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The secret to the Holy Grail of hot chips

<div class="copy"> <p><span>Perfectly golden, crunchy on the outside but fluffy pearly white in the centre, the perfect hot chip is a thing of undeniable beauty.</span></p> <p>The Belgians and Dutch know a thing or two about chips, but we do pretty well too – except for pubs that put the schnitty on top of chips.</p> <p>When that plate hits the table you know you’re in for a disappointing time.</p> <p>A soggy, mushy mess, it’s a waste of everyone’s time and money and quite frankly heads should roll.</p> <p>“Texture plays a very important role in why we accept or reject food,” says <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.deakin.edu.au/about-deakin/people/gie-liem" target="_blank">Gie Liem</a> from <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.deakin.edu.au/exercise-nutrition-sciences/research/centre-for-advanced-sensory-science-cass" target="_blank">Deakin University’s Centre of Advanced Sensory Science</a>.</p> <p>Gie is a legend who decided to investigate the perfect hot chip. Someone had to.</p> <p>“This can be cultural, for example, <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.japan-talk.com/jt/new/neba-neba" target="_blank">some cultures like slimy food</a>, while in other cultures that might be a sign that the food is off."</p> <p>"But we find that crunchy on the outside and soft on the inside is one of the texture combinations that is universally liked, and this is a key characteristic of good hot chips.”</p> <h3>Crunchy is the Goldilocks of food textures</h3> <p>This preference of crunchy on the outside, soft on the inside went back to <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4163920/" target="_blank">evolutionary factors</a>, ensuring humans were able to identify the right food to eat.</p> <p>“A lot of fruit and vegetables are crunchy on the outside when ready for consumption. When they’re too hard to bite into it means they’re not quite ready to eat and when they’re too soft then that means they’re overripe."</p> <p>"So in that way ‘crunchy’ can be like the Goldilocks of food textures, it tells us something is just right.”</p> <p>However, Gie says all our senses play a part in how we perceive the texture of food.</p> <p>“<a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.livescience.com/60752-human-senses.html" target="_blank">Sight</a> and <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.livescience.com/60752-human-senses.html" target="_blank">taste</a> all play a big part, and so does hearing the crunch. We consume food every day without thinking much about it, but there is a whole lot of science behind what we choose and why,” he says.</p> <h3>The recipe for hot chip success</h3> <p>So, what is a scientist’s perfect chip recipe? You gotta go for fresh fries to get the perfect crunch says Gie.</p> <p>He advocates celebrity chef <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.sbs.com.au/food/recipes/heston-blumenthals-triple-cooked-chips" target="_blank">Heston Blumenthal’s thrice-cooked method</a>.</p> <p>“People seem to be getting more serious about their chips…use fresh potatoes and take the time to cook them properly.”</p> <p>“That means starting by cooking the cut potatoes in water and then thoroughly drying them out in the fridge. Then fry them first on a low temperature, let them dry out again, then fry them at a high temperature before serving immediately for that super-crunch.”</p> <p>For those who are contending with the crowds at oval tuckshops, Gie recommends keeping an eye out for a fresh batch before swooping in.</p> <p>“It’s best to eat chips as soon as they’re out of the fryer or the moisture on the inside will start to come out and make the chips soggy.”</p> <p>“At sporting events the food outlets will make a lot of chips and they can sit there for a while. So if it looks soggy then it is soggy, use all your senses.”</p> <h3>The fraught question of sauces?</h3> <p>Once you’ve got the crunch right, it’s now all about what you put on top, and that choice might be influenced by where you are.</p> <p>“Sauce seems to be a cultural thing. While tomato sauce is popular here and in the US, vinegar is much more popular in the UK, mayonnaise in France, Belgium and the Netherlands, while it’s curry sauce in Germany, or gravy and curds in Canada."</p> <p>“While some of these seem to align with what we know about taste science – for example vinegar provides something acidic to cut through the fatty fries – they can also be counter-intuitive. Pouring on vinegar is the fastest route to a soggy chip.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p> <p class="p1"><em>This article was published for <a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/asc-edits/the-secret-to-the-holy-grail-of-hot-chips/" target="_blank">cosmosmagazine.com</a>.</em></p> </div>

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“We won’t stand for segregation”: Sydney cafe to support unvaccinated customers

