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NSW RFS reveals how the $51 million raised by Celeste Barber will be spent

<p>Almost one year and a legal battle later, the $51 million in bushfire donations raised by Comedian Celeste Barber is being spent.</p> <p>Barber's fundraiser garnered attention from all over the world with people donating in droves for last year's Black Summer bushfire crisis.</p> <p>But the cause soon sparked controversy when it was revealed the funds could only be spent by the NSW Rural Fire Service (RFS) Trust, which Barber had chosen as the benefactor, rather than shared with charities and victims.</p> <p>The RFS went to the NSW Supreme Court to see if they could distribute the donations to other groups, but a judge declared the money could only go to them.</p> <p>Now they have revealed how the plan on spending the money.</p> <p>Speaking to Sunrise, inspector Ben Shepherd revealed the RFS asked its thousands of volunteers on what the service should do with the millions.</p> <p>“That money was donated to our firefighters, we had to ask them where they wanted to spend it, because ultimately that money is theirs,” he explained.</p> <p>“There’s a number of different projects the money is being funnelled into.”</p> <p>He said $30 million would be spent on new hi-tech equipment, including state-of-the-art helmets and tracking devices.</p> <p>And another $20 million has been distributed among brigades across the state for "station enhancements" and upgrades.</p> <p>A separate $10 million is being kept in a "benevolent fund" for firefighters who were injured and families of heroes killed in the line of duty.</p> <p>Shepherd said he wanted generous Australians to have “confidence” the RFS was spending the funds correctly.</p> <p>“It’s ultimately the firies determining how it’s going to be spent, because the money was donated to them,” he said.</p>

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ALDI shoppers form dozens-long queue for unlikely item

<p>A shopper shared a surprising photo of a queue that "went the length of the store" while she was trying to get into her local ALDI.</p> <p>Mum Maria revealed the "crazy" scene at ALDI's annual "Back To School" Special Buys sale.</p> <p>Many look forward to this sale as it started nationally on Wednesday, January 13th.</p> <p>“Another crazy day at ALDI,” wrote Maria on the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/groups/1034012533313136" target="_blank">Aldi Mums</a><span> </span>Facebook page.</p> <p>“Back to school sale. People everywhere, line up to the end of the store.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839476/aldi.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/78fd6fccb97b43b29905c5a858238c7a" /></p> <p>People are eager to get their hands on the store's popular $14.99 school shoes, especially with the pandemic tightening budgets around the nation.</p> <p>Other shoppers agreed that busy scenes were the norm at their local ALDI stores.</p> <p>“Yes, I had to line up for half an hour to pay,” said one.</p> <p>Added another: “I was 3rd in line but the woman who was first took every box of the white double strap jogger.”</p> <p>Some were quick to point out the lack of social distancing at the stores.</p> <p>“Hope they were all wearing masks,” said one.</p> <p>“I wanted to go but thought social distancing and COVID are more important.”</p>

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"Be vigilant": New scam involving Woolworths

<p>Scamwatch, run by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission, has been warning Woolworths shoppers about an elaborate scam.</p> <p>The scammers pose as virtual Woolworths representatives and asks shoppers to submit personal information to a text message.</p> <p>The scam has shoppers worried as it is able to identify the name of the recipient correctly.</p> <p>The text message tells recipients that a receipt from one of their purchases in 2020 had "automatically entered" them into a draw and they are able to claim a prize.</p> <p>The text message asks users to click on a link. One shopper did enter the website and was addressed by “Suzy” and welcomed to the fake “Woolworths interactive prize universe”.</p> <p>“I’m your virtual guide Suzy and I’ll be helping you to claim the prize you won today,” a robot said.</p> <p>The fake website had similar features to the Woolworths chat feature, which has stung unassuming shoppers.</p> <p>A Facebook user warned the supermarket giant about the scam by posting to Woolworths' Facebook community.</p> <p>He said he received “an email claiming to come via the WOW online chat and to click “here” to receive your gift,” the user wrote. “Presumably a scam, so just wanted to make you aware.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The latest scam impersonating Woolworths pretends to be a chat bot. Do not provide your address or credit card details. You will not receive the prize or gift voucher. <a href="https://t.co/EOldN6Q1Bv">pic.twitter.com/EOldN6Q1Bv</a></p> — Scamwatch_gov_au (@Scamwatch_gov) <a href="https://twitter.com/Scamwatch_gov/status/1348409129736409089?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">January 10, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>A Woolworths spokesperson refused to comment on how scammers were able to correctly identify the names of the text message recipients after being questioned by<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/gadgets/mobile-phones/scammers-posing-as-woolworths-virtual-assistants-with-fake-prizes-ask-shoppers-for-personal-information/news-story/8afa666f9a36a8f691f765b6f17cabe1" target="_blank"><em>NCA NewsWire.</em></a></p> <p>“We'd leave it to the relevant authorities to comment on the specific nature of the scam,” the spokesperson said.</p> <p>The spokesperson also said that the scam is not involved with Woolworths.</p> <p>“This is not an authorised message from Woolworths and is not affiliated with us in any way,” a statement read.</p> <p>“As always, we encourage our customers to be vigilant of online and text phishing scams, which seek to imitate well-known brands to collect personal information.</p> <p>“We never ask our customers for their personal or banking details in unsolicited communications. We report scams to the ACCC‘s Scamwatch and regularly update our Scam Alerts page on our website to help keep customers secure online.”</p>

