Relationships

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Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan to ditch their royal titles

<p><span>Prince Harry and Duchess Meghan are making their TV debut soon, and they won’t be using their royal titles when we do see them.</span><br /><br /><span>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex will go by just Harry and Meghan when they make their TV debut to celebrate Time magazine’s annual list of the world’s most influential people.</span><br /><br /><span>In a new promo shared by E! News, the pair were introduced by their first names.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFQmLf1FUA_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFQmLf1FUA_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Cantante Kattia Rizor (@cantantekattiarizor)</a> on Sep 17, 2020 at 6:23pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>Notably, in the credits they were listed as “the Duke and Duchess of Sussex Prince Harry and Meghan Markle.”</span><br /><br /><span>This follows as the Sussexes were said to be unhappy with the final conditions of quitting from their royal duties.</span><br /><br /><span>The main one includes the Queen banning the couple from using the word “royal” in any of their branding.</span><br /><br /><span>The TIME event will be held on September 22 in the US.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFQPPb8nqlB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFQPPb8nqlB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex (@loveprinceharry1)</a> on Sep 17, 2020 at 3:03pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>It is the first time ever TIME 100 Most Influential People will be broadcast on television, rather than exclusively in its magazine.</span><br /><br /><span>Other guests on the show will be Trevor Noah, Sandra Oh, Kumail Nanjiani and John Legend. There will also be performances by Halsey, Jennifer Hudson and The Weeknd.</span><br /><br /><span>It seems Taylor Swift is among those who will be on the coveted list.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFPm5fSju0n/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFPm5fSju0n/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Storm⛈ (@storm_watchh)</a> on Sep 17, 2020 at 9:10am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>“In a year in which we are unfortunately unable to convene the TIME100 community together in person, we are excited to celebrate the extraordinary achievements of the members of this year’s list with a brand-new experience on ABC that will allow more people to participate than ever before,” TIME studios president Ian Orefice wrote in a statement.</span></p>

Relationships

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We studied what happens when guys add their cats to their dating app profiles

<p>These photos don’t just relay attractiveness; a recent study suggested that 43% of people think they can get a sense of someone’s personality by their picture. You might guess that someone who has included a photo of themselves hiking is an outdoorsy type of person.</p> <p>But as scientists who study human-animal interactions, we wanted to know what this meant for pet owners – in particular, male cat owners.</p> <p>If you’re a guy who owns a cat, what kind of effect does it have on suitors if you post a picture posing with your favourite feline?</p> <p>Prior studies suggested that women do judge a potential male partner based on whether he has pets. While they favour men with dogs, the results showed that they also give men with cats an edge over non-pet owners.</p> <p>Because of this, we reasoned that men pictured with cats would probably be viewed as more attractive and desirable than men who didn’t pose with any animals.</p> <p>In our study, we recruited 1,388 heterosexual American women from 18 to 24 years old to take a short anonymous online survey. In the survey, we presented them with photos of one of two young white men in their early 20s either posing alone or with a cat. To avoid biasing the women’s responses, we randomly presented which photo they saw first. Each participant only rated one man, with and without a cat.</p> <p>Each time the participants saw a photo, we asked them to rate the man pictured on several personality attributes, including his masculinity, femininity and date-ability. We also asked the women if they defined themselves as a “cat person,” “dog person,” “neither” or “both.”</p> <p>Most of the women found the men holding cats to be less dateable. This result surprised us, since previous studies had shown that women found men with pets to have higher potential as partners. They also thought the men holding cats were less extroverted and more neurotic, agreeable and open. Importantly, they saw these men as less masculine, too.</p> <p><strong>This last point may explain our findings.</strong></p> <p>Prior research suggests that women often seek masculine men – both in terms of physical appearance and behaviors. So the fact that women in our study found the photo of the man alone more masculine and more dateable supports the idea that women are likely to look first for clues related to masculinity when determining date-ability.</p> <p>We suspect old cultural norms may be playing a role in the responses. Past research suggests that male femininity and homosexuality are still perceived to be connected. Since cats are sometimes associated more closely with female owners – and therefore, considered a feminine pet – posing with cats may have primed the women taking our survey to default to this outdated trope, despite some popular media efforts to elevate the status of male cat owners.</p> <p>Alternatively, the perception of male cat owners as less extroverted and more neurotic, agreeable and open may have nudged our respondents to put these men in the “friend zone.” In other words, perhaps seeing a man pose with the cat suggests he might be a better confidant than date.</p> <p>It’s important to note that whether the women identified themselves as “cat people,” “dog people,” “both” or “neither” affected their perceptions. Women who self-identified as “cat people” were more inclined to view the men pictured with cats as more dateable or say they had no preference.</p> <p>Of course, like any research, our work has its limitations. Our sample is a very specific population – heterosexual, primarily white women, aged 18 to 24 years and living in the United States. We don’t know how these results would change if we surveyed, say, bisexual or gender-fluid women, men interested in men or individuals from different cultural backgrounds.</p> <p>And that’s the best part. This is a new, growing area of research, and it’s only one of a handful of potential studies on the relationship between pet ownership and first impressions on dating apps. This means we have our work cut out for us.</p> <p>But in the meantime, if heterosexual men are looking to get a match, it’s probably a good idea if they save showing off their photos with their favourite felines for the first or second date.</p> <p><em>Written by Misha Ketchell. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/we-studied-what-happens-when-guys-add-their-cats-to-their-dating-app-profiles-144999">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

Relationships

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Pink shares sweet tribute to husband

<p>Pink knows how to keep it honest and genuine with her fans about her relationship.</p> <p>The singer shared a beautiful post dedicated to her husband Carey Hart on Tuesday and admitted that while marriage has not been the easiest journey, she wouldn’t change it.</p> <p>"He's still my favorited sweet little dirtball. He and I have been at this a long time, and it is our relentless and stubborn idealism that keeps us together," she began her lengthy post.</p> <p>"Marriage is awful, wonderful, comfort and rage. It is boring, terrifying, and a total nail biter. It is loving another fallible creature while trying to love yourself. It is a lifetime of coming back to the table."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFI0QbRpNE6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFI0QbRpNE6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by P!NK (@pink)</a> on Sep 14, 2020 at 5:52pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>At one point in their 14-year marriage, the pair did get up and leave the so-called table.</p> <p>There was a point in the couple’s 14-year-marriage that they decided to split.</p> <p>Two years after their picture-perfect beach ceremony in Costa Rica in 2006, Pink announced they she and her hubby had called it quits for the time being.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9emKzAJ2vy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9emKzAJ2vy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">#internationalwomensday strong women; may we know them, may we raise them, may we be them.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/pink/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> P!NK</a> (@pink) on Mar 8, 2020 at 8:42am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>A year later in 2009, she says they came out stronger than ever thanks to therapy.</p> <p>She wrote: "Therapy isn't for weak people or hippies or liberals. It's for broken people that want to be whole. It's for runaways that want a family. It's a lesson on how to sit down and listen. How to love yourself so that the other person can, too.</p> <p>"I love you babe. I'm grateful we made it to this photo." </p> <p>The couple now share two children together: daughter Willow, nine, and son Jameson, three.</p>

Relationships

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Stuck at home with your partner?

