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Iconic Coon cheese unveils new name after racism claims

<p>The makers of Coon Cheese have rebranded after bowing to public pressure amid racism claims.</p> <p>The cheese was originally named "Coon" after American cheese pioneer Edward William Coon, but the word is also a racist slur against people of colour.</p> <p>The 85-year-old dairy product will now be known as "Cheer cheese" from July, a decision that was made six months ago in response to growing criticisms of racism.</p> <p>“The name Cheer has the significance of pleasure and joy,’ Saputo chief executive Lino A. Saputo said.</p> <p>“We took some time to think about this, we wanted to do the proper due diligence and consulted with different focus groups and we narrowed it down to three to five names and resoundingly consumers thought this was the right reflection of what we’re bringing for families."</p> <p>“CHEER Cheese is a cheese for everyone, and we trust our valued consumers and those who are new to our products will embrace this new name.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839455/coon-hero-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/63fa2e0e265449e9a8203b0e193c4cec" /></p> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>The company announced the decision six months ago as the Black Lives Movement gained momentum around the globe.</p> <p>“At Saputo, one of our basic principles as an organisation is to treat people with respect and without discrimination and we will not condone behaviour that goes against this,” the company said in a statement.</p> <p>Despite the cheerful name change, there was an outpouring of anger on social media after the name change was announced.</p> <p>One person said: “Absolutely bulls..t. I won’t ever call it that.”</p> <p>“I’m an Aussie and our Coon cheese is getting a name change to cheer cheese – another Aussie icon name gone,” another said.</p> <p>“How ridiculous. It may well be a racist slur, but was the gentleman’s surname. Cheer cheese? I mean, really?” one woman wrote.</p> <p>The new products will be on supermarket shelves nationwide from July 2021.</p> </div>

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The nifty kettle cleaning hack you need to try

<p>When did you last clean your kettle?</p> <p>Most people haven't cleaned their kettle since they purchased it, and scrubbing at it endlessly to get rid of the stubborn limescale isn't anyone's ideal way to spend their weekend.</p> <p>But unfortunately, if you want to avoid flakes in your cup of tea, it needs to be done.</p> <p>Thankfully, one woman has shared a simple and natural way of effectively cleaning your kettle, with zero scrubbing required.</p> <p>Plus, an added bonus is the hack uses fruit you'll likely already have at home, avoiding harsh cleaning chemicals.</p> <p>The woman, who shared the nifty hack on TikTok, uses slices of lemon as a natural cleaner and deodoriser.</p> <p>“This is the natural, no-scrub way to rid kettle limescale,” she captioned the demonstration clip on the video-sharing platform.</p> <p>In the video, she simply fills the kettle with water and adds a sliced lemon.</p> <p>Once the lemon has been added, the user who goes by the name Mama_Mila_ says to boil the kettle twice and keep the hot water in the kettle for 30 minutes before draining.</p> <p>She then suggests rinsing out the kettle with water before admiring your limescale-free appliance.</p> <p>After she shared the simple trick, TikTok users flocked to the comments, obsessed with the efficacy of the no-scrub method.</p> <p>“I just did this to my kettle. Amazing result. Thank you,” one impressed fan wrote.</p> <p>“This really works, thanks,” another added.</p>

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Bean dad sparks internet fury

<p>One of the biggest debates of 2021 so far has sent social media site Twitter into a furious divide – and it all started over a humble can of beans.</p> <p>Earlier this week US man John Roderick was met with fierce backlash after he took to Twitter share his own parenting story that involved making his nine-year-old daughter starve for six hours until she was able to open a can of beans.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.34556574923545px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839375/bean-dad-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/980b37e0a02a4dcfac2916ab7a7a0abb" /></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.34556574923545px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839374/bean-dad-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8683226e648c47f98bdd1cc5cc06f112" /></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.38718173836696px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839373/bean-dad-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ba7680d19f194a7982b6e88af2fd5ce1" /></p> <p>The man has since deleted his Twitter account, but screenshots last forever.</p> <p>In a series of tweets, he recounted how horrified he was to discover his young child did not know how to use a can opener.</p> <p>He instructed her to “study the parts” and “study the cans” which left her struggling with the can for six hours in order to open the can.</p> <p>Hours later, Mr Roderick says his daughter had been left defeated.</p> <p>What was meant to be a hilarious parenting anecdote, a number of people did not see it that way.</p> <p>Nicknaming him “Bean Dad”, the father has been slammed for not helping his daughter, and insisting she starve instead of assisting her.</p> <p>The debate became even more heated when a series of racist and anti-Semitic tweets penned by Mr Roderick resurfaced.</p> <p>He promptly issued an apology for his “poorly told” parenting story.</p> <p>“I framed the story with me as the asshole dad because that’s my comedic persona and my fans and friends know it’s ‘a bit’,” he said in a statement.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">still waiting on my dad’s response but my mom’s response is killing me. “he is mean.” <a href="https://t.co/JKqhRpwwhY">pic.twitter.com/JKqhRpwwhY</a></p> — austin carter 🥨 (@_amcarter) <a href="https://twitter.com/_amcarter/status/1346134461457592327?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 4, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>“I was ignorant, insensitive to the message that my ‘pedant dad’ comedic persona was indistinguishable from how abusive dads act, talk and think.”</p> <p>In standard Twitter fashion, a number of users took the odd story and turned the parenting lesson into a parenting test.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://t.co/XZ0VnMSFyW">pic.twitter.com/XZ0VnMSFyW</a></p> — Arianna Haut (@AriannaHaut) <a href="https://twitter.com/AriannaHaut/status/1346180249231347712?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 4, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>Writer Caroline Moss shared a screenshot of a text conversation between her and her dad where she wrote: “If I was eight and didn’t know how to open a can with a can opener, how would you suggest I learn.</p> <p>“Take a can, an opener, start the opening, let you finish. Give you another can let you start yourself. Help if necessary,” Caroline’s dad replied.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">This was a sweet answer but also weird bc we never went out to restaurants when I was 9 cuz we didn’t have money. For reference also I am 35 now, Dad is 68. <a href="https://t.co/caaCh99t3y">pic.twitter.com/caaCh99t3y</a></p> — Leslie (@Leslie_D) <a href="https://twitter.com/Leslie_D/status/1346213277253201922?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 4, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>Soon others were sharing their responses from their dads, which had a number of hilarious responses.</p>

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Man’s avocado deodorant stick sends internet into chaos

<p><span>One man has invented an avocado deodorant stick as a way to make the “fastest avocado toast ever”.</span><br /><br /><span>Posting to the TikTok page Unnecessary Inventions, the man behind the account introduced his insta invention, "avocado on a stick".</span><br /><br /><span>At the crux of it, it appears to just be an empty deodorant stick filled with smashed avocado.</span><br /><br /><span>"I invented the easiest way to make avocado toast," he says as the clip begins.</span><br /><br /><span>“Meet the avocado on a stick."</span><br /><br /><span>The tutorial went on to demonstrate how the avocado stick functions much the same as a stick of roll-on deodorant.</span><br /><br /><span>"This handy little container features fresh, mashed avocado. And you can twist this little knob to reveal a little more avocado," he says.</span><br /><br /><span>"Then you just grab a piece of toast and spread on your avocado. The fastest avocado toast ever."</span><br /><br /><span>The video has since been viewed over 4.6 million times.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839271/avocado.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ea9f3fdaf7fa442d941ee5361f68bbd9" /><br /><br /><span>"Im so repulsed [sic]" one person wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>Another added: "That really does not look edible.”</span><br /><br /><span>"This makes me uncomfortable," a third chimed in.</span><br /><br /><span>Not all the comments were bad however, with some choosing to admire his “creative take”.</span><br /><br /><span>“The point is you tried,” one person commented.</span><br /><br /><span>Another user added: “I appreciate the effort indeed.”</span></p>

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Australia's "fattest" town to receive fourth McDonald's

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A fourth McDonald's has been given the green light to be built in Tamworth, Australia's fattest town.</p> <p>Councillors voted on Tuesday night in support of the development in the town in northeast New South Wales.</p> <p>The fourth fast food restaurant will be built within a 2.5km walking distance of a McDonald's in the regional city centre, 3kms away from McDonald's Tamworth West and 5.9kms from McDonald's Tamworth South.</p> <p>It's expected to open late next year with an estimated construction cost of $3.34 million.</p> <p>Tamworth Regional Council received 20 submissions that "indicated a level of community concern".</p> <p>Some of the concerns were that Tamworth "does not need a fourth McDonald's and another McDonald's will further increase the rates of obesity in Tamworth".</p> <p>The planning response stated: “Whilst noted, these concerns are not a matter for consideration in accordance with Section 4.15 of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979.”</p> <p>“I can fully understand the concerns of the residents and hopefully the conditions will address that,” Tamworth councillor Helen Tickle told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.northerndailyleader.com.au/" target="_blank"><em>The Northern Daily Leader</em></a>.</p> <p>“Unfortunately we’re known as the fattest town in Australia and that’s a terrible statistic.”</p> <p>On Facebook, one local said: “Another McDonald’s for Fatsville, you have to be kidding.”</p> <p>Another man said: “What you put in your stomach is entirely your choice. Don’t stop employment and economic growth and development opportunities.”</p> <p>As the new McDonald's site is in a general residential zone, council staff are watching it closely.</p> <p>“Council staff are not yet convinced the proposed operating hours are acceptable in respect to the zoning and amenity, and therefore to enable the development to proceed it is recommended to restrict the hours of operation,” the council said.</p> <p>“It is considered the development will have a positive impact upon the wider community by increasing the food and drink options for the community and for the reasons discussed throughout this report,” the business paper states.</p> <p>“The key issues that relate to this application have been addressed by either a redesign or the recommended conditions of consent.</p> <p>“Therefore, it is considered that approval of the application is not contrary to the public interest, subject to implementation and compliance with the conditions as proposed.”</p> <p>The new McDonald's will create 220 jobs in the area, according to a McDonald's Australia spokeswoman.</p> <p>“McDonald’s North Tamworth is expected to open late 2021 and will provide additional support to the local community through job creation and construction of the site,” she said.</p> <p>“The restaurant will inject over $5 million into the local economy and create approximately 100 jobs during construction. Once operational, the restaurant will create a further 120 jobs for the local community.”</p> <p>The spokeswoman said the fast food chain continues to review the nutritional value of its food and has been “providing choice” for more than 10 years.</p> <p>“We include kilojoule labelling for all products on our menu boards, website, digital kiosks and MyMacca’s app, to allow customers to make informed choices,” she said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Coles drops price on Christmas delicacy

<p>Coles is selling lobster for half price this Christmas after buying excess to help out fishermen who had their stock rejected by China.</p> <p>The supermarket giant is selling its Western Australian Rock Lobsters for just $20 - matching the price at Woolworths - which will be available in the deli section of its stores nationwide.</p> <p>Coles purchased 29 times the amount of lobsters it did last year, in what Coles General Manager for Bakery, Deli and Seafood Andy Mossop said was a win for the industry and consumers.</p> <p>He said the company was preparing for its busiest week of the year for seafood sales, with customers purchasing over 70 per cent more in December compared to other months.</p> <p>“Coles is committed to supporting local producers and providing great value for customers,” Mr Mossop said.</p> <p>“This is a fantastic example of how we have been able to act quickly to support our suppliers with an income stream during a very challenging time while also benefiting our customers at the checkout.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839207/shutterstock_795373393-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7b9d8ad50a4e4510bcbe77819e7603d0" /></p> <p>”We are delighted to be able to offer premium quality and sustainable Australian seafood, like WA Rock Lobsters, at exceptional prices and help customers enjoy a luxury Christmas staple for less this year.”</p> <p>Woolworths also made an announcement saying they will drop the price of lobsters to $20.</p> <p>Western Rock Lobster Council CEO Matt Taylor said the market closures in China meant there was an increased supply of the “premium” product for domestic markets.</p> <p>“Partnering with national retailers to boost local consumption will play an important role in the viability of fishing businesses and their regional communities,” he said.</p> <p>Marine Stewardship Council Program Director of Oceania Anne Gabriel said Coles has helped out WA fishing companies immensely this Christmas.</p> <p>“With a third of global fish populations overfished, choosing sustainable seafood with the blue fish tick supports livelihoods, communities and helps protect one of the last major food sources truly from the wild,” she said.</p> <p>“When you see the MSC blue fish tick label on Aussie lobster at your local Coles deli counter, you can feel good that your purchase is not only good for your pocket, but for the ocean and those that depend on it too.”</p>

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Major Woolies move after Made in China backlash

<p>Woolworths has begun its shift towards sourcing its paper bags from an Australian supplier after they faced a major amount of backlash when it was discovered the item was being imported from China.</p> <p>The supermarket announced this week that South Australian producer Detpak would eventually supply stores around the country with recyclable paper bags, made from 70 per cent recycled paper.</p> <p>The paper bags which were imported from China launched in June this year, but many shoppers weren’t too happy about it.</p> <p>Some had issues with the non-plastic option while others weren’t thrilled about them being imported.</p> <p>The new partnership has promised to create more jobs for Australians and contribute to less plastic entering the environment.</p> <p>At least 12 new jobs at the manufacturer’s Adelaide plant had been created so far, with an additional 12 to be created as the bags are introduced nationally.</p> <p>The Australian-made bags are currently available in South Australia and Northern Territory stores and are expected to be available nationwide within the next year.</p> <p>“Our proudly SA-made bags are the result of Detpak’s hard work to build the local capacity needed to supply almost 80 stores across South Australia and the Northern Territory,” Woolworths managing director Natalie Davis said.</p> <p>“We look forward to seeing our contribution to the local industry grow as we roll out Australian-made bags nationally over the next year.</p> <p>“As paper bags become a permanent part of our range, we’re delighted to be supporting new South Australian jobs as we move to a local manufacturer in Detpak.”</p> <p>The bags will be made with 70 per cent recycled paper and also contain un-recycled paper to provide a stronger structure. All materials used have been sourced responsibly.</p>

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Leaked list of 41 Aussie vineyards owned by Chinese firms

<p>Aussie wine lovers are being urged to steer clear of 41 Australian wineries after a viral list revealed that they were owned by Chinese companies.</p> <p>The list was shared on social media following Beijing's escalating feud with Australia, which has led to restrictions to be imposed on Australian industries.</p> <p>This includes the wine industry, which has been impacted with new import taxes of up to a shocking 212 per cent.</p> <p>Other industries impacted include timber, lamb, lobster and barley, with fears their tactics could spread to other sectors.</p> <p>The list was shared on the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/vinoeamigos" target="_blank">Vino e Amigos</a><span> </span>Facebook page and revealed that most of the Chinese-owned vineyards are in Victoria, South Australia, Tasmania, WA and NSW.</p> <p>The Facebook page has since been deleted.</p> <p>Some pointed out that the percentage of each winery owned by Chinese companies was not on the list and that wineries owned by Australian-Chinese people weren't to blame.</p> <p>Another pointed out some on the list were “run by Aussie workers though, and Aussie workers are still getting paid”, indicating a boycott may cause more harm than good.</p> <p>“No wonder some Aussies always say the govt is selling the country to China,” one person posted, while another added: “Aussie winemakers have been teaching the Chinese how to make wine for years. For what, to screw us over?”</p> <p>The unprecedented tariffs on Australian wine would destroy the sector which was already struggling due to bushfires.</p> <p>“The wine production industry generated revenue of $7 billion in 2019-20. Of that amount,$2.9 billion was generated from exports,” IBISWorld Senior Industry Analyst Matthew Reeves said.</p> <p>“China is the dominant market for Australian wines, accounting for 36.7% of export revenue last year.”</p> <p>“Australia’s premium wine exports will have an easier time finding new buyers outside of China, supporting bigger players in the industry. On the other hand, exports of cheaper wines will likely face significant difficulty in the coming months.”</p>

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The subtle yet sneaky Woolies tactic you didn’t notice at checkout

<p><span>A little-known feature at Woolworths’ self-serve checkouts is being used to stamp out potential theft and helping customers scan groceries faster.</span><br /><br /><span>Sneaky shoppers who may try to cheat the self-serve system by scanning avocados as carrots should beware.</span><br /><br /><span>New technology at the assisted checkouts will now be able to detect the type of loose product a customer is purchasing.</span><br /><br /><span>The upgrade in the self-service checkout machines has been rolled out in 220 of its 1050 stores and allows the scanner to analyse the subtle characteristics of the product being weighed.</span><br /><br /><span>The screen will then give chekoutlists with three fruit and vegetable options to choose from.</span><br /><br /><span>“So if a customer places a loose tomato on the scanner, the system will show a range of tomato varieties rather than the full list of fruit and veg items,” a Woolworths spokesperson told<em> Yahoo News Australia.</em></span><br /><br /><span>“This makes self-serve that little bit faster and improves the accuracy of product selection for customers.”</span><br /><br /><span>The Picklist Assist feature scans fruit and vegetables using imaging technology.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839069/woolies-sself-servce-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f9b1985b850a4be3b5802a52ffa9915f" /><br /><br /><span>It brings up shortlists of items to help shoppers make selection of their product image quicker.</span><br /><br /><span>Woolworths hopes the technology will simplify their shop.</span><br /><br /><span>“We’re always looking for ways to make shopping easier for our customers,” the Woolworths spokesperson said.</span><br /><br /><span>“As we progressively upgrade our assisted checkouts, we have access to new technology, which helps customers find loose fruit and veg items in the system faster.</span><br /><br /><span>“The system uses image recognition technology to filter the list of possible products based on their colour, shape or size.”</span></p>

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“Please explain”: Customer demands answers from Coles over confusing milk label

<p class="p1">A Coles shopper has spotted a misleading label on its home brand milk and demanded answers.</p> <p class="p1">Taking to the Coles Facebook page, the customer from Tasmania wanted to purchase a bottle of Coles Full Cream Milk, which was advertised on the front label as a product of Tasmania.</p> <p class="p1">However, on the back of the bottle it stated the milk was “sourced from Queensland farms and bottled in Queensland”.</p> <p class="p1">The frustrated customer asked Coles to “please explain” as she posted a photo of the milk in question.</p> <p class="p1">The shopper had purchased the bottle from Coles Burnie in Tasmania and said it was important for her to shop local.</p> <p class="p1">“Tasmanian products are very important to me,” she wrote.</p> <p class="p1">Another customer responded to the post and said they found it hard to purchase and support local farmers.</p> <p class="p1">“Milk is ‘frustrating’ to purchase. You try to do the right thing and support your local farmers, but dig a little deeper and many of what you think are small independently run/owned brands are not!” a user wrote.</p> <p class="p1">A spokesperson for the grocery store apologised for the mishap and clarified to Yahoo News Australia that a number of bottles sold in Tasmanian stores had been labelled incorrectly.</p> <p class="p1">“All Coles Brand milk sold in Tasmania is supplied by Tasmanian dairy farmers and bottled locally.</p> <p class="p1">“This is an unfortunate labelling error that impacted a small number of bottles and is currently being fixed.</p> <p class="p1">“We apologise to our Tasmanian customers for any confusion,” a Coles spokesperson told Yahoo News.</p>

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ALDI shopper causes $180k in damages after smashing alcohol

<p>Footage of a woman going rampant and causing severe damage to an ALDI store by smashing bottles of alcohol has caused great concern among customers. </p> <p>The video was recorded at a supermarket in Stevenage, UK, on Wednesday (local time) afternoon.</p> <p>Footage shows the woman wearing a hoodie and a backpack removing bottles of alcohol off the shelves with her arms.</p> <p>She then slips in the mess she created and falls to the ground.</p> <p>“Oh god, she’s not right,” a man is heard saying off-camera.</p> <p>The woman quickly gets back up and starts her tirade of breaking more bottles.</p> <p>The man off camera notices the woman has cut her hand and it’s covered in blood, while another person reveals the police won’t arrive for a while.</p> <p>“I’ve never seen anything like this,” someone is heard saying.</p> <p>A man who was waiting in the check-out line asked the woman to “calm down” and the woman threw a bottle of booze at his leg.</p> <p>The store manager estimated the damages to cost approximately $AUD180,270 when taking into account the loss of stock and revenue due to being forced to close the store to clean.</p> <p>According to The Comment, police officers arrived at the scene at around 2.30 pm and arrested the woman, who was taken to hospital and treated for her injuries.</p> <p>Image credit: <a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/entertainment/viral-weird/woman-smashes-500-bottles-of-alcohol-in-five-minutes-during-bizarre-aldi-rampage-c-1662545" target="_blank">7NEWS</a></p>

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Arnott's slams wild claim about Scotch Finger recipe

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A frustrated grandfather slammed Arnotts and accused them of tampering with the ingredients of the beloved Scotch Singer biscuit after he realised that the snack didn't snap into two separate pieces as easily as it used to.</p> <p>He said that the brand of "breaking" the biscuit by changing the recipe without letting customers know.</p> <p>“We have not made any recent changes to the current formulation of this famous bickie,” an Arnott’s spokesperson confirmed to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/food/eat/arnotts-shuts-down-wild-claim-about-scotch-finger-recipe/news-story/da895f4bb5f48a80852be7cad1510758" target="_blank">news.com.au</a>.</p> <p>The grandfather was outraged on Reddit.</p> <p>“Today I attempted to break the iconic Scotch Finger biscuit into two fingers to show my two-year-old granddaughter how to eat these biscuits, that I myself ate at her age, in a right of passage for all Australian kids,” he began the post.</p> <p>“We Australians know innately that when offered a packet of Arnott’s Assorted biscuits you chose the Scotch Finger because the moment you get it, ‘snap’ down the vertical, and you have two perfectly formed biscuits. Two for one.</p> <p>“Well, horror (ensued) as I attempted to snap the Scotchie!” he continued, adding that after he snapped it, it formed two “ill formed stubs”.</p> <p>Shocked by what he had happened, he quickly covered his granddaughter’s eyes.</p> <p>“But she did glimpse the carnage and I’m not sure (if) permanent psychological damage has been done.”</p> <p>“Protest, write to your local supermarket, canvass your local member, inundate Arnott’s Facebook page with your views, phone<span> </span><em>A Current Affair</em>, tweet Kochie — do whatever it takes.</p> <p>“I’m old, and I can live with it, but I’m doing it for the kids. If we remain silent it is they who will suffer.”</p> <p>However, Arnotts confirmed that the recipe had not changed.</p> <p>“We bake our biscuits right here in Australia using local wheat, so occasionally if weather conditions have altered the harvest, there can be slight biscuit variations from batch to batch, but the Scotch Finger recipe Aussie know and love remains!” the Arnott’s spokesperson said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Beloved 98-year-old grandma turned Facebook chef dies of coronavirus

<p>Lucy Pollock is not the only person who turned to cooking and baking during the coronavirus lockdown.</p> <p>However, she is one that stuck out after her videos, originally meant for friends and family, online began to gain traction and stick in the hearts of everyone watching her.</p> <p>Over time, the beloved 98-year-old’s cooking show<span> </span><em>Baking With Lucy</em><span> </span>amassed over 40,000 followers.</p> <p>Sadly though, the woman did not make it long enough to share any of her delicious Christmas recipes, passing away on Sunday after being diagnosed with coronavirus and suffering from a fatal lung infection.</p> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/inhercozykitchen/posts/232858605036662" data-show-text="true" data-width=""> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>As Lucy would say, " Happy Tuesday!!" Here is a beautiful photo of my mom and me at an art show Latrobe Art Center when...</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/inhercozykitchen/">Baking With Lucy</a> on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/inhercozykitchen/posts/232858605036662">Tuesday, November 24, 2020</a></blockquote> </div> <p>The Pennsylvania woman’s daughter Mary Ellen Raneri was the one who announced the sad news in a video shared to Pollock’s popular baking video page.</p> <p>"The beautiful, lovely Lucy, talented woman and amazing mother, passed away last night at 3 in the morning," she explains in the video.</p> <p>"It was very unexpected. It was due to a lung infection and also, she tested positive for COVID, so it's quite an eye-opener for us and for everybody.</p> <p>"It's kind of ironic that what she struggled so hard to help people with eventually ended up hurting her."</p> <p>Raneri was able to visit her mother prior to her death and sang<span> </span><em>You Are My Sunshine</em><span> </span>in their final moment together.</p> <p>She closed her eyes, she looked really happy, and she was at peace," she said in the video.</p> <p>Pollock brought joy to thousands in her humble kitchen, cooking up almost a century's worth of family recipes, baking dishes that had been passed down through generations, donated by friends, and taken from frayed, handwritten notes.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838935/lucy-pollock.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4ef471798165452e895bde030b4f8207" /></p> <p>In mid-March, Raneri shared a photo on Facebook of her mother making cinnamon scrolls.</p> <p>The pair were then encouraged to make "live videos" of themselves cooking up more dishes.</p> <p>Raneri would often stand nearby and read out recipes while her mother baked due to her poor eyesight.</p> <p>Pollock would bake while her husband Phil filmed her and the humble, family-friendly videos took off quickly – with Pollock earning worldwide recognition, an upcoming cookbook and a national television appearance on NBC's Today show,</p> <p>"I can't believe that I'm sitting here on a Sunday morning doing this," Raneri said in the sad video.</p> <p>"Because at this point we'd all be scurrying around, yelling at each other 'Who's going to get the flour?' and 'Where are we going to put it?' But life has twists and turns.</p> <p>"I feel like my heart is breaking right now. But I wanted to tell everybody that I think right now she's in a really good place, and I'm going to go with that."</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838934/lucy-pollock-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/10634dde307746af8dd66b63045051a8" /></p> <p>Pollock's cookbook will go ahead as planned.</p> <p>"I don't think I knew how much I loved my mum until we started to do this project together," Raneri said of the cookbook.</p> <p>"I loved her, but I don't think I knew how much I admired her. She was an amazing person."</p> <p>Pollock will be buried in a private service on Friday.</p> <p>The service will be live streamed at 11 a.m. on the Baking with Lucy Facebook page.</p>

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"Straight to jail!": Woman berated for “barbaric” steak video

<p>A woman has horrified online users after she shared a video of her cooking a steak in a toaster.</p> <p>Juliette shared her bizarre method on TikTok under the username @itsmeju1iette, captioning the clip: "Cooking steak for my boyfriend."</p> <p>She wrote "How to cook steak," across the video.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838831/tiktok-steak-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/aad6f49f34fb4258b42574506b98336c" /></p> <p>It showed her placing two pieces of steak into the toaster, then slathering it in sauce and eating it.</p> <p>The clip has been viewed over 10 million times.</p> <p>One user questioned: "How do you clean the toaster?" while many others were disgruntled to see she had not seasoned her meat “properly”.</p> <p>"This is so barbaric it's not even funny," one angry user wrote.</p> <p>"Straight to jail!" another said.</p> <p>Another added: "I'm physically upset," added someone else.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838829/tiktok-steak-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/12efd32f18a74140ac2acd3856062b80" /></p> <p>"How to not cook steak," one user wrote.</p> <p>Juliette has had viral clips before, with one reaching over 24 million views that shows her humorously demonstrating how to boil ice in a saucepan.</p> <p>"My grandma's secret recipe! [Please] don’t share with anyone," she captioned the video.</p>

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New names for "racist" Nestle lollies revealed

<p>Nestle's Allen's Red Skins and Chicos lollies are being rebranded after the brand announced that it would rename the products due to the names being "out of step with the company's values".</p> <p>Red Skins are being changed to Red Ripper and Chicos will become Cheekies.</p> <p><img id="__mcenew" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838837/nestle-body.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/12be705c35f242d59e404087c693b797" /></p> <p>Nestle general manager confectionery Chris O’Donnell said the renamed products would appear on shelves early next year.</p> <p>“Nestle has an unwavering commitment to upholding respect for our friends, neighbours and colleagues,” he said.</p> <p>“We hope Australians will support the evolution of these two much-loved lollies – while the names are new, the lollies themselves remain unchanged.</p> <p>“We will keep pack changes simple to help lolly lovers find their favourites easily.”</p> <p>The intention for the name change was announced on June 20th, with Nestle vowing to "move quickly" on the issue.</p> <p>However, fans are less than impressed with the new names.</p> <p>"An absolute joke. Those lollies have had there original names for years and no one was offended until now," one person commented on Facebook.</p> <p>"Absolutely rediculous these companies need to stop bowing down to snowflakes and people who look for things to complain about," another agreed.</p>

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