said that many of those applications are most likely from those who work in the tourism or hospitality industry, which have been the hardest hit.</p> <p>“They’re the sort of people that would ordinarily work at the bars and coffee shops that I walked past to get to this interview that are shut,” said Clare.</p> <p>“People are looking for a safe haven … for a place where they know there is going to be a job tomorrow.”</p> <p>Coles said casuals will have their inductions fast-tracked to boost numbers of staff on shop floors across the country.</p>

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ALDI's savage solution to “sneaky” toilet paper trick

<p><span>ALDI has announced their drastic new measures to crack down on shoppers who are using “sneaky” tricks to get around grocery bulk-buying restrictions during the coronavirus outbreaks.</span><br /><br /><span>CEO Tom Daunt says customers who attempt to get around the product policies will be handed to police.</span><br /><br /><span>“Together with our store employees we’ve developed new conditions of entry to our stores,” Mr Duant said.</span><br /><br /><span>Rules for entry into ALDI Australia’s stores now include “respecting employees and their physical space” and “practising good hygiene”.</span><br /><br /><span>“Do not attempt to ‘game’ our product restriction policies,” Mr Duant went on to say.</span><br /><br /><span>“We remind you that we will not accept any violent behaviour (verbal or physical) in or around our stores and the police will be called immediately if required.”</span><br /><br /><span>The German grocery chain’s major move follows after it was realised parents were getting young children to line up and buy toilet paper packets on their own to get past the “one pack per customer” rule.</span><br /><br /><span>People on social media shot back at the sneaky trick by labelling the act “un-Australian” and “sneaky”.</span><br /><br /><span>“When the chips are down people think of themselves,” one frustrated person said on Facebook as fears gear up over COVID-19.</span><br /><br /><span>“These people are greedy and selfish,” another wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>One angry shopper could be heard shouting “that’s un-Australian – there will be nothing left for anyone else” in a store as parents were allegedly handing their children cash to carry out the task.</span><br /><br /><span>The bizarre tactic comes as Coles, Woolworths and Aldi battle to deal with the “unprecedented” demand for essential supplies over the weekend.</span><br /><br /><span>The supermarket giants introduced new grocery limits not long after, with ALDI Australia’s CEO Tom Daunt announcing on Wednesday morning that the supermarket was introducing limits on dry pasta, flour, dry rice (excludes microwave rice), paper towels and hand sanitiser – two packs per customer.</span><br /><br /><span>ALDI had previously held off introducing grocery limits, only restricting shoppers to just one pack of toilet rolls.</span></p>

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ALDI finally announces its shopping restrictions

<p>ALDI is hitting back at panic buyer by restricting purchases on a number of items, including sought after products such as toilet paper, pasta and rice.</p> <p>From March 17, ALDI Australia’s CEO Tom Daunt says the restriction will begin in order to discourage hoarders from wiping out shelves.</p> <p>Mr Daunt has also called for shoppers to remain calm as demand for products skyrocket.</p> <p>"All Australians deserve access to groceries and we are working extremely hard to deliver on this promise," Daunt said in a press release.</p> <p>"We know many of you are worried about the spread of coronavirus and your ability to access fresh food, hygiene products and essential items. We want to let you know that there is more than enough food to go around; we just need your patience and support."</p> <p><strong>Here is what ALDI will be restricting.</strong></p> <ul> <li>Toilet paper – 1 unit</li> <li>Dry Pasta – 2 units</li> <li>Flour – 2 units</li> <li>Dry Rice (excludes microwave rice) – 2 units</li> <li>Paper Towels – 2 units</li> <li>Tissues – 2 units</li> <li>Hand Sanitiser – 2 units</li> </ul> <p>Coles has also told shoppers their will be a one packet restriction for toilet paper and a two packet restriction for these items:</p> <ul> <li>Pasta</li> <li>Flour</li> <li>Dry rice</li> <li>Paper towels</li> <li>Paper tissues</li> <li>Hand sanitisers</li> <li>Mince meat - includes Beef, Pork, Lamb, Chicken &amp; Turkey</li> </ul>