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Man takes back tip from rude waitress

<p>One man's dining experience has ended in an altercation, with a waitress not providing good customer service as promised.</p> <p>Taking to Reddit, an anonymous man wrote about his experience of dining at a local Chinese restaurant with a friend.</p> <p>He explained that while the food was "great", he and his friend had "almost no interactions" with wait staff during the evening due to coronavirus precautions.</p> <p>"The bill came out to be just about $30, and I tipped just a little above 15 per cent, giving $5," he said.</p> <p>The waitress took the bill from the table, but she returned just before the man and his friend left to question their tip.</p> <p>"She returned with the $5 bill we left to cover the tip and in a passive-aggressive tone [said] 'Was something wrong with the food? Where's the rest of the tip?'" he said.</p> <p>He says the interaction left him feeling "shocked and confused".</p> <p>"I recall it being the very first time I was confronted for not tipping enough, as my usual 15 per cent tip suffices in past restaurant experiences," he explained.</p> <p>He decided to take back the $5 tip without speaking to the waitress, and walked out of the restaurant with his friend, even though she attempted to call them out as they did.</p> <p>"In the moment, we both agreed that it was an insane thing for the waitress to do, acting as if we didn't tip at all," he said.</p> <p>"The waitress that had confronted us had been someone we had close to almost no contact with the entire time, as she had only been to our table once to give our food."</p> <p>He asked other Redditors to share what they would have done in the situation.</p> <p>"Ignore her request to tip more and leave the $5 bill as it was, or give a larger tip as she asked just to get the situation over with?" he asked.</p> <p>Commenters widely sided with the man.</p> <p>"Fifteen per cent is enough and you gave more. Taking the tip away from an entitled waitress is totally justified," one wrote.</p> <p>Another said they were "glad" he took the $5 note back, adding, "She's lucky you didn't get her fired, which she deserved."</p>

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Doctor's incredible $800,000 gesture to cancer patients

<p>A doctor from the US has helped out 200 of his former patients by forgiving their medical debts, as he plans to close his practice this year.</p> <p>Oncologist Dr Omar Atiq plans to shut his practice, The Arkansas Cancer Clinic, down in March this year, after serving the community for close to 29 years.</p> <p>After closing up shop, Dr Atiq tried to collect payments from some of his former patients but didn't get very far.</p> <p>Speaking to Good Morning America, he revealed some people were unable to cover their debts, so after a discussion with his wife, they decided to forgive the debts of some 200 of his former clients.</p> <p>"We saw that we could do it and then just went ahead and did it," he said.</p> <p>Dr Atiq's patients received a greeting card the week of Christmas, explaining their debt had been paid for and that the Arkansas Cancer Clinic "was proud to serve you as a patient".</p> <p>“Although various health insurances pay most of the bills for majority of patients, even the deductibles and co-pays can be burdensome,” the card said.</p> <p>“Unfortunately, that is the way our health care system currently works. Arkansas Cancer Clinic is closing its practice after over 29 years of dedicated service to the community.</p> <p>“The clinic has decided to forego all balances owed to the clinic by its patients.”</p> <p>In the end, Dr Atiq ended up erasing US$650,000, or roughly AU$842,000, of his patient's debt and explained ever since he opened up his practice, the thought of his sick patients worrying about money made him uneasy.</p> <p>"I saw patients over the years who just didn’t have anything or who went bankrupt trying to pay for their treatment," he told Good Morning America.</p> <p>"In many ways it seems like a totally unfair situation."</p> <p>Good Morning America reported Dr Atiq is now working at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock.</p>

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"Disgusting": Woolworths shopper likens store policy to the Holocaust