<p dir="ltr">A Sydney café has made the <a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/sydney-cafes-bold-move-to-support-unvaccinated-customers-001318307.html" target="_blank">controversial decision</a> to stay open for takeaway only until unvaccinated customers can also dine inside.</p> <p dir="ltr">Anthony Milotic, the owner of Bare Wholefoods, shared an “open letter to the community” via Instagram, stating that he wants “everyone to feel welcome” in his café and “won’t stand for segregation”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Right now the path out is unknown, but we do know one thing. We won’t stand for segregation. We are one, we are family!” Mr Milotic wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I want everyone to feel welcome at all times and I will never put profit before people.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Milotic said he is “choosing love, accepting differences and a community in unity is what we need right now”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT6h1HfldLU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CT6h1HfldLU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Bare Wholefoods (@bare.wholefoods)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“So we have chosen to continue to operate as takeaway only until everyone is free to dine-in,” he wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We will always value family and hope that you feel the same.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Bare Wholefoods, which has venues on the North Shore and the Northern Beaches, shared the open letter last week to a flood of comments.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though many supported the decision, others argued that treating those who choose not to be vaccinated differently to vaccinated people isn’t segregation.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Segregation is a term that is used to describe separation from normal society a group of people that have inherent characteristics such as race or religion or sex. Being non-vaxxed is a decision, not an inherent characteristic,” one user wrote.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You insult all those people that have experienced true segregation for their whole life by suggesting that non-vaxxers are being segregated.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s a couple of weeks at the most until they are free to do their own thing and it’s to protect their own health. Seems like more of a publicity stunt than anything really meaningful.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The post comes as hospitality and retail venues across Greater Sydney will be able to reopen to fully-vaccinated customers in early October when 70 percent of the state is fully vaccinated.</p> <p dir="ltr">The state is expected to hit the milestone around October 11.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though some venues have said they are “open to all”, Bare Wholefoods have stated its continued closure until unvaccinated patrons can also dine in.</p> <p dir="ltr">Other venues have confirmed they will follow the suggestion from the NSW Government to only open to vaccinated customers.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Berejiklian believes the state will reach 70 and 80 percent vaccination rates in “two to three weeks”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“NSW will be the first state that in all likelihood hits 80 percent double dose, but there will also be a point in time after that where unvaccinated people will be able to participate in activities,” the premier said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“So that is the information we are providing this week to make very clear when those key milestones will occur.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: bare.wholefoods / Instagram</em></p>

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Cafe with Peppa Pig on the menu causes outrage

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A cafe in the centre of the Scottish capital of Edinburgh has come under fire for a divisive sign to lure in customers. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gordon Street Coffee decorated their chalkboard with a drawing of Peppa Pig next to a bacon sandwich to sell the popular breakfast item. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As well as the “distasteful” sketch of the popular children’s character, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">the cafe had also included their own rendition of The Magic Roundabout cartoon cow, Ermintrude, to sell beef sandwiches. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite the cafe’s light-hearted attempt at advertising tactics, outraged members of the public slammed their ideas and methods.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Angry parents expressed their disappointment online over the sign, as they thought the drawings would traumatise children once they realised their beloved characters were intended as food. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Animal rights organisation PETA led the online outrage, taking to Twitter to say, “Luring kids to meaty meals with cartoons of happy animals isn’t new, but it is dishonest.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Kids naturally love animals, and would be horrified to see gentle pigs' throats slit for a sandwich.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many other parents and vegan activists also slammed the cafe, saying the cafe was “sick, upsetting and dishonest”. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One woman wrote on Twitter. “That's going to make a lot of children question food.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I support that but damn this is pretty sick.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another mother agreed, saying, “Even if you are not vegan or vegetarian that could be really upsetting.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“My kids would be absolutely traumatised if they saw that sign, it's really not funny.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The outrage comes after a new survey showed that one in five children have no idea that steak, sausages and ham are meat that comes from animals. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Twitter</span></em></p>

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Aldi customer shocked by "babushka" ice cream

<p>A stunned Aldi customer has revealed the strange thing that happened when she was unwrapping one of the store’s ice cream cones.</p> <p>Sharing her unusual find on Facebook, the woman from Victoria said she had settled down for some “me time” when she opened the Chocolate Crowns ice cream box which she purchased from Aldi.</p> <p>But what she unwrapped in the four-pack box from ice cream company Monarc was far from normal.</p> <p>Surprisingly, the ice cream was seemingly double wrapped with a wrapped cone inside another fully wrapped ice cream.</p> <p>“Dear Aldi, what the…. Is that?” she she wrote alongside a picture of her weirdly wrapped ice cream.</p> <p>“I don’t know if the whole box is like that.”</p> <p>Her bonus cone find delighted and perplexed fellow shoppers who were seriously stunned by the unusually wrapped cone.</p> <p>“I don’t understand what I’m looking at?” one baffled person said.</p> <p>“It’s an ice cream babushka?” another asked.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844307/new-project-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/58f5e70d144142be8eae847ca6ab108c" /></p> <p>Image: Facebook</p> <p>“A cone…. In a cone, what’s inside the wrapper,” questioned a third person.</p> <p>Simply put, one Aldi fan called the mishap “Cone-ception” while others thought the strange “bonus cone” find was extremely lucky.</p> <p>“Buy a lotto ticket….that’s some luck!!” one person said.</p> <p>“Probably the best thing I have ever seen,” added another.</p> <p>This isn’t the first time a shopper has spotted a packaging mishap in a supermarket product.</p> <p><strong>Surprising find in tin of tomatoes</strong></p> <p>This isn’t the first time a shopper has spotted a packaging mishap in the supermarket.</p> <p>Melbourne shopper Shell McKenzie told Yahoo News Australia she was shocked when she opened a tin of tomatoes that contained no tomatoes at all.</p> <p>Instead, the sealed tin was full of water.</p> <p>Shell said she had purchased the Woolworths Essentials brand diced Italian tomatoes as part of her online order.</p> <p>“It was delivered to my workplace,” she explained.</p> <p>“My cook opened it and was shocked it was filled with water….we bought others that were fine.”</p> <p>A Woolworths representative quickly responded to Shell’s odd fine on Facebook.</p> <p>“We’re sorry to see you’ve received a can of diced tomatoes filled with water. We can imagine the surprise this would’ve caused when you opened it,” the spokesperson says.</p> <p>“I spoke with them on the phone and they were shocked and offered a refund and a $10 goodwill credit,” she said.</p> <p>“They have no idea how it happened.”</p>