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Special shopping periods announced for elderly and disabled

<p>Australian supermarket, Woolworths made an announcement on Monday morning to say they will be allowing a one hour shopping grace period for senior Australians in an attempt to ease chaos that has ensued among stores across the country. </p> <p>The new move has introduced a shopping hour for help elderly people and those with a disability to move freely across the store without feeling the pressure to rush. </p> <p>Woolworths has said it will begin from Tuesday until Friday for now and occur between 7 am and 8am.</p> <p>It follows after chaos in supermarkets across the country as many vulnerable people have been left unable to fight for purchases to essential items including toilet paper, tissues, pasta and rice.</p> <p>“While we’ll continue to do our very best to restock our stores during this period of unprecedented demand, we know many of our elderly customers have been missing out on essential items when they shop,” Woolworths Supermarkets Managing Director Claire Peters said in a statement.</p> <p>“This temporary measure will give them, and those with a disability, the opportunity to shop before our stores officially open - helping them obtain the essential items they need most in a less crowded environment.</p> <p>“We continue to encourage all Australians to be mindful of those in our communities who might need extra help at this time. Now - more than ever - we need to be kind to each other, especially to those most vulnerable.</p> <p>“We’d like to thank our customers for their patience and apologise for any inconvenience caused by the revised opening hours.”</p> <p>Wilkinson said those at greatest risk of suffering from the deadly virus are the elderly, the weak, the unwell and the vulnerable.</p> <p>In a shocking move, Woolworths has also gone as far to halt its click and collect services for customers and have also stopped a popular delivery service.</p> <p>Coles has also introduced a new limit on customers stockpiling mince – it has now been restricted to two packs per person from today.</p> <p>This rule includes all cuts – beef, pork, lamb, chicken and turkey.</p> <p>The supermarket giants have urged customers to “shop as they normally would” and not panic buy to help stop the stripping bare of shelves across the country.</p> <p>As the COVID-19 pandemic continues to spread around the world customers are swarming to supermarkets and filling their trolleys to the brim with their essentials.  </p> <p>The Victorian chief health officer Brett Sutton in the<span> </span>Sunday Herald Sunurged shoppers to have a “two-week supply of food and a 60-day supply of prescription medication”.</p>

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Shoppers throw punches in packed Woolworths in front of shocked onlookers

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>A fight between shoppers broke out at a packed Woolworths in south-west Sydney as panic buying due to coronavirus sees empty shelves and high tensions.</p> <p>Footage of the incident was posted to social media, and a young man can be seen being led from the checkouts to the exit by Woolworths staff.</p> <div id="fb-root"></div> <div class="fb-video" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=631885920878127&amp;external_log_id=ace4c9727848c5ddb6e71ce40e9906d9&amp;q=woolworths%20fight"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"><a href="https://www.facebook.com/9News/videos/631885920878127/">WOOLWORTHS CUSTOMER CLASH</a> <p>#WATCH: Police were called in this afternoon after a clash between customers at Woolworths Bass Hill Plaza got out of hand. Woolworths has just released a statement saying they “will not tolerate violence of any kind from customers”. #9News</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/9News/">9 News</a> on Saturday, March 14, 2020</blockquote> </div> <p>Two men get into a fist fight as shocked onlookers watch on.</p> <p>Woolworths said it was aware of the incident and that it doesn’t tolerate any violence.</p> <p>"We're grateful for the efforts of our team members to calm the situation down and pleased none of them were harmed," a Woolworths spokesperson said in a statement.</p> <p>"Our team members are doing the very best they can to serve the needs of the community, so we ask customers to be respectful to them, and each other."</p> <p>According to<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/coronavirus-panic-woolworths-fight-bass-hill-shoppers/ff0f62c1-c7c3-4139-adfa-72c8ae8f0340" target="_blank"><em>9News</em></a>, NSW Police arrested a 39-year-old man yesterday evening and he has been charged with common assault after the brawl.</p> <p>Police do not believe that the two men were fighting over groceries.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="post-action-bar-component-wrapper"> <div class="post-actions-component"> <div class="upper-row"><span class="like-bar-component"></span> <div class="watched-bookmark-container"></div> </div> </div> </div>