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A furious Woolworths customer has been slammed online after they compared a standard store policy to the Holocaust.</p> <p>The customer ranted on the supermarket's Facebook page to complain after a worker had called the store manager to approve $1,300 worth of gift cards being purchased.</p> <p>The woman visited the supermarket in Leura with her husband to purchase the vouchers for his clients when they were questioned by the staff.</p> <p>“We told her it was none of her business at first then told her the reason. She told us it was due to some scam, what scam I’m paying for the cards to give as gifts as part of promoting the business!” the woman wrote.</p> <p>“Last time we checked we live in a democracy but it appears communists run Woolworths,” she added.</p> <p>“The lady said she was just doing her job just what the Germans said during the Holocaust.”</p> <p>The post has been slammed by hundreds, with many calling the woman "disgusting" for the "offensive" comparison.</p> <p>“How dare you compare this situation to the holocaust!!! “ one woman wrote, adding, “the staff were looking out FOR YOU, in case YOU were being scammed.”</p> <p>“Did you really just compare information sharing at the point of sale to the holocaust?! Yikes,” another customer said.</p> <p>A Woolworths spokesperson confirmed to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/woolworths/disgusting-woolworths-shopper-slammed-for-likening-store-policy-to-the-holocaust-c-1759974" target="_blank"><em>7NEWS.com.au</em></a><span> </span>that the policy was introduced after the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission raised concerns about scammers targeting individuals with demands for payments via gift cards.</p> <p>“As a responsible retailer, we want to play our part in reducing harm to consumers from scams,” the spokeswoman said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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"Get stuffed": Alberici's fiery response to critics

<p>Former ABC journalist Emma Alberici has defended herself against trolls who took aim at her for appearing on Sunrise, where she plugged insurance company Compare The Market.</p> <p>The respected former economics correspondent has been hired as the chief strategy officer for insurance comparison website Compare the Market in September.</p> <p>On Friday morning, she was back on the small screen to encourage Australians to drive a little further to save money on petrol - and it’s certainly raised a few eyebrows.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Would you like to save an extra $150 a year on petrol? <a href="https://twitter.com/albericie?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Albericie</a> from Compare The Market says it's as easy as downloading an app and being willing to drive a little further ⛽💰 <a href="https://t.co/eYPyRfMs5z">pic.twitter.com/eYPyRfMs5z</a></p> — Sunrise (@sunriseon7) <a href="https://twitter.com/sunriseon7/status/1336787929264361472?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 9, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Taking to social media, viewers shared their surprise after seeing the former Lateline host on commercial television in what seemed to be an infomercial for her company’s app.</p> <p>“Sunrise?? Don’t catch racism while you’re there,” one follower said, referring to the program’s stolen generation controversy in 2018.</p> <p>“Don’t sell your integrity which is broadly admired,” another said.</p> <p>“I know you need to pay the bills, but Sunrise? OMG,” one more chimed in, while another added: “Not sure this is a good use of your talents?”</p> <p>Others criticised her petrol advice: “How much additional pollution and emissions do you create in 4 mins extra worth of driving to save 41c? And what if you told a few hundred thousand people to do the same? And what impacts would that have on additional traffic?”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Get stuffed Twitter trolls <a href="https://twitter.com/sam_armytage?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@sam_armytage</a> is my friend &amp; <a href="https://twitter.com/sunriseon7?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@sunriseon7</a> is fun tv which we could all use more of. I was on there to let you all know that you can save money by using fuel price apps. This morning I saved 41c by driving a further 4 minutes down the road. Lighten up <a href="https://t.co/g4GM2wtfLX">pic.twitter.com/g4GM2wtfLX</a></p> — Emma Alberici (@albericie) <a href="https://twitter.com/albericie/status/1336789920313188365?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">December 9, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Defending herself, the journalist lashed out at “trolls”, telling them to “lighten up”: “Get stuffed Twitter trolls @sam_armytageis my friend &amp; @sunriseon7 is fun tv which we could all use more of. I was on there to let you all know that you can save money by using fuel price apps. This morning I saved 41c by driving a further 4 minutes down the road. Lighten up.”</p>

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Elderly woman’s $10 million surprise for her neighbours