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10 simple rules to cook everything faster

<p><strong>1. Start with heat</strong></p> <p><span>Before doing anything else, turn on the oven, crank up the grill, preheat a frying pan and set water to boil. Appliances, pots, pans and water take time to get hot. Boiling water is always my first move.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Don't dirty an extra dish</strong></p> <p><span>Use kitchen scissors to chop cooked or tender raw vegetables (especially greens) right in the bowl or pan.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Speed up your washing time </strong></p> <p><span>Put all the produce together in a colander and rinse under cold water. (If you have a large amount, wash in batches, putting what’s done on towels.) During downtime while cooking, wash vegetables used toward the end of a recipe. Rinse foods like carrots and cabbage after they’ve been trimmed or peeled.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Chop all at once</strong></p> <p><span>If a recipe calls for minced garlic, minced ginger and/or minced chillies at the same time, consolidate the job with my go-to technique: Peel the garlic and ginger, trim the chillies, and put them all in a pile. Then chop and mince them together using a rocking motion.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Cut before cooking </strong></p> <p>Big, thick pieces of food take longer to cook through than those cut small or sliced thin. I cut chicken cutlets in half so they cook faster; chop veggies accordingly.</p> <p><strong>6. Make use of your grater </strong></p> <p>Making a pureed vegetable soup? Grate your veggies instead of chopping them. If you cut them into chunks, they’ll take 20 minutes or more to soften. But grated, they’re ready in a flash.</p> <p><strong>7. Let your pots do double dut</strong>y</p> <p><span>When you sauté or simmer something moist – such as vegetables, beans, or sauces – lay a different food on top (especially a protein like fish, chicken, or eggs), cover with a lid, and let the steam naturally cook that upper layer. For instance, for a fast eggs Florentine, steam the eggs on top of the spinach rather than poaching them separately.</span></p> <p><strong>8. Use less liquid when braising </strong></p> <p><span>Submerge your braising ingredients in about two centimetres of liquid, cover the pot and cook, turning occasionally, adding a little liquid as necessary.</span></p> <p><strong>9. One sandwich is faster than four </strong></p> <p><span>Cut a baguette in half the long way, assemble one giant sandwich, then cut that into as many pieces as you like. (I’ve seen people do the opposite!)</span></p> <p><strong>10. Cut around the core </strong></p> <p><span>This method is a fast way to prep apples, pears, tomatoes, cabbage, peaches and capsicums: Slice downwards around the core, removing flesh in three or four pieces; then cut flesh into slices or wedges.</span></p> <p><span><em>This article was first published for <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/18-simple-ways-to-cook-everything-faster">Reader's Digest. </a></em></span></p> <p><span><em>Image: Getty </em></span></p>

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Breakfast myths busted: Is cereal really that bad for you?