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Mums condemn limits at supermarkets amid coronavirus stockpiling

<p>Frustrated Australian mums have taken to Facebook to criticise the limits enforced on household goods at supermarkets.</p> <p>In recent weeks, limits have been introduced at grocers on various items, including toilet paper, rice and hand sanitiser. Authorities have also urged Australians to refrain from <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/beauty-style/why-are-people-stockpiling-toilet-paper-we-asked-four-experts">stockpiling supplies</a>.</p> <p>But mums have argued that the limit is preventing them from acquiring goods for their big families, with one sharing her <a href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/mums-slam-grocery-item-limits-due-to-coronavirus/news-story/a62567a2207af90a3a375ab41bb26aca">experience</a> shopping for her eight children in the <a href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/402639530073131/?ref=nf_target&amp;fref=nf">Budgeting, Food, Stockpiling, Savings, Ideas, Life Help Australia Facebook group</a>.</p> <p>“I was at Woolworths this morning to get some things I could not get last week and this smartass b**ch in front of me at the checkout kept looking at my stuff and shaking her head,” she wrote.</p> <p>“[She] then asked the lady at the register if those paper towels were for sale, the lady said, ‘yes you can have two packets’, she said, ‘no I only want one’, and looked at me and said, ‘I am not greedy’.</p> <p>“I said, ‘WTF come talk to me when you (are) feeding eight kids and not one … None of the stuff I bought had restrictions on them and no it’s not for my stockpile, it’s just stuff I could not get last week!”</p> <p>The post prompted other mums to share the difficulties they had faced to buy groceries for their families.</p> <p>“I have eight kids with five at home, these limits are killing me. I have to try and shop every two days to try and get what I need,” one wrote. “My trolley was FULL and people were sniggering about me and my panic buying mode — umm this was about a five day worth shop.”</p> <p>“We get filthy looks for buying 12 cartons of rice milk last week and again today! I have a dairy-free child and this is a weeks’ worth for us,” another shared.</p> <p>One woman advised other shoppers to make an online order instead. “Shop online. Just did a $600 shop &amp; not one single judgmental look.”</p>

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Bunnings selling years’ worth of toilet paper for $42

<p>Bunnings Australia is selling jumbo toilet paper rolls that could last an entire year as “panic buying” continues due to the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>The hardware store is now offering shoppers industrial sized toilet papers, which is usually used in public bathrooms and shopping centres.</p> <p>For $42, shoppers can purchase eight rolls of Scott Essential Jumbo Tissue Rolls – measuring 2,400 metres, while the six-pack of Kleenex rolls, which total 1,800 metres will cost $75.</p> <p>The website states the jumbo-sized toilet papers “deliver quality with superior softness, strength, absorbency and comfort.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 311.216429699842px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835078/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a2a38cc4393d48f6b00bb308cb2eb53f" /></p> <p>“If anyone gets truly desperate Bunnings sells the industrial rolls, the ones you usually find in public toilets in the large dispensers,” wrote one shopper.</p> <p>“It’s not going to run out on you anytime soon.”</p> <p>According to some shoppers, the toilet rolls could last an entire year, but that depends on how many people live in one household.</p> <p>The item comes after the Australian Government and health authorities pleaded with people to not panic-buy, but after chaotic scenes at supermarkets around the country, it was evident that people were not taking notice.</p> <p>As of Thursday, the number of confirmed coronavirus cases in Australia was 129.</p>

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ALDI takes a swipe at coronavirus panic buyers