<p><span>A senior German woman who passed away in late 2019 has shocked her community after it was revealed she bequeathed her entire $10 million stock and property portfolio to them.</span><br /><br /><span>Renate Wedel died aged 81 in the Weiperfelden district of Waldsolms in Hesse, where she had lived since 1975 with her stockbroker husband, Alfred, who died in 2014 at 88.</span><br /><br /><span>Following her death, the district was informed Wedel had left it and its six villages the couple’s bank balance, shares and valuables.</span><br /><br /><span>Wedel’s sister was the original heir but she had sadly already passed.</span><br /><br /><span>“I thought at first, this is simply not possible, I thought a comma had slipped, something is not quite right,” local mayor Bernd Heine said while speaking to local media outlet Hessenschau.</span><br /><br /><span>The community plans to use the $10 million for community infrastructure and facilities.</span><br /><br /><span>Heine said the community is considering spending it on a kindergarten, cycling paths and buildings.</span><br /><br /><span>An outdoor pool and public transport is also being considered.</span><br /><br /><span>“The community of Waldsolms posthumously thanks the Wedel couple for this important inheritance,” the community said.</span><br /><br /><span>“We will deal with it very responsibly, develop our community for the good of all and keep an honourable memory of both.”</span></p>

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Pauline Hanson calls for full boycott on Chinese products this Christmas

<p>One Nation leader Pauline Hanson has once again called for a boycott on Chinese made products this Christmas, as relations between the two countries plunge to a new low.</p> <p>“You might think it’s awfully hard, yes it is hard, I get it,” Hanson said in a Facebook video on Monday night. “We all have our part to play in this. Think about it when you buy that furniture, that toy, that food, whatever you buy, have a look where it comes from, and if it’s China, let it sit on the shelf.”</p> <p>The Senator first proposed a boycott last week in response to “China’s recent economic attacks against Australia”, which included a 200 per cent tariff on Australian wine.</p> <p>On Monday, China’s Foreign Ministry spokesman Zhao Lijian took to Twitter to post an image showing an Australian soldier holding a bloodied knife to the throat of an Afghan child, referencing the allegations in the Brereton war crimes report.</p> <p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison blasted the image as “repugnant” and demanded an apology from the Chinese government.</p> <p>“It is deeply offensive to every Australian, every Australian who has served in that uniform, every Australian who serves in that uniform today,” he said at a press conference.</p> <p>In her Facebook video, Hanson said it “absolutely disgusts me”. “This is why I am so anti-China – they are a country that says they want to grow to a stage where they will control and that’s exactly what they’re doing,” she said.</p> <p>She said 20 per cent of products Australia imports “we can’t buy from anywhere else but China”. “Our shelves are full of Chinese products because we’ve stopped our manufacturing industry,” she said.</p> <p>“We used to produce 40 per cent of our products here in Australia through manufacturing. Guess what, it’s only 6 per cent now, because we have allowed this through consecutive governments, Liberal and Labor, to bring products into Australia from other countries which has destroyed our own manufacturing industries."</p> <p>Hanson pleaded with Aussies to try to avoid products made in China “in every little way”.</p> <p>“Whether it’s the wrapping paper – I know you can actually go and buy it online from an Australian manufacturing company here”.</p> <p>She argued that would “put pressure on the Australian government” to support local manufacturing. “That’s the only way we can get out of this bloody mess, if not we’re going to allow China dictate to us every step of the way what we do because we’ve become so reliant on them,” she said.</p>

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Mystery family breaks Australian art auction record with one purchase

<div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A large Brett Whiteley painting was sold for $5 million in just five minutes to an unidentified Sydney family – for a grand total of $6.136 million including the buyers' premium charged by the auction house.</p> <p>The sale of the painting set a new record price for an Australian artwork at an auction, and the new owners – a family from Sydney's lower north shore – remain anonymous to the wider public as they have chosen not to be revealed as yet.</p> <p>The painting, Henri's Armchair, measures almost 2 metres high by 3 metres in length and is a reference to French painter Henri Matisse, who Whiteley admired.</p> <p>Elizabeth Evatt sold the painting and hoped that a public institution would buy it so it could be enjoyed by the public.</p> <p>"In parting with it I'm coming to terms with parting with Clive two years ago, it's a huge wrench," she said.</p> <p>"To have this amazing painting in our life everyday was magnificent," Mrs Evatt said.</p> <p>Her husband, art dealer Clive Evatt, died in 2018 and bought the painting directly from Whiteley in 1975.</p> <p>She explained the story behind her husband acquiring the painting, as it had never been offered for sale before.</p> <p>Her late husband stopped in at Whiteley's house on his way home from the races and offered to buy the work on the spot.</p> <p>He led Whiteley out to his car, popped open the boot of his car and showed him his winnings from the racetrack.</p> <p>The pair then grabbed the money, counted it together and the sale of the painting was done and dusted.</p> <p>The auctioneer, Justin Turner, said he felt "really great" after the sale.</p> <p>"This has been an amazing year for the art market, it took us all by surprise, we expected the worst when COVID hit," he said.</p> <p>"I thought if we could get through the year without laying off staff that would be a success," he said.</p> <p>The artist's ex-wife Wendy Whiteley, who controls his estate, said before the auction that she hoped for a good result.</p> <p>"I'm not involved with it at all and I certainly can't afford to buy it," she said.</p> <p><em>Photo credits:<span> </span></em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.msn.com/en-au/money/markets/brett-whiteley-painting-breaks-australian-art-auction-record-selling-for-dollar6136-million/ar-BB1bnx5x?li=AAgfYrC" target="_blank"><em>abc.com.au</em></a></p> </div>

