Relationships

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How do you know when it's time to break up?

<p>Christmas may be a time of giving, but it’s also a <a href="https://informationisbeautiful.net/2010/peak-break-up-times-on-facebook/">peak time for break-ups</a>. Facing the prospect of spending yet another festive season with their romantic partner, many people start having doubts about their relationship in the run up to Christmas. This is even the case for marriages, with formal divorce applications <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-46761442">tending to peak in January</a>.</p> <p>But knowing whether it is time to break up can be extremely difficult. Should you try harder to make the relationship work, or have you wasted too much energy on it already?</p> <p>Making a list of pros and cons can be one way to decide. <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/1948550617722834?journalCode=sppa">A study from 2018</a> showed that most people are able to produce a list of reasons to stay with or leave their partner. Based on 447 participants’ open-ended responses to questions about their relationship, the researchers were able to identify 27 reasons people want to stay in their relationship.</p> <p>Common reasons to stay included the fulfilment of emotional and physical intimacy, family duty and financial benefits of staying together. Reasons to leave included breaches of trust, an unsatisfying sex life, too much conflict, being incompatible, disliking their partner’s personality and finding someone new.</p> <p>So what is it that tips the scales and motivates some to move on and others to stay?</p> <h2>The investment model</h2> <p>The <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/0022103180900074">investment model</a> is one way researchers have attempted to understand the tipping scales of commitment. According to this model, three factors equally contribute to whether people stay committed. First, relationship satisfaction is a gauge of how much positive relative to negative experiences people have with their partner. When satisfaction is high, people feel that their needs are being met.</p> <p>The model also takes into account the investments people have made in the relationship, which would be lost. This can include financial investments, such as shared bank accounts and houses, as well as investments in children, friends or in-laws. Finally, there is the quality of alternatives. These can include the potential for new romantic partners, but also friends, family and even hobbies that represent sources of fulfilment outside of the relationship.</p> <p>According to the investment model, satisfaction and investments positively contribute to commitment, while alternatives decrease it. In an ideal configuration, people would feel extremely satisfied in their relationship, have invested a lot in it and feel like the alternatives pale in comparison to what they have.</p> <p>If people aren’t satisfied, have invested little in the relationship or feel like they can easily be fulfilled outside the relationship, they’re more likely to break up.</p> <p>In reality, these factors aren’t always easy to determine and can combine in confusing ways. For example, people may over- or under-estimate their ability to meet a new romantic partner or devote time to their hobbies, making them feel like they have less or more of a choice than they actually have.</p> <p>Take Jordan, who has been with Josh for a few months and can’t remember the last time she has had so much fun with a boyfriend. However, in the past few weeks, Jordan has noticed her colleague Micha flirting with her. Micha is not only attractive but shares a lot of the same interests and values as Jordan. Despite Jordan’s high satisfaction with Josh and months of investing time and effort, she may well decide to dump him and see how things work out with Micha instead.</p> <p>But even if Jordan lists the pros and cons of her relationship with Josh, she might not be able to know for certain whether Micha is ultimately interested in the kind of relationship she is, making her final decision a gamble.</p> <h2>Staying out of fear</h2> <p>Despite seeing all the potential benefits of starting a new relationship, some people hold on to their current one because of the harm they think they will cause to the person they’re leaving – or the damage it will cause themselves.</p> <p>Breakups are, after all, <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1993-29337-001">associated with spikes in distress and ill health</a> as well as a <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/0146167209352250">loss of identity</a>. It can also lead people to <a href="https://abdn.pure.elsevier.com/en/publications/losing-the-wind-beneath-your-wings-the-prospective-influence-of-r">miss goal pursuits</a> that ex-partners facilitated.</p> <p>So it is unsurprising that some people are afraid of being single. This can leave many people <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24128187">settling for less than what they want</a> or deserve in a relationship when they do not have clear alternatives available to them. This is closely linked to a fear of regret, which makes us biased towards <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-fear-of-regret-can-lock-us-into-bad-relationships-jobs-and-habits-heres-how-to-break-free-111115">sticking with the status quo</a> even if our reasoning or intuition says we shouldn’t.</p> <p>Single people also are <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1467-8721.2006.00446.x?journalCode=cdpa">stigmatised by society</a>. Others see them as lonelier and less happy than their romantically attached counterparts. So even when people may not fear being single themselves, cultural and social forces may put them off pulling the plug.</p> <p>If you find yourself pondering a breakup, try to think objectively about what’s good about your relationship, what you have invested and what alternatives you realistically have. But also consider whether fear is a motivating factor. <a href="https://theconversation.com/can-you-revive-the-spark-in-a-long-term-relationship-science-reveals-all-54602">You can revive a spark</a> in a long-term relationship. But it’s not fair to be with someone simply out of fear of ending up alone.</p> <p>But what should you do if you find yourself newly single this holiday season? First, find solace in friends and family. Social support is an important part of getting over painful life events, including breakups.</p> <p>Also, think about everything <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0265407514546978">you have learned</a> from the relationship and how it has made you a better person. And try to see the bright side of single life. Despite a tendency to fear singledom, it is also a time to focus on yourself, your goals and your needs for the future, without having to worry about compromising with a partner.</p> <p>Whether you are looking to leave or rekindle your existing relationship, starting afresh in either way might seem daunting. But just like the new year ahead, it offers countless opportunities as well.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/128185/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Veronica Lamarche, Lecturer of Psychology, University of Essex</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/how-do-you-know-when-its-time-to-break-up-heres-the-research-128185" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Relationships

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Princess Anne shrugs at the Queen in hilarious clip

<p>Princess Anne has been caught on camera shrugging at Queen Elizabeth II in an apparent ‘snub’ to US president Donald Trump.</p> <p>In a video filmed at Buckingham Palace’s NATO reception on Tuesday evening, the Queen could be seen shaking hands with Trump and his wife Melania.</p> <p>The 93-year-old monarch then looked over and noticed her daughter standing nearby. The Queen gestured at her daughter, but the princess shrugged and replied, “It’s just me and this lot.”</p> <p>According to Britain’s PA Media news agency, Princess Anne was pointing to members of the royal household, including the Deputy Master of the Household, Lt Col Anthony Charles Richards, and William Peel, the Lord Chamberlain.</p> <p>Social media users believed that the Queen was “scolding” Princess Anne for not greeting the president.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">We're all Princess Anne in this video. <a href="https://t.co/hlImWTbWCV">pic.twitter.com/hlImWTbWCV</a></p> — Jono (@jonoread) <a href="https://twitter.com/jonoread/status/1202168606311747590?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 4, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>However, the <em>Times </em>journalist Valentine Low said Princess Anne was not snubbing the Trumps.</p> <p>Low said he found from colleague Laura Elston of the Press Association that the interaction was caused by a mix-up from the Queen.</p> <p>“Princess Anne: the truth. No, she didn’t snub the Trumps. And she wasn’t told off by the Queen,” Low wrote on Twitter.</p> <p>“Instead the Queen, after greeting the Donald (and the Melania), turned to Anne to see who was next. But there wasn’t anyone waiting: Trump was the last leader to be received by the Queen.</p> <p>“Anne raised her hands in the air, laughed and said: ‘It’s just me’, adding a moment later ‘and this lot’ as she pointed to the members of the household behind her.</p> <p>“So, the truth is now out there. Not that anyone will pay any attention. Anne the Trump Snubber is a much better story.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">So, the truth is now out there. Not that anyone will pay any attention. Anne the Trump Snubber is a much better story.<br />5/5</p> — Valentine Low (@valentinelow) <a href="https://twitter.com/valentinelow/status/1202227560639352834?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 4, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Princess Anne was also caught on camera alongside <a href="https://o60.me/qfVfu2">world leaders who were joking about Trump</a> at the event.</p>