<p>ALDI is just one of many supermarkets to introduce tough new limits as panic buying toilet paper has gripped Australia.</p> <p>Just like Woolworths and Coles, ALDI has dropped its toilet paper limits to one pack per customer instead of the previous limit of four.</p> <p>A new sign was spotted by a customer, saying “We apologise if this act of courtesy is a disruption to your shop”.</p> <p>“The sign is across all stores and reflects the current sentiment of the brand,” an Aldi spokesperson told<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/health/health-problems/coronavirus-australia-aldi-sign-takes-swipe-at-toilet-paper-crisis/news-story/4da15f872ede00a245b2e95f3889a9e0" target="_blank">news.com.au</a></em>.</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Customers were fans of the sign.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835041/aldi-sign.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/24e2b2faa23845249b9b0e49cd8eef53" /></p> <p>“Love the little dig at the end to the uncourteous shoppers,” one person wrote on Facebook.</p> <p>“Exactly what EVERY supermarket chain should be doing,” another said.</p> <p>ALDI has also put a post on its Facebook page explaining the changes.</p> <p>“To help improve access to toilet paper for our customers, we have limited the purchase of all toilet paper lines to one pack per customer,” it reads.</p> <p>“We ask our customers to remember to show kindness, empathy and calmness when shopping with us.”</p> <div id="fb-root"></div> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/ALDI.Australia/photos/a.637019469688891/3179491655441647/?type=3&amp;theater" data-width="auto"> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>To help improve access to toilet paper for our customers, we have limited the purchase of all toilet paper lines to one...</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ALDI.Australia/">ALDI Australia</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/ALDI.Australia/posts/3179491655441647:0">Sunday, March 8, 2020</a></blockquote> </div> <p>Customers are on board with the new limits, saying that it’s a welcome change.</p> <p>“Thank you for helping reduce the insanity and greed and helping those with limited funds and access,” one person wrote.</p> <p>“Thank goodness. All stores need to do this … stop the madness!!” someone else added.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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5 surprising benefits of a plant-based diet