<p>When it comes to breakfast, cereal more often than not has a bad reputation.</p> <p>Breakfast in general seems to be the meal most Aussies are most likely to skip. With studies showing almost half of choose to ditch breakfast on weekdays.</p> <p>For most, breakfast cereal might be a little way down the list of choices, especially those who are a little more health conscious. If you’ve heard one of the most common and surprising myths around – that breakfast cereal is too sugary and has little to no nutritional value.</p> <p>A first-ever scientific analysis of different types of breakfast cereals and their impact on the health of Australians found positive benefits for body weight and nutrition, regardless of the type of cereal and sugar content.</p> <p>If this surprises you, here molecular nutritionist Dr Emma Beckett shares with <em>Yahoo Lifestyle</em> other breakfast myths that you didn’t know about:</p> <p><strong>Myth:</strong> Traditional breakfast foods are bad for you</p> <p><strong>Truth: </strong>Some foods high in carbohydrate, such as wholemeal bread and breakfast cereals contain dietary fibre, which helps us to feel fuller, therefore starting the day off right.</p> <p>Breakfast cereal is a simple and convenient way to start the day and it can often provide more nutrients such as Iron, B-vitamins and fibre, than non-cereal breakfast choices. What’s better, cereal pairs well with other nutrient dense breakfast foods such as Greek yogurt, and nuts, which are a source of protein. Protein is essential in the diet as it is the most filling macronutrient that can help reduce grazing habits throughout the day.</p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>Processed = bad</p> <p><strong>Truth: </strong>Most food needs to go through some sort of processing for it to even be edible and digestible – processing is a broad term that includes cooking, cutting and packaging.</p> <p>For many foods it is also necessary to undergo some sort of processing in order to preserve the food and prevent wastage, and to make them tasty and practical. </p> <p>From a nutritional perspective, key nutrients like protein aren’t necessarily lost during processing, they can sometimes be retained or made easier to access through processing. Others like B vitamins and iron may be added back if they’re lost, in a process called enrichment. </p> <p>Staple foods, like breakfast cereals and breads are also often fortified with extra nutrients – these foods are chosen because they are affordable, accessible, shelf stable and popular. It is also important to consider to what degree the food item has been processed, with ultra-processed items to be consumed in moderation.</p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>Cereal is too sugary and has no nutritional value</p> <p><strong>Truth: </strong>Australian data has shown that cereal contributes less than 3 per cent of added sugar in the diet. </p> <p>Many cereals contain whole grains and fibre which many people are not getting enough of. They are full of essential vitamins and minerals that are important for health and wellbeing, and are the number one source of iron in the Aussie diet, especially in children. </p> <p>Cereal contains a range of sugar levels, there are some sweeter ones, but most are moderately sweetened and many sweetened with added fruits which contain natural sugars.</p> <p>For example, half of <em>Kellogg’s</em> 55 cereals contain two or less teaspoons of sugar per bowl. Updating formulations have meant that they have removed over 700 tonnes of sugar and 300 tonnes of salt from Aussie diets – that’s the equivalent to the weight of around seven blue whales!</p> <p>Cereal has been proven to have positive benefits for body weight and nutrition.</p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>If it isn’t wholegrain it doesn’t contain fibre</p> <p><strong>Truth</strong>: Whilst whole grain foods contain fibre, not all fibre-containing foods contain the whole grain. Fibre is found in the outer part of the grain called the bran. The bran can be removed from the grain and used in foods. Foods made with bran may not always contain whole grain but they do contain plenty of fibre.</p> <p>Two out of three Aussies are not meeting their daily fibre targets. In fact, four out of five Aussies don’t eat enough fibre to protect themselves from chronic disease! An adequate intake of fibre is between 25 and 30 grams a day for most of us. That might sound hard, but getting your daily dose is actually easy if you eat high-fibre options including fibre rich breakfast cereals, whole grains, fruits, vegetables and nuts.</p> <p>Did you know that different whole grains have different levels and types of fibres - for example whole grain brown rice and corn both have naturally less fibre compared to other whole grains such as whole grain wheat and oats, which have higher amounts of fibre.</p> <p><strong>Myth: </strong>It’s expensive to have a healthy diet</p> <p><strong>Truth: </strong>It can be a misconception that healthy food is far more expensive than unhealthy and takeaway options. </p> <p>According to recently published Australian research based on modelling, it is possible to improve Aussie diets while spending less money on food, choosing low-cost nutritious foods improves diet quality and can reduce a family’s grocery bill by over 25 per cent.</p> <p>There are actually lots of healthy options that are cheap to buy and aren’t going to spoil quickly. Wholemeal bread and breakfast cereals are good for the budget and last for a while. When it comes to buying fruit and vegetables, canned and frozen options are just as healthy as the fresh ones, and you can buy them cheap and store or freeze ahead of time. If you do your research and shop around, healthy eating really doesn’t have to be as expensive or challenging as it might seem. </p> <p><strong> </strong></p>

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Woman’s sweet Bunnings snag goes viral