Relationships

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How you can skip fights about digital devices over the holidays

<p>Holidays are a time for family and friends to come together, to celebrate and to enjoy each other’s company. Older adults, who are often <a href="https://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/aarp_foundation/2012_PDFs/AARP-Foundation-Isolation-Framework-Report.pdf">lonely and socially isolated</a>, can particularly <a href="http://assets.pewresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2013/12/Christmas-survey-2013-full-report.pdf">look forward</a> to reconnecting with family and friends. However, when technology enters the picture, gatherings may not be quite so positive.</p> <p>All across the U.S., people of all ages are <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2017/02/09/digital-divides-feeding-america/">increasingly using technology</a> – including <a href="http://www.pewinternet.org/2017/05/17/tech-adoption-climbs-among-older-adults/">adults 65 and older</a>. My research, and that of others, has found that using computers, smartphones and the internet can help seniors <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbu018">fight depression</a> and <a href="http://doi.org/10.2196/jmir.2306">loneliness</a>, and <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/geronb/gbw130">enhance their sense</a> of <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/03601277.2016.1205425">well-being and self-worth</a>. Technology use can also help older adults <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-40542-1_49">feel like they matter to others</a> and help them stay connected with loved ones.</p> <p>However, my research, with colleagues, has also found that older adults still <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/03601277.2015.1083392">prefer in-person social interactions</a>. This can cause problems during holiday-season family gatherings, when younger relatives are likely to want to spend lots of time on their smartphones and other devices, often ignoring others in the same physical location. It’s a conflict one of my Ph.D. students, <a href="https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=edkc4HUAAAAJ&amp;hl=en">Christopher Ball</a>, has called the “<a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/0733464817732518">physical-digital divide</a>.” Fortunately, our work both offers explanations for these difficulties and suggests ways to turn holiday disagreement and disappointment into increased family connection that can last all year long.</p> <h2>Conflicting feelings</h2> <p>When they’re away on family visits that can last several days, it’s common for young people – tweens, teens and those in their 20s – to want to stay connected to their friends. However, older adults nearby may feel frustrated, disrespected, isolated and even offended.</p> <p>In our study, older adults told us they often attempt to limit this and other negative effects of digital devices by <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/0733464817732518">declaring tech-free “bubbles” at particular times or places</a>. They ask their friends and relatives to put devices aside during mealtimes and other key activities, to better focus on engaging with others face to face.</p> <p>But that’s not the only way to create a balance between using technology and interacting directly.</p> <h2>Finding opportunities</h2> <p>Certainly there can be times when devices should be put down and in-person interaction comes first. Yet all generations can benefit when older family members see how <a href="https://www.crcpress.com/Designing-Technology-Training-for-Older-Adults-in-Continuing-Care-Retirement/Cotten-Yost-Berkowsky-Winstead-Anderson/p/book/9781498718127">they can use technology</a> to <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/0733464811431824">improve their own lives</a>.</p> <p>Our work suggests that situations with potential for intergenerational conflict can be shifted to bring relatives together: Younger generations can show their older family members about technological devices.</p> <p>Grandchildren, for example, can demonstrate to their grandparents how they use mobile phones, tablets and social media, explaining what they like about the technologies. It might even turn into a teaching opportunity, helping older family members learn to entertain themselves online. They might even want to find out how to text – or even video chat – with geographically distant relatives. Using these technologies can help people stay connected to friends and family once the holidays are over.</p> <p>That will likely require some additional patience on the part of the younger technology coach. Older adults <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24475051">learn at slower rates than younger generations</a>. And it may be harder for them to <a href="http://www.apa.org/research/action/memory-changes.aspx">remember instructions</a>, so they might need to be shown how to use the device or app several times. A key factor is making sure the relatives know they <a href="http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0733464815609440">can ask for help</a> when technical difficulties inevitably strike.</p> <p>If older family members see how excited their descendants are about using digital devices, they may decide to cross the generational digital divide – which can help them live more enjoyable, connected lives not just during the holidays, but all throughout the year.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/88763/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Shelia R. Cotten, Professor of Media and Information, Michigan State University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/skip-fights-about-digital-devices-over-the-holidays-instead-let-them-bring-your-family-together-88763" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Relationships

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Sylvia and Larry Emdur celebrate 25 years of marriage

<p>Sylvie and Larry Emdur have professed their love to each other as the couple celebrated their 25<sup>th</sup> wedding anniversary.</p> <p>On Wednesday morning, Sylvie shared a throwback picture of the couple sharing a kiss during their trip to the Maldives.</p> <p>“Who would have thought. 25 Years, you and me. We are meant to be. Love you even more. Now that you’re older. And a little bolder,” Sylvie wrote in the caption.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5n4MA5g4IS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5n4MA5g4IS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">💚Who would have thought 💙25 Years, you and me 💚We are meant to be 💙Love you even more 💚Now that you’re older 💙And a little balder 🤪🤣</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sylviemdur/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Sylvie Emdur</a> (@sylviemdur) on Dec 3, 2019 at 12:07pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><em>The Morning Show </em>co-host responded to the picture in the comments, “Bugger!!! I forgot!! Thanks for reminding me bub, I’ll jump into the 7/11 on the way home and get you some of them real pretty flowers in that nice shiny paper and two of them gourmet pies for dinner.”</p> <p>Within a couple of hours, Larry posted the same picture on his account with a special message.</p> <p>“Happy 25th anniversary my gorgeous girl. I’ve married Sylvie three times so I hope she gets the message. This pic is from our second wedding and I reckon we need to get married a few more times just so she knows I’m serious about this whole “going steady” thing,” the 54-year-old wrote.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5oBbmbB22o/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5oBbmbB22o/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Happy 25th anniversary my gorgeous girl . I’ve married Sylvie 3 times so I hope she gets the message. This pic is from our 2nd wedding and I reckon we need to get married a few more times just so she knows I’m serious about this whole “going steady” thing xxxxxx lluvyalotzzzz baby doll xx</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by @<a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/larryemdur/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> larryemdur</a> on Dec 3, 2019 at 1:27pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The couple tied the knot in 1994 and have two children together.</p> <p>Last year, Larry shared that Sylvie asked a question as they marked 24 years of marriage. “This morning Sylvie asked me why on earth she should stick around for another 24 years,” he wrote on Instagram. “I said coz I’ll be the funnest guy in the nursing home... she’s currently considering her options.”</p>

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Wiggles star Emma Watkins addresses fan theory about her hair