<p>Many of the important benefits of a plant-based diet – particularly for <a href="https://theconversation.com/five-ways-the-meat-on-your-plate-is-killing-the-planet-76128">climate health and animals</a> – are well known. Yet despite the science being very clear, there remains confusion about the impact on human health.</p> <p>We have long known for example, that a diet centred around whole plant-foods – fruits, vegetables, whole-grains, beans, nuts and seeds – significantly reduces the risk of <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0735109717375216?via%3Dihub">heart disease</a>, <a href="https://journals.plos.org/plosmedicine/article?id=10.1371/journal.pmed.1002039">type 2 diabetes</a>, <a href="https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article/110/3/574/5498644">obesity</a> and <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/ijc.31593">certain cancers</a>. In fact, a low fat plant-based diet is the only diet to have been shown to actually <a href="https://dresselstyn.com/JFP_06307_Article1.pdf">reverse</a> established coronary artery disease. It has also been seen to reverse <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2677007/">type 2 diabetes</a>, enable effective and <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/nutd20173">sustained weight loss</a> without portion control or exercise, and arrest the progression of early stage <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18602144">prostate cancer</a>.</p> <p>Here are five additional benefits of a plant-based diet that may surprise you.</p> <p><strong>1. Improves mental health and wellbeing</strong></p> <p>Diet choices can have a major impact on mood and mental health, and there is a very good reason for this. Diet affects the health of our gut bacteria, which produce many of the hormones active in the brain. Gut bacteria thrive on fibre, which is only found in whole plant foods. So it is no surprise to find that a plant-based diet can benefit mental health.</p> <p>In <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24524383">one US study</a> conducted at a large insurance company, participants who were overweight or had a history of type 2 diabetes were either prescribed a low-fat vegan diet or asked to continue their usual diet for 18 weeks. The results showed a significant improvement in mental health, wellbeing and work productivity in those on the vegan diet, as well as lower levels of depression and anxiety.</p> <p><strong>2. Reduces arthritic pain</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/osteoarthritis/">Osteoarthritis</a>, the painful breakdown of cartilage in the joints, appears to be an inevitable consequence of ageing. It is not reversible but it is manageable, usually with pain medication and sometimes surgery.</p> <p>So what role could a plant-based diet play here? One <a href="https://www.hindawi.com/journals/arthritis/2015/708152/">small study</a> looking at the diet’s impact showed a significant improvement in self-reported pain and functioning in people with osteoarthritis. One reason for this could be the <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/public-health-nutrition/article/association-of-vegetarian-diet-with-inflammatory-biomarkers-a-systematic-review-and-metaanalysis-of-observational-studies/ED9F562A1AEC0E65B90A092A0427C093/core-reader">anti-inflammatory properties</a> of the micro-nutrients present in plant foods, as inflammation is the main cause of pain in arthritis. Meat-based diets have the opposite effect and, in general, increase the level of inflammation in the body.</p> <p><strong>3. Improves period pain in women</strong></p> <p>So if a plant-based diet can improve arthritis pain, could it also perhaps improve other types of pain? Some <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10674588">research</a> suggests it could help with period pain in women.</p> <p>For this study, women swapped to a low-fat vegan diet for two menstrual cycles, and then back to their usual omnivorous diet for their next two. Pain duration and intensity and pre-mentrual symptoms were recorded and levels of a hormone affecting oestrogen levels were measured.</p> <p>On the low-fat vegan diet, women reported less pain duration and intensity, shorter duration of premenstrual symptoms and tests showed a lower level of oestrogen. People are often surprised to hear that diet can impact hormone levels in the body. This study shows exactly that, and how lower oestrogen levels can benefit women’s health in a number of ways.</p> <p><strong>4. Reduces the risk of urinary tract infections</strong></p> <p>Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the <a href="https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/189953.php#causes">most common</a> causes of infection in the general population with the bacteria <em>Escherichia coli</em> (<em>E coli</em>) often being the culprit. Infection can occur because <em>E coli</em> from the intestine finds its way into the urinary tract. But UTIs can also be caused by <em>E coli</em> strains commonly found in farm animals such as chickens and pigs, so eating contaminated sources of meat can lead to infection.</p> <p>Given the link between <em>E coli</em> and UTIs, It might seem obvious that those on a plant-based diet who avoid meat might have a lower risk of infection, but whether this was the case was not known for sure until recent research came out.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-58006-6">The analysis</a> of several studies shows that vegetarians have a 16% lower risk of UTIs compared to non-vegetarians. This confirms previous data suggesting that meat-bourne bacteria are a major contributor to the risk of UTIs. Increasingly these food borne bacteria are displaying antibiotic resistance.</p> <p><strong>5. Saves on hospital costs</strong></p> <p>So if those following a health plant-based diet have a lower risk of ill health then surely this will save on health costs.</p> <p>In a <a href="https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03204552">large Taiwanese study</a>, vegetarians were found to have a lower rate of outpatient visits, which translated into a 13% lower outpatient expenditure and a 15% lower total medical expenditure. So it is interesting to hypothesise the health economic impact of a plant-based diet on the UK’s cash-strapped National Health Service.</p> <p>In 2017, <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/healthcaresystem/bulletins/ukhealthaccounts/2017">spending on healthcare</a> in the UK totalled £197 billion – approximately £2,989 per person. If everyone in the country shifted to a vegetarian diet, this could (using the 15% reduction as a guide) reduce healthcare expenditure by £30 billion.</p> <p>Plant-based diets then, not only have the potential to dramatically improve human and planetary health, but could have significant benefits for the health of the economy too.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/130902/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/shireen-kassam-873292">Shireen Kassam</a>, Visiting Professor, Health and Wellbeing Research Group, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-winchester-743">University of Winchester</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/five-surprising-benefits-of-a-plant-based-diet-130902">original article</a>.</em></p>

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“Check your receipts”: Shopper issues Woolworths plastic bag warning