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An Aussie cake artist has paid tribute to the iconic Bunnings sausage sandwich in the sweetest way.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hailing from Melbourne, Tigga Maccormack shares elaborate dessert designs with her 510,000 followers on TikTok.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In her latest video, Tigga shows her followers how she made a sweet version of the Bunnings snag, stunning viewers with its realism.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844251/sanga1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e195d8fa7f9b498591d724c2b33c53fa" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: tigga_mac / TikTok</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Creating the bread from a square vanilla buttercream cake, Tigga showed how she gave the cake its bread shape with glasses and spatulas.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I then sliced off the crust and sliced it in half, then you’ve got two pieces of bread - but it’s cake,” she said in the clip.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Next, Tigga created the snag with a piece of chocolate mud cake that was “kind of squished and rolled into a sausage”.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844252/sanga2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9260bd36907548cebca2a973845c2588" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: tigga_mac / TikTok</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Then I got some brown fondant and I put my ‘sausage’ in the fondant and rolled it up, smoothed it all out,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Then I got my little baby torch and I torched the crap out of it.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Finally, Tigga piled on the toppings, including some sauce and fried onions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Once my snag was done I put it on the cake bread and we actually fried some apple in sugar for our onions,” Tigga said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tigga topped the snag with red buttercream icing disguised as ‘tomato sauce’ and drizzled on top from an old sauce bottle.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844253/sanga3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/98e9a191adbf4cda9859d0c7b9e7da41" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: tigga_mac / TikTok</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The video has been viewed 1.4 million times and received more than 1500 comments, with many unable to believe it wasn’t a real snag.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But why does it look so real? I swear my brain wouldn’t be able to let me eat it. It would be so confused,” one person wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“That’s genius,” another said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Others joked that Tigga’s snag wouldn’t meet Bunnings’ safety standards, with the hardware giant introducing a rule that onions had to go underneath the sausage to avoid them falling out of the bread to prevent customers from slipping..</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Onions on the BOTTOM. Have the Bunnings accidents taught you nothing,” one person joked.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: tigga_mac / TikTok</span></em></p>

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Plant based diets could prevent type 2 diabetes

<p>Eating a diet high in plant foods with little or no red meat has been linked to a lower risk of type 2 diabetes in the most comprehensive scrutiny of this connection so far.</p> <p>This protective effect is even stronger for diets high in healthier plant foods such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts.</p> <p>Diabetes has been called “the fastest growing health crisis of our time”. At the same time, plant-based diets are gaining popularity.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Therefore, the researchers thought it was important to quantify their link with diabetes risk, says first author Frank Qian from the Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, US – especially given the large variation in these diets. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">The analysis, </span>published<span style="font-family: inherit;"> in the </span>Journal of the American Medical Association<span style="font-family: inherit;">, included nine studies with more than 300,000 participants – of whom 23,544 had type 2 diabetes – over two to 28 years of follow-up. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">In the primary evaluation, Qian and co-authors focussed on an overall higher intake of plant-based foods along with little or no animal-based foods. Therefore, this included vegetarian or vegan dietary patterns.</span></p> <p>They found that people with the highest adherence to predominantly plant-based diets had a 23% reduced risk of type 2 diabetes compared to those with the lowest consumption of plant foods.</p> <p>But these dietary patterns didn’t exclude plant-derived foods that have been linked to higher diabetes risk, such as sugar and refined carbohydrates.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">When narrowing the analysis to four studies that defined a plant-based diet as the healthy whole food options, they found a 30% lower risk of type 2 diabetes.</span></p> <p>While it must be noted that the studies are observational, most, if not all, adjusted for well-known risk factors, including body mass index (BMI), gender, smoking status and family history of diabetes, among other potentially confounding variables.</p> <p>Several factors could explain the associations, the authors say.</p> <p>Plant-based diets typically include healthy plant foods packed with nutrients, polyphenols and fibre, which can improve insulin sensitivity, lower blood pressure, reduce inflammation and help maintain a healthy weight.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">All of these can lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Conversely, eating red and processed meat has been linked to higher risk.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Because the studies controlled for BMI, and excess weight and type 2 diabetes are a deadly duo, the authors suggest the associations they found could underestimate the actual degree of protection conferred by the diets.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">“Overall,” says senior author Qi Sun, “these data highlight the importance of adhering to plant-based diets to achieve or maintain good health.” </span></p> <!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <p><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=26041&amp;title=Plant-based+diets+could+prevent+type+2+diabetes" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></p> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrition/plant-based-diets-could-prevent-type-2-diabetes/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/natalie-parletta">Natalie Parletta</a>.</p> </div>

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When is milk chocolate good for you?