<p>The Yellow Wiggle Emma Watkins has put fan theories to rest in her latest interview about whether or not her hair is real on children’s show<span> </span><em>The Wiggles</em>.</p> <p>The 30-year-old performer admitted that her character, Emma Wiggle, surprisingly wears a wig.</p> <p>"I'm about to confirm that I do wear a wig in <em>The Wiggles</em> show! There's been lots of chat on all different forums about whether it is my real hair or not," Watkins said in an interview with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.allure.com/story/emma-watkins-the-wiggles-daily-routine-hair-makeup-video" target="_blank" title="Allure"><em>Allure</em></a>. </p> <p>"Initially at the beginning, I was using my own hair and that's why it was quite confusing. Especially when people were watching my first season, compared to the second one.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/nKPKqezKpR/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/nKPKqezKpR/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">THANK YOU to everyone who came today to the shows in Golden Grove!!! 4 wonderful SOLD OUT shows!!! #thisismyhappyface #matchesmyballoon @thewiggles @anthony_wiggle @lachy_wiggle #wiggles #happy #smile #geecmon</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/emma_wiggle/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Emma_Wiggle</a> (@emma_wiggle) on Apr 23, 2014 at 9:56pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"So yes, I do wear a wig and I don't just have one, I have about four wigs now. Some for touring, some for filming overseas, [and] one at home all the time, just in case."</p> <p>Watkins explained that the reason behind the wigs is that it was too difficult it was to constantly recreate the same look for each performance.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1YuKOthT8q/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B1YuKOthT8q/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Met Jack last night before the show in Atlanta 💛 Great dancing, wiggling and signing Jack! 🤟🏽🤟🏻</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/emma_wiggle/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Emma_Wiggle</a> (@emma_wiggle) on Aug 20, 2019 at 5:45am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"After about a year and a half, my hair started to fall out because I was parting it in the same place everyday. That's why I invested in a good wig. It is so much easier, and it gives a sense of consistency to the character, Emma Wiggle."</p> <p>Watkins is the first female Wiggle in the group’s 28-year history and is hugely popular with all children.</p>

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Shane Warne opens up on intense relationship with Liz Hurley: “She was great”

<p>Australian cricketer Shane Warne has opened up about her intense, fiery relationship with actress Liz Hurley.</p> <p>Warne dated Hurley from 2011 to 2013 after meeting at the races in England and admitted while he was used to the scrutiny of Australian media, there was no preparing for the pressure of UK tabloids.</p> <p>The Australian leg-spinner says the paparazzi frenzy in the UK was unlike anything he’d experienced and he felt like he was constantly under a microscope.</p> <p>“When I got together with Elizabeth, that was really odd because I had the sporting media that would follow you then I suppose the entertainment media collide, so everyday, anywhere we went we were followed by anywhere between six to 10 paparazzi photographers that would run you off the road,” Warne said on the You Cannot Be Serious podcast with former AFL Footy Show star Sam Newman, AFL journalist Mike Sheahan and Don Scott.</p> <p>“They would follow you — stop you, two cars in front of you, make you react … my kids in the car were scared one day too. It was ridiculous.</p> <p>“Mainly here in Melbourne and it was more intense in the UK.</p> <p>“Little things like you’d walk out of the house and there’d be six photographers there and I’d have my tracky pants on and a T-shirt and suddenly the next day all the papers would critique you and you’re going, ‘What?’ Who gives a s***, really.</p> <p>“That was sort of weird but we used to laugh about it. Elizabeth laughed about it, I laughed about it, but it was quite a fun time.”</p> <p>Warne says the two hit it off instantly when they met at Goodwood Racecourse and revealed he was pretty chuffed when he won the attention of Hurley.</p> <p>“I was pretty happy with myself, I played it calmly and nicely,” Warne said of their initial meeting on the podcast.    </p> <p>“We crossed paths and hit it off straight away.</p> <p>“She was lovely, she was fantastic.</p> <p>“She’s still a very good friend, we still speak all the time. She’s great.”</p> <p>In his book No Spin, Warne revealed he and the couple still speak all the time.</p> <p>He said there was no “clear reason” as to why their relationship ended in December, 2013, but it was clear Hurley’s time was completely taken up by her landing a new role on TV series The Royals.</p> <p>“The more you’re apart, the more you ask questions,” Warne wrote.</p> <p>“I got jumpy about the time Elizabeth still spent with Hugh Grant … He is her best friend but they saw each other more when I wasn’t around so, well, you know.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Liz Hurley and Shane Warne together. </p>

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Emma Watkins opens up after public heartache: “I’m in love”

<p>Emma Watkins, known as the yellow Wiggle from the popular children’s group has confirmed she has found love again following the high-profile split from bandmate and ex-husband Lachy Gillespie.</p> <p>Interestingly enough, she has met her new love through work – again.</p> <p>She confirmed to<span> </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/lifestyle/stellar" target="_blank">Stellar Magazine</a> </em>she has found love with Wiggles musician Oliver Brian..</p> <p>“Yes, I’m in love and I feel very excited to tell you,” she said.</p> <p>Watkins revealed she and her partner had worked together for four years before her self-described “total opposite” asked her to dinner.</p> <p>“He’s a very calm and thoughtful person and I’ve always been interested in his mind and his take on life, and his morals. He loves talking about the environment and food production,” she said.</p> <p style="text-align: left;"><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/ac0bc0434cb64c038e90d675a79c93a1" /></p> <p>Watkins and her co-star Lachy Gillespie’s split dominated headlines in 2018, but both admit they have remained close friends and co-stars since their marriage breakdown.</p> <p>The two have maintained such a close relationship, Watkins even confided she’d knew Gillespie would hit it off with his new partner, Australian Ballet dancer Dana Stephensen, before they started dating.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5hDGyFBhST/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5hDGyFBhST/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Emma_Wiggle (@emma_wiggle)</a> on Nov 30, 2019 at 8:27pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Stephensen who had also worked with The Wiggles to record a DVD in 2018, told a friend she thought they had “similar energy”.</p> <p>Watkins and Gillespie were together for two years before announcing their separation in August 2018 on Facebook.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B435xIkhQoU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B435xIkhQoU/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Emma_Wiggle (@emma_wiggle)</a> on Nov 14, 2019 at 8:57pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>When she spoke to Australian Story, Watkins admitted they’d made a point of keeping their relationship private in its initial stages.</p> <p>“I don’t really think many people knew about it at the beginning.</p> <p>“I think people recognised that maybe dynamically things had changed between us but there weren’t any upset feelings. We were just trying to work out our friendship during that time.”</p> <p>These days, Watkins says they will be connected for the rest of their lives.</p> <p>“A lot of people have said to us that they just can’t see how it can be so amicable.</p> <p>“But truly, Lachy and I, we just get each other. Just because we’re not romantically together anymore doesn’t mean we’re not together for the rest of our life,” she told Australian Story.</p> <p>She added: “I feel really lucky to have him supporting me through the whole thing, which sounds bizarre, but this is our life and we are so connected.”</p>

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Good news for Schapelle Corby as eagle-eyed fans spot a potential engagement ring