<p>A Woolworths customer who noticed an unusual charge on her shopping receipt has warned others to check if they too have been stung by an extra cost.</p> <p>The woman said a staff member intentionally scanned a reusable bag that she brought from home at least three different times as she was checking out.</p> <p>Taking to the company’s Facebook page to issue a complaint, she expressed her confusion as to how a wrinkled-up bag inside her handbag was mistaken for a brand new one.</p> <p>“For the third time (that I am aware of) you have charged me 15 cents for my own bag,” the shopper wrote.</p> <p>She said it was not about the money but made her question how many others had been charged.</p> <p>The woman said that although she always keeps a reusable bag in her handbag, so she didn’t get “caught out”, the decision seems to have backfired due to careless staff members.</p> <p>“Those bags are so neatly and tightly folded that it should be quite obvious to anyone that they have not just been picked up in store that day,” she wrote.</p> <p>“The scrunched-up handles and few little tears are also a dead giveaway. Not to mention the fact that when I hand it over, I say, ‘Here’s my bag’.”</p> <p>The woman advised others to “check your receipts” as she was certain that she wasn’t the only one hit with the charge.</p> <p>“I’m not the only one this would be happening to. Shame on you Woolworths,” she said.</p> <p>A spokesperson for Woolworths responded to the shopper saying it was an error on the staff member’s part, but that they “wouldn’t intentionally re-scan” the reusable bags.</p> <p>“We’d be more than happy to fix it up next time you’re in store. We like seeing our customers bring their own bags and wouldn’t intentionally re-scan them,” said the representative.</p> <p>“If you can please let us know the store visited, that would be appreciated, and we’ll ensure the feedback is forwarded to the store management team. We look forward to hearing from you and appreciate your understanding.”</p>

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The $25 Kmart item sending shoppers into a frenzy

<p>Aussie parents are praising Kmart for the release of a toy they say is helping break down tired and outdated gender stereotypes.</p> <p>The discount department store recently released a $25 cordless toy vacuum cleaner that shows a young boy on the front of the box.</p> <p>Those who have spotted the item in-store have taken to Facebook to share photos and commended the retailer for their latest move.</p> <p>“I love that there is finally a boy on the packaging of a product like this! Well played, Kmart,” wrote on person.</p> <p>Another thrilled commenter said: “A boy on the package! Yes! Yes! Yes!”</p> <p>A third added: “If that actually works, I’ll buy two for my sons and one for my husband.”</p> <p>Other people said their sons will be excited to get their hands on the latest toy as they’re already showing a knack for household chores.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 332.89646133682834px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7834803/1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1d31a91cecfc4904a40d618893c07c47" /></p> <p>“Elijah would love this! And so would I because he actually wants to clean,” said one person.</p> <p>Another said: “Hudson would love this. Win-win”.</p> <p>Other people were keen to know how well the toy vacuum stacked up in terms of realistic “suction”.</p> <p>According to the information on Kmart’s website, the battery-powered item features “real suction to pick up dirt”.</p> <p>“Includes multiple attachments, an easy open dirt compartment and realistic sounds and swirling action.”</p> <p>Many people said the loved the concept behind the toy as it teaches children about cleaning.</p> <p>“Start ‘em young,” said one person, adding: “This is so cool, now all they need is a mini mower.”</p> <p>Another said: “Chuck in the mini washing machine and dryer and we’re sorted.”</p>

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Why the FODMAP diet is not for weight loss