<p>That’s what many older retired couples do too, even when there isn’t a pandemic. Their experiences are worth listening to, because many psychology studies find that marriages among the Medicare-eligible set are the happiest of any cohort across the life span.</p> <p>A review of the research reveals a U-shaped pattern of marital happiness over the life cycle. Early marriage features many positive aspects interlaced with a lot of conflict, while older couples enjoy the highest levels of companionship with low levels of conflict. Midlife couples who are raising children are at the bottom of the U. They tend to see a plunge in their enjoyment of one another, along with an uptick in fighting.</p> <p>Of course, you might wish you could be securely retired with a partner right now, especially if you’re currently on your own. Working remotely or facing unemployment while running a one-room schoolhouse, planning three meals a day without running out of food and worrying about your family’s health makes retirement look like a dreamy vacation.</p> <p>But there are some important similarities between retirement and the isolation required by social distancing. Your social networks have shrunk. Without work connections and friends to meet for lunch or at the gym, a partner becomes more essential than ever. As a therapist who has been treating couples at all stages of life for almost three decades, I’m currently witnessing the relational challenges of this pandemic, a big magnifier that can bring out the very best and sometimes the worst in relationships.</p> <p><strong>Lean on me</strong></p> <p>Older, retired couples primarily focus on supporting one another: Can I depend on you when I need help, feel scared, worry about dying or don’t feel well? And am I willing to be that source of comfort and stability when you need me?</p> <p>No matter the age or stage of the couple, the current pandemic has revealed the need for much more mutual dependency. Can I count on you to protect yourself and us when you go to the grocery store? If I’m feeling scared about my parents’ health or mine, can I tell you? If teaching algebra (a subject I struggled with the first time around) to our children has pushed me to the breaking point, can I ask you to take over, kindly and with no eye-rolling?</p> <p>Now is an ideal time to develop your help-asking muscle and, in turn, to welcome your partner’s vulnerability. You can practice now for the years ahead when you’ll need to be comfortable with more mutual dependency – being able to count on and be counted on in moments of need and frailty.</p> <p><strong>Have fewer, kinder fights</strong></p> <p>My colleague, psychiatrist Bob Waldinger, brings octogenarian couples into his laboratory to study their conflicts. He told me that he often has trouble getting them to reenact a fight. Having had the same fights for decades, these older couples are quite bored at the prospect of another round. They already know the other one’s lines. Do we have to do this again?</p> <p>When older couples do fight, they tend to handle conflict better than younger ones: They are more likely to interject expressions of affection and are less prone to voicing disgust, belligerence and whining. Because the relationship is so central, they may be more likely to forgive their partners or let a grievance slide.</p> <p>So, try to catch a fight as it starts and consider saying to your partner, “Can we talk about something more interesting? We probably already know how this is going to unfold.”</p> <p>Or, if the conflict is important to air, try to remember that you can say something kind without surrendering, or give a warm nonverbal smile or touch.</p> <p>It’s also a good idea to refrain from making any contemptuous or nasty comments. Couples researchers recommend following the “magic ratio” of 5 to 1 during a fight to secure a stable relationship: Try to say five positive things to every one zinger or negative comment. This ratio, which may seem outlandish, is based on the fact that negative interactions carry more weight than positive ones.</p> <p><strong>Focus on the present reality</strong></p> <p>Studies suggest that older couples focus on the present and are better able to accept the relationship as it is, rather than looking ahead to a time when it is going to be transformed.</p> <p>While they may not discuss their own mortality, older couples’ perspectives are shaped by a shorter time horizon. They typically pay more attention to positive experiences, want to understand their emotions better and focus on a smaller group of close friends and family.</p> <p>Try focusing on what is good about your relationship. What do you admire and feel grateful for? If you focus on the ways your partner is supportive, research shows that both you and your spouse will feel better about the relationship. Focusing on emotion will not be hard during a pandemic that elicits powerful feelings of anger, fear, worry, grief, love and gratitude. What can you learn about your partner that you didn’t know before about his or her strengths, ways of coping and cracks in that coping?</p> <p>Being stuck with your partner 24/7 may leave you pondering the expression “for better or worse, but not for breakfast, lunch and dinner.” But you may come out the other side with some new skills. You don’t have to wait for retirement to have a stronger relationship.</p> <p><em>Written by Misha Ketchell. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/stuck-at-home-with-your-partner-look-to-retirees-for-how-to-make-it-work-134834">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

Relationships

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“Our marriage is not fake”: Bride responds to online abuse

<p><span>For many, weddings are supposed to be the happiest day of our lives.</span><br /><br /><span>However for one bride, her special moment with her husband was turned into a circus when she revealed her wedding photos to the world.</span><br /><br /><span>Hannah Aylward told her followers of the cruel insults she received after sharing news of her wedding to Shane Burcaw.</span><br /><br /><span>Hannah and Shane wed in a backyard ceremony on September 4, and took to Instagram to announce their happy news last week.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837872/couple-marriage-wedding.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/41cee0cf1f8c4d27a8c59ffee38ebf7c" /><br /><br /><span>Shane has spinal muscular atrophy, and with his wife Hannah they boast more than 700,000 subscribers on their Youtube account, Squirmy and Grubs.</span><br /><br /><span>Spinal muscular atrophy is a genetic condition that affects the nerves that monitor muscle movement.</span><br /><br /><span>Muscles become weak and damaged before eventually wasting away.</span><br /><br /><span>When Hannah shared their wedding pictures, they had thousands of comments wishing them well.</span><br /><br /><span>Unfortunately, she also was forced to deal with cruel comments saying their wedding was “some kind of joke” and that it must have been “photoshopped”.</span><br /><br /><span>“But for real thought … does she also have another partner for having sex with?” one comment read.</span><br /><br /><span>“I’m saying this without any kind of apologies. I’m pretty sure that woman married him because if (sic) money and not for love,” another person claimed.</span><br /><br /><span>“Some of us women will do anything and everything for money, even if it means putting up a front, pretending just to get what they want. No not true love.”</span><br /><br /><span>In response Hannah took to Instagram to say that despite documenting their relationship on Youtube for years, they had still had to put up with people claiming it was fake.</span><br /><br /><span>“A few years ago, reading words like these was painful,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>“For a while, I held onto the idea that once Shane and I were married, all the people doubting our relationship would realise it was real.”</span><br /><br /><span>Hannah went on to say that she was “not that naive” now.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837871/couple-marriage-wedding-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/451c892d78384228b5abcf8920c3f3ce" /><br /><br /><span>She has learnt to ignore hurtful comments and instead focus on the positive impact sharing her relationship has had.</span><br /><br /><span>“Shane and I continue to make content and share our story with the hopes of showing as many people as we can that disabled people are worthy partners,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>In an article for <em>Today</em> back in 2019, Shane said that many people assumed his then-girlfriend Hannah was his caregiver.</span><br /><br /><span>“This one feels quite obvious, but you’d be shocked by how often strangers assume that Hannah is my nurse, my mom, my sister or my babysitter,” he wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>“Hannah and I were once checking out at a liquor store when the cashier said to Hannah: ‘Does this big guy want a lollipop?’”</span><br /><br /><span>Shane said he and Hannah had a “satisfying intimate life” and their relationship was “not special”.</span><br /><br /><span>“As our YouTube channel has grown, hundreds, if not thousands of couples in similar situations have reached out to us,” he wrote.</span><br /><br /><span>“It turns out, people with disabilities are in fact still human, with emotional wants and needs like everyone else!”</span></p>

Relationships

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Keith Urban gets candid about his bond with Nicole Kidman

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban usually keep a tight lid on their personal lives, but the country singer couldn't help himself in an interview with Zane Low on Apple Music.</p> <p>He gushed about Kidman and revealed how much of an influence she's had on his music over the years.</p> <p>"She's got great taste in music – it's always visceral. It's just like, I don't know who the artist is, I don't know what genre it is, I just love this song. It's all that matters to her.</p> <p>"You know what I've learned from her is to be more fearless in artistry and go for the curious place you want to go as an artist, don't question it," he explained.</p> <p>"Her whole thing is 'oh I'm interested in that, I'm going to go over there,' it's not like can I do it? That's definitely had a big impact on my music in the last five to six years particularly."</p> <p>The pair initially met at the 2005 G'Day USA gala and were married in 2006.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CB3-P70pM91/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CB3-P70pM91/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Happy Anniversary Baby!!!!! 14 years.... and i feel like your boyfriend in ALL the right ways!!!!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/keithurban/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Keith Urban</a> (@keithurban) on Jun 25, 2020 at 3:19pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Kidman also opened up about how the coronavirus pandemic has impacted their family, as they have two daughters, Sunday, 12 and Faith, nine.</p> <p>"We travel together, so we are always together, but never where you are in a house and you can't go to the store, to a restaurant of the movies," she said.</p> <p>"Staying home, doing school from home and all of those things that everyone has been doing is a completely different life for us."</p> <p>The Kidman-Urban family have never been happier despite the changes. "I love being in the kitchen in the morning so that when my kids come down, there's noise and there's joy in the home. That's really important to me," she said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Couples tie the knot in first drive-through wedding

<p>Five UK couples tied the knot at the UK’s first drive-through wedding after their special days were postponed due to the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>Brides and grooms wed in black cabs in London thanks to the service, launched by the ride-hailing app Free Now.</p> <p>Couples were either nominated by friends or by themselves and were then picked by the firm explaining why they should get hitched at the drive-through.</p> <p>All couples wed at the Boundary Gardens in East London, and enjoyed a quiet ceremony after exchanging their vows.</p> <p>The grooms were escorted in black cabs while brides travelled in white private hire vehicles.</p> <p>The business model was similar to a Vegas-style elopement in which the couple arrives at a chosen location in their car to meet the celebrant and the two witnesses.</p> <p>Mariusz Zabrocki, the General Manager of FREE NOW UK said the aim of the initiative was to make sure the couples have fun after restrictions forced many to postpone their plans.</p> <p>“We all know someone who has been in limbo as they’ve had to postpone their wedding due to COVID, and have felt their pain. </p> <p>“And with so much fun currently taken out of weddings, such as not being allowed to have a proper reception, only inviting up to 30 people and a ban on singing; we were inspired to step in and enable some lucky couples to get married in a fun and unusual way,” he told <a rel="noopener" href="https://london-tv.co.uk/the-uks-first-drive-through-wedding-launched-by-free-now/" target="_blank">LondonTV</a>.</p> <p>In the UK, only 30 people are permitted to be at weddings, with a ban on dancing and singing.</p>

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What my daughter taught me when she came out as trans

<p><em>“I am a trans woman. I would like she/her pronouns and my name is Hannah.”</em></p> <p>This is the sentence my child blurted out to me over the phone three years ago. Despite its bluntness, the statement wasn’t callous or even ill-timed. Truth be told, I had forced the declaration. My child had called with something important to say and wanted to talk to my husband, Colin, and me at the same time, but Colin was away. Given that I possess a not-insignificant panic strain in my genetic makeup, I found myself, well, panicking. Was my child injured? Ill? Dying? I conjured the thin thread of authority I had over my then 25-year-old and said, <em>“No, you have to tell me now!”</em></p> <p><em>“I would rather wait,”</em> was the measured response. I could feel all the saliva I possessed leaving my body for damper pastures. I couldn’t have this matter hanging, so I pushed and pleaded, cajoled and begged. It was a shameless display – clearly, I wasn’t above that.</p> <p>After more back-and-forthing, out it came: <em>“I am a trans woman. I would like she/her pronouns, and my name is Hannah.”</em> I paused to take in the situation – or at least lie to myself that I was taking it in. Then, relentlessly upbeat, I exclaimed: <em>“I’m so happy for you, very happy. You know that your father and I will support you 100 per cent, and it’s wonderful and I’m not super surprised and you are such a wonderful person and we really don’t care what you do with your life as long as – ”</em> Dear God, I had to find a way to shut up. I was exhausting myself.</p> <p>I’m what I call an emotional first responder – when a loved one is sharing something difficult or complex, I put on my support cape and swoop in to distribute accolades and platitudes willy nilly. Breathe, I urged myself. Breathe.</p> <p><em>“So, um, why ‘Hannah’?”</em> I heard myself ask. There it was. Apparently my takeaway from this huge moment in my child’s life was a name. “<em>Hannah</em>” seemed to be my issue. Shallow waters run deep.</p> <p>She responded to my question in a very calm manner. <em>“You know how much I loved Cheryl’s dog.”</em></p> <p><em>“You are naming yourself after Hannah the dog? Really?”</em></p> <p><em>“I thought the name was soft and pretty, and I needed my name to be soft and pretty. Does that make sense?”</em></p> <p>Of course it made sense. My heart ached with shame. I was officially a bad person. Because it had been a few moments since I’d launched into a breakneck run-on sentence, I said, <em>“Well, if you love the name Hannah, I love the name Hannah, and I am sure your father will love it, and I am so glad it makes you feel beautiful, because you are beautiful, inside and out, and I support this choice wholeheartedly, honey. It’s your life and you are old enough to make your own choices and – ”</em></p> <p>At this point I was desperately hoping someone would hand me a pill. Hannah stopped my runaway train of thought by cutting in: <em>“Thanks. I love you so much and I knew you would support me. Why don’t I come over the day Dad gets home and we can have dinner and spend time talking?”</em></p> <p><em>“Of course, yes, um, Hannah. We can do that. That would be great. What a wonderful idea, um, Hannah.”</em></p> <p>Mercifully, she wrapped up the conversation with <em>“great, love you, bye”</em> and hung up before I could respond.</p> <p>I spent the next few hours pacing up and down the stairs of our home, our two terriers at my heels. As I attempted to sort out why I was upset, the dogs kept their gaze trained on me: Walk? Are we going for a walk? Walk?!</p> <p>After really analysing my reaction and my feelings, it came down to one thing. I was fine with my child’s transition. I wasn’t invested in her gender, just her humanity. But there was so much fear: fear for her safety, fear for how the world might treat her, fear for her heart.</p> <p>The two following nights were fraught with nightmares. I dreamed our son was lost. Our son was dead. We never had a son. I gave birth, but when I looked for my son, they told me at the hospital that I was mistaken and had simply had my appendix removed. Our son had joined a tiny-house cult and was never heard from again.</p> <p>Once I woke up, I was a zombie, the despair of those horrible dreams clinging to me like possessed dryer sheets. I had made peace with our child’s news and had no issues with the concept of her transition, but I was still mourning the loss of our son. I didn’t get a chance to say goodbye.</p> <p>She is a woman. As much as I thought I was prepared for that, I guess I wasn’t.</p> <p>I had to remind myself that this shouldn’t have been a huge shock. A few years before our daughter came out to us as trans, she had broken up with her girlfriend of four years. She told us she was bisexual and wanted to explore that. Then she began, as she put it, “experimenting with my feminine side.” After almost a year of seeing her integrate more traditionally feminine looks into her wardrobe, we became used to this new bi, fluid, femme, butch, male/female person.</p> <p>LGBTQ+ wasn’t all-encompassing enough. It’s like she was rocking the whole alphabet with her identity. And then she landed.</p> <p>The day after Hannah’s call, her dad came home. He was fine – no anxiety, no nightmares, just a loving parent in a relaxed state of acceptance. Show-off! As a result of my constant anxiety, I resembled an 80-year-old with dirty hair who had lived hard. Having no control over much else, I opted to shower. An all-around good choice.</p> <p>The following afternoon, we were in the kitchen making pasta primavera – our daughter’s favourite meal – as we waited for her to arrive. We were also spending the time diligently practicing pronouns. I was busy “she”-ing and “her”-ing it up with zeal, but every time I said “Hannah,” the name came out garbled, like I was drunk and wearing my night guard.</p> <p>At some point, we heard a key turn in the front door, and in she walked. To my elation, no one was lost or missing. They were all here in the hall: the hes, the shes and the thems, in one beautiful package. No one had left us. The same human we first met 25 years earlier was standing right in front of us. We all started to cry. Thank God it was all of us – I was tired of being the loopy one.</p> <p>We moved into our sunroom, wine in hand, to chat. The three of us talked all the talks there were to talk, and Colin and I asked all the questions we could think of. Over the course of an afternoon that can best be described as an acronym-o-rama, we listened and learned. We so wanted to respect and understand what she was going through. We could see that she was exploring, too, taking time to listen to her heart and her mind.</p> <p>At some point, the conversation moved into more familiar topics: her work and social life, Japanese films. It was as if nothing had changed. And nothing had, really. It had always been the three of us, our tight little unit, and today was no different. We ate her favourite meal and then our lovely daughter went home to her apartment.</p> <p>Since that day, we have sometimes slipped up on pronouns, and she has always patiently, gently corrected us. We’ve gone out in public, and people have been mostly supportive, but there have been looks. Stares. Our daughter says she’s often fine with that – people are just trying to figure her out. She’s a more generous soul than me.</p> <p>As time passed, I realised that I was somehow still stuck on the name.</p> <p>“Hannah” was lovely, yes, but not nearly unique or powerful enough for my girl. But I knew I had to let it go.</p> <p>Then, in a surprise turn of events, our daughter told us that many trans people come out using a name they don’t end up keeping. She said she had been thinking about it and she wanted a new name and would love for us to be part of that process. She asked us to pitch names from our Scottish and Irish backgrounds. I was elated and set to the task as soon as she was out of our sight. What a glorious privilege to get to help name her! I know it sounds silly, but it was like she was being born all over again.</p> <p>After copious research, Colin and I presented our daughter with 40 names. She decided on Kinley, from the Irish side. Kin for short. It fits her. It belongs to her.</p> <p>What is more difficult is figuring out how to move through the world such as it is. One day a year or so ago, Kinley and I were at a local fair. As we passed by a woman and her twenty something daughter, they shot a look of such hate and disgust that it left me breathless.</p> <p>The object of their ire was Kinley. The daughter, mouth agape, had exclaimed,</p> <p><em>“There’s a transvestite!”</em> and the mother then wheeled around to spew,</p> <p><em>“Where is it?”</em></p> <p><em>“It.”</em></p> <p>She said<em> “it.”</em> I was gutted.</p> <p>The younger woman circled my daughter, looking her up and down. We were stunned, frozen in place. As she walked away, I stumbled over to her on legs suddenly made of rubber. Circling her the same way she had circled Kinley, I looked her up and down, then moved close to her face, uttered <em>“uh-huh”</em> and stalked away.</p> <p>In an attempt to recover, I said to Kinley, <em>“This must make you so angry.”</em></p> <p>Her reply: <em>“I can’t afford to be angry. I just get frightened.”</em></p> <p>Frightened for just living her life. Frightened for existing.</p> <p>I came home and, weeping, told Colin what had taken place. But after thinking about it, I realized that my reaction, although possibly warranted, was also aggressive. That didn’t sit well with me.</p> <p>So I had cards made up. If things got ugly again, I would hand out a simple statement, embellished on one side with a lovely pink flower, that reads: <em>“My daughter is a trans woman. She is a loving and kind human being. Please join me in supporting her and every person who is trying to live their authentic life. Peace and love.”</em></p> <p>I remember the day the package arrived in the mail. Colin laughed as I opened the box of 250 cards. <em>“Wow, you’re expecting trouble!”</em> he told me. What can I say? There was a special if you ordered in bulk. I am happy to say that I have not handed out a single card.</p> <p>Instead, I get to focus on Kinley, my lovely, brave, poised, bright daughter. I have a daughter! There should be a newer, more powerful word for pride. As for our family, life as a trio continues as before, filled with old favourites, like watching movies, and new experiences, like buying bras.</p> <p>A little while ago, Kinley and I were out shopping for clothes. As we exited our separate cubicles in the change room, we realised, laughing, that we had tried on the exact same dress.</p> <p>I ended up buying one dress for me and treating Kinley to hers. At least that way I know she won’t be raiding my closet – because that’s what daughters do.</p> <p><em>Written by Debra McGrath. This article first appeared on </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/what-my-daughter-taught-me-when-she-came-out-as-trans"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Weeks to live: Woman marries love of her life after being falsely promised more time

<p>A terminally ill bride has married the love of her life with just days to live after she wrongly told by doctors that a cancerous lump on her leg was something not to think about.</p> <p>23-year-old Ashleigh Simrajh tied the knot with her boyfriend Jason Hale in a deeply emotional last-minute ceremony that was attended by the couple’s family and friends on the Gold Coast.</p> <p>Ashleigh was diagnosed with cancer in May last year – over a year after she was told a lump on her leg was nothing serious.</p> <p>Her family claims the doctor dismissed it for nothing more than a “wart”.</p> <p><img id="__mcenew" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837771/grandma.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3d6474caf0c04678ac18366cd6a501a2" /></p> <p>She was sent her to a surgeon after a quick visual examination and was quoted $2,500 to get the lump removed, her father Tony Simrajh explained to Sunrise.</p> <p>“Ashley went away from those appointments thinking she just had something cosmetic on her and it wasn’t something that she had to worry about,” he said.</p> <p>“About May last year she went to check it again because it was sore, with another doctor, who within five minutes did a biopsy and then we got the devastating news that it was a nodular melanoma.”</p> <p>Scans that uncovered the cancer had determined it was already too late as it had spread to Ashleigh’s lungs, lymph nodes and liver.</p> <p>Tony says that his daughter has been using all of her energy throughout her cancer battle to encourage others to go for regular skin checks.</p> <p>She has also urged people to question a doctor’s diagnosis if something doesn’t feel right</p> <p>“It’s a story that didn’t need to happen,” he said.</p> <p>“If the basics had been done then we wouldn’t be where we are now.”</p> <p>“Ashleigh is 23 years of age and has terminal cancer due to a GP and specialist not conducting basic tests like a biopsy,” Tony said on a <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/d8wx3-ashleighs-cancer-journey" target="_blank">GoFundMe page</a> set up for his sick daughter.</p> <p>“She is on a mission to get her story out there for young people to get checked but also to get another doctor to have a look at it if you are still not sure.</p> <p>“That would have saved her life if she did.”</p> <p><em>Image Credit: Willow And Finch Photography</em></p>

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Family rallies behind pregnant Queensland woman after husband’s tragic death

<p>Family and friends are showing their support to a young woman from Queensland, who is set to give birth to triplets, after the sudden death of her husband.</p> <p>32-year-old Matt Conwell died after being hit by a car in Carindale on September 2.</p> <p>He leaves behind wife Ashleigh, who was inconsolable at the scene of the incident which occurred in Brisbane’s south-east.</p> <p>Speaking to Courier Mail, Ashleigh’s sister, Emily Fallon revealed that family and friends are supporting the soon-to-be mum to “(make) sure Ashleigh is not alone now and not alone in the future”.</p> <p>“There is a tribe behind her, and there is going to be a village that raises these babies.</p> <p>“The outpouring of support is a testament to the kind of person Matt was – very non-judgemental, very genuine and caring, an unassuming, quiet person who had time for everyone.”</p> <p>Fallon told the paper that the family’s loss “still doesn’t seem real”, and her sister had been in “severe shock for the first few days”.</p> <p>A family friend of the couple, Alexandra Nesevski, set up a GoFundMe page to “help Ashleigh bring her and Matt’s little trio into the world and provide a future for them.”</p> <p>Nesevski says Ashleigh faces significant financial implications as she endures her world being “torn apart emotionally”.</p> <p>Both she and Conwell were hit hard when the pandemic began.</p> <p>“They were already stretching every dollar and budgeting tightly for the arrival of their unexpected but so very wanted ‘instant’ family,” Nesevski said.</p> <p>“Losing Matt has placed an almost overwhelming burden on Ashleigh.”</p> <p>At the time of publication, more than $140,000 had been raised for Ashleigh.</p>

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Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban’s secret vow renewals Down Under

<p>After a rough start to the year, Nicole Kidman and Keith Urban have finally found solace in Byron Bay in the NSW North Coast.</p> <p>Last week it was revealed the couple, along with their daughters Sunday, 12 and Faith, nine, are calling a rumoured $20,000-a-week estate home as the actress films her new TV show,<span> </span><em>Nine Perfect Strangers</em>.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>Woman’s Day</em>, an insider revealed that the Spanish-style property is about to serve as a stage for a vow renewal ceremony between the couple, who celebrated their 14th wedding anniversary in June.</p> <p>"Nicole had barely dropped her suitcase when she was struck with the idea of doing this with Keith at the house," says a source.</p> <p>"It just feels made for a romantic ceremony, and Nicole has this fantasy of exchanging sweet nothings with her husband in the macadamia orchard surrounded by twinkling fairy lights and their closest family members."</p> <p>"It's been a rough year full of separations and stress for Nicole and Keith, and this could be the perfect way to put this all behind them," says the source.</p> <p>"At the back of Nicole's mind is always her mum's health worries, and she wants to put on a day for Janelle to bask in – and she loves nothing more than being surrounded by family."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEAgknZptWY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEAgknZptWY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">#ByronBay is the real deal! 😍🌅 No green screen needed 👌 #OfficeViews</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/nicolekidman/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Nicole Kidman</a> (@nicolekidman) on Aug 17, 2020 at 3:55pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Despite being hard at work on set, Nicole is said to be using her downtime to plan the ceremony.</p> <p>"She's organising mocktails for Keith, of course, and plans to turn the stunning deck overlooking the fields and ocean into a giant dance floor.</p> <p>She wants it to be extremely intimate, so it will most likely just be her mum and sister, his mum and brother, and their nieces and nephews," revealed the source, saying Sunday and Faith will be bridesmaids on the big day.</p> <p>Meanwhile, "hopeless romantic" Keith, 52, is already working on a speech.</p> <p>"He's pottering around writing a speech that he knows will be a tear-jerker," says the source.</p> <p>"Nicole and Keith are excited to create a beautiful day for their nearest and dearest – and give their marriage some much-needed TLC as well".</p>

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Signs you’re a conversational narcissist

<p>Showing conversational narcissism doesn’t mean you have a personality disorder. (To learn more about that, watch out for these 12 signs you’re dealing with a narcissist.) The term was coined by sociologist Charles Derber and describes the tendency to turn a conversation back to yourself. A balanced dialogue should involve both sides, but conversational narcissists tend to keep the focus on themselves, so you’re getting attention but not giving any away, says licenced marriage and family therapist Kate Campbell, PhD. “It invalidates the other person and what they’re trying to share,” she says. The problem is, talking about ourselves is natural, so it’s hard to notice when you’re overdoing it.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>You don’t ask many questions</strong></p> <p>Asking questions gives the other person a chance to elaborate more – so conversational narcissists won’t ask them, says Celeste Headlee, author of We Need to Talk: How to Have Conversations that Matter. “If they do ask questions, they’re questions that lead back to themselves,” she says. “Things like ‘Do you know what I mean?’ ‘Did I tell you about this?’ ‘Did we see this movie?’” To be a better listener, ask follow-up questions to show interest in what the other person is saying.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>You use a lot of filler phrases</strong></p> <p>Even when listening to another person, a conversational narcissist will respond mostly with fillers like “hmm” or “interesting” instead of showing any true curiosity, says Headlee. “It’s passive conversational narcissism, which is withholding attention until the attention goes back to ourselves,” she says. Make sure you’re fully engaged in a conversation, even if you can’t personally relate – your relationship will be stronger for it.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>You’ve been talking for ages</strong></p> <p>The amount of time you’ve been talking is a major red flag that you’re showing conversational narcissism. “It becomes more of a monologue versus a dialogue,” says Dr Campbell. “You need to have a back-and-forth flow.” Make a point of being more self-aware of how long you’ve been talking. If no one else can get a word in edgewise, it’s time for you to step aside for the next speaker.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The listeners’ eyes are glazing over</strong></p> <p>Because you care so much about what you’re talking about, sometimes it can be hard to realise that you’ve been dominating the conversation. The trick, then, is to notice subtle cues in the people you’re with. “Their body language might look uncomfortable, or they could be crossing their arms or not paying attention,” says Dr Campbell. Some might even be scrolling through their phones to avoid engaging. At that point, try to bring one of them into the conversation by mentioning something he or she would want a say in.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>You wait until you’re done to ask questions</strong></p> <p>You’ve noticed you’ve been doing most of the talking in the conversation – great! That’s the first step to shutting down your own conversational narcissism. But it won’t mean much if you only say “enough about me!” at the end of your chat when everyone is getting ready to leave, you aren’t giving the other person much chance to talk. “It’s a nod to politeness … when really it’s just surface and not an honest invitation,” says Headlee. Give the others a chance to get a word in early on so you can have a balanced two-way conversation.</p> <p>One phrase Headlee says you shouldn’t let out of your mouth when someone else is dealing with a tragedy: “I know how you feel.” You might think you’re showing support, but that phrase is actually turning the conversation away from the other person’s pain and over to your own. “It shuts down that conversation,” says Headlee. “You’re saying ‘you don’t need to tell me anymore – I know how you feel.’” What that person really needs is a listening ear, she says, so encourage your friend to tell you more. No need to pretend you can’t relate, but after you share a story, bring the focus back to the other person. Try something like “I lost a parent last year too and can’t imagine what you’re going through. Is there any way I can help?”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>You’re constantly thinking of your next line</strong></p> <p>In contrast to a conversational narcissist, a good listener “would be listening to understand versus listening to respond or share a story,” says Dr Campbell. Instead of wracking your brain for a similar story you can add to the conversation, put the focus on the speaker. Once there’s a pause, show you genuinely want to understand by confirming what you’ve heard and allowing the person to elaborate, or ask for extra details.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>You’re feeling awkward</strong></p> <p>Some people try to ask questions to divert focus away from themselves when they’re feeling shy, says Headlee. On the other hand, others might default to conversational narcissism, says Dr Campbell. “Especially if they’re nervous or uncomfortable socially, they go back to what they know – and that’s their own personal experiences,” she says. Try these science-backed tips for boosting self-confidence to get over your nerves.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Marissa Laliberte</em><em>. This article first appeared on </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/relationships/8-signs-youre-a-conversational-narcissist"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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12 proven ways siblings help make you who you are

<p>Whether you grew up with a bossy big sister, a whiney little brother, or a twin you couldn’t live without, we don’t often consider the roles our sibs play in our lives. “Grownups can have very strong love-hate feelings about their siblings, but adults don’t always recognise how formative those childhood relationships were,” says Laurie Kramer, PhD, a clinical psychologist and Professor of Applied Psychology. She adds that science has just recently started investigating these dynamics. “There’s been an awful lot of research on how parents – especially mothers – impact the adults their children become, while the influences of siblings has been under-recognised. But when you study siblings you see how powerful those relationships are in terms of shaping the people we end up being and affecting social skills that impact other relationships across our lives.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Having a unique influence</strong></p> <p>Part of the power of sibling relationships comes from the fact that they’re different from all other family and social connections. “It’s the longest-lasting relationship in most people’s lives,” says Susan McHale, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Human Development and Family Studies, and Professor of Demography at Penn State University. “It starts in childhood before people meet a spouse or partner and usually ends in late life after parents are gone, so there’s a lot of time for sibling influence.” In addition, growing up together means sharing intimate knowledge about the interior of your family and each other. “Not many people know you like your sibling does,” McHale adds.</p> <p>What’s more, a sibling relationship often brings different stages together. “Unlike childhood friendships, siblings – unless twins – aren’t the same age,” says Nina Howe, PhD. “So they’re at different levels in terms of development and knowledge of the world, which can come into play as they interact.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Providing practice</strong></p> <p>The fights and friendships between young siblings add up to rehearsal for life outside the nest. “The sibling relationship can be a natural laboratory for learning how to get along in the world,” says Howe. This can include figuring out how to engage in positive interplay, testing authority over younger siblings and negotiating disagreements. Of course, such practise can involve negative behaviours, too. A 2014 Developmental Psychology paper co-authored by McHale that looked at the social “training ground” between brothers and sisters reported, “If sibling exchanges are predominantly hostile, then negative interaction patterns are reinforced and the child develops a generalised coercive interpersonal style.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Predicting your romantic relationships</strong></p> <p>It turns out whether you grew up with a same-sex or other-sex sibling impacts the nature of your romantic heterosexual relationships in adolescence. “Middle childhood is a period of segregation, when the other sex ‘has cooties,’ so exposure to peers of the opposite gender can be limited,” says McHale. “This means that children with a sibling of the other sex have the advantage of seeing the behaviours and interests that are more common in the other gender.” McHale co-authored a 2015 study in the Journal of Family Issues that found adolescents who had grown up with other-sex siblings had greater “romantic competence,” which included considering themselves better able to relate to an other-sex partner. “We also asked adolescents in romantic relationships to rate their levels of intimacy, conflict and power, and we found those with other-sex siblings had higher quality romantic relationships,” McHale says.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Being shaped by parents’ “favourites”</strong></p> <p>Researchers say a key area of sibling life is the perception of whether mum and dad played favourites. “From a young age, children are very attuned to how parents treat them relative to their sibling,” says McHale, who has published multiple studies in this area. “A great deal of research has shown that children and adolescents who are less favoured – especially in terms of warmth, closeness and support – have more adjustment problems, from depressive symptoms to risky behaviour.”</p> <p>Research showing these connections has found that even adult children are susceptible to the impact of uneven treatment from parents. A 2013 study in the Journal of Marriage and Family found that young adults who said they got less parental support than their sibling reported more depression, and the greater the amount of differential treatment, the less closeness there was between siblings. However, if a parent’s uneven treatment is warranted for some reason, for example, if one sibling has a disability or illness, the other sibling might not like it, but they do consider it fair, which can counteract the effects of differential treatment on children’s adjustment.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Affecting achievement</strong></p> <p>Differential treatment from parents can also impact each sibling’s academic achievement, says McHale, who has researched this area well. “If parents see one child as being smarter than the other, the difference in school grades between the two siblings increases over time.” Some studies have even seen parental differential treatment predict differences in tertiary graduation among siblings. This phenomenon may have to do with the ways kids see their place in the family. For example, if little brother gets the message he’s “the athletic one” and big brother gets the message he’s “the smart one,” little brother may be less inclined to try in academic areas. “All this evolves from the parents’ differential treatment, which leads to children hearing messages about who they are and how they compare to who their sibling is.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Impacting the parent you become</strong></p> <p>Kramer’s research has involved visiting families to observe siblings and talk with parents, and she was surprised to find a backward link in the way that mothers’ memories of their own sibling relationships affected the sibling relationships of their kids. “It was striking that mothers who reported more negative sibling relations during childhood were most likely to have offspring who interacted more positively,” said the resulting paper in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. This observation seemed counter-intuitive until Kramer dug deeper. She realised that mums who had positive childhood sibling relationships might assume kids just get along, so these mums were more hands-off with their own kids. By contrast: “Mothers reporting anxious and lonely childhood peer relations took the most active role in their children’s development and voiced the strongest intentions to help their children experience more positive relationships,” the paper found.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Developing a sense of humour</strong></p> <p>Howe and her colleagues have been laughing more lately because they’ve started to study humour between young siblings, from potty jokes to goofy movements. “Siblings are a natural audience for one another, so they can explore that humour dynamic in a safe, positive way, which serves us later in life,” she says. What’s more, when you tell a joke, you’re understanding someone else’s point of view, which is an important skill even beyond humour, she adds. “Those kinds of interactions don’t go away. While the bathroom humour may disappear in adolescence, developing a good-natured sense of humour is a really important part of getting along with people – it just makes life go better.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Getting pegged by birth order</strong></p> <p>For some, being the firstborn, middle chil or baby of the family affects us long after we’ve left the nest. “I think birth order has some impact on the interactions of young children: Older ones tend to be leaders in play and teaching, so younger ones default to the complementary role of the learner,” says Howe, who adds that older siblings often assume caretaker responsibilities, as well. “Those roles can persist throughout adulthood.” Kramer agrees that birth order can bestow certain traits. “In many families, older children can be expected to act as role models, helpers and teachers, which could lead some first-born children to develop characteristics of being a leader or helper over time.” However, both experts concede these roles can reverse, either because you rebel against them, or because adult illnesses or injuries among older siblings can force younger brothers and sisters to become caretakers.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Increasing risk-taking behaviour</strong></p> <p>Young siblings are famous for getting in trouble together, and research is showing how such negative behaviours can lead to bad choices later in life. A concept called deviance training (nicknamed the “partners in crime” theory) says that siblings can team up to make mischief at home and beyond. “Siblings can get together to engage in risky behaviours, from disobeying parents to off-colour jokes, and they can reinforce these non-compliant behaviours by egging each other on with laughter and praise,” says McHale. Some evidence – including the 2014 Developmental Psychology study co-authored by McHale – suggests that such deviance training is more common in brother pairs and that the closer the sibling relationship, the greater the influence. In this way, having a big brother who engages in risky behaviours puts little brother at greater risk for those behaviours as he grows. “Risky behaviours like playing with matches in primary school often predict risky behaviours like underage drinking in adolescence,” McHale says.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Becoming stressed – or strengthened – by disability</strong></p> <p>Having a brother or sister with special needs can create lots of challenges. “Siblings of children with disabilities are at a greater risk than average of developing emotional issues, anxiety and stress,” Avidan Milevsky, PhD, wrote in Psychology Today. He explained that these siblings may be neglected by overburdened mums and dads, take on parent-like responsibilities, and grapple with emotions from guilt and embarrassment to fear and jealousy. But it’s also possible that having a sibling with a disability could create opportunities later in life. “These siblings often develop certain positive characteristics such as self-control, cooperation, empathy, tolerance, altruism, maturity and responsibility as a result of dealing with their family situation,” Milevsky wrote. “In some cases, these siblings use someone’s attitude about special needs as a test for screening friends and mates. Their involvement with their sibling may even lead them to choose future occupations in the helping professions.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Providing later-life support</strong></p> <p>As siblings grow they often form other key relationships with spouses and their own children. But later in life those newer connections can end or change. “A lot of people are going to wind up in senior adulthood without a husband or wife, their kids have scattered to other cities, and the only people left at the dance will be the ones what brung them, which is their brothers and sisters,” Jeffrey Kluger, a TIME magazine editor at large and author of The Sibling Effect: What the Bonds Among Brothers and Sisters Reveal About Us told NPR’s Science Friday. This is the time to take advantage of healthy sibling relationships and retrieve ones that may have been lost. “The argument I make, particularly when it comes to taking care of ageing parents, is if you can fix [a sibling relationship], do,” Kluger said. “Your sibs are just such a resource.”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The absence of siblings</strong></p> <p>While there may be some stereotypes that say an “only child” is selfish and can’t get along with others, the experts say not to worry. “There is a small amount of research on only children, and for the most part those kids grow to be well adjusted,” says Howe. “Only children often develop close connections with cousins or friends instead.” Kramer agrees. “When it comes to developing social skills, it’s not like you’re doomed for life if you’re an only child,” she says. “Children find other relationships in their lives to develop those competencies.”</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Kimberly Hiss. This article first appeared on </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/relationships/12-proven-ways-siblings-help-make-you-who-you-are"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe"><em>here’s our best subscription offer</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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“What I wish I’d known before getting a divorce”

<p>Divorces can get really messy if you let them. But the tips below from the real-life men and women who have been through it may help make this huge life change as smooth a process as possible.</p> <ol> <li><strong> Treat it like a business deal</strong></li> </ol> <p>“Take your heart out of the process, says Karen L.</p> <p>“Remember, your lawyer is not your friend; he is your legal counsel. Period.”</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Try to have a good relationship with your ex</strong></li> </ol> <p>“Keep in mind that your kids are not involved in the demise of the relationship, they are always the mother and fathers’ children no matter what,” says Stephanie M.</p> <p>“Keeping the children out of the parents’ relationship is an effort that needs to be both parents’ priority. This is something that should be addressed before the children are told about the change that’s about to happen in their lives.”</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> Your actions will impact your children</strong></li> </ol> <p>“I wish I had known how much my resentments and the hurts that I had not dealt with and let go of impacted my daughter’s life after the divorce,” says Phil R.</p> <p>“Life was, and sometimes is still, hard but we have all grown through the pain.”</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Don’t be afraid to do it</strong></li> </ol> <p>“Staying in a marriage for 22 years was such a waste of precious years,” says Liz B.</p> <p>“I was fearful of leaving because my ex threatened that if I did I would lose my daughter.</p> <p>“Knowing now what I know about child custody, that would not have happened. My daughter deserved a better, calmer and less chaotic home.”</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> There will still be co-parenting differences</strong></li> </ol> <p>“Our biggest challenge with marriage has been over the differences in parenting styles,” says Randy U.</p> <p>“We fought about everything from respecting the privacy of the master bedroom to being accountable for chores.”</p> <p>And those arguments don’t stop just because you’re now divorced.</p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Keep financial records</strong></li> </ol> <p>“I wish I would have had in-depth knowledge of financial assets and debts including insurance policies, business worth and stock accounts,” says Lisa H.</p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong> Listen to your instincts</strong></li> </ol> <p>“I got divorced because my ex was drinking early morning through the night. Then he would pick a fight when he’d had too many,” says Gilly H. “I didn’t want my young children growing up with that.”</p> <p>But whatever the reason, listen to your instincts, she says.</p> <p>“Make plans to work and support yourself and your kids. Be self-sufficient, but get family and local support too if you can.</p> <p>“Work hard and your kids will love and respect you, even if you are a single parent.”</p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong> There’s love after divorce</strong></li> </ol> <p>“It doesn’t matter your age or number of children, there are lots of good, single people out there,” says Erin O.</p> <p>“Women especially are told that once we become a certain age, we are no longer ‘marriage material’, whatever that is.</p> <p>“Don’t buy into that. If what you want is marriage again, then you will find it!”</p> <p><em>Written by Kaitlyn Chamberlin. This article first appeared on </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/relationships/what-i-wish-id-known-before-getting-a-divorce" target="_blank"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe" target="_blank"><em>here’s our best subscription.</em></a></p> <p><strong>Image:</strong> Shutterstock</p>

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Bunnings Karen holds seance with Princess Diana

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Lizzy Rose, known as "Bunnings Karen", has claimed that she summoned the spirit of Princess Diana in a seance, explaining she feels the late royal's "energy".</p> <p>She posted a Facebook status on Monday, where she claimed to have a spiritual encounter with the late princess.</p> <p>"I have worked with her energy most of my life whilst she was living and since her public death," Ms Rose's post reads. </p> <p>"I am working with her energy and essence to gain the answers that we seek."</p> <p>The Facebook post explained that she will record the answers on an audio file and will then be translated into a video and be released on her social media.</p> <p>"I feel we need to connect deeply to what's ahead of us as to prepare in safety, wisdom and intelligence for the sake of our humanity".</p> <p>She took questions from her followers and asked the spirit 33 questions, including what Princess Diana thinks of Meghan Markle and "is there a matrix hack we can use to unbind the police from the dark magic so they stand with the people on the day of the protest?".</p> <p>Lizzy Rose has been called "Bunnings Karen" after refusing to wear a mask despite it being mandatory in Victoria and filmed the encounter.</p> <p>She uses her social media to spread conspiracy theories, including a video of her "vaccination burn" to get rid of the current Victorian Government and Daniel Andrews.</p> <p>"Cast you and your agenda out. We say no to mandatory vaccinations against our will," she said in the footage.</p> <p>"We burn away your evil agenda. We, the awakened people, say no to mandatory vaccinations. We cast you out."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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We asked kids who their favourite teacher is, and why. Here’s what they said

<p>Most of us can remember a favourite teacher. Some of us can also remember a teacher we didn’t get on with or with whom we always seemed to get in trouble.</p> <p>Relationships between students and teachers at school are important. They predict students’ motivation, performance, and expectations of future relationships.</p> <p>We interviewed 96 students from a range of schools in Years 3 to 9. We wanted to find out who students remember as their favourite and least favourite teachers. We also wanted to find out what made those relationships positive or negative.</p> <p>In our study, published in the journal School Psychology Review, all students described similar factors that made them like their teachers — care, kindness and humour.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>What we wanted to find</strong></p> <p>Past research shows students with disruptive behaviour are more likely to experience negative relationships with their teachers than their less disruptive peers. Teachers often rate relationships with such students to be low in closeness and high in conflict.</p> <p>But these relationships aren’t always negative. Even self-described troublemakers and class clowns often remember a specific teacher who stood up for them, who took them under their wing, or who changed their perceptions of school for the better.</p> <p>The first group we interviewed consisted of 54 students who had a history of disruptive behaviour, such as acting out in class or being frequently suspended. Around half were in a special behaviour school for disruptive behaviour, and the remainder attended a mainstream school.</p> <p>The second group consisted of 42 students with no history of disruptive behaviour. They were often high achieving (such as school prefects or A-students), and all attended a mainstream school.</p> <p>We were particularly interested in the “magic ingredients” that would support positive student-teacher relationships, even for disruptive students. We also wanted to determine if there were “contaminating ingredients” that could sour these relationships, even for exemplary students.</p> <p><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>Who is your favourite teacher?</strong></p> <p>We first asked students if they could remember any teachers they’d had a really good relationship with. If the student replied yes, we then asked what made the relationship good.</p> <p>The reasons students liked teachers were almost identical across groups. Even highly disruptive students bonded with teachers who were caring, kind and funny.</p> <p>One 13-year-old with disruptive behaviour (in a special school) said of their favourite teacher:</p> <p><em>"Every time I’d go there without food … Miss H always used to buy me lunch, let me go on excursions. … I was never allowed to go on an excursion [before] because of my ADHD."</em></p> <p>A 15-year-old with disruptive behaviour (also in a special school) said of their favourite teacher:</p> <p><em>"Mr M, he’s just hilarious. He’s the funniest man on earth. He’s always saying this weird stuff […] walking around with this big puffy jacket, like some kind of Russian guard […] pretending his pencil is a cigar […] we just laugh."</em></p> <p>These answers show how important it is for teachers to separate student disciplinary matters from relationship matters.</p> <p>Around 16% of students highlighted teacher helpfulness, while 10% highlighted effective teaching, as a key advantage of their favourite teachers.</p> <p>One 12-year-old without disruptive behaviour said about their favourite teacher:</p> <p><em>"She gave me and some of the other smart kids harder work. [I liked that] because it challenges me."</em></p> <p> </p> <p><strong>What causes conflicts?</strong></p> <p>We next asked students if they could remember any teachers they really didn’t get on with or clashed with. If a student replied yes, we asked what sort of things would bring that on.</p> <p>While not all students could remember a teacher they clashed with, a large proportion of each group could.</p> <p>Students in both groups overwhelmingly agreed on the key factors contributing to negative relationships.</p> <p>Across groups, 86% highlighted instances where they had perceived the teacher being unnecessarily hostile towards them, or where they felt they were treated unfairly.</p> <p>One 13-year-old with disruptive behaviour (in a mainstream school) said:</p> <p><em>"I usually have my earphones in and I just sit there and just listen to music […] she just like opened the door, seen me listening to music […] She comes up, grabs the earphones, she just rips them out of my ear [pretend shouting] ‘Listen to the teacher!'"</em></p> <p>A 16-year-old with disruptive behaviour (in a special school) said:</p> <p><em>"She just used to pin stuff on me. If I done the littlest thing wrong and someone done somethin’ major wrong, she would […] go for me first […] She just hated me, and I hated her."</em></p> <p>Another 10-year-old with no disruptive behaviour said:</p> <p><em>"She was always yelling […] Because she gave us a real hard book, and we were only in Year 1, and we couldn’t really read it that good […]"</em></p> <p>Frequently, students’ descriptions of unfair treatment included pre-emptive punishments and reprimands:</p> <p>One 15-year-old with disruptive behaviour (in a special school) said:</p> <p><em>"Well, I remember one time that, like, I went inside the classroom and she just, like, came up to me and she was like, you had better not talk this lesson and I wasn’t even talking at all."</em></p> <p>Another 15-year-old with disruptive behaviour (in a mainstream school) said:</p> <p><em>"Well, she always picked me out, as well, for misbehaving, so I got in a lot of trouble for that, but […] like, a lot of people were just doing a lot worse than I was doing, but she was like, no, no, you’ve been bad before."</em></p> <p>A 12-year-old with no disruptive behavior (in a mainstream school) said:</p> <p><em>"Every time I did something in the playground that was good, someone told her I’d done something bad and [Miss C] always believed them."</em></p> <p><strong> </strong><strong> </strong></p> <p><strong>What teachers can take from this</strong></p> <p>Based on our research, below are some things teachers and parents can do to promote positive relationships with teachers for the young people in their care.</p> <ol> <li>Remember empathy and humour go a long way to building positive relationships with students. Caring about students as individuals genuinely does break down barriers. Most teachers already report caring deeply for their students. It may simply be a matter of making one’s acts of kindness and care more visible<br /><br /></li> <li>Consider how warnings are given. Students benefit when they are allowed to start the day with a clean slate, and when reprimands are held back until an offence has actually been committed<br /><br /></li> <li>Separate classroom management from relationship building. Students who are most disruptive are also often the ones who could use a positive relationship the most<br /><br /></li> <li>Parents can help by encouraging students to reflect on their relationships with teachers. Sometimes situations are ambiguous, and understanding a teacher’s perspective may help in interpreting situations that would otherwise feel unreasonable to a young person. Students and teachers both win when they work on the same team.</li> </ol> <p> </p> <p class="p1"><em>Written by Misha Ketchell. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/we-asked-kids-who-their-favourite-teacher-is-and-why-heres-what-they-said-145093">The Conversation</a>.</em></p> <p> </p>

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Richard Wilkins shares rare photo of eldest daughter Rebecca

<p>Richard Wilkins is the proud father of five kids, and on Sunday he honoured his eldest daughter Rebecca who we rarely see on social media.</p> <p>To celebrate her birthday, Wilkins shared a snap of him alongside Rebecca, her husband James and her daughter Bella.</p> <p>“So proud of my beautiful Becky, She's always done everything perfectly and continues to do so,” he said.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEOSAH9huZB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEOSAH9huZB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Richard Wilkins (@richardwilkins)</a> on Aug 23, 2020 at 12:17am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Happy Birthday my Darling, and hearty congratulations to you, James and Bella.”</p> <p>In the photo, the veteran reporter was leaning over his beloved daughter as she marked her special day.</p> <p>In the second photo of the sequences, Wilkins was holding up a black and white portrait of his darling daughter.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CDuqLlWBMxx/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CDuqLlWBMxx/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Richard Wilkins (@richardwilkins)</a> on Aug 10, 2020 at 5:33pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Rebecca is Richard's second oldest child and eldest daughter.</p> <p>Rebecca may not be on social media, or have a following like her little brother Christian, but she still remains close to her star-studden family.</p> <p>In February 2016, when Rebecca married her long-time beau James Bateman in Bali, the entire Wilkins clan was present for the incredible occasion.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-WSiJZhAPg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-WSiJZhAPg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Richard Wilkins (@richardwilkins)</a> on Mar 29, 2020 at 11:47pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Christian said he was thrilled to be involved in Bec's big day.</p> <p>“I'm going to be a bridesman. My sister and I are very close. I was honoured because I'm obviously close to her fiancé as well,” he said.</p> <p>“I've gone with her to all the dress fittings and all the bridesmaids' fittings, so it was nice to be part of that.”</p>

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Royal bridesmaid reveals real truth behind Prince Frederik and Princess Mary’s “fairy-tale” meeting

<p>Princess Mary and her husband Prince Frederik shook the world when it was revealed they met by chance at a Sydney pub during the 2000 Olympics.</p> <p>However, a bridesmaid of Mary Donaldson, now the Crown Princess of Denmark, has revealed her friend’s seemingly “random” meeting with the royal isn’t quite the fairy tale we all thought it was.</p> <p>Amber Petty says Mary actually met her then-future hubby at an exclusive private dinner party with a group of royals who were in Australia for the Olympics.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.29117259552044px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837423/new-project-4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ed2d81a67624464ba5a05c216e300897" /></p> <p>“I’m sorry to break everybody’s hearts, but it’s not always about randomly bumping into princes in pubs,” Petty told Seven’s<em> Sunrise.</em></p> <p>“It wasn’t just a random meeting.</p> <p>“It was an organised small dinner during the Olympics and Mary happened to be invited and most of the guests happened to be royals.”</p> <p>“That’s really the truth... it’s not what you know, it’s who you know.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.29117259552044px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837422/new-project-5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7ca75598d75242d69269ddb542432dd4" /></p> <p><em>Mary Elizabeth Donaldson's bridesmaids, sisters Jane Alison Stephens, Patricia Anne Bailey and friend Amber Petty.</em></p> <p>Petty went on to say that Mary and Frederik were seated close together and quickly developed a “really lovely connection.”</p> <p>“I think they were sitting across from each other, which is obviously the perfect position to be talking and bonding with someone,” she said.</p> <p>“It was a very civilised, lovely dinner and it was the start of what would become a very big chapter for both of them.”</p> <p>Amber Petty is still relatively to the Princess and has just released her memoir, called<span> </span><em>This Is Not A Love Song.</em></p>

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13 famous sisters who were also fierce rivals

<p>Families fight – that’s just what they do. Usually, when a family has a rift within it, it’s kept within the home and dealt with internally. That is, of course, only when the family isn’t famous. For those in the public eye, every little problem is broadcast to the world.</p> <p>While all families have a few skeletons in the closet (and sometimes you only learn unbelievable family secrets after someone dies), famous families seem to have more than their fair share. For these famous female siblings, their dirty laundry was flaunted for the whole world. No one can drive you crazy like family!</p> <p><br /><br /><strong>Anne and Mary Boleyn</strong></p> <p>Both Mary Boleyn and her younger sister, Anne, had affairs with King Henry VIII, but only one married him. That sister wasn’t Mary – she was married off to one of the King’s friends in 1521. That left Anne, and well, lucky her…it wasn’t long before Henry grew tired of her and her inability to produce a living male heir. Henry set his sights on his next wife and had Anne imprisoned on trumped-up charges. In 1536, he had her beheaded.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Queen Mary and Queen Elizabeth</strong></p> <p>Before Anne, Henry VIII had been married to Catherine of Aragon, who’d borne him a daughter named Mary. Henry divorced Catherine to marry Anne Boleyn, but we know how that turned out (see above). Anne did give Henry a daughter, Elizabeth, before she died. Mary eventually became Queen in 1553. Fearing Elizabeth was more popular than she, Mary had Elizabeth imprisoned and banished; however, Elizabeth was the victor overall when Mary died childless in 1558, leaving Elizabeth to ascend the throne and become one of the most famous Queens in all of history.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Venus and Serena Williams</strong></p> <p>It’s only natural Venus and Serena would be famous for their sisterly rivalry, which has been played out in some 30 professional tennis matches since 1998, most recently in 2018. Serena leads Venus in terms of wins and number of weeks ranked as the number one female tennis player in the world. But there are no hard feelings from Venus apparently; the Williams sisters leave their rivalry on the clay (or grass).</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Lee Radziwell and Jackie Kennedy</strong></p> <p>The two daughters of Janet and Jack Bouvier were beautiful, wealthy, and though very loving as sisters, were highly competitive with one another, especially when it came to rich men. Although Lee eventually became a princess (having married a Polish prince), she couldn’t possibly “win” once Jackie married John F. Kennedy in 1953, in the union that created “Camelot”.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Catherine and Pippa Middleton</strong></p> <p>Like the Bouvier sisters, the Middleton sisters have always been loving but rivalrous. When Catherine married Prince William, it was clear that she’d “won.” Or was it? On the day of the wedding, while the new Duchess of Cambridge was undeniably a truly lovely bride, her sister, Pippa caught more attention for her gorgeous figure in her fitted, white bridesmaid’s dress. If this makes you think of your sister, try these family quotes that hit too close to home.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Joan Fontaine and Olivia de Havilland</strong></p> <p>Olivia and Joan, born in 1916 and 1917, respectively, both became major Hollywood stars, and stories of their professional rivalry followed them throughout their lives. Theirs wasn’t just a professional rivalry, however; Olivia had resented Joan from birth, and their fights sometimes became physical (Joan claimed Olivia broke her collarbone in 1933). Joan died in 2013 while Olivia is still alive, now 103 – but their rivalry will live on forever.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Zsa Zsa and Eva Gabor</strong></p> <p>Eva Gabor was famous for portraying the pampered socialite married to a farmer on television’s Green Acres. Both of her older sisters, Zsa Zsa and Magda, were in the entertainment industry too, but it was the rivalry between Zsa Zsa and Eva that was most famous. In 1990, the Los Angeles Times even went so far as to playfully tally up their “wins”: Eva was skinnier. Zsa Zsa had more marriages. Eva sold wigs. Zsa Zsa sold costume jewelry and skin cream. Ultimately, even though Eva was the more successful actress, ironically, people often confused the two Gabor sisters.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The Andrews Sisters</strong></p> <p>No one can compete with the Andrews Sisters trio in terms of their being the best-selling female vocal group of all time. But boy, did they compete with one another. Their fighting included a period of two years when Maxene and LaVerne wouldn’t speak to Patty. After LaVerne died, Maxene and Patty continued to sing together, but they never really stopped feuding. The AV Club reports that when asked about the sisters’ feud, Patty’s reply was that there’d only ever been one disagreement. “It started in 1937 and it’s still going!”</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>The Brontë sisters</strong></p> <p>There were three Brontë sisters, but many know only about Charlotte, author of Jane Eyre and Emily, author of Wuthering Heights. The lesser-known Anne may have been a better storyteller, but something derailed her career, and some believe it was Charlotte. “Charlotte had always underestimated and patronised” Anne according to Penguin Publishing Group, and Charlotte may have taken the idea for Jane Eyre from Anne’s Agnes Grey. Not that Anne was entirely blameless; it’s been said she used her book, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, to critique both Jane Eyre and Wuthering Heights.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Jessica and Ashlee Simpson</strong></p> <p>Jessica and her younger sister, Ashlee, competed intensely for record sales during the early naughts, but according to VH1 at least, they’ve had “equal success” with hits including “Irresistible” and “Pieces of Me,” respectively. Both have been hotly criticised (Jessica for being an airhead, and Ashlee for plastic surgery), but “they survived scrutiny and have powered on.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Cleopatra and her sister, Arsinoe</strong></p> <p>“It can’t be easy having a sister who is much more famous and successful than you,” writes the Dangerous Women Project of how it must have been for Arsinoe, the younger sister of Cleopatra. Yeah, that Cleopatra, the one who seduced Julius Caesar and Mark Antony, and ultimately committed suicide by snake bite. Before all that went down, however, Cleopatra and Arsinoe had been bitter political rivals with Cleopatra ultimately ordering the 20-year old Arsinoe’s murder.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Beyoncé and Solange Knowles</strong></p> <p>There was a short time during their childhood when the two Grammy-winning sisters weren’t getting along, revealed their mother Tina Knowles in a 2018 Facebook chat with Maria Shriver, as reported by the Independent. The relationship was fraught because Solange is five years younger and Beyonce was on her way to being a superstar from a young age. “She [Beyoncé] couldn’t stand her for a minute. You know, they were little, [Solange] was all in her stuff, trying to hang around her and her friends and Beyoncé was really irritated…” So Knowles brought the two to therapy, despite criticism from her own family. “My family was like, ‘you’re going to make them crazy because they’re too young for you to take them,’ but I wanted Beyoncé to be sensitive to the fact that Solange had to deal with being a little bit in her shadow.” By all accounts, Tina’s early invention worked and the two siblings are each other’s biggest supporters to this day.</p> <p> </p> <p><strong>Dear Abby and Ann Landers</strong></p> <p>Pauline and Esther Friedman had a “ferocious” rivalry, according to a 1958 LIFE profile, that fuelled their individual successes as advice columnists. While many consider Pauline’s “Dear Abby” the iconic advice column, it was Esther’s “Ask Ann Landers” that paved the way for it (and all other advice columns to follow) starting in 1955. The two went head-to-head almost immediately, and their rivalry continued throughout the remainder of their lives. In fact, it continues even after their deaths through their respective families.</p> <p> </p> <p><em>Written by Lauren Cahn. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/13-most-famous-sister-rivalries-in-history">Reader’s Digest</a>.</em></p>

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