<p>Schapelle Corby, who made headlines after being found with 4.1 kilos of marijuana inside her boogie board bag in Bali Airport back in 2004, has sparked rumours that she is engaged to her current partner.</p> <p>The 42-year-old flashed a diamond ring on her wedding finger while sunbathing at a Gold Coast beach and posted the photos to Instagram.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5ZGtUzA8l4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5ZGtUzA8l4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Days are better with you in my life. Happy 2nd Birthday #Lucille • who is your Favourite Author • what are you reading now ?</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/schapelle.corby/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Schapellecorby</a> (@schapelle.corby) on Nov 27, 2019 at 6:25pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>While Corby didn’t confirm that her boyfriend, Ben Panangian, had proposed, she hinted by tagging him in one of her posts.</p> <p>One of her followers also noticed the ring and commented 'That's a beautiful ring you're wearing', alongside an engagement ring emoji.</p> <p>Corby replied: “I think so too.”</p> <p>Panangian and Corby first met at a church service in Bali’s Kerobokan Prison in 2006 while both serving sentences for drug-related crimes.</p> <p>They only spend 'two precious weeks a year together' because Panangian is unable to enter Australia due to his criminal record.</p> <p>Corby is able to return to Indonesia if she chooses but does not feel “Comfortable” doing so as of yet.</p> <p>Her and her partner meet in countries where visas are not required for entry.</p> <p>She has previously described Panangian as her “soulmate”.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see some of the happy moments between the couple.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: Instagram<span> </span><span>@</span>schapellecorby</em></p>

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Alone together: How mobile devices have changed family time

<p>There is now widespread concern about the <a href="https://theconversation.com/too-much-screen-time-linked-to-an-epidemic-of-myopia-among-young-people-111599">amount of time</a> children spend staring at screens – with many people worried about the <a href="https://theconversation.com/mental-health-risks-to-girls-who-spend-more-than-an-hour-a-day-on-social-media-new-study-93406">negative impacts</a> mobile devices might have on health and well-being.</p> <p>Concerns have also been raised about the influence of technological change on relationships and face-to-face interactions. Sherry Turkle, a professor of the social studies of science, came up with the famous term “<a href="http://alonetogetherbook.com/">alone together</a>” – which is also the name of her book. “Alone together” captures this idea of spending time on devices to the neglect of interacting with those who are physically nearby.</p> <p>Many people believe that technological changes have had a detrimental impact on the time family members spend together – with “alone together” time colonising family life. Yet, to date, very few studies have actually been done in this area.</p> <p>Our new <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jomf.12564">research</a> looks to change this, by providing the first real insight into how technology has impacted the way families spend their time in the UK. To do this, we analysed time diaries collected by parents and children aged eight to 16 years-old in 2000 and then again in 2015 – a period that has witnessed rapid technological change.</p> <h2>More time at home and alone</h2> <p>Contrary to expectations, we found that children spent more time around their parents in 2015 than in 2000. This equates to just over half an hour extra a day (347 minutes per day in 2000 and 379 minutes in 2015). Notably, all of this additional time near parents was spent at home.</p> <p>This was a surprising finding. But looking closer, we found that children reported they were “alone” during all of this additional time at home with their parents. In this sense then, “alone together” time has increased.</p> <p>Our analysis also showed some relatively small changes in time for shared family activities, with contemporary families spending less time watching TV and more time on leisure activities and family meals. But the overall time spent in shared activities has remained the same.</p> <p>Our data shows that mobile device use cuts across all aspects of family time. We found that children and parents both spent approximately the same amount of time (around 90 minutes) using mobile devices when together.</p> <p>We found all these patterns to be particularly pronounced among young people aged 14 to 16. Young people in this group spent around one hour more at home “alone” with their parents in 2015 than in 2000. Mobile device use when near their parents was also more frequent and heavily concentrated.</p> <h2>Lack of quality time?</h2> <p>Academics have long noted the capacity for <a href="http://sk.sagepub.com/books/families-and-time">technology to bring families together at home</a>. And while our research does seem to indicate this could be the case, this increase in time at home may also be associated with other issues such as the <a href="https://theconversation.com/helicopter-parents-the-real-reason-british-teenagers-are-so-unhappy-111673">parent’s concerns for their children’s safety</a>. <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2017/09/has-the-smartphone-destroyed-a-generation/534198/">Research in the US</a> finds similar patterns of change – with teens spending less time outside the home away from their parents.</p> <p>There is increasing evidence that the mere presence of a phone <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0265407512453827">negatively affects face-to-face interactions</a>. This may go some way then to explain <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/02614367.2016.1141974">parents’ perceptions</a> of decreasing family cohesion and time together with their children, reported in earlier studies.</p> <p>Indeed, we found that both children and parents were using mobile devices during family meals, television viewing, and other activities. So even though this was for a relatively small amount of time, it may have a disproportionate impact on the quality of this time for family members.</p> <p>Of course, in some cases, it is possible that mobile devices are in fact complementing family interactions. If, for example, family members use them for video streaming, to play group games or to contact other relatives. And further research on mobile device use and content is now necessary to help ascertain their full impact on daily life and move beyond commonly held negative assumptions.</p> <p>But what is clear, is that although a rise in “alone together” time means families now spend more time at home, it is not necessarily in a way that feels like quality time.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/111478/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Stella Chatzitheochari, Associate Professor in Sociology, University of Warwick and Killian Mullan, Lecturer Sociology and Policy, Aston University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/alone-together-how-mobile-devices-have-changed-family-time-111478" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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There’s a yawning gap in the plan to keep older Australians working