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What to expect at Kmart’s Black Friday sale

<p>Kmart is bringing back Black Friday for the second year running - and there’s one item in particular that shoppers are dying to get their hands on.</p> <p>The discount department store will be launching Bright Friday - its version of Black Friday - from this Friday, with a select range of heavily discounted or limited edition items hitting shelves.</p> <p>Kmart is bringing back its extremely popular egg-shaped chair, with similar versions of the chair selling out almost instantly in the past.</p> <p>This year’s Bright Friday $199 version features cream cushions and rattan in a chic brown finish, making it perfect for both outdoor and indoor living spaces.</p> <p>Posts about the chair have started to pop up in different Kmart Facebook groups, with shoppers saying their “backyard needs this”.</p> <p>“Need this in my life,” one person commented, while another person said they would be getting it as a “Xmas present to myself”.</p> <p>But others have warned that the chair will most likely sell out “super fast” like other Kmart Bright Friday deals.</p> <p>Others were excited about Kmart’s other Bright Friday deals, which include a SodaKING maker slashed from $69.95 to $27, a Hollywood light mirror for $69, and a $49 sewing machine.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CH7FZ9ZHFY4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CH7FZ9ZHFY4/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Anna | Melbourne Mum (@homeiswhereabargainis)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“This could be dangerous,” one person wrote on Facebook, while another joked: “I think I just wet my pants of excitement, I can’t wait!!!!!!”</p> <p>But some said they were “not even gonna try (to) go” claiming their local Kmart probably wouldn’t have stock.</p> <p>Kmart is urging customers to try shopping online with shoppers also being able to book a shopping slot during busy times to avoid queuing.</p> <p>Stores in NSW and Victoria will have extended trading hours, as well as mobile check-outs to help customers pay for their items faster.</p> <p>Kmart’s general merchandise general manager Callum Smith said that when it comes to Bright Friday, “once they are gone, they’re gone”.</p> <p>“Black Friday was incredibly popular and well received by our loyal customers last year. As a team, we had some learnings from the event and understanding of the types of products our customers love. We can’t wait for our customers to see what’s on offer this year,” he said.</p> <p>“Some of last year’s much-loved favourites have returned with a new twist as well as completely new lines never seen before.”</p>

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This $1 coin could get you thousands of dollars in return

<p>Australians could be hanging on to a $1 that could be worth thousands of dollars, and not even know it!</p> <p>A mother in Melbourne has posted on the Facebook group <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/melbournewithkidz/posts/3364153870285984" target="_blank" title="">Melbourne with Kidz </a>that she found a “mule” dollar coin from the year 2000.</p> <p>These coins were produced due to a technical error by the <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/RoyalAustralianMint/" target="_blank" title="www.facebook.com">Australian Mint </a>in Canberra twenty years ago.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838803/sam-armytage-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8d47c8539c5a4a4793cb1713be19d0e3" /></p> <p>Mule dollars are slightly thicker than a regular $1 coin in appearance and also have a double rum around the Queen’s head.</p> <p>“It’s a small number of the year 2000 $1 coins that had been minted using the incorrect obverse die (heads side) and released into circulation by mistake and only discovered a year or two later,” the mum wrote after doing some research.</p> <p>“With just a 1.4 millimetre difference in diameter between the 10 cent and $1 coin, you can clearly see a double rim circle going around the edges of the coin.”</p> <p>The<span> </span>Daily Mail<span> </span>reported that there are just 6000 coins that were minted incorrectly.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838804/sam-armytage-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/3b10ff7bf936450f8ce57b5b74502c87" /></p> <p>A few of these coins have been placed on eBay at a value ranging from $700 to $5000.</p> <p>“Check your change and empty out the kids piggy bank! You could be sitting on a winner,” the mum said.</p>