<p>The <a href="https://www.monashfodmap.com/">FODMAP diet</a> is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24076059">used to help manage</a> irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but it’s becoming more popular. Now bloggers and so-called health gurus have jumped on board, claiming it can treat everything from acne to weight loss.</p> <p>While it would be great if the diet did help to manage these hard-to-treat conditions, these claims are closer to science fiction than science.</p> <p><strong>What are FODMAPs?</strong></p> <p>FODMAPs are a group of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24830318">carbohydrates</a> found naturally in a wide range of foods, including garlic, onion, dairy, many fruits and vegetables, breads, cereals, pulses, nuts and many manufactured foods.</p> <p>FODMAP is an acronym that stands for Fermentable Oligo- Di- Monosacharides And Polyols. Our team at Monash University coined the term in 2005 when we <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15948806">showed</a> this group of carbohydrates trigger symptoms of IBS in susceptible people, and reducing all of them together would have a greater impact on IBS symptom relief than reducing any one of them alone.</p> <p><strong>How do FODMAPs lead to IBS?</strong></p> <p>FODMAPs attract water as they <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28592442">pass slowly</a> through the small intestine. They then pass undigested into the large intestine where bacteria ferment them. In people with IBS, this leads to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27144627">excessive gas production and changes in bowel habit</a>, along with many other typical IBS symptoms including pain, bloating and distension.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3921083/">One in seven Australian adults</a> are thought to have IBS. Our <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24076059">research</a>, which has been replicated by groups all over the world, has shown the diet reduces IBS symptoms in three out of four sufferers.</p> <p><strong>FODMAP is not a weight loss diet</strong></p> <p>While a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28244658">limited number</a> of <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/31947991">studies</a> indicate weight loss is an <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22739368">unintended consequence</a> of a low FODMAP diet, the diet is ill fit for this purpose. For people needing to lose weight, the food restrictions the FODMAP diet imposes are unnecessary.</p> <p>Unless carefully implemented, the diet can compromise intake of nutrients such as fibre, iron and calcium. This can lead to a <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28244658">shortage</a> of these nutrients if the diet is followed strictly long-term.</p> <p>One example of this is the diet restricts intake of prebiotics, the fuel source for good bacteria in our bowel. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25016597">Numerous studies</a> have <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22739368">shown</a> an unintended consequence of the FODMAP diet is it changes the composition of the gut microbiota. While the long-term consequences of these changes are unknown, it is not advisable to restrict FODMAPs unnecessarily.</p> <p>There is no scientific evidence to suggest the FODMAP diet reduces acne.</p> <p><strong>How should the FODMAP diet be used?</strong></p> <p>A FODMAP diet is a three step diet best followed under the guidance of an experienced dietitian.</p> <p>People follow the diet strictly at the start, and relax and personalise the dietary restrictions over time. The aim is to strike a balance between adequate symptom control and a minimally restrictive diet.</p> <p>In step 1, people reduce intake of all FODMAP groups below a threshold level. The aim of this step is to reduce IBS symptoms. If IBS symptoms improve sufficiently, people progress to step 2.</p> <p>In step 2, people undertake a series of “food challenges” to determine which FODMAPs they can tolerate.</p> <p>In step 3, well tolerated FODMAPs are brought back into the diet, while poorly tolerated FODMAPs are restricted, but only to a level necessary to control IBS symptoms.</p> <p><strong>Growth in popularity</strong></p> <p>The success of the FODMAP diet is due to its widespread uptake among patients with IBS. Backed by <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6202292/">scientific evidence</a>, the diet is <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25716701">recommended</a> in various local and international clinical guidelines as a first-line IBS treatment.</p> <p>As consumer demand for low FODMAP food choices grows, some companies have started to adopt Monash University’s low FODMAP certification. Brands like Vegemite, Kellogg’s USA, and Bakers Delight now offer low FODMAP-certified products.</p> <p>But with bloggers and “health gurus” promoting fad diets under the FODMAP name, our research team is spending more time combating disinformation. This takes time away from our research and the support we can offer IBS sufferers.</p> <p>To learn more about the FODMAP diet, visit <a href="https://www.monashfodmap.com/">monashfodmap.com</a>.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/131550/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jane-varney-963066">Jane Varney</a>, Senior Research Dietitian in the Department of Gastroenterology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-fodmap-diet-is-everywhere-but-researchers-warn-its-not-for-weight-loss-131550">original article</a>.</em></p>

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