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the past decade a 30-year trend to earlier retirement has been reversed. In OECD countries the </span><a href="https://www.oecd.org/els/emp/average-effective-age-of-retirement.htm"><span style="font-weight: 400;">average age</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> at which people retire has risen by about one to two years. In Australia the average age has risen from 64 to 65.6 for men, and from 61.8 to 64.2 for women.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">For the Australian government, though, this isn’t enough.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a speech last night, Treasurer Josh Frydenberg spoke of the pressure put on Australia’s </span><a href="https://joshfrydenberg.com.au/latest-news/preparing-for-an-ageing-population/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">health, aged care and pension systems</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> by an ageing population.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over the next four decades the number of Australians working and paying income tax for every person over the age of 65 would fall from 4.5 to 2.7, he said. The proportion of people over 65 in the workforce would therefore have to grow substantially.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The government needs people to keep working and paying income tax to offset spending on age pensions, health care and the like.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Its most obvious policy stick is to raise the eligibility age for the pension, which is now 66 but will be </span><a href="https://www.humanservices.gov.au/individuals/services/centrelink/age-pension/who-can-get-it"><span style="font-weight: 400;">67 in 2023</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. Raising it further, however, is something the government has rejected as not on the cards. Instead Frydenberg is talking about more training for older workers to keep their skills relevant.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But </span><a href="https://www.nomos-elibrary.de/10.5771/0935-9915-2019-1-120/working-conditions-and-retirement-how-important-are-hr-policies-in-prolonging-working-life-jahrgang-30-2019-heft-1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">my research</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> with Mikkel Barslund, Jürgen Bauknecht, Nathan Hudson-Sharp, Lucy Stokes and David Wilkinson suggests this is a very small and unappealing carrot.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Our findings suggest there’s a limit to retirement ages rising organically. Because there comes a point where work, especially full-time work, just isn’t something most people want to – or indeed can – do.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The reason has to do with getting tired at and through work, how that tiredness affects partners and families, and the limit to which workplaces have shown themselves capable of accommodating the needs and preferences of older workers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is something that can only be addressed by dramatically reconfiguring work options.</span></p> <p><strong>The limits of job satisfaction</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These conclusions are based on two studies into the experiences of older workers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These studies have been based on data gleaned from two large European surveys, the </span><a href="http://www.share-project.org/home0.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Survey of Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> (SHARE) and the </span><a href="http://www.europeansocialsurvey.org/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">European Social Survey</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> (ESS). SHARE is a database of information on the health, socio-economic status and family networks of about 140,000 individuals aged 50 or older in 28 countries. ESS measures the attitudes, beliefs and behaviour of people in more than 30 nations. The demographics of these surveys means the results are relevant to the Australian population.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The </span><a href="https://www.nomos-elibrary.de/10.5771/0935-9915-2019-1-120/working-conditions-and-retirement-how-important-are-hr-policies-in-prolonging-working-life-jahrgang-30-2019-heft-1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">first study</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> used data from SHARE to model the link between the step into retirement, job satisfaction and the factors that shape job satisfaction.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The results found people happy in their jobs retired later than those who were less satisfied with their job and its working conditions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">That’s perhaps not a surprising finding. But what is interesting is that our modelling showed that, if every mature age workers’ job satisfaction was raised to its highest level, the effect on retirement would still be small.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It would add, on average, about three months to current retirement ages.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The effect was stronger for women and those with tertiary qualifications. If working conditions made them more satisfied with their job, they would spend an extra 9 to 12 months in work before retiring.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Job satisfaction is only part of the story, though. </span><a href="https://elibrary.duncker-humblot.com/journals/id/21/vol/68/iss/1802/art/10267/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The second study</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, using data from ESS, highlights the obstacle of increasing tiredness to longer working lives. This is so because tiredness after work can adversely affect relationships with partners and families.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Interestingly, the significant factor in the perceptions of partner or family is not the number of hours worked but ability to determine a daily work schedule.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Those with greater influence over their working day were much less likely to find their partner or family “fed up” with their working beyond the time they could have retired. This greater control did not eliminate tiredness, but it appeared to help non-retirees better balance work with home life.</span></p> <p><strong>Tangible measures</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Our studies do point to a few tangible things that can be done do to make working in later life more bearable.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Improved job satisfaction could come from reducing time pressures, minimising physically demanding work, better pay, skill development opportunities and more autonomy. In particular, greater flexibility over working hours would help.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These are things, of course, that might improve job satisfaction for any worker, regardless of age. But they are within the control of the employer, not the government.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So perhaps what Josh Frydenberg and the federal government now need to talk about is not just a narrow focus on education or training to help older Australians remain in the workforce for longer, but how to encourage better working environments for everyone, regardless of age, gender or occupation.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Andreas Cebulla. Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://theconversation.com/theres-a-yawning-gap-in-the-plan-to-keep-older-australians-working-119013"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Conversation. </span></a></em></p>

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Queen Elizabeth reportedly cancelled Prince Andrew’s 60th birthday

<p>The fallout from Prince Andrew’s disastrous<span> </span>BBC<span> </span>interview about Jeffrey Epstein continues as there are reports from<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/edition/news/queen-cancels-prince-andrews-60th-birthday-bash-3dx6rwkr3?wgu=270525_54264_1574731557672_51666ea60d&amp;wgexpiry=1582507557&amp;utm_source=planit&amp;utm_medium=affiliate&amp;utm_content=22278" target="_blank">The Times</a><span> </span>that the Queen has cancelled the large celebration planned for Prince Andrew’s 60th birthday.</p> <p>The birthday would have highlighted all the work that the Duke of York does with his charities, but he has stepped back from them.</p> <p>Instead, the royal family are planning to celebrate Prince Andrew’s birthday with a “small family dinner”.</p> <p>An insider from the<span> </span>Times<span> </span>says that the Queen is “privately supportive” of Prince Andrew despite being “deeply frustrated” with how his scandal has impacted public view of the monarchy.</p> <p>Another royal insider said that the Queen “did not give her approval” for the infamous interview with Emily Maitlis, where the Prince showed no remorse for victims of Epstein.</p> <p>The cancelled birthday party is the latest in the growing fallout for the Duke of York.</p> <p>Prince Andrew announced after the interview that he was stepping down from royal duties for the “foreseeable future”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5GMamUpy9B/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5GMamUpy9B/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A statement by His Royal Highness The Duke of York KG.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/hrhthedukeofyork/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> The Duke of York</a> (@hrhthedukeofyork) on Nov 20, 2019 at 10:09am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>"It has become clear to me over the last few days that the circumstances relating to my former association with Jeffery Epstein have become a major disruption to my family's work and the valuable work going on in the many organisations and charities that I am proud to support," he said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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How diversity and change has made the Australian family stronger than ever

<p>Nostalgia is a powerful force in how we think about family. There is a persistent myth that family structures were better in the past; that the “golden age” of marriage is over, and the family is in decline. Historical and sociological research tells a different story.</p> <p>There were dramatic changes to ideals and practices of family life across the 20th century. The five decades between the end of the first world war and the 1970s saw the triumph of ideals about <a href="http://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9781137328625">mutuality in love and romance</a>. Ordinary people could afford to marry for love, rather than on the basis of economic strategy. In the 1950s, more people married than ever before and married young.</p> <p>As many historians have observed, this all changed in the 1970s. The sexual revolution introduced new ideals about love, sex and relationships. Sex could be separated from love and marriage. No longer bound to life-long monogamy, sex could be viewed as “a rewarding form of play”.</p> <p>This loosening of the bounds of sex and marriage was enabled by significant social, medical and political changes: the contraceptive pill, safer access to abortion, no-fault divorce. The new attitudes to women, reproduction and marriage that underpinned and emerged the sexual revolution also altered understandings of the family.</p> <h2>Did the sexual revolution destroy the family?</h2> <p>The significance of marriage certainly changed. Marriage no longer regulates social life as was once the ideal. It is no longer the reason most people leave home and establish their own household, start a career, and embark on adulthood. Now, it’s something people contemplate after having achieved those goals.</p> <p>Marriage is no longer the structure in which people expect to make their sexual debut. It is not necessarily the structure in which people have and raise children. Nor is it the structure in which many people expect to live out their final years.</p> <p>However, marriage is far from being “over”. Demographic research reveals that the profile of family life in Australia has been remarkably stable for the last 20 years.</p> <p>People are marrying later, but marriages lasting slightly longer. Almost all couples live together before marrying (almost 80%). And marriages are becoming more equal.</p> <p>US historian Stephanie Coontz recently reissued her study of the American family, <a href="http://www.stephaniecoontz.com/books/thewayweneverwere/">The Way We Never Were</a>. Coontz suggests the ongoing claims of social conservatives that the family is in crisis are not well-founded.</p> <p>While divorce rates are high, they are actually falling. And divorce isn’t necessarily bad for families. Coontz found that after the introduction of no-fault divorce, suicide rates of wives plummeted, and so did rates of domestic violence.</p> <p>Despite more women engaging in paid work, parents have actually increased the amount of time spent on child care. Women’s hours of child care have increased slightly, and men’s have tripled. While women still do more domestic work, the combined hours of paid and domestic work for men and women are similar. Men tend to increase their hours of paid work after having children.</p> <p>This increase in equality in the home appears to be good for couples. Coontz found:</p> <blockquote> <p>… heterosexual couples who share housework and childcare equally now report the highest levels of marital and sexual satisfaction – and the most frequent sex.</p> </blockquote> <p>Anecdotal evidence suggests that marriage is actually increasing in popularity. Rather than life-long heterosexual monogamy being the only family ideal, new family values have emerged. Most Australians now recognise and value rainbow, blended and diverse family structures.</p> <p>So rather than the sexual revolution having undermined the family, it appears that the family is thriving. Our family values have changed, though. For most Australians, marriage is no longer a ritual that initiates a family, but something contemplated when the family has become established.</p> <h2>Have our politicians kept up with changes to the family?</h2> <p>Families are always spoken about in politics as homogeneous, unchanging and timeless.</p> <p>The last 50 years have seen the development of a range of “ideal” families. The vast majority of Australians now support marriage equality for LGBT people, recognising the dignity of value of existing LGBT families.</p> <p>It’s time for our political leaders to catch up.<!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Timothy W. Jones, Senior Lecturer in History, La Trobe University</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/how-diversity-and-change-has-made-the-australian-family-stronger-than-ever-58981" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Kylie Minogue reveals intimate details on fiery fling with Michael Hutchence