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Kevin Rudd caught up in Epstein donation scandal

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd has been forced to address revelations that his think tank received $US650,000 in donations from sex offender Jeffrey Epstein.</p> <p>Epstein donated to the INternational Peace Institution, where Rudd is the chairman.</p> <p>Rudd has said he was "blindsided" by the information and also said that the "revelations were deeply disturbing".</p> <p>He has also convened a special meeting of the organisation's board to "ensure an equivalent sum was donated to sex assault victims".</p> <p>However, Rudd has insisted he had no dealings with Epstein.</p> <p>“I have no recollection whatsoever of ever meeting Epstein,” he said</p> <p>“I first learned of contributions from Epstein’s foundations to the IPI in November 2019 through reporting by the Norwegian press.”</p> <p>“Subsequent searches by IPI staff, made at the request of the Board, have identified donations totalling $650,000 that were received between October 2011 and May 2019.”</p> <p>“The source of these donations had not previously been disclosed to the board, nor to me as chair.”</p> <p>The story was broken by Norweigian business paper <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dn.no/politikk/jeffrey-epstein/kevin-rudd/international-peace-institute/think-tank-board-chair-kevin-rudd-breaks-silence-on-jeffrey-epstein-connections-i-am-deeply-disappointed/2-1-901840" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>DN</em></a>, who also revealed that the International Peace Insitute President, Norwegian diplomat Terj Rod-Larsen had a personal loan with Epstein to the sum of $US130,000.</p> <p>Rudd confirmed he was not aware of the loan and that “any significant engagement with someone as odious as Epstein must be taken ­seriously and investigated thoroughly.”</p> <p>The former PM added that he was “deeply disappointed that the board has had to learn about so much of this through the media.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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ALDI brings back popular Christmas-themed Special Buy

<p>Many are looking for the light at the end of the tunnel to an interesting year, and for some, that involves getting excited about an ALDI Special Buy.</p> <p>The discount supermarket chain has made sure that it's selling the $99 pre-lit Christmas Tree that has consistently sold out in previous years.</p> <p>The tree is 2.13 metres tall and has lights already attached, making it a bargain.</p> <p><img id="__mcenew" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838483/aldi-hero.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/dc2ed5ec068f49bf99bc4ec31fc7d62c" /></p> <p>The tree is set to hit stores on November 4th, but eager shoppers are already warning others that it'll sell out quickly.</p> <p>“I bought one 3 years ago and it is so so good. Better than my $400 one from David Jones that I had previously!” one person wrote in the Aldi Fans Australia Facebook group.</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Others praised the tree’s quick set-up.</p> <p>“I’ve had it for 3 years and love it,” one person wrote. “It’s just a couple of pieces that link together, then you fold down the branches. There are so many branches that it actually looks decent even if you can’t be bothered unfolding / fluffing up the smaller branches.”</p> <p>Some shoppers are a fan of the light's colour changes, as you can change it from white, to multi-coloured or a mixture of both.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/lifestyle/home/aldi-special-buys-brings-back-popular-99-prelit-christmas-tree/news-story/558e9d6d70e1bba33d53bb3187eda42f" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">news.com.au</a></em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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AusPost offers bizarre excuses for CEO's overspending