<div> <div class="copy"> <p>It’s always gratifying to hear that our guilty pleasures can have health benefits – like dark chocolate being good for your heart, or coffee preventing chronic liver disease, or wine keeping your teeth healthy – but what about milk chocolate?</p> <p>Though it’s higher in fat, sugar and calories than dark chocolate, milk chocolate’s effect on your health depends on when you eat it, according to a new study published in <em>The FASEB Journal</em>.</p> <p>Spanish and US researchers set out to understand how the timing of milk chocolate consumption affects human health.</p> <p>Nineteen participants – all postmenopausal women – were split into groups and asked to eat no chocolate, eat 100 grams of milk chocolate within an hour of waking up, or eat the same amount an hour before going to sleep.</p> <p>During the study, other factors were recorded, including the participants’ weight, physical activity, hunger and cortisol levels, number of calories consumed per day, and glucose metabolism.</p> <p>“One of the surprises was that despite eating close to 550 kilocalories [of chocolate] per day for two weeks, people didn’t gain weight, either when taken in the morning or in the evening,” says co-researcher Frank Scheer, a neuroscientist and professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School.</p> <p>“The morning group showed more fat oxidation, as opposed to the evening group, which had more carbohydrate oxidation occurring. So the mechanisms appear to be different, but both led to no weight gain in these two cohorts.”</p> <p>In the morning group, fasting glucose levels also went down, along with waist circumference.</p> <p>“Waist circumference is really thought to be primarily related to visceral fat, which has been associated with adverse metabolic effects,” says Scheer.</p> <p>The mechanism behind the loss of waist circumference is unclear. It may be due to the fact that 100 grams of milk chocolate is approximately 30% of a typical daily calorie intake, so participants may have cut down other food intake for the day.</p> <p>This study builds on previous research, which has shown that the timing of chocolate consumption in rats affected their circadian rhythms, preventing their sleep cycles from becoming disrupted during simulated jetlag. Other studies have also suggested that mistiming food intake can lead to obesity and problems controlling glucose.</p> <p>It’s clear that the time at which we eat is important to energy balance and metabolism. But further research is needed, with a larger and more diverse group of participants over a longer period of time, because the findings pose even more questions for the researchers.</p> <p>“Are these findings due to effects that the energy timing has on metabolism?” asks Scheer. “If you eat chocolate in the morning, for example, does the body, by perceiving this kind of excess energy, then dial up energy expenditure or dial down cravings for food? And then, in addition to hedonic mechanisms and energy-balance mechanisms, could it be anything more specific to the content of the micronutrients in chocolate?”</p> <!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=157513&amp;title=When+is+milk+chocolate+good+for+you%3F" alt="" width="1" height="1" /> <!-- End of tracking content syndication --></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrition/when-is-milk-chocolate-good-for-you/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/lauren-fuge">Lauren Fuge</a>. Lauren Fuge is a science journalist at Cosmos. She holds a BSc in physics from the University of Adelaide and a BA in English and creative writing from Flinders University.</p> </div> </div>

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BEYOND shocking: Ugly note left on Aldi shopper's car

<p><em>Image: Getty</em></p> <p>A woman in regional Victoria returned to her car after a shopping trip at Aldi, only to discover a shocking note left on her windscreen.</p> <p>Taking to Facebook, the Traralgon resident explained that the person who wrote the note must have thought she was flouting lockdown rules based on the dealership stickers on her car.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844117/new-project-11.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1350ca544ad044fea3ec7e1dd9320f46" /></p> <p><em>Image: Facebook</em></p> <p>As of Friday, those living in country Victoria no longer have strict stay-at-home restrictions after some rules were lifted.</p> <p>However, Melbourne remains in lockdown and based on that – the person who wrote the rude note presumably believed the Traralgon mum was from the city.</p> <p>“Beside my number plate, it has the name of the dealership my car was purchased from, in Melbourne” she wrote in a post alongside a photo of the note.</p> <p>“I’m assuming that’s why this lovely note was left on my windscreen this evening in the Aldi car park. I cannot believe the insanity and nastiness right now”.</p> <p>Many comments have flooded her post, describing the person behind the note as “disgusting”.</p> <p>“That’s shocking. I’m sorry people are so rude”, one person replied. “OMG that’s horrible. I’m amazed we aren’t getting the same thing. We live here yes but we didn’t buy our car here. There is a lot of craziness at the moment” said another, while a third person added its “So Un-Australia”.</p> <p>But it’s not the first-time regional residents have been at the centre of unwarranted attacks by their own people.</p> <p>Another woman from Inverloch said she was abused in Wongthaggi car park because someone thought she was from the city.</p> <p>“We were confused as to why she would think that from just looking at the car”, the woman said in a Facebook group, according to the Herald Sun. “Our car has a Melbourne dealership sticker on the rear window” as do most cars.</p> <p>Senior Sergeant Peter Watson told the publication that abuse towards others needs to stop.</p> <p>“People shouldn’t assume things, cars can be bought from anywhere” he said.</p>

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Woman driven to tears by ungrateful "Karen" customer

<p><em>Image: TikTok</em></p> <p>A Queensland small business owner has been left in tears after a vegan ‘Karen’ customer sent her a rude email about a free lolly that was included in her order.</p> <p>Carissa Collins, founder of TLC Body, took to TikTok earlier this week sharing her feelings about the email.</p> <p>She has been adding lollies to her packages sent to her customers as a thoughtful gesture.</p> <p>“So once again I’m in a position where I will not be buying from you again because I no longer trust your word” the email read.</p> <p>“I don’t eat lollies – vegan or not – what do you think you are gaining by sending someone a bit of sugary junk in the first place? I’d rather pay less for my product than get something I never asked for or wanted”</p> <p>“If they were vegan I could have at least appreciated the thought”.</p> <p>The email from the customer ended with them saying they would never buy Collins again.</p> <p>In a teary video on TikTok, Collins shared the email, asking “when did it become okay to speak to people like this?”</p> <p>“I literally just received an email from a customer complaining about me giving them a lolly. A bloody lolly in their order”, Collins said in the video.</p> <p>“Honestly, how this email was worded, it was almost as if I had stabbed them or something. What the hell. I am trying to do a nice thing by giving free gifts with orders. If you don’t like a lolly, don’t eat it”.</p> <p>Following her video, Collins received a massive amount of support, with fellow TikTokers commending her for the “lovely gesture”.</p> <p>“This lady is clearly a Karen” one person said.</p> <p>“You don’t want customers like that, it’s a blessing in disguise, don’t let this put you down” another said.</p> <p>In a follow up video she said she has been blown away by support.</p> <p>“All I can say right now is wow these last two days have been crazy”.</p> <p>“I really want you guys to know I appreciate you so much, thank you for your support and kind words”.</p> <p>The young business owner says she will not let the customer get her down and will continue to throw free lollies in to her orders.</p>

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Woolies apologises after shocking find in muffin pack

<p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p> <p>A loyal Woolworths customer was shocked when he found a live cockroach crawling inside a packet of unopened muffins.</p> <p>The mini chocolate chip muffins were purchased from the bakery section of his local Woolies in Spearwood, Perth.</p> <p>The disgusted customer took to Facebook to share disturbing images of the unwanted guest residing in his muffin packet.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844043/new-project-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/eeb3295ebfaf4665bc6a02ddb964f83e" /></p> <p><em>Image: Facebook</em></p> <p>“The fresh food people can’t get any fresher than a live cockroach crawling all over the unopened packet of mini-muffins that were bought yesterday at Spearwood,” wrote the surprised shopper.</p> <p>Woolworths responded to this post, extending apologies and assuring customers they would raise the issue with their product quality team.</p> <p>“We’re sorry to hear you’ve found a live cockroach crawling over the mini muffins you purchased yesterday at our Spearwood store,” wrote a Woolies representative on Facebook.</p> <p>“We can imagine the concern this would cause as you’ve mentioned the package was unopened, in the meantime we’d like to let you know that you’re more than welcome to return this product, its packaging or your receipt to your local Woolworths store to receive a full refund or replacement,” they added.</p> <p>“No way it came from my bakery,” came the online claim from the Woolies bakery manager when the concerned customer showed up for a refund. "The muffins arrive frozen and it would’ve been impossible for the cockroach to survive."</p> <p>“Made to feel like I put it in there,” wrote the disappointed shopper in response. “Think I’ll be going somewhere different to shop.”</p> <p>Fellow customers were quick to see the humour in the cockroach catastrophe, with some light-hearted comments posted on Facebook.</p> <p>“The good ole place a roach in the bag trick to become Facebook Famous,” wrote one commentator.</p> <p>A Woolworths spokesperson told Yahoo News Australia that the supermarket takes food safety very seriously. “We’re aware of the customer's report and are looking into it with our supply partner to understand how this could have happened,” they said in a statement.</p> <p>“We are sorry to hear about this customer’s experience and have offered a full refund”, the spokesperson added.</p>

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Surprise warning for Kmart air fryer stuns Aussie mums

<p>A loyal Kmart fan is raising awareness about an often-overlooked warning regarding the popular air fryer, after finding something concerning in her kitchen.</p> <p>Kmart customer Rita shared her concerns to popular “Mums Who Build, Renovate &amp; Decorate” Facebook group after she noticed something strange happening with the bottom of her air fryer.</p> <p>“You hear all the horror stories about air fryers cracking benches (so glad I heard them) so I found this great terrazzo tray that matches my bench at Kmart, and it has cracked” Rita wrote.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843941/new-project-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d9205f4e74ee4e0ba9f4cc332a00caa1" /></p> <p><em>Image: Facebook </em></p> <p>“But at least it isn’t the bench!”</p> <p>The recently purchased terrazzo tray from Kmart was placed underneath her air fryer to protect the bench-top from heat damage, after hearing air fryers were at risk to damage surfaces they sit on due to their heat.</p> <p>As per Kmart’s instruction manual, air fryers should be placed and used on a “stable, horizontal, flat and heat-resistant” surface. The company also recommends putting the air fryer on an insulated heat pad.</p> <p>Rita was shocked the terrazzo tray had cracked from the heat underneath her air fryer and went out seeking advice from fellow Facebook group members.</p> <p>“Do I leave it and ignore the crack? Buy another but it will probably happen again or use something else?”.</p> <p>A large amount of group members came forward and said they had no idea air fryers came with this warning and were capable of doing this, whereas others had sage pieces of advice.</p> <p>“Wow, I’ve never heard that! We use ours on a stone bench and I guess I have just been lucky” one user writes. Another said “this is news to me too”.</p> <p>One group member shared she has hers kept on a thick wooden chopping board, also from Kmart. Another member made a similar suggestion although she doesn’t have a stone bench and claims her air fryer has never damaged her laminate bench.</p> <p>Thick wooden chopping boards or heat proof mats were among the most popular suggestions.</p>