<p>Australian pop star Kylie Minogue has shared intimate details of her intense relationship with INXS frontman Michael Hutchence between 1989 and 1991 for the documentary<span> </span>Mystify: Michael Hutchence.</p> <p>The film shows love letters from the young couple sent to eachother by fax while touring, as well as never before seen footage of the two sharing intimate moments.</p> <p>Minogue spoke about the moment Hutchence broke her heart, just as she knew he would.</p> <p>“The room was dark, the curtains were drawn, he was on all fours on the floor, crying,” she said of the moment.</p> <p>“Was it work, was it the drugs? I don't know. He was like a broken man.”</p> <p>While the heartbreak took a long time get over, the pop princess says she knew it would happen even when the pair were loved up and sending each other secret love letters while in different parts of the world.  </p> <p>Both touring consistently, the couple would fax one another from their hotel rooms using the aliases Gabby Jones and Swordfish.  </p> <p>“Jones was my mother's maiden name and Gabby was my dog. He was swordfish, well, just because.”</p> <p>They hoped the secret code names would prevent receptionists and hotel staff from reading their love letters.</p> <p>“Sex, love, food, drugs, music, travel, books, you name it, he wanted to experience it,” Minogue said of their insense relationship.  </p> <p>“As his partner I got to experience a lot of that as well. If you're a sensual being, all of your senses need stimulation. He definitely awakened my desire for things in my world.”</p> <p>The documentary featured never-before-seen footage of Hutchence and Minogue during their few years together.</p> <p>One clip showed the pop star naked along with others of the pair on a boat during a romantic holiday.</p> <p>Minogue said the public perception that she was a “pure, good girl dating this dark, bad boy” was accurate, but despite it all, she felt “safe with him”.</p> <p>“I felt protected. He had insatiable curiosity, all the good things in life and some the bad.</p> <p>“He opened up a whole new world for me. A lot of it was based around pleasure, let's face it.”</p> <p>The whirlwind romance, Kylie says, was never built to last.</p> <p>“It felt loving, yet sad and probably doomed. We talked through things and I couldn't give you an actual reason [as to why it happened]. </p> <p>“I left pretty confounded and destroyed and I knew that was...that was it. Yeah, he broke my heart. I have to confess, the hurt stays for quite a long time,” she said.  </p> <p>After the breakup, Minogue went on to have a series of high profile relationships with actors and stars.</p> <p>Hutchence also went on to find love with British television personality Paula Yates.</p> <p>Together the couple had a daughter, Heavenly Hiraani Tiger Lily in 1996.</p> <p>Sadly, just one year later, Hutchence was found hanging by his snakeskin belt in his Sydney hotel room while on holiday in Australia.</p> <p>Three years later, on September 17 2000, Yates was found dead in her home. She died of an accidental heroin overdose while Tiger Lily was at home with her. </p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Kylie Minogue and Michael Hutchence during their whirlwind romance.</p>

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How to end an argument fast

<p><span>Ever been in a heated discussion that just wouldn’t cease? Sometimes, no matter how hard you try in getting your points across and providing facts to back them up, the other person simply refuses to acknowledge them. However, there’s a simple trick that could put a stop to the winding debate you find yourself in.</span></p> <p><span>According to Reddit user <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/LifeProTips/comments/dt9ve0/lpt_saying_fair_enough_is_the_quickest_way_to_end/">u/nfhii</a>, there is a fitting response that could stop uncomfortable conversations in their tracks: “Fair enough.”</span></p> <p><span>The line is especially suitable for when you could see the other person’s reasoning or how they get to the point they’re making. It does not necessarily resolve the argument, but it allows you to move on in a peaceable way. </span></p> <p><span>User <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/LifeProTips/comments/dt9ve0/lpt_saying_fair_enough_is_the_quickest_way_to_end/f6w4zdv/">u/kyithios</a> summed it up: “Context and tone matters. When I say "fair enough" to friends when discussing something, it’s usually to denote I get their point. I may not necessarily agree with said point, but I get what they mean. As a result, we can move forward with a conversation or even change the subject without making things awkward, or someone angry.</span></p> <p><span>“In short, it’s just an acknowledgement of an argument, and understanding of it.”</span></p> <p><span>What about when the opposing party is wrong and far from fair? Saying “agree to disagree” suggests that more discussion is not going to change either of your minds and helps you out without having to concede to their view.</span></p>

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Royal family celebrates Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip’s 72nd marriage anniversary

<p>Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip tied the knot seventy-two years ago, and their ever-growing family has helped them celebrate in a special way. </p> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge paid tribute to the senior royal couple on social media. Both Prince William and Duchess Kate publicly wished the monarch and her husband a happy anniversary alongside a gorgeous vintage photograph and a newer one of the happy, loved-up couple. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5FUH9Cl16B/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5FUH9Cl16B/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Kensington Palace (@kensingtonroyal)</a> on Nov 20, 2019 at 1:57am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Their post read: "Wishing Her Majesty The Queen and His Royal Highness The Duke of Edinburgh a very happy 72nd Wedding Anniversary!"</p> <p>The Duke and Duchess took a similar approach by sharing a simple black-and-white photograph of the Queen and Duke from many years ago.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5Fu4krF6IS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5Fu4krF6IS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Duke and Duchess of Sussex (@sussexroyal)</a> on Nov 20, 2019 at 5:51am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"Happy anniversary to Her Majesty The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh!" their comment read. </p> <p>"On this day, seventy-two years ago, they were married at Westminster Abbey. Many congratulations!"</p> <p>The main royal family account shared their own sweet sentiments to celebrate the couple’s marriage. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5FUIhwneYh/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B5FUIhwneYh/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Royal Family (@theroyalfamily)</a> on Nov 20, 2019 at 1:57am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The page, which represents the Queen, Prince Philip and a number of other Windsor members, featured a two-photo slideshow of the couple waving from the balcony at the wedding, to a more recent shot of the two pictured together. </p> <p>The Duke of Edinburgh, 98, is retired, and currently spending time at Sandringham in Norfolk while his wife is some distance away in London for work.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see Queen Elizabeth and Prince Philip over the years.</p>

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Prince William and Duchess Kate’s date full of love: Body language expert dishes verdict on couple’s night out