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Australia Post CEO Christine Holgate and her personal office have spent a shocking $275,000 on corporate credit cards since her appointment. There are now demands for a line-by-line disclosure on the spending from Parliament.</p> <p>The spending, which the bulk of it is "organisational spending" could be the key to Holgate holding onto her role of CEO, regardless of whether or not the spending was legitimate under Australia Post policies.</p> <p>Insiders say that the terms of inquiry were established with references to her "personal expenses" that "sets up" Holgate and asks that a judgement be made over Aus Post executives adhering to "high standards regarding the expenditure of money".</p> <p>Holgate has a personal corporate credit card for her own use that racked up a surprisingly low $88,100 since she was appointed to her role as CEO three years ago.</p> <p>However, it's the second relatively new card that's been used for $287,000 in this financial year alone that has caught the attention of the Labor government.</p> <p>Australia Post has offered odd excuses as to why a line-by-line breakdown of spending can't be provided, including the former "work from home" requirements in Melbourne.</p> <p>“Australia Post’s Melbourne Headquarters have been closed for several months, due to the COVID-19 lockdown in metropolitan Melbourne. As a result, Melbourne office staff have been working remotely and access to some records has been restricted,’’ Australia Post said.</p> <p>Labor Senator Kimberley Kitching told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/leaders/australia-posts-bizarre-excuse-for-refusing-to-disclose-corporate-credit-card-spending/news-story/bae8362ceba28161aece0718f4cfe06a" target="_blank"><em>news.com.au</em></a> that Australia Post’s explanation as to why it won’t provide an itemised list of spending does not make sense.</p> <p>“They should furnish the Senate with the credit card statements which I had already requested, but I was told that they couldn’t provide those statements because employees were working from home,’’ Senator Kitching said.</p> <p>After the previous chairman of Australia Post, John Stanhope, left the organisation in 2019, the "Office of teh CEO" took responsibility for any previous charges and the card that racked up the $287,000 bill was used to purchase flowers, catering, car hire as well as being used for travel expenses.</p> <p>“The Group Chief Executive Officer &amp; Managing Director has not been issued with a travel charge card,’’ Australia Post said.</p> <p>“However, there is one credit card in the name of the ‘Office of the CEO’ used to pay for various organisational expenditure, including travel expenses. Organisational expenditure paid with this credit card totalled $287,063.44 for the 2019/20 financial year.</p> <p>“The credit card was used for a wide range of organisational expenditure, including in relation to the Group Chief Executive Officer &amp; Managing Director, the Board Chair, the Executive Team, the Office of the CEO, and the Extended Leadership Team.”</p> <p>So far, Australia Post is refusing to provide a breakdown of expenses, saying it would involve an "unreasonable diversion of resources".</p> <p>“There is one credit card in the name of the Group Chief Executive Officer &amp; Managing Director,’’ Australia Post said.</p> <p>“An itemised breakdown of the charges over this period (almost three years) would involve an unreasonable diversion of resources.”</p> <p>A report will be provided to the Morrison Government within four weeks of the investigation commencing.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Cash handout: Thousands of Aussies urged to check eligibility for $500 boost

<p>Tens of thousands of Australians may not be aware they are eligible for an extra $500 from the federal government.<br /><br /><span>The new plan offers handouts for aged and disability pensioners, veterans, people on carer payments and family tax benefit recipients as part of the 2020-21 budget.</span><br /><br /><span>Commonwealth Seniors Health Card (CSHC) and pensioner concession cardholders will also be eligible for the cash.</span><br /><br /><span>Recipients will receive a $250 cash boost in December and another $250 in March 2021.</span><br /><br /><span>National Seniors Australia has urged self-funded retirees to check their eligibility too.</span><br /><br /><span>The group believe thousands of older Australians who are self-funded retirees may go without the cash boost, as they may be under the impression they don’t qualify for the CSHC.</span><br /><br /><span>Changes to deeming rates used as part of the CSHC income test has improved eligibility for the card.</span><br /><br /><span>This means there is also improved eligibility for budget stimulus payments.</span><br /><br /><span>To qualify for the CSHC, an individual must have reached the pension age, meet an income test, not be receiving any payments from Veterans Affairs and be an Australian resident living in the country.</span><br /><br /><span>To meet the income test, individuals or couples must earn below the following thresholds:</span></p> <ul> <li><span><span>$55,808 for singles</span></span></li> <li><span><span>$89,290 for couples</span></span></li> <li><span><span>$111,616 for couples who are separated by illness, respite care or prison.</span></span><span><span></span></span></li> </ul> <p><span><span>“Self-funded retirees who are among the hardest hit by the COVID Financial Crisis (CFC) could really do with some extra cash in their pockets going into Christmas,” National Seniors Chief Advocate Ian Henschke said.</span><br /><br /><span>Australians have until November 27 to be eligible and receive the first $250 payment.</span><br /><br /><span>Those eligible are strongly advised to make sure their details are up to date on MyGov before the payments start flowing through.</span></span></p>

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Hugh Jackman scores big as iconic brand comes home to Australia