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Tea drinkers may well live longer

<div class="copy"> <p>Tea is good for you, according to new research from – perhaps not surprisingly – China.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Habitual consumption – defined as at least three times a week – is associated with lower risks of cardiovascular disease and all-cause death, according to Xinyan Wang from the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences.</span></p> <p>In other words, it contributes both to longer life expectancy and more healthy years of life.</p> <p>The favourable health effects appear to be particularly robust for green tea and for those with a long-term love of it.</p> <p>In their study, Wang and colleagues followed 100,902 participants in the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27682885">China-PAR</a> Project who had no history of heart attack, stroke or cancer for a median of 7.3 years. All were classified into one of two groups – habitual and never / non-habitual.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">Regular drinkers were found to have a 20% lower risk of incident heart disease and stroke, a 22% lower risk of fatal heart disease and stroke, and a 15% decreased risk of all-cause death.</span></p> <p>The analyses estimated, for example, that 50-year-old habitual tea drinkers would develop coronary heart disease and stroke 1.41 years later and live 1.26 years longer than those who never or seldom drank tea.</p> <p>The potential influence of changes in tea drinking behaviour were analysed in a subset of 14,081 participants with assessments at two time points.</p> <p>Habitual drinkers who maintained their habit had a 39% lower risk of incident heart disease and stroke, 56% lower risk of fatal heart disease and stroke, and 29% decreased risk of all-cause death compared to consistent never or non-habitual tea drinkers.</p> <p>“Mechanism studies have suggested that the main bioactive compounds in tea, namely polyphenols, are not stored in the body long-term,” says Dongfeng Gu, senior author of a <a href="https://dx.doi.org/10.1177/2047487319894685">paper</a> in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.</p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">“Thus, frequent tea intake over an extended period may be necessary for the cardioprotective effect.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: inherit;">The study found green tea to be more beneficial than black, though Gu acknowledges that may be because of the preferences of those studied. Only a few preferred black tea.</span></p> <p>Nevertheless, the researchers say their findings “hint at a differential effect between tea types” – and suggest two factors may be at play.</p> <p>First, green tea is a rich source of the polyphenols which protect against cardiovascular disease and its risk factors, but black tea is fully fermented and during this process polyphenols are oxidised into pigments and may lose their antioxidant effects.</p> <p>Second, black tea is often served with milk, which <a href="https://academic.oup.com/eurheartj/article/28/2/219/2887513">previous research</a> has shown may counteract the favourable health effects of tea on vascular function.</p> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=34602&amp;title=Tea+drinkers+may+well+live+longer" alt="" width="1" height="1" /></div> <div id="contributors"> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/health/nutrition/tea-drinkers-may-well-live-longer/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/nick-carne">Nick Carne</a>. </p> </div>

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Why supermarket shelves are emptying – and it's NOT panic buying

<p>Customers across Sydney are being greeted with empty shelves at major supermarkets in what is a flow-on effect of the state’s ongoing coronavirus lockdown.</p> <p>Over the weekend, NSW entered its 11th week of lockdown. Frustrated shoppers at Woolworths, Coles and Aldi Stores in Greater Sydney took to social media to share pictures of depleted, bare shopping aisles.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://twitter.com/Coles?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Coles</a> in Katoomba is looking a bit empty 🙁 <a href="https://t.co/tjIzXVd9v1">pic.twitter.com/tjIzXVd9v1</a></p> — JON DEE (JonDee.com) (@JonDeeOz) <a href="https://twitter.com/JonDeeOz/status/1433344350021324805?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 2, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>Fresh fruit, vegetables, meat, dairy and bakery sections all looking a little scarce. However, panic buying isn’t responsible this time around, instead wide spread covid-19 virus is to blame, forcing employees into isolation for an extended period of time.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843870/new-project-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/924413f836c14a31a85d6971cf33811e" /></p> <p><em>Images: supplied by customer</em></p> <p>This has caused serious disruption to supply chains. Woolworths have over 3,300 staff members in self-isolation while Coles has just under 1800 people in quarantine. Aldi has admits self-isolation orders for staff are causing disruptions across their supply chain too.</p> <p>Staff members that remain able to work are stretched thin, causing widespread issues in the supply chain and their ability to stock shelves. All retails involved have assured customers that food remains plentiful – the problem being just getting it into stores.</p> <p> </p> <p> </p>

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