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After eight years and three children together, the royal couple looked just as loved up as they would have been on their first date night, a body language expert has revealed. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Judi James says both Prince William and Duchess Kate, who are not a couple to publicly display acts of affection, exhibited “subtly flirt” behaviour that royal fans got to see at the beginning of their relationship. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While their displays of love and appreciation may be a little more downplayed than the Duke and Duchess of Sussex, James told</span><em><a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/index.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;"> FEMAIL</span></a></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, they still signal they have a solid foundation rooted in mutual affection. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The body language expert noted a photograph showing Prince William’s hand on the small of his wife’s back appeared “gentlemanly.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“William and Kate aren’t known for their overt PDAs and they can keep their touch rituals to a minimum in public but this back-touch from William looks unusually tactile and affectionate,” she said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“His smile looks almost shy here and the splayed hand appears gentle and gentlemanly, although that raised thumb suggests intense happiness.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It was not the only snap that showed the royal’s looking starry eyed and in love that got James’ attention though. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An image shared by Kensington Palace’s official Instagram page displayed the Duke and Duchess in their seats at the London Palladium during the show. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The couple’s mirroring is always tight, showing like-minded thinking and a subliminal desire to present as an double act based on two empathetic equals,” James said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Here though they add some strong eye-engage signals, leaning their heads together at matching angles to do so. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The eye contact has produced facial expressions that suggest the classic "look of love", with a softening of the features plus a dimpled smile from Kate.’</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Once more, a picture of the couple laughing in their box during the show signalled to the body language expert that they were both having fun. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Royal Variety performances can prompt some smiles from the royal box but here William and Kate are literally rocking with laughter,” Judi explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Again it is mutual though, with mirrored movements, suggesting a shared sense of fun.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, what stood out to her was a snap of the couple leaving the event and heading back to their car after a long night in public. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“When any smiling public displays have been an act it’s the moment a couple take their seats in the car that you’ll often see masks begin to slip,” Judi said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“But if anything Kate’s expression of delight appears to intensify here. Her excited, widened eye expression, her rounded cheeks and her symmetric smile all make her look like someone on a first date.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll through the gallery above to see the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge looking loved up on date night. </span></p>

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Sarah Ferguson writes emotional letter in support of Prince Andrew

<p>Sarah Ferguson, affectionately known as “Fergie” has written an emotional statement in support and defence of her ex-husband Prince Andrew.</p> <p>The statement was written just hours before his explosive interview with<span> </span><em>BBC Newsnight</em><span> </span>about his friendship with sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.</p> <p>In the Instagram dedication, the Duchess of York paid tribute to her ex-husband and said that he is a “true and real gentleman”.</p> <p>“Andrew is a true and real gentleman and is stoically steadfast to not only his duty but also his kindness and goodness of always seeing the best in people,” Sarah wrote.</p> <p>“I am deeply supportive and proud of this giant of a principled man, that dares to put his shoulder to the wind and stands firm with his sense of honour and truth.</p> <p>“For so many years he has gone about his duties for Great Britain and The Monarch. It is time for Andrew to stand firm now, and that he has, and I am with him every step of the way and that is my honour.</p> <p>“We have always walked tall and strong, he for me and me for him. We are the best examples of joint parenting, with both our girls and I go back to my three C's... Communicate, compromise, compassion.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B45hF8DlXMg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B45hF8DlXMg/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">It is so rare to meet people that are able to speak from their hearts with honesty and pure real truth, that remain steadfast and strong to their beliefs. Andrew is a true and real gentleman and is stoically steadfast to not only his duty but also his kindness and goodness of always seeing the best in people. I am deeply supportive and proud of this giant of a principled man, that dares to put his shoulder to the wind and stands firm with his sense of honour and truth. For so many years he has gone about his duties for Great Britain and The Monarch. It is time for Andrew to stand firm now, and that he has, and I am with him every step of the way and that is my honour. We have always walked tall and strong, he for me and me for him. We are the best examples of joint parenting, with both our girls and I go back to my three C’s .. Communicate Compromise Compassion @hrhthedukeofyork</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/sarahferguson15/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Sarah Ferguson</a> (@sarahferguson15) on Nov 15, 2019 at 12:00pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>While many royal fans were thrilled with the show of support from Ferguson, others were less than thrilled with his interview.</p> <p>This includes<span> </span><em>The Project<span> </span></em>host Lisa Wilkinson, who made her thoughts clear during Sunday night’s episode of the panel show.</p> <p>“If that interview was meant to take the heat off Prince Andrew it's going to do exactly the opposite,” she told the panel program’s studio audience.</p> <p>“The extraordinary thing is at the end he was asked ‘is there anything we've left out?’</p> <p>“At no point in 60 minutes did he find the time to condemn child sex trafficking around the world or express any remorse for what's happened to the victims of Jeffrey Epstein. Breathtaking.”</p>

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“Are you kidding?”: Blanche d’Alpuget responds to Lisa Wilkinson’s controversial question

<p>Six months after the death of Bob Hawke, his wife of nearly 25 years Blanche d’Alpuget has sat down with <a rel="noopener" href="https://10daily.com.au/shows/theproject/a191115ipsbn/bob-hawke-had-lost-touch-with-normal-life-says-blanche-dalpuget-in-raw-interview-with-lisa-wilkonson-20191117" target="_blank"><em>The Sunday Project</em></a>’s Lisa Wilkinson to address the controversies surrounding their relationship.</p> <p>In an interview aired on Sunday, d’Alpuget said she did not feel guilty about how her <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/bob-hawke-and-blanche-dalpuget-felt-a-click-inside-australia-s-most-favourite-love-story" target="_blank">relationship with the Labor veteran</a> began.</p> <p>Hawke, Australia’s third longest-serving prime minister, faced public criticism after divorcing his wife of 38 years Hazel in 1994 and marrying d’Alpuget the following year. He was the first PM in Australian history to divorce.</p> <p>Wilkinson asked d’Alpuget if the late politician ever felt guilt about having an affair.</p> <p>“Do you think Bob had a problem with the fact that this relationship had begun?” Wilkinson asked.</p> <p>“Are you kidding?” d’Alpuget replied laughing. “He was perpetually unfaithful. He loved Hazel and he was perpetually unfaithful.”</p> <p>When asked if d’Alpuget herself felt any guilt for Hazel, who stood by Hawke throughout his re-election campaign despite his affair.</p> <p>“Did you feel guilty about the role that Hazel was playing at that point, she was publicly the first lady, she was also keeping the home fires burning with the kids, how hard was that for you to reconcile?” Wilkinson asked.</p> <p>“Look, it wasn’t an issue because Bob was not a faithful husband, so I didn’t feel I was doing anything bad,” d’Alpuget said.</p> <p>Hazel Hawke, who came public with her Alzheimer’s diagnosis in 2003, died aged 83 in 2013.</p> <p>“I think there was a mood in Australia around the time that we discovered that Hazel had dementia, I think there was a feeling that Hazel got the worst of Bob and you got the best of Bob, do you think that’s a fair assessment?” Wilkinson asked.</p> <p>“No, because her time as the wife of the prime minister was absolutely wonderful for her, he wasn’t drinking, she had all of the liberty and the restrictions of being the prime minister’s wife but all the good things she was able to do, socially, for society and herself,” d’Alpuget said.</p> <p>In another interview with <em><a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/he-wanted-to-go-i-came-to-accept-it-blanche-d-alpuget-on-life-after-bob-20191112-p539oo.html">The Sydney Morning Herald</a> </em>published on Saturday, d’Alpuget said their affair dated back to 1976. She said she then realised Hawke was “having affairs with women all over the country, that his love life was a kind of free-wheeling, decentralised harem, with four or five favourites and a shoe-sale queue of one-night stands”.</p> <p>When asked whether Hawke was faithful to her, d’Alpuget said, “I asked him about that once towards the end, and he swore to me that he was.”</p> <p>Today, the 75-year-old said she was getting used to life without her husband but was touched by the support from Australian people.</p> <p>“People would come into supermarkets and I’d be trying to buy cauliflower and someone would come up and go, ‘I just wanted to say’, and I’d cry on the cauliflower,” said d’Alpuget.</p> <p>She said she wanted Hawke to be remembered as “a man who loved his country and did his best to make it better”.</p>

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Is love losing its soul in the digital age?

<p>Instagram users have taken to issuing “weekiversary posts,” where they diligently mark the duration of their romances. <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/24/opinion/sunday/relationships-love-instagram.html">An article</a> in The New York Times explained how weekiversary posts have the unintended – or very much intended – consequence of shaming people who are not in love.</p> <p>The article also noted that this phenomenon <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/24/opinion/sunday/relationships-love-instagram.html">makes some doubt</a> the intensity of their own relationship. They wonder why their partners are not similarly starry-eyed and gushing online. Some even admitted that this phenomenon prompted them to stay in relationships longer than they should have: they go on celebrating their weekiversaries, just to keep up appearances.</p> <p>In truth, this could apply to any of the social media platforms, where people increasingly feel the need to act their lives in real time in a public format, documenting every event and incident, no matter how remarkable or mundane.</p> <p>As a <a href="https://yalebooks.yale.edu/book/9780300208931/do-guns-make-us-free">philosopher</a> researching the topic of privacy, I found myself thinking about the brave new culture of digital sharing.</p> <p>What does it say about love, that many are compelled to live their romances aloud, in detailed fashion?</p> <h2>Why display your love?</h2> <p>On one hand, there is nothing new here. Most of us seek the approval of others – even before our own, sometimes. Others’ approval, or their envy, makes our joy sweeter.</p> <p>Philosopher <a href="https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/rousseau/">Jean Jacques Rousseau</a> recognized something like this when he distinguished between “amour de soi” and “amour propre” – <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=n0tdG2qZFJUC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=rousseau+second+discourse&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwjZ2J-3sazgAhUPTt8KHQRbDNAQ6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&amp;q=rousseau%20second%20discourse&amp;f=false">two different forms of self love</a>. The former is love that is instinctual and not self-reflective. Rousseau sees it in presocial man, who is unconcerned with what other people think of him. Largely, he loves himself unconditionally, without judgment.</p> <p>Society, which complicates our lives irredeemably, introduces amour propre. This is self-love mediated through the eyes and opinions of others. Amour propre, in Rousseau’s view, is deeply flawed. It is hollow, flimsy, if not downright fraudulent. The opinions and judgment of others change rapidly and do not make for a firm foundation for honest, enduring, confident self-love and any emotions related to or rooted in it.</p> <p>This suggests an unflattering view of weekiversary posts. Are they just one’s way of satiating the need for amour propre – meeting the approval, and stoking the envy of online witnesses? Are they for one’s lover at all? Or, are they for public affirmation?</p> <h2>Curating our life stories</h2> <p>Is there a more positive way to make sense of weekiversary posts?</p> <p>Philosopher <a href="https://www.biography.com/people/paul-ricoeur-9458208">Paul Ricoeur</a> argued that humans have an inherent need to view their lives <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=5h9lJLdjoBwC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=ricoeur+time+and+narrative+volume&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwif8fGbsqzgAhUlh-AKHbpZDS8Q6AEIKDAA#v=onepage&amp;q=ricoeur%20time%20and%20narrative%20volume&amp;f=false">in a narrative fashion</a>. This is a prime way in which a person makes sense of his or her world.</p> <p>Specifically, one aims to project a narrative structure onto life, and give it a beginning, a climax and, hopefully, a fitting conclusion. The individual also wishes to situate his life story within a greater narrative, be it social, historical or cosmic.</p> <p>Social media, I believe, gives us newfound powers to curate the story of our lives, and if need be, change characters, dominant plot lines or background themes, how and when we like. In documenting everyday events and occurrences, we could even elevate them and lend them a degree of significance.</p> <p>So, it might seem perfectly natural that people would like to narrate their budding romances.</p> <p>I am now long and happily married, but I remember how first love is both exhilarating and confusing. It’s a mess of emotions to work out and understand. Among the many mixed messages issued by family, society and the media, it is often difficult to know how best to navigate romance and determine if you are doing things right – or if you have found “the one.”</p> <p>In fact, I sought to get a handle on it all by writing down my many thoughts. This helped give me clarity. It objectified my thoughts – I literally projected them on paper before me, and could better understand which were more resonant, powerful and pressing.</p> <h2>Love and insecurity</h2> <p>Social media, on the other hand, is not designed for introspection or soul-searching: Posts must be relatively short, eye-catching and declarative. Twitter emissions only tolerate 280 characters.</p> <p>Ambiguity has no place there. Social media isn’t the place to hash through a host of conflicting emotions. You are either in love, or you are not – and if you are in love, why declare it if it isn’t blissful?</p> <p>As Facebook discovered, negative posts tend to lose followers – and many people <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/30/technology/facebook-tinkers-with-users-emotions-in-news-feed-experiment-stirring-outcry.html">want to keep up their viewership</a>. The legal scholar <a href="https://www.law.columbia.edu/faculty/bernard-harcourt">Bernard Harcourt</a> argues that social media sharing <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=ymouCwAAQBAJ&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=bernard+harcourt&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwiHl7q4sqzgAhWHm-AKHdmzADIQ6AEINDAC#v=onepage&amp;q=bernard%20harcourt&amp;f=false">evokes the great American tradition of entrepreneurship</a>. From this perspective, in issuing weekiversary posts, individuals are creating an identity and a story – they are generating a brand that they can market widely.</p> <p>It’s hard to see how this phenomenon contributes to or makes for lasting and fulfilling relationships. If, for example, as Ricoeur says, social media effusions are an attempt to elevate the mundane, the simple, the everyday, and lend it special meaning, it begs the question: Why might one feel the need to do this repeatedly, persistently?</p> <p>I would argue that it betrays an air of insecurity. After all, at some point, all the affirmation one needs should come from your lover.</p> <h2>True love</h2> <p>There is an understandable need for young lovers to pronounce their joy in public. But love, when it matures, does not live publicly.</p> <p>Loving couples are not necessarily easy to pick out in public. I think of my parents, and my in-laws, married for nearly 50 years. They can sit with each other in comfortable silence for long periods of time. They can also communicate with each other without saying a word.</p> <p>Love is largely a private relationship, and demands intimacy. Only in intimacy does the inherent ambiguity or complexity of love emerge. Only in intimacy are you and your partner fully seen and known, with all your shortcomings or contradictions – and they are forgiven.</p> <p>It is in these intimate moments that lovers learn to tolerate ambiguity, negotiate differences and endure.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/110686/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Firmin DeBrabander, Professor of Philosophy, Maryland Institute College of Art</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/is-love-losing-its-soul-in-the-digital-age-110686" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

Relationships