<p>Hugh Jackman is set to pocket a whopping $10 million after mining magnate Andrew “Twiggy” Forrest has purchased the iconic Australian bootmaker RM Williams.</p> <p>Dr Forrest's investment fund Tattarang has bought 100 per cent of the company, and it includes Jackman’s five per cent ownership as a minority shareholders.</p> <p>It is reported that the sale price was less than half the original asking price for $190 million.</p> <p>RM Williams had been up for sale for almost 18 months after its Louis Vuitton owned parent company, L Catteron, began seeking buyers.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838322/rm-williams.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/70076b780deb4555a34dc86144ebddc4" /></p> <p><em>Andrew Tiggy Forrest and wife Nicola Forrest.</em></p> <p>The Western Australian-based mining magnate said he is proud and humbled to be taking the iconic brand back in Australian hands.  </p> <p>“R.M. Williams is a quintessential Aussie brand with a long and proud history of high-quality Australian craftsmanship,” Dr Forrest said in a statement.</p> <p>“By bringing R.M. Williams back into Australian hands, we will ensure the Australian craftmanship continues to be loved and worn all around the world.</p> <p>“I've never forgotten the first time I pulled on a pair of RMs. To wear RMs is to wear the boots of the countless hard-working Australians that have come before us.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838320/hugh-jackman-rm-williams.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/4a9d5e496eaf4498b9b1d4e016134513" /></p> <p>His wife Nicola Forrest added “Andrew and I want to continue the legacy of this great company, and that means continuing to employ and support the Australians that have built and grown the brand.”</p> <p>RM Williams chief executive Raju Vuppalapati said he hoped the business would grow under Dr Forrest's ownership.</p> <p>“The RM Williams team and I look forward to Andrew and Nicola's stewardship as we enter the next exciting phase of surprising and delighting our consumers with hand-crafted products made in Australia,” he said.   </p> <p>RM Williams was founded in Adelaide in 1932 by bushman and entrepreneur Reginald Murray 'RM' Williams.</p> <p>The iconic boots are a popular item both locally and overseas, and the brand has stores in New York, London, New Zealand, and Scandinavia.</p> <p>Jackman will remain involved with RM Williams as an ambassador.</p>

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Virtually unknown ALDI checkout rule confounds shoppers

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Many shoppers at ALDI are confused about a virtually unknown rule that was shared on Facebook.</p> <p>Over the last week, several shoppers have shared their confusion over ALDI's refusal to allow shoppers to purchase alcohol if they have a minor with them.</p> <p>ALDI policy states that a customer can be denied the sale of alcohol if a child under the age of 18 is accompanying them or if a minor has handled alcohol they intend to buy.</p> <p>One shopper was unaware of the rule and claimed he was stopped from purchasing Vodka Cruisers for his wife as he had his teenage daughters with him.</p> <p>Another shopper said the same thing happened to her, as she was refused service after her 18-month-old toddler touched a bottle at the checkout.</p> <p>“I did and had my 18-month-old daughter with me,” said the shopper.</p> <p>“I was holding her on my hip and she leant over and touched the alcohol on the conveyer while I was loading other groceries on.”</p> <p>Another claimed she was denied service in the presence of her underage son.</p> <p>“I was refused because I was buying a carton and had my son carry it because I have a bad back,” the shopper said.</p> <p>The German supermarket has confirmed with <a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/food/the-little-known-aldi-checkout-rule-that-has-many-scratching-their-heads-c-1390041" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink"><em>7News</em></a> that the policy of the supermarket is in line with Australian laws.</p> <p>“As a responsible retailer, ALDI Australia supports and adheres to all regulations for the purchase of alcohol including Responsible Service of Alcohol (RSA),” said an ALDI Australia spokesperson.</p> <p>“Under the Liquor Control Reform Act 1998, it is an offence to supply alcohol to a person under the age of 18 and for a person under the age of 18 to purchase or receive alcohol.</p> <p>“The sale of alcohol can be refused if a minor has handled alcohol that could be potentially purchased by an adult for the minor’s consumption.</p> <p>“This also extends to a minor accompanying an adult purchasing alcohol, even if the minor has not physically touched an alcoholic product.</p> <p>“It is the store’s responsibility to refuse any customer who presents a risk and ultimately it is at the discretion of the person serving alcohol to decline the sale should they have any doubts or concerns.</p> <p>“There are severe consequences for breaching laws and policies set in place by the Australian government involving the sale of alcohol.</p> <p>“As such, ALDI faces heavy penalties should we sell alcohol to any customer who supplied to a person under the age of 18.”</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Scott Morrison ignores Anthony Albanese's budget reply speech

<div class="body_text "> <p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison and other Coalition MPs have been slammed by high-profile Australians for disrespecting Opposition Leader Anthony Albanese during his budget reply speech.</p> <p>Albanese delivered his reply to the budget on Thursday night and outlined a range of ALP policies, including childcare reform.</p> <p>Almost immediately after Albanese began talking, attention shifted to the behaviour of his rivals as screenshots were shared on social media of politicians ignoring the Labor leader as he spoke.</p> <p>Morrison, for example, turned away from Albanese and fiddled with his phone as well as closed his eyes during the speech.</p> <p>Well-known Australian barrister Julian Burnside said that the Prime Minister's behaviour was a “disