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Etiquette rules even experts don’t follow anymore

<p><span>According to etiquette expert Peggy Post, times change, but manners, which she defines as a “sensitive awareness of the feelings of others,” remain constant. “If you have that awareness, you have good manners, no matter which fork you use.” The rules of etiquette are there to help smooth social interactions, but they aren’t intended to take the place of ‘manners’. That’s why etiquette rules that cease serving smooth social interactions eventually cease to exist.</span></p> <p><strong>A man should stand to greet a woman</strong></p> <div class="tg-container categorySection detailSection"> <div id="primary" class="contentAreaLeft"> <div id="page2" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>It wasn’t all that long ago that it was proper etiquette for a man to stand when greeting a woman entering the room. But today, standing up is correct etiquette whenever anyone greets another person. The body language of standing sends a signal to the person you’re greeting that you’re eager to greet that person, etiquette expert, Maralee McKee explains. Consider it ‘rising to the occasion,’ whatever your gender.</p> <p><strong>Ladies are served first</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page3" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>Traditional etiquette holds that at a seated meal, women are served first, going clockwise around the table. The men are then served, also going clockwise. But as you may or may not have noticed, the restaurant industry is quietly redefining the etiquette surrounding who gets served first to a more gender-neutral and overall efficient model, reports <em>Eater</em>, and that will likely affect the order of service in private homes as well as in restaurants.</p> <p><strong>Don't shake a woman's hand unless she offers</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="tg-container categorySection detailSection"> <div id="primary" class="contentAreaLeft"> <div id="page4" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>It used to be that ‘a man has no right to take a lady’s hand until it is offered,’ as was noted in one Victorian-age guide to etiquette. And it wasn’t all that long ago that people still followed this rule. In fact as recently as 2000, in GQ’s guide to handshake etiquette, the rule is clearly stated, ‘What’s proper is for the woman to offer her hand first.’ This is no longer the case. “Today, a man does not need to wait for a woman to offer her hand before he extends his. Whether you are a man or a woman, always remember to shake hands,” advises Emily Post. It’s a simple gesture that can make a big impact.</p> <p><strong>Wedding gifts should be based on the host's price per head</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page5" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-image">At one time, many people were under the impression that wedding gifts should match the host’s cost per plate at the reception. If this was ever actually proper (which wedding planning site, <em>The Knot</em>, calls into question), it no longer applies. As <em>The Knot</em> points out, using the cost per plate as a guide requires guests to ask nosy questions of the host. A current and more sensible rule of thumb is: give a gift in the price range that makes sense for your budget as gift-giver.</div> <div class="slide-image"></div> <div class="slide-image"><strong>You have a year to send a wedding gift</strong></div> </div> </div> <div id="page6" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>It used to be that the rules of etiquette permitted you to wait a full year after attending a wedding to send a wedding gift to the ‘newlyweds.’ And why that was isn’t even clear to etiquette experts, who might wonder whether the idea was to wait to see if the couple made it through the first year of marriage. Nowadays, it’s proper to send a wedding gift within a month (or sooner!) after the wedding.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/etiquette-rules-even-experts-dont-follow-anymore"><strong>The man pays for the meal</strong></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="tg-container categorySection detailSection"> <div id="primary" class="contentAreaLeft"> <div id="page7" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-image"></div> <div class="slide-image">Gone are the days of men being obligated to pay for the meals of the women with whom they dine. Going ‘Dutch’ is entirely appropriate, particularly when two equals mutually make a plan. Otherwise, the rule is that whoever does the inviting pays for the meal, according to the Emily Post Institute.</div> <div class="slide-image"></div> <div class="slide-image"><strong>A man must hold the door for a woman</strong></div> </div> </div> <div id="page8" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>It’s not that chivalry is dead, explains McKee. It’s that these days chivalry, like everything else, has moved into a gender-neutral territory. And so now it is no longer customary for a woman to move aside so that a man can open the door, especially if he’s a stranger. Rather, the first person at the door should open it and then hold it open for the next person. And when you do hold the door, be sure to stand in a way that allows for maximum room for others to pass.</p> <p><strong>No elbows on the table</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page9" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>The ‘no-elbows-on-the-table’ rule made a lot of sense in the days when tables were makeshift trestles covered with cloth because a misplaced elbow might mean the collapse of the table. But those days are long gone. In fact, these days, leaning in towards someone who is speaking, which might include resting on one’s elbow, is a sign of interest and attention. So, you can stop following the ‘no-elbows’ rule… except when you have a plate of food in front of you, according to McKee. Because that’s just inviting a mess.</p> <div class="at-below-post addthis_tool" data-url="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/etiquette-rules-even-experts-dont-follow-anymore"><strong>The man should walk on the left side of a woman</strong></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="tg-container categorySection detailSection"> <div id="primary" class="contentAreaLeft"> <div id="page10" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>The fact that this etiquette rule even requires a mention in today’s world is astonishing when you consider it stems from the Middle Ages, when knights wore their swords on the left side of their bodies, making it uncomfortable and potentially unsafe for a ‘lady’ to walk beside him on the left. It’s no longer the rule. In fact, there really is no rule about the ‘sides’ that men and women should walk on vis a vis one another.</p> <p><strong>‘Dear sir or madam’</strong></p> <div id="page1" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>It seems a common theme among all these etiquette rules that are no longer followed is that they make presumptions about gender that can no longer be made. Here is another one. At one time, ‘Dear sir,’ was the default greeting when corresponding with a stranger. Nowadays, it’s almost nonsensical, and adding ‘or madam’ doesn’t help (considering the many possible ways in which people identify). If you don’t have or can’t find a name, use the title of the position (eg. human resource manager) or ‘To Whom It May Concern,’ Grammarly suggests.</p> <p><strong>Adults addressing other adults as Mr or Ms</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page2" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>“We no longer need to call other adults who are approximately our same age by Mr or Ms and their last name until they ask us to call them by their first name,” McKee assures anyone who is still in doubt. “Unless it’s your corporate culture to do otherwise, as an adult you’re safe to call someone you’ve just met by their first name.</p> <p><strong>Offering toasts requires drinking alcohol</strong></p> </div> </div> </div> <div id="page3" class="slide-show"> <div id="test" class="slide listicle-slide"> <div class="slide-description"> <p>No. Just no. The silly etiquette rule requiring those not drinking alcohol to refrain from raising their glasses in a toast came entirely from superstition, dating back to the Ancient Greeks (involving a river of water symbolizing death). Etiquette experts such as Letitia Baldridge disagree with any such rule, advising, “If you are avoiding alcohol for any reason at all, feel free to hoist your glass of soft drink, water, or juice. You can also hold it to your lips without sipping, or raise your hand as though holding a glass.”</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Lauren Cahn</span>. This article first appeared in </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/etiquette-rules-even-experts-dont-follow-anymore" target="_blank"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. </em></p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Inside the private relationship with Nicole Kidman and her two oldest children

<p>In all her glamour and grace, Nicole Kidman has become known for keeping her personal life hidden from the public and tabloids.</p> <p>The starlet is mother to four children, and shares her two eldest, Cruise, 27, and Connor Cruise, 25 with her ex-husband Tom Cruise.</p> <p>Over the years, her relationship with her two adopted children has become a popular topic of conversation amongst tabloids, however Kidman insists she always has “unconditional love” and support for her children.</p> <p>However, there has always been curiosity on whether Nicole actually does have contact with her two children.</p> <p>Both she and Tom, who are Hollywood heavyweights in their own right, united in marriage in 1990 and most recently opened up about Isabella and Connor in an interview with<span> </span>Who.</p> <p>The 51-year-old actress’ two children are both loyal members of the Church of Scientology, just like their father.</p> <p>Nicole hasn’t appeared publicly with her two eldest since reportedly 2007.</p> <p>“They are adults. They are able to make their own decisions,” Nicole said when asked about Isabella and Connor.</p> <p>“They have made choices to be Scientologists and as a mother, it’s my job to love them.”</p> <p>Nicole is no longer a member herself and disassociated in 2001 after 10 years of marriage with Tom. Reports claim Kidman is considered a “suppressive person” by the church, and thus maintains minimal contact with her children.</p> <p>When speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.who.com.au/nicole-kidman-truth-connor-cruise-bella-cruise-adopted-kids?utm_medium=google" target="_blank">Who</a><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.who.com.au/nicole-kidman-truth-connor-cruise-bella-cruise-adopted-kids?utm_medium=google" target="_blank"> magazine</a>, the actress gave a rare statement on the topic of scientology and her children.</p> <p>“They have made choices to be Scientologists and as a mother, it’s my job to love them,” she explained.</p> <p>“And I am an example of that tolerance and that’s what I believe — that no matter what your child does, the child has love and the child has to know there is available love and I’m open here.”</p> <p>Previously, Nicole told Vogue that she had “chosen not to speak publicly abut Scientology.”</p> <p>“I have two children who are Scientologists — Connor and Isabella — and I utterly respect their beliefs,” she said.</p> <p>Back in 2010, Nicole also <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.usmagazine.com/celebrity-moms/news/nicole-kidman-talks-kids-isabella-connor-cruise-2014295/?utm_medium=google" target="_blank">admitted</a> that the kids chose to live with Tom instead of her: “I’d love them to live with us, but what can you do?”</p> <p>Nicole has two children with her current husband Keith Urban, Sunday, 10, and Faith, 7.</p> <p>Nicole told Who magazine that she’s “very private” about her relationships with Isabella and Connor.</p> <p>“I have to protect all those relationships,” she said. “I know 150 percent that I would give up my life for my children because it’s what my purpose is.”</p> <p>She went on to explain that, no matter what, she’ll always love them unconditionally.</p> <p>“I think that’s so important because if that is taken away from a child, to sever that in any child, in any relationship, in any family — I believe it’s wrong,” Nicole said. “So that’s our job as a parent, to always offer unconditional love.”</p> <p>According to former Scientologist Leah Remini in her book, Troublemaker: Surviving Hollywood and Scientology, Isabella allegedly claimed that her mother was “a f***ing SP [Suppressive Person].”</p> <p>Notably, Nicole wasn’t at Isabella’s wedding in 2015, and Nicole hasn’t appeared in a public photograph with either child in years.</p> <p> </p>

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Jackie O reveals sneaky “trick” Karl Stefanovic used that left her feeling “foolish”

<p>Jackie O has exposed Karl Stefanovic’s sneaky but highly effective “trick” that he uses in interviews. During an interview with Stefanovic for a 60 Minutes story in early May, the pair sat down to discuss Jackie's work and family life.<br /><br />The KIIS FM host admitted she didn’t want to cry on camera but knew “the one thing” that would bring her to tears would be any discussion of her daughter, Kitty.<br /><br />“I just thought, ‘OK, prepare yourself, because the minute her name gets mentioned you’re going to get teary’”, she said on air.<br /><br />“He asked me about her … He said, ‘you’ve got such a beautiful child,’ and it looked like Karl was crying. His eyes were welling up.”<br /><br />Jackie said that she burst into tears the moment she saw Stefanovic getting emotional.<br /><br />“When you see someone else’s eyes well up with tears and they’re talking about something really deeply personal to you, that was it, all I had to do was look into his weeping eyes and I started crying,” she said.<br /><br />But as soon as the interview ended, Jackie began to suspect that Stefanovic was faking his tears to make her emotional.<br /><br />“I thought, ‘Oh, I think he did that deliberately, actually. That might be his trick, which is a great trick. Oh my god, I feel so foolish now.’<br /><br /></p> <p>Jackie continued: “I’m thinking, ‘why would Karl have tears in his eyes over my daughter that he only met five minutes ago?’”<br /><br />Kyle revealed that Stefanovic tried to pull the same stunt with him during his own interview.<br /><br /></p> <p>“This is what he does,” Kyle said on air at the time. “He tried to do that to me too.<br /><br />“He goes, ‘So, it must have been tough finding yourself homeless at 16,’ and his eyes started welling up. And I thought, ‘This bastard can cry on demand!’”<br /><br />Kyle said his sit-down chat with Stefanovic went for hours and added: “I knew he was just trying to make me cry. So many hours and hours of questioning and I said, ‘just tell me the question you really want to ask for god’s sake.”</p>

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Chandler Powell posts sweet tribute to new wife Bindi Irwin

<p>Bindi Irwin and Chandler Powell tied the knot in an intimate ceremony at Australia Zoo two months ago.</p> <p>Chandler, 23, surprised fans by sharing a never-before-seen snap from their wedding album.</p> <p>“Every day I'm so happy to be married to you and spending our time together doing what we love most,” he wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAXZL98hB2f/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAXZL98hB2f/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Every day I’m so happy to be married to you and spending our time together doing what we love most @AustraliaZoo ❤️</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/chandlerpowell/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Chandler Powell</a> (@chandlerpowell) on May 19, 2020 at 3:08am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>His blushing bride commented back, saying that “I will never find the words to describe how much I love you.”</p> <p>The photos were taken at the zoo, which is not open to the public due to the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>However, it appears work is still going on at the zoo, with the newlywed couple spending their honeymoon at the zoo.</p> <p>This is due to COVID-19 travel restrictions.</p> <p>“Our honeymoon may not have turned out as we'd planned, but we're grateful to be spending time with our beautiful animals,” she wrote.</p> <p>“Things are incredibly busy here while we're temporarily not open. We're all working together to make sure our animal family is happy.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_GJou5By5A/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_GJou5By5A/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Chandler, When I went to write my vows I found I couldn’t stop writing them. I started by sharing all the ways you make my life beautiful and wrote close to a thousand words. Then I moved on to write about what an extraordinary person you are and I needed a new pen. Finally I wanted to share all my hopes for the future and I ran out of notebook paper. I thought about how there is no way to describe genuine, unconditional love. A love like this is meant to be felt, in every part of our soul. Marriage marks an incredible beginning and yet I feel like we’ve already experienced so much life together. We say all the time that it feels like we’ve been married for years. We’ve been a team through life’s wonderful highs and difficult lows. You’ve held my hand as we’ve run towards every new adventure. My dad used to say that I couldn’t marry anyone unless he could swim across the croc pond first. And now, here you are, helping us during our regular crocodile demonstrations. One of your jobs is to jump into the water with our biggest crocs to help encourage them home! They say there’s a moment when you know you’ve fallen in love with someone, for me it was watching you happily jump in the water with a 15 foot crocodile and then tell me how much you enjoyed it. You are my soulmate. I promise to love you with all my heart through every twist and turn the world brings our way. I promise to encourage your dreams and help you achieve them. I promise to stand beside you as your wife, teammate and friend. I promise to share an ‘I love you’ before I sleep each night no matter what our day has brought. I promise to be your strength and light when you need a it. I promise to revel with you in each breathtaking moment we are given in this life. Chandler, Thank you for loving me for me. You love me when I’m uncontrollably laughing or falling asleep by ‪6pm‬. You validate what unconditional love really means. You’ve been my best friend for over six years. You’ve made me smile every day since I first met you. That’s amazing and so are you. My husband, my teammate and partner in conservation. To quote our favourite show, “I love you and I like you”.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/bindisueirwin/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Bindi Irwin</a> (@bindisueirwin) on Apr 17, 2020 at 1:53pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Bindi also shared how easy vow-writing was for her as her love of Chandler flowed through the pen.</p> <p>“Chandler, When I went to write my vows, I found I couldn’t stop writing them. I started by sharing all the ways you make my life beautiful and wrote close to a thousand words,” she wrote on Instagram.</p> <p>“Marriage marks an incredible beginning and yet I feel like we’ve already experienced so much life together. We say all the time that it feels like we’ve been married for years.</p> <p>“We’ve been a team through life’s wonderful highs and difficult lows. You’ve held my hand as we’ve run towards every new adventure.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Game over: Kyrgios and Kalinskaya’s messy romance

<p>Nick Kyrgios’ relationship with Russian tennis star Anna Kalinskaya has reportedly ended on bad terms.</p> <p>Although the details surrounding their relationship is unknown, the two were spotted together at an Acapulco street stall in March, with Kyrgios kissing Kalinskaya on the forehead.</p> <p>Shortly after, the couple attended an NBA game in Los Angeles together.</p> <p>The Aussie was also seen cheering on the 21-year-old at the Citi Open in Washington last August.</p> <p>However, a series of cryptic Instagram posts from Kalinskaya suggests the couple’s recent break-up was not pleasant.</p> <p>The world No. 95 shared a black and white photo on her Instagram with the caption, “You’re not a bad boy, you are simply a bad person,” with most followers assuming the message was directed at Kyrgios.</p> <p>Hours later, she posted another snap with the caption, “F*** energy vampire,” but the picture was deleted soon after.</p> <p>Kalinskaya confirmed the break-up on Monday during an Instagram Q&amp;A, adding the two are no longer on speaking terms.</p> <p>“We broke up. We aren’t friends. I understand you are his friends and it’s cool but I’m not going to talk about him. Have some respect for me as well please,” Kalinskaya posted.</p> <p>Although they never confirmed they were dating, rumours of their on-and-off romance have been circulating for months.</p> <p>In December, Kalinskaya called Kygrios “Satan” after he commented on one of her social media posts.</p> <p>The 24-year-old Kyrgios previously dated Croatian-Australian tennis player Anya Tomljanovic, but they split in 2017.</p>

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​Brothers in arms: Prince William and Harry repairing severed relationship

<p><span>After reported tension between Prince William and Prince Harry, claims have been made that the brothers are “back in touch” and sorting through their issues with each other.</span><br /><br /><span>“There have been clearly some quite major rifts in that relationship, but things have got better and I know that William and Harry are in touch on the phone,” royal expert Katie Nicholl explained to ET.</span><br /><br /><span>“They have done video calls together, they have done a lot of family birthdays and I think with Prince Charles not being well, that really forced the brothers to pick up the phone and get back in touch.”</span><br /><br /><span>Nicholl says Harry felt homesick after touching down in L.A, but has found the “right time” to patch things up with his big brother.</span><br /><br /><span>“I think there is a sense of relief on both sides that this high drama is now a thing of the past,” she said.</span><br /><br /><span>“The Sussexes are free to get on with their new lives [and] the Cambridges can get back to their old lives without all the upset and drama that was clearly a big deal behind the scenes.</span><br /><br /><span>“I think Kate and William miss Harry and Meghan to a degree, but certainly they miss Harry [being] around and part of their lives.”</span><br /><br /><span>Nicholl went on to say it’s not a far-fetched idea to believe the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge took part in a birthday video call to Archie.</span><br /><br /><span>“I am quite sure there would have been communication between the Cambridges and the Prince of Wales and I am told Harry picks up the phone regularly to his grandmother, the queen,” Nicholl said.</span><br /><br /><span>“They had that same call on her birthday. I'm sure there was a Zoom birthday call for Archie, too.”</span><br /><br /><span>Prince Harry and Meghan Markle announced they were stepping down as senior royals in January, and wrapped up their last required duties by April.</span><br /><br /><span>While giving a speech at a private dinner in London for his charity Sentebale, the Duke of Sussex said he had “no other option” than to step down.</span><br /><br /><span>“The decision that I have made for my wife and I to step back is not one I made lightly … there really was no other option,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“I have accepted this, knowing that it doesn’t change who I am or how committed I am.</span><br /><br /><span>He went on to add: “But I hope that helps you understand what it had to come to, that I would step my family back from all I have ever known, to take a step forward into what I hope can be a more peaceful life.”</span></p>

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Tom Gleeson pours fuel on feud with Kerri-Anne Kennerley

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p><em>ABC</em> comedian Tom Gleeson has reignited his feud with <em>Studio 10</em>’s Kerri-Anne Kennerley a year after she called him a “wimp” for not showing up to his scheduled Studio 10 interview after his Gold Logie win.</p> <p>Gleeson, 45, jokingly compared the 66-year-old to a “hungry python” while hosting his game show<span> </span><em>The Hard Quiz</em><span> </span>on Wednesday night.</p> <p>He fired questions at contestant Darren and footage of a snake flashed up on the screen as Gleeson asked Darren as to how snakes digest food.</p> <p>“The left and right side of a python's lower jaw can move independently, allowing them to drag food down their throats through a process known as the what walk?” Tom asked.</p> <p>Darren struggled to answer, and Gleeson took advantage of the awkward silence.</p> <p>“It's like watching Kerri-Anne eat dinner!” he exclaimed, much to the delight of his fans.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">"Its like watching Kerrie-Anne eat dinner." - <a href="https://twitter.com/nonstoptom?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@nonstoptom</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/screaming?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#screaming</a> !!!😂😂😂!!! <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/genius?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#genius</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/bestlineofseason?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#bestlineofseason</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/abc?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#abc</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/hardquiz?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#hardquiz</a> <a href="https://t.co/ePAi9PslYx">pic.twitter.com/ePAi9PslYx</a></p> — radioShirley &amp; mr.K (@radioShirley) <a href="https://twitter.com/radioShirley/status/1260566207125733377?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 13, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Kerri-Anne has been vocal about her disapproval of Gleeson’s joke campaign, after he joked it was a “victory for quiet Australians”.</p> <p>She was putting mock quotations marks around words as she blasted Gleeson for not showing up to the interview.</p> <p>“He has turned into 'Gold Logie winner Tom'. 'Wimp Tom'. You're supposed to be here!” Kerri-Anne exclaimed during the <em>Studio 10</em> broadcast</p> <p>“You’ve turned into a winner now. And now you're a wimp, you're far too good for us little people, Tom,” she added.</p> <p>“I'm so disappointed. You wanted a hard chat? I could give you a hard chat,” she joked, making a reference to the popular<span> </span><em>ABC</em><span> </span>quiz show.</p> <p>Despite co-hosts Sarah Harris and Joe Hildebrand saying he could still show up, Kerri-Anne started back up again.</p> <p>“No, he's too good for us. I know the <em>ABC</em> type. He's now so far 'there' where he wants to be,” Kerri-Anne raged.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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How to stay calm and manage those family tensions during the coronavirus lockdown

<p>The coronavirus restrictions are <a href="https://theconversation.com/as-restrictions-ease-here-are-5-crucial-ways-for-australia-to-stay-safely-on-top-of-covid-19-138000">slowly being eased</a> but the pressures on families at home still probably lead to many tears of frustration.</p> <p>It could be tensions about noise and clutter, keeping up with home schooling and mums and dads torn between parenting and their own work duties.</p> <p>So to make sure our memories of being locked in with our families are as positive as possible, here are some evidence-based tips for calming down, preventing conflict and dealing with any sibling rivalry.</p> <p><strong>Take a deep breath</strong></p> <p>If you feel yourself getting angry at something, breathe in while counting to three. Then breathe out slowly counting to six (or any patterns with a slower out breath). If you do this ten times you should notice yourself <a href="https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0005796710001324" title="Differential effects of mindful breathing, progressive muscle relaxation, and loving-kindness meditation on decentering and negative reactions to repetitive thoughts">becoming calmer</a>.</p> <p>If you’re too agitated to breathe slowly, put your <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S019745561300124X" title="The impact of breathing and music on stress levels of clients and visitors in a psychiatric emergency room">hands on your heart</a> and simply wait until you feel more relaxed. Try counting to ten or 100 <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/02699931.2011.579088" title="Counting to ten milliseconds: Low-anger, but not high-anger, individuals pause following negative evaluations">before you react</a>.</p> <p>Leave the room and take a break. Plan to deal with the niggle another time. When you’re on break, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022103107000078" title="Take a break! or not? The impact of mindsets during breaks on negotiation processes and outcomes">do something to distract yourself</a> like make a drink, listen to music, look at a beautiful picture or play a video game that is absorbing.</p> <p>Call a <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15374416.2010.517160" title="Parent–Child Relationships and Dyadic Friendship Experiences as Predictors of Behavior Problems in Early Adolescence">friend</a> or <a href="https://au.reachout.com/urgent-help">professional helpline</a> to help you get another perspective, especially if you feel scared or hurt.</p> <p>Different strategies work for different people, so try them all. Encourage your kids to keep trying if they don’t initially succeed. You need to practise any skill to make it feel natural. For <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/0300443940970112" title="Encouraging the development of responsible anger management in young children">younger children</a>, taking a break may be <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/42900065" title="Encouraging the development of responsible anger management in young children">simpler</a> to master.</p> <p><strong>Ease the tension before things blow</strong></p> <p>It’s good to calm down from explosions but it’s even better if you can reduce the build-up in the first place.</p> <p>Take time to <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/21642850.2016.1228458" title="A structural equation model of conflict-affected youth coping and resilience">share some of the problems</a> upsetting people and see if as family you can negotiate a solution.</p> <p>It’s likely everyone in your family is more tense because of the COVID-19 crisis. Many aspects can’t be easily fixed, like lost work or money stress, but others can, such as creating new routines or sharing space, resources or chores.</p> <p>Work out different ways to get exercise indoors, like games or apps. <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1529100618821893" title="Beyond Willpower: Strategies for Reducing Failures of Self-Control">Plan ahead</a> for the times that need extra care, like when people are tired, or if difficult tasks need finishing. Let others know what to expect.</p> <p>And importantly, <a href="https://spssi.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1540-4560.1998.tb01217.x" title="Resilience and Thriving: Issues, Models, and Linkages">lower expectations</a> for everyone. What used to be easy might now be hard, and that’s okay.</p> <p><strong>Control the emotions</strong></p> <p>Help everyone work on <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1002/per.1993" title="Explaining the Link Between Personality and Relationship Satisfaction: Emotion Regulation and Interpersonal Behaviour in Conflict Discussions">managing their emotions</a>. Just because you are experiencing extra distress doesn’t mean you should snap at your loved ones.</p> <p>You need to grow your <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1186/s12888-014-0227-6" title="Building resilience for future adversity: a systematic review of interventions in non-clinical samples of adults">toolkit</a> of things that make you feel calmer and happier when you’re under pressure.</p> <p>It could be spending time talking about what is going right and what is okay, working with your hands, meditation or prayer, time with your partner, reading or learning something new.</p> <p>Every day, take time do something from your toolkit to chill out.</p> <p><strong>Talk to each other</strong></p> <p>When the tension is lower, quiet family conversations can help by <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0022096514002215" title="Parenting predictors of cognitive skills and emotion knowledge in socioeconomically disadvantaged preschoolers">naming any stresses</a>. Naming things like “this is a stressful time” or “I’m a bit grumpy about work today” helps children process emotions.</p> <p>It’s important to <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0033294116646159" title="Effects of Active Listening, Reformulation, and Imitation on Mediator Success: Preliminary Results">actively listen</a> to others and <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/fulltext/2000-05084-011.html" title="The Triple P-Positive Parenting Program: A comparison of enhanced, standard, and self-directed behavioral family intervention for parents of children with early onset conduct problems">celebrate strengths</a>.</p> <p>Listening and repeating back what others say makes people feel heard, and so does acknowledging shared feelings (“I miss my friends too”). When parents calmly talk about how some things cannot be easily changed, it <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-1-4614-3917-2_5" title="Community-Based Practice Applications of a Family Resilience Framework">builds acceptance</a>.</p> <p>Over time, the most powerful thing to prevent explosions is to <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.janxdis.2014.07.001" title="Peeking into the black box: Mechanisms of action for anger management treatment">notice when anger is building</a> so you can deal with it before things escalate.</p> <p>It’s useful to reflect on <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1999-08103-013" title="Cognitive behavioural interventions for anger, aggression and violence">questions</a> such as “Will this matter in 20 years?” and “Am I taking this too personally?”</p> <p>You can help children by exploring <a href="https://www.pediatricnursing.org/article/S0882-5963(03)00083-6/fulltext" title="Communication approaches to parent-child conflict: young adolescence to young adult">what might really be bothering</a> them. That argument about a toy might be about feeling sad. Try to listen for the deeper message, so they feel understood.</p> <p><strong>Calm that sibling rivalry</strong></p> <p>If sibling rivalry is driving you to distraction, the good news is <a href="https://centerforparentingeducation.org/library-of-articles/sibling-rivalry/coping-sibling-rivalry/" title="COPING WITH SIBLING RIVALRY">it does not</a> mean there is something wrong. Low-level sibling bickering is common during times of tension and boredom.</p> <p>But you should <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1741-3737.2000.00746.x" title="Step In or Stay Out? Parents' Roles in Adolescent Siblings' Relationships">step in</a> when the volume goes up with nasty name-calling or physical contact.</p> <p> </p> <p>Acknowledge emotions, help the kids express what they feel and encourage empathy. Try to help them decide what’s fair, instead of imposing your view.</p> <p>More serious incidents require you to stop the interaction. If there is harm, separate the kids, care for the hurt child and consider a consequence. Use time-outs to calm things down, not for punishment.</p> <p>But like all conflict, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0149718912000651" title="Enhancing sibling relationships to prevent adolescent problem behaviors: Theory, design and feasibility of Siblings Are Special">prevention</a> is better than punishment. Does one child need more attention, exercise, stimulation or structure? Do certain toys need to be put away, or shared?</p> <p>Depending on the age of your children, you can help older kids to learn to react gently to provocation. Praise children when they take steps to manage their stress.</p> <p>Remember, these are stressful times for many families around the world. If we can use this time to stay patient, manage tension and act with goodwill towards our loved ones, our families will be better equipped to weather COVID-19, and many other storms that will follow.</p> <hr /> <p><em>For more help and information see our <a href="http://www.socialchangelab.net/covid19.html">website</a> or go to <a href="https://www.1800respect.org.au/">1800Respect</a> and <a href="https://www.ntv.org.au/">No To Violence</a>.</em></p> <p><em>This article was co-written with help from Tori Cooke at <a href="https://www.ntv.org.au/">No To Violence</a>, Peter Streker at <a href="http://communitystars.com.au/">Community Stars</a>, Carmel O’Brien at <a href="https://www.psychrespect.com/">PsychRespect</a>, and the University of Queensland’s students Ruby Green and Kiara Minto.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/137166/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/winnifred-louis-3612">Winnifred Louis</a>, Professor, Social Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-queensland-805">The University of Queensland</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/tom-denson-122725">Tom Denson</a>, Professor of Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/unsw-1414">UNSW</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/how-to-stay-calm-and-manage-those-family-tensions-during-the-coronavirus-lockdown-137166">original article</a>.</em></p>

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"Worst in the world": Bill Connolly reveals the nickname he was saddled with in school

<p><span>Sir Billy Connolly has revealed the first nickname he ever received that he claims was by far “the worst in the world.”</span><br /><br /><span>The star admitted he was branded “cuddles” by an angry teacher while he was in primary school, and says he was scared the moniker might stick with him forever.</span><br /><br /><span>He revealed this in a new documentary where he talked about his harsh upbringing and how his childhood erupted him into A-lister fame.</span><br /><br /><span>“I had the worst nickname in the world when I was at school. It lasted about a year but it mercifully went away,” he’s said.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836050/bill-connolly-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/21dd0c97913c41b984df26aa645dc9f6" /><br /><br /><span>The star explained that a certificate that allowed the person who was holding it to receive a free hug was passed all around the class until it landed in his hands.</span><br /><br /><span>“’This certificate entitles you to a cuddle from such and such and so on.’ It was passed round the class and someone passed it to me</span><br /><br /><span>“The teacher went, ‘What’s that, Connolly? Bring it out here.’ He took it and he read it and said, ‘OK, Cuddles, sit down,’ and that was me for a year.”</span><br /><br /><span>Connolly talks candidly in his six-part docu series Billy and Us, where he also reflects on the traumatising yet enlightening experiences he had growing up.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836051/bill-connolly-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1a4071e819a2400991fdbf2c7fee105f" /><br /><br /><span>In the first episode – Stupid but Saveable – the star reflected on his poverty-stricken childhood which saw him severely physically abused by his father at home, and berated mercilessly by teachers at school.</span><br /><br /><span>The 77-year-old whose mother walked out on the family when he was four years old, said: “It was post-war Britain when beating up children was normal for the slightest things.</span><br /><br /><span>“There were no generation gaps as children were battered on to the next. I always stood apart. My mum left home when I was very young and I was always looking for attention by showing off in stupid ways, like by sitting in puddles.</span><br /><br /><span>“My most vivid memory of childhood is of me and Gerald McGee seeing who could pee the highest.</span><br /><br /><span>“My father caught me and hit me so hard on the back of the head my willy popped back into my trousers.</span><br /><br /><span>“I went to St Peter’s Primary School. I went back to do a programme once and they had removed my name from the books because of the religious stuff in my stand-up about the crucifixion and the Last Supper.</span><br /><br /><span>“I just wanted to make people laugh. I didn’t set out to shock. The scrapes and embarrassments of me and my classmates and the chaos and catastrophes of being a child make for good material.”</span><br /><br /><span>Billy was raised by his father and two aunts and explained that at school, “I had a psychopathic teacher who used to say, ‘I taught your father and he was an idiot too.’</span><br /><br /><span>“The experience of school stays with me to this day. It was traumatic. You take the worst things and try to make them funny.”</span><br /><br /><span>The documentary series, featured on BBC was filmed near the end of 2019.</span></p>

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The touching moment bride visits her grandmother through care home window on her wedding day

<p>Ever since the coronavirus pandemic hit, the world has had to adjust their lifestyles, and with the elderly at high risk from COVID-19, one bride from the US found a way to make sure her grandmother was a part of her wedding day.</p> <p>Shauna Varner married Travis Scepaniak in Sartell, Minnesota on April 25.</p> <p>The aged care facility, Country Manor, where her grandma Janis currently stays has been on strict lockdown since mid-March due to the virus. This forced Varner and Scepaniak to get creative.</p> <p>On the morning of the couple’s special day, staff at Country Manor helped dress Janis up.</p> <p>"With our salon services being shut down, it took some joint effort from us non-professionals to get her hair fixed, but she was pleased with the final product, which is all that matters," Emily Frericks, the facility's director of public relations and marketing told <em>Good Morning America</em>.</p> <p>"She felt beautiful, which was a rewarding feeling for staff."</p> <p>Before walking down the aisle, Varner and Scepaniak stopped at the facility to “visit” Janis from the other side of her window, leaving her overjoyed.</p> <p>In footage of the moment, Varner is seen showing off her wedding dress and two blew kisses to one another through the glass.</p> <p>"You got to see [the dress] first," said Varner.</p> <p>"Good," replied Janis, adding, "Your hair looks nice. Everything looks nice. You're beautiful."</p> <p>Even with the pandemic sweeping across the globe, people are finding ways to stay connected with their loved ones.</p>

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Guy Sebastian sweetly reveals how he proposed to Jules

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Guy Sebastian and his wife Jules have been together for almost two decades after tying the knot back in 2008. The couple have two kids, Hudson,8, and Archer, 5.</p> <p>In order to kill time during self-isolation, the couple reflected on their relationship and answered questions from fans on Instagram Live.</p> <p>Guy revealed that he popped the question while on a trip to Queensland’s Hervey Bay, where he had bought an investment property.</p> <p>"I was pretending that we were holidaying there, and I said let's go for a walk down the beach. There's a nice stretch of beach that's not very populated so I thought it'd be nice and quiet," he said.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5W5_WJF6WA/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5W5_WJF6WA/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Check this one out 👉 @julessebastian 💓#ARIAs @youtubemusic @aria_official</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/guysebastian/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> guysebastian</a> (@guysebastian) on Nov 26, 2019 at 9:55pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"We got to like where this house that I had bought and there's a bench that overlooks the water and we sat on that bench and I got on my knee."</p> <p>Guy said the nerves almost got the best of him during the proposal and he hadn’t come prepared with a speech.</p> <p>"I did it really fast because I was really nervous. I didn't even have a speech, I wasn't like 'We've been together for this long...'" he said.</p> <p>Jules added, "It was literally like we sat down and as soon as his butt hit the bench, he was on the ground with the ring."</p> <p>Guy had another surprise for his future wife in the investment property, where a bunch of their friends were waiting to celebrate with them.</p> <p>"It was good. It was really, really good. I couldn't believe it," Jules admitted, before laughing, "Then he said, 'Ok I'm going fishing now' and disappeared for five whole hours."</p> <p>Jules shared more insight into her marriage is like to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.nowtolove.com.au/celebrity/celeb-news/jules-sebastian-guy-sebastian-delta-goodrem-60524" target="_blank">Now To Love</a>.</em></p> <p>"I think it comes down to I really like Guy. I mean, of course I love him, but I like him, I have a lot of respect for him, I just think he's a really solid dude," Jules said.</p> <p>"He really makes good decisions, he's really kind to people and he works really hard and he has all those really strong characteristics that I find attractive. It can't all be rainbows and unicorns everyday. Life is just not like that, but yeah, we have a good time.</p> <p>"We've got to work at it, absolutely - but for the most part, it's been pretty smooth sailing."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Nicole Kidman dishes on early days with Keith Urban: “I was a goner”

<p><span>Hollywood heavyweight Nicole Kidman has been married to her hubby Keith Urban for almost 14 years and has opened up about just what exactly made her fall so hard for him.</span><br /><br /><span>“He's pretty much the flip side of neurotic,” Kidman explained of her “mellow” musician husband who she met in 2005, while speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/nicole-kidman-cover-story-interview-11586970315?tesla=y%3Fmod%3De2igmag&amp;utm_campaign=later-linkinbio-wsjmag&amp;utm_content=later-6768717&amp;utm_medium=social&amp;utm_source=instagram" target="_blank">Wall Street Journal.</a></span><br /><br /><span>The pair met accidentally while attending an industry event and Nicole says he rode her around on his Harley-Davidson to Woodstock, New York.</span><br /><br /><span>The New Zealand born singer ended off the romantic night with a picnic in the woods - an experience Kidman could not deny as special.</span><br /><br /><span>“I was a goner—I mean, c'mon.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/B_iELb_JgMW/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/B_iELb_JgMW/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Nicole Kidman (@nicolekidman)</a> on Apr 28, 2020 at 10:05am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>The couple now share two daughters together; Sunday Rose, 11, and Faith Margaret, nine, and she is determined to keep her family close knit.</span><br /><br /><span>“I’ll pass on films,” the Australian beauty said, and went on to say she purposefully selects projects shooting on the East Coast when her kids are not in school so she can balance her work and family time.</span><br /><br /><span>“We have a system worked out to keep the family together,” she explained.</span><br /><br /><span>“When Keith's not touring, it's much easier. He'll be on tour next year, and then I just don’t work as much. Literally—it will become imbalanced, and we will change it.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B6cd_Y6JJEX/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B6cd_Y6JJEX/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Nicole Kidman (@nicolekidman)</a> on Dec 23, 2019 at 10:17pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>“We don’t have the answers, but the one thing we do know is that we will not jeopardize us.”</span><br /><br /><span>When asked about her preference for movie roles is what she likes to choose, she admitted: “My taste is really out there. There's no sense. I'm a complete random nonconformist.</span><br /><br /><span>“People are like, ‘What are you doing?’ I'm like, ‘I don't know what I'm doing.’</span><br /><br /><span>“I'll very much go on the record saying I have no idea what I’m doing.”</span></p>

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"We just can't wait to meet this little girl": Karl Stefanovic on fatherhood for a fourth time

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Karl Stefanovic and his wife Jasmine are expecting a new baby girl any day now and the<span> </span>Today<span> </span>host has opened up on becoming a father for the fourth time.</p> <p>Stefanovic is already a father to three children from his previous marriage to Cassandra Thorburn with children Jackson, 20, Ava, 14 and River, 12.</p> <p>He said that despite having a vasectomy when he first met Jasmine, he had the procedure reversed and having a child together was always a goal for the couple.</p> <p>"We discussed it very early on in our relationship and I was very excited about the prospect of having a baby," he told <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-8236013/Karl-Stefanovic-juggles-Today-allen-keys-prepares-fatherhood-fourth-time.html" target="_blank">Daily Mail Australia</a>.</p> <p>"I can't wait," he said.</p> <p>He also says that his new daughter will be an expression of the love he has for his new wife.</p> <p>"We [he and Jasmine] do have a very loving relationship and to have a baby as an expression of that love is incredible. It's never an easy thing and I think that kids are a miracle and we just can't wait to meet this little girl. Just to shower her with all the love that we have."</p> <p>The couple are nesting in Karl’s multi-million dollar home in Sydney’s north shore.</p> <p>"I've had a fair few boxes arrive at the door and I've had to get the allen keys out," he revealed.</p> <p>"I've helped build the cot, they've got this breast-feeding chair thing that I've put together. This is not easy stuff for a guy like me. But we are all ready to roll now."</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9OU3TTJkcn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9OU3TTJkcn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by karl stefanovic (@karlstefanovic_)</a> on Mar 2, 2020 at 12:02am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>He says that his older kids are thrilled to see his half-sister into the family, but has confirmed that he and Jasmine have not settled on a name.</p> <p>"I'm not in such a hurry to go somewhere else and I'm not chasing the yarns overseas like I was when I was building up to this point in my career," he explains.</p> <p>"And I don't think that's any great sleight on me as a father - it's just the way things were. As a family we were working towards other things but you are busy in your 20s and 30s. You're providing for your family every step of the way.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8k1wUwFAX7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B8k1wUwFAX7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Jasmine Stefanovic (@jasyarby)</a> on Feb 14, 2020 at 9:22pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"I like to think I've been a pretty good dad along the way.</p> <p>"I think every dad would have a level of insecurity about how good they've been, but at the end of the day my kids are loved."</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Dad at 70! Richard Gere welcomes second child with wife Alejandra Silva

<p>Congratulations are in order for Richard Gere and his wife Alejandra Silvia, who welcomed a baby boy.</p> <p><em>HOLA!</em><span> </span>confirmed the exciting news, revealing that the couple are bonding with their new son at their ranch on Pound Ridge, just outside New York. The new arrival is a baby brother for the couple’s firstborn, two-year-old Alexander, who arrived in February 2018.</p> <p>Both Richard, 70, and Spanish activist Alejandra, 37, have children from their previous relationships; the<span> </span><em>Pretty Woman<span> </span></em>star shares 20-year-old son Homer with ex-wife Carey Lovell, while Alejandra is the mother to seven-year-old Albert from her marriage to businessman Govind Friedland.</p> <p>The past few years have been fast paced for the couple who tied the knot in 2018, with Alejandra saying at the time: “I feel like I’m in a true fairytale. Without a doubt, I feel like the luckiest woman in the world.”</p> <p>Richard, who wooed Alejandra by sending her flowers until she agreed to date him, added: "I'm the happiest man in the universe. How could I not be? I'm married to a beautiful woman who is smart, sensitive, committed to helping people, who's fun, patient, who knows how to forgive, who's a great cook – and who makes the best salads in the world!"</p> <p>Describing her new husband, Alejandra shared: "He is the most humble, sensitive, affectionate, attentive, funny, generous man that I've ever met. What can I say? I'm so in love! How would you feel if each morning you were asked: 'What would make you happy today?' Not a day goes by that he doesn't mention how important I am to him. I feel very lucky."</p>

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Karl Stefanovic gushes over wife to publication he once branded as "despicable"

<p>Karl Stefanovic has given a wide ranging interview to an outlet he once described as having a “despicable track record” and begged viewers not to read, as he continues the PR blitz surrounding his return to the<span> </span><em>Today</em><span> </span>show.</p> <p>The breakfast show host spoke about his relationship with wife Jasmine Yarbrough and their excitement over the impending birth of their daughter next month in a new in-depth, three-part interview with the<span> </span><em>Daily Mail</em>.</p> <p>But in 2017, things were different, as the 45-year-old delivered a blistering on-air takedown of that same publication and begged viewers of the<span> </span><em>Today</em><span> </span>show to “never go on that website” after it published photos of him checking into a country NSW caravan park with a female colleague, with whom he was working on a story.</p> <p>The article pointed out that then-girlfriend Yarbrough was “nowhere to be seen”.</p> <p>At the time, Stefanovic begged people viewing the show at home to not read the<span> </span><em>Daily Mail</em>.</p> <p>“How would you feel if I judged you for what you’re wearing this morning. How would you feel if I criticised your hair, or mocked your make-up or shamed you for not wearing any?” he asked.</p> <p>“I want to take a couple of minutes right now to call out an organisation that trades in these kind of insults. It’s a news website which seeks to profit from criticising and publicly humiliating people — women especially,” he said.</p> <p>“The sleazy suggestion we are checking in somewhere and that I’m ‘settling in for a long night.’ Fact: this was work. We were filming a story about our struggling prawn farmers; they deserve a rum or two. The producer pictured on the website is a committed, talented, hardworking and totally professional young woman and not deserving of this cheap, lazy, sexist online slur.”</p> <p>Stefanovic continued: “The idea that colleagues of the opposite sex cannot work together without something going on surely belongs to the 1950s. The <em>Daily Mail </em>has a long, despicable track record of denigrating women, of ridiculing women and objectifying women.”</p> <p>He went on to give examples of previous stories the<span> </span><em>Daily Mail</em><span> </span>had published, about his then-Today colleagues Lisa Wilkinson and Sylvia Jeffreys. He also referenced the outlet’s infamous Samantha Armytage “granny panties” post that resulted in an apology from the publication.</p> <p>“This is the same site that ridiculed Lisa for wearing the same blouse four months apart, the same site that tried to suggest that Lisa and Sylvia couldn’t work together, presumably because they are both women. The same site that tried to shame Sunrise host Samantha Armytage for wearing so-called ‘granny pants’.”</p> <p>“I am over it. I don’t know what you think, but I hope Australia is over it as well. Go hard on me, make up your stories, publish your lies and send out the paps. But if you have any care whatever for the women of Australia, do not slur the reputations of others in your eagerness to throw mud at me. If you agree with me, the best thing that you can do is never go to that website.”</p> <p>But now, as<span> </span><em>Today<span> </span></em>struggles in the ratings department against rival<span> </span><em>Sunrise</em>, Stefanovic gave a wide-ranging interview to that same outlet, gushing about his love for Yarbrough.</p> <p>“I think there’s a light about her and a loyalty and an inner beauty – that was the biggest attraction for me,” he told the publication.</p> <p>“And she’s beautifully loyal to her friends and her family. She’s just a great Queensland girl and I’m very, very lucky … We do have a very loving relationship and to have a baby as an expression of that love is incredible.”</p> <p>The couple will welcome a baby girl next month – her first and her husband’s fourth. Stefanovic is already a father to Jackson, 20, Ava, 15, and River, 13 – but he admitted that this time around, he’ll approach parenting differently.</p> <p>“It’s obviously going to be different. I’m going to be a bit slower but I think slower might be a good thing,” he told the outlet.</p> <p>“I’m not in such a hurry to go somewhere else and I’m not chasing the yarns overseas like I was when I was building up to this point in my career.</p> <p>“And I don’t think that’s any great sleight on me as a father – it’s just the way things were. As a family we were working towards other things but you are busy in your 20s and 30s. You’re providing for your family every step of the way.</p> <p>“You’re pretty busy making your way and you don’t stop to smell the roses sometimes but that’s the way it is.”</p>

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Can I visit my loved one in hospital even if they don’t have coronavirus?

<p>The number of people with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 who need to go to hospital is <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/resources/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-at-a-glance">increasing</a>.</p> <p>So family members and friends will be asking whether they can visit their loved ones. People will also want to visit patients in hospital for another reason. Perhaps they’ve just given birth or are recovering after a heart attack.</p> <p>Whether you can visit or not depends on a mix of policies put in place nationally, by the states, and by individual hospitals.</p> <p>And as the situation can change daily, it’s best to check the hospital’s website or phone ahead to avoid being refused entry at the hospital gates.</p> <p><strong>Why are more people in hospital?</strong></p> <p>The number of new cases diagnosed with the coronavirus each day in Australia is <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/news/health-alerts/novel-coronavirus-2019-ncov-health-alert/coronavirus-covid-19-current-situation-and-case-numbers">decreasing</a>. But the number of people expected to be hospitalised with a suspected or confirmed case is still <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/resources/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-at-a-glance">increasing</a>.</p> <p>This is due to the time lag, because whether there’s a need to hospitalise a patient for COVID-19 only becomes evident around the <a href="https://ama.com.au/article/update-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">fifth day after diagnosis</a>, sometimes even later. Further, patients with severe COVID-19 often have to remain in hospital for some time.</p> <p>Initial estimates by the <a href="https://www.who.int/publications-detail/clinical-management-of-severe-acute-respiratory-infection-when-novel-coronavirus-(ncov)-infection-is-suspected">World Health Organisation</a> predicted about 81% of COVID-19 infections to be mild or have no symptoms. But about 14% develop severe disease and require oxygen and 5% become critically unwell, requiring mechanical ventilation.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-17/coronavirus-cases-data-reveals-how-covid-19-spreads-in-australia/12060704">latest data for Australia</a> look a little better with 8% receiving hospital care, including 2% being in intensive care units (ICU).</p> <p>People spend on average <a href="https://www.doherty.edu.au/news-events/news/covid-19-modelling-papers">eight days in hospital with COVID-19</a>. But if they develop serious complications and require a ventilator, the average length of stay might be <a href="https://www.esahq.org/esa-news/analysis-of-the-number-growth-of-icu-patients-with-covid-19-in-italy-and-lombardy/">double that</a>.</p> <p>This is much longer than the <a href="https://www.aihw.gov.au/reports/hospitals/admitted-patient-care-2017-18/data">usual length of hospital stays</a> which, for patients who spent at least one night in hospital, is 5.3 days overall.</p> <p><strong>How are hospital visits changing?</strong></p> <p>Before the coronavirus, hospitals encouraged family and friends to visit their loved ones as <a href="https://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/health/servicesandsupport/visitors-in-hospital">this can help</a> reduce patients’ anxiety and stress, and may help them recover faster.</p> <p>Visiting hours and hospital policies are set to limit traffic in and out of wards, allow treatment to take place and for patients to rest and recover.</p> <p>Hospitals might also have asked visitors to clean their hands when they first arrived to avoid bringing infections in.</p> <p>In light of COVID-19, much tougher restrictions are now in place to protect the patient, hospital staff and the visitors.</p> <p>For patients with COVID-19, rules about visiting them in hospital, and especially in the ICU, may be very restricted. Visiting may be prohibited or, if allowed, only for a very short amount of time under extra precautions.</p> <p>For example, in <a href="http://www.cec.health.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0006/567987/Infection-control-nCoV-2019-Hospital-Setting-V2-.pdf">New South Wales</a>, visitors must wear a surgical mask and protective eyewear if they are visiting a person suspected or confirmed to have coronavirus.</p> <p>These restrictions are set nationally and by individual states, and adapted into the visiting policies of individual hospitals.</p> <p><strong>Different states have different rules</strong></p> <p>The most recent <a href="https://www.dhhs.vic.gov.au/health-services-and-general-practitioners-coronavirus-disease-covid-19">rules for Victoria</a> allow patients in public, private and denominational hospitals only one visit per day, a maximum of two visitors at a time and for up to two hours.</p> <p>However, you will be prohibited from visiting if you have:</p> <ul> <li>been diagnosed with coronavirus and should be in isolation</li> <li>arrived in Australia within the last 14 days</li> <li>recently come into contact with a person confirmed to have the coronavirus</li> <li>a temperature over 37.5℃ or symptoms of a respiratory infection.</li> </ul> <p>These restrictions are in place regardless of whether your loved one has COVID-19 or is in hospital for another reason.</p> <p>In some cases, visitors can stay longer than two hours. These exemptions include parents or carers of people under 18, carers of people with a disability, the partner or support person of someone giving birth, a person accompanying a patient to the emergency department, or a person providing end-of-life support.</p> <p>While most <a href="https://www.qld.gov.au/health/conditions/health-alerts/coronavirus-covid-19/take-action/coronavirus-prevention">states</a> and <a href="https://health.act.gov.au/hospitals-and-health-centres/canberra-hospital">territories</a> have issued similar advice, Tasmania has <a href="https://www.dhhs.tas.gov.au/hospital">closed all hospitals</a> to visitors after the recent coronavirus outbreak in the North West Regional Hospital in Burnie.</p> <p>Hospitals in Tasmania will make exceptions for people visiting their partners at the birth of a child, parents visiting dependent children and for “compassionate and end-of-life reasons”. But a person visiting under any of these exemptions still needs to check with the hospital.</p> <p><strong>Hospitals also have their own rules</strong></p> <p>Hospitals around the country have also restricted visiting hours and numbers beyond what the health departments are mandating.</p> <p>For instance, <a href="https://monashhealth.org/patients-visitors/coronavirus#visiting-monash-health">at our hospital</a> in Victoria, currently only one visitor per patient per day is allowed, and no children under 16. Visitors to our ICU are limited to a maximum of ten minutes whereas during labour one partner or support person can be there for 24 hours.</p> <p>On entry, staff will screen you for symptoms and signs of COVID-19. This might be done by asking you a series of questions and/or checking your temperature.</p> <p> </p> <p>So as the rules vary across states, territories, individual hospitals – and even different wards within a single hospital – check the latest restrictions for your state and hospital before planning a visit.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/135565/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. 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More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/maximilian-de-courten-21676"><em>Maximilian de Courten</em></a><em>, Professor in Global Public Health, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/victoria-university-1175">Victoria University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/barbora-de-courten-1029132">Barbora de Courten</a>, Professor and Specialist Physcian, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/erwin-loh-826318">Erwin Loh</a>, Group Chief Medical Officer, St Vincent's Health Australia &amp; Clinical Professor, Monash University, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/georgia-soldatos-1034140">Georgia Soldatos</a>, Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor, School Public Health and Preventative Medicine, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/monash-university-1065">Monash University</a></em></span></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/can-i-visit-my-loved-one-in-hospital-even-if-they-dont-have-coronavirus-135565">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Wheely romantic: Couple ties the knot while taking out the bins

<p>A NSW couple has not let coronavirus restrictions get in the way of their nuptial plans as they ceremoniously pulled a set of wheely bins during their makeshift wedding procession.</p> <p>Louise and Dan Smith tied the knot on Saturday and went on to take pictures while getting the bins out in Albion Park, following the trend of Australians getting dressed up to put the bins out under isolation.</p> <p>“Got married yesterday... bin waiting long enough, weren’t going to let a bit of quarantine get in our way,” Louise wrote in a post on the Facebook group Bin Isolation Outing.</p> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/louise.anne.sedg/posts/10159555751847646?__cft__[0]=AZVPDBbf7Qfz21Pp5bvLxeDBOBiFO7jwoKGGoYRwmQbkPYhOuSOGvH_a0g8nHO7IdxL7XcQcHgaKphP6PYI0xkun8Ey3CWcDl8l9DiTX8YYj5tCp4JK-J-06vP0O1L7b0c1Wx3-Uoc-LiBRBqHfD-o5FC8zRHNC9LfyYMK851d-SIw&amp;__tn__=%2CO%2CP-R" data-show-text="true" data-width=""> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>The only pics we have so far 😂😂😂</p> Posted by <a href="#">Louise Smith</a> on <a href="https://developers.facebook.com/louise.anne.sedg/posts/10159555751847646">Saturday, 18 April 2020</a></blockquote> </div> <p>The post has received more than 8,000 comments and 300 shares.</p> <p>Louise told <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://10daily.com.au/news/good-news/a200420tbmvx/bin-waiting-long-enough-couple-ties-the-knot-with-wheely-bins-in-lockdown-wedding-20200420" target="_blank">10 daily</a> she saw the bins when they were returning from the wedding. “I thought:<span> </span><em>I can’t resist</em>,” she said.</p> <p>The couple had been planning to get married in the UK in October, but said the ceremony must happen “pandemic or no pandemic”.</p> <p>The wedding followed Australia’s social distancing rules, with only five people in attendance, including the celebrant.</p> <p>“We just had my mum there and my best friend and a celebrant. We got married under some trees and it was a simple service,” Louise said.</p> <p>“Once the celebrant left, the photographer came and we kept to the five.”</p> <div class="fb-post" data-href="https://www.facebook.com/tomhealyphoto/posts/2779877715442408" data-show-text="true" data-width=""> <blockquote class="fb-xfbml-parse-ignore"> <p>Lou &amp; Dans elopement yesterday. If you or anyone you know is getting married and are after a photographer or videographer, get in touch. www.tomhealy.com.au/weddings</p> Posted by <a href="https://www.facebook.com/tomhealyphoto/">Tom Healy Photography</a> on <a href="https://developers.facebook.com/tomhealyphoto/posts/2779877715442408">Saturday, 18 April 2020</a></blockquote> </div> <p>The ceremony was livestreamed on Facebook, and the reception was held on a Zoom conference call.</p>

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Morning show hosts forced to awkwardly explain why they’re not social distancing

<p>Social distancing measures in the UK amid the coronavirus pandemic has become a new normal for people.</p> <p>However, viewers of<span> </span>The Morning<span> </span>show have forced the programme’s hosts to explain why they are not sitting six feet apart.</p> <p>In a clip posted to their Twitter page, Eamonn Holmes and Ruth Langsford explained why fans should not be worried about their close proximity to each other.</p> <p>“For anyone who's worried,<a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://twitter.com/EamonnHolmes" target="_blank"> @EamonnHolmes</a> and<a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://twitter.com/RuthieeL" target="_blank"> @RuthieeL</a> are actually married in real life, so it's safe for them to sit close to each other in the studio,” the show wrote in the caption.</p> <p>“If you're maybe new to watching This Morning because you're on lockdown...we are allowed to sit this close to each other because we're married, we live in the same house,” Ruth said. </p> <p>However, some fans did not approve of the reasons given by the show’s host, with one person writing: “They should be setting example saying 2 meters apart not everyone know this very shameful this needs to change asap.”</p> <p>Others believed it was still important for Ruth and Eamonn to follow the social distancing guidelines, however some questioned how people could not know the hosts were married.</p> <p>Eamonn spoke on the show after their twitter clip made waves online, saying: “With regard to social distancing, don't bother phoning in and saying 'why are these two together' because we are together all day in the house, we live together.</p> <p>“And in case a lot of you don't know this, we actually do live together.”</p> <p>Ruth added in: “Some people think it's a fake marriage darling, it's a TV marriage.”</p> <p>Eamonn and Ruth both regularly present the morning TV show side by side, have been married for ten years and share an 18-year-old son together. </p>

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Why can’t I stop thinking about my dead parents?

<p><em>“How can someone stop thinking about his or her dead parents? Is this really possible?”</em> Mirka, by email.</p> <p>After I finished my studies I worked as a carer for the elderly for a few months. It was a difficult job, but there are some people I remember fondly. One of them was a woman in her 90s, with memory loss and hearing problems. I’d cook lunch for her and then sit and listen as she’d eat and share stories about her life. She had been married and had several children. But the people that she talked about the most, that she seemed to remember best, were her parents.</p> <p>The thought scared me. Even when we are very old, and we forget what we did yesterday or who our neighbours are, we remember our parents. It scared me because it showed that there are things that we can never leave behind, that memories from a distant past can come back to haunt (or, of course, delight) us. We are not in control of what we remember. Time does not heal everything. It does not wash it all away like a benevolent numbing wave.</p> <p>It seems we simply cannot leave some people behind, especially people who are dead and whom we may wish to forget, because remembering hurts. It may hurt because we miss them and our ongoing love for them is painful. It may hurt because we feel guilty for not appreciating them more. Or it may hurt because we still can’t forgive them.</p> <p>Whatever the reason, we may wish to live in a world in which they do not exist, not even in our minds, because we cannot feel the loss of something that we never think about. So we believe that, if only we could forget, there would be no loss, nor pain. We may even believe that forgetting about our parents will somehow make us free to finally be ourselves.</p> <p>Perhaps all this is true, but perhaps that is also the wrong way to think about it.</p> <p>Here is a thought that you may find either soothing or terrifying: I don’t think it is possible to ever experience a world in which our parents are completely absent. To start with the obvious reasons, our parents are part of us, biologically and psychologically. We are who we are <a href="https://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/pediatrics/104/Supplement_1/164.full.pdf">because of who they are</a>, or were.</p> <p>There are always going to be moments when we’ll look in the mirror and recognise their smile in the way we smile, or remember the way they waved their hands in the air in frustration, because we do that too. Perhaps we have a temper, like them; perhaps we are good with children, just as they were. Our confidence or insecurity, our particular fears and the way we love, are influenced by them.</p> <p>Of course we have some freedom and independence as well, because there are parts of ourselves that have been shaped by factors that have nothing to do with our parents, and because we can partly <a href="https://theconversation.com/free-thought-can-you-ever-be-a-truly-independent-thinker-129033">choose who we are</a>. But there are always traces of our parents in us – some good, others less so.</p> <p>Most parents leave a legacy that is a mixture of positives and negatives. That is only human. And if we have children, we will be present in them in the same way, and so on. That’s how the reproduction of life works, and we join in the dance.</p> <p>Indeed, if we want, we can go further and think about all the history and generations and natural factors that went into the making of ourselves. It is a bit dizzying, but also an incredibly expansive thought. To borrow <a href="https://poets.org/poem/song-myself-51">a line</a> from American <a href="https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/transcendentalism/">transcendentalist</a> poet Walt Whitman, you can say: “I contain multitudes.”</p> <p>We can think about this as a matter of biology, a matter of culture, <a href="https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/identity-personal/#Fis">a philosophical question of personal identity</a> or as a spiritual perspective. I like to think that the separation between these approaches is porous, and we can adopt all of them together.</p> <p>None of this denies our individuality. It is rather about recognising that our individuality is not independent of what we conceive as “not us”, and that parents are a big part of the individual we are.</p> <p><strong>The nature of memory</strong></p> <p>Psychologically, two factors explain the <a href="https://www.apa.org/monitor/2011/09/memorie">pervasive nature of memories</a> related to our parents: one is the fact that emotionally intense experiences last longer in our memory. The other is that we are more likely to create memories when things are new – and childhood is the time of our lives when so many <a href="https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2020.00322/full">things we experience are novel</a> and important.</p> <p>Parents are typically central in both cases. Our first emotions take place with them. They are present during our first explorations of the world and of ourselves. So if we put them together it becomes clear that parent-related situations have a greater chance of being impressed in our memories than almost anything else.</p> <p>But does this mean that we are stuck with memories of our parents, sometimes painful, replaying in our minds all the time, day after day? Not at all.</p> <p>I think that we can use the inescapable presence of our parents within us as a spring to move forward and as a liberating knowledge to project ourselves outward into the world. That someone is part of us does not mean that we must think about them all the time. Or even at all. It means that we are free, in fact, to think about everything else, because we don’t have to keep our thoughts fixed on them in order for them to be present. They already, always, are.</p> <p>If we have made peace with this composite identity, if we have incorporated and allowed their legacy into us in ways that serve us and we can accept, then we do not need to tend to it. We are able to place our full attention on to the things in the world that require it, without feeling the guilt of letting our parents go. If anything, we are carrying them forward.</p> <p><strong>Confronting darkness</strong></p> <p>Sometimes, though, the aspects of ourselves that are shaped by our parents are causes of suffering, and we need to observe them and work on them. There may be haunting memories – or legacies – that we cannot ignore. Perhaps the English poet Philip Larkin captured this sense of negative inheritance most memorably in his searingly frank <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/48419/this-be-the-verse"><em>This Be The Verse</em></a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>They fuck you up, your mum and dad.<br />They may not mean to, but they do.<br />They fill you with the faults they had<br />And add some extra, just for you.</p> </blockquote> <p>If this is the case, we may need to remember to go back to the roots of the suffering and examine them, <a href="https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/psychoanalysis-unplugged/201801/why-does-your-therapist-ask-about-your-childhood">to try to resolve them</a>. This is often worth doing, particularly if we have trouble forgiving our parents for having wronged us. Regretting the fact that we never forgave them, or feeling shame because we still love the people who humiliated and hurt us can be a deep source of trauma. The easy option is often to try to forget about it.</p> <p>But confronting the memories can help us move on. Perhaps it is possible, <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/48419/this-be-the-verse">as Larkin also pointed out</a>, that however much our parents wronged us, they were also let down by their parents, who were in turn let down by their parents. This doesn’t justify their actions. But accepting that they were to some extent also victims, or that they also had some good qualities, can be a way of breaking a dark cycle – a way of refusing to inherit such behaviour.</p> <p>So coming to terms with dark memories, and carrying them with us, can make us exceptional people. And if we still can’t forgive our parents, thinking about them could at least help us to accept that we can’t forgive them. And that acceptance may make our memories less painful – fleeting, occasional thoughts rather than relentless, towering waves of pain and anxiety.</p> <p>The same is true for feelings of guilt. Sure, we could have all shown our parents more love and care. But chances are they felt exactly the same about their parents, and therefore always understood that we loved them more than we could say. It’s a comforting thought.</p> <p>Ultimately, we are bound up with the people who generated us and who brought us up (sometimes they are the same, sometimes they are not).</p> <p>But we can choose where to turn our gaze. Indeed, I’d argue that it is precisely because of the inescapable presence of these people, that we have greater freedom to direct our attention elsewhere, outward, to wherever it is needed. And we can be assured they will be with us, in some way, whichever path we choose to take.</p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/silvia-panizza-996002"><em>Silvia Panizza</em></a><em>, Teaching Fellow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-college-dublin-1365">University College Dublin</a></em></span></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-cant-i-stop-thinking-about-my-dead-parents-135588">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Dr Jane Goodall reveals Prince Harry is finding new LA life “challenging”

<p>Dr Jane Goodall has revealed her dear friend, Prince Harry, is finding it “a bit challenging” adjusting to his new life in Los Angeles.</p> <p>The 86-year-old primatologist admitted she had “been in touch” with the royal after he and his wife, Duchess Meghan, stepped back from their positions as senior members and moved to Canada.</p> <p>The couple eventually moved onto Los Angeles with their 11-month-old son Archie.</p> <p>The pair have been widely reported to be big fans of Dr. Jane Goodall who has been a major activist for climate change and global warming, and she says she believes she might be the first person outside of the royal family to have held Archie.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-99vuNHUjs/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-99vuNHUjs/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Celebitchy (@celebitchyofficial)</a> on Apr 14, 2020 at 9:35am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Currently, the activist is in quarantine in Bournemouth.</p> <p>“I don’t know how his career is going to map out, but, yes, I’ve been in touch – though I think he’s finding life a bit challenging right now,” she said while speaking to <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.radiotimes.com/" target="_blank">Radio Times</a>.</p> <p>She went on to say both Harry and his big brother love to hunt, but believes since Meghan “doesn’t like hunting”, he may give it up.</p> <p>Dr. Goodall recalled a conversation she and Prince Harry when they met last summer while attending an event to raise awareness for her Roots &amp; Shoots education programme at Windsor Castle.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-8M4wvJa9R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-8M4wvJa9R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Comunidad Inti Wara Yassi (@inti_wara_yassi)</a> on Apr 13, 2020 at 5:09pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I made Archie do the Queen’s wave, saying, ‘I suppose he’ll have to learn this’”, she said.</p> <p>“Harry said: ‘No, he’s not growing up like that’.”</p> <p>The activist went on to say she is enjoying her life at home but found replying to emails was more exhausting than travelling the world.</p> <p>When asked if she was becoming restless, she responded: “No, I hate travelling the way I do, but I still have a message to get out.</p> <p>“With all the emails and requests I’m getting, this is actually more exhausting than travelling.”<span class="CmCaReT" style="display: none;">�</span></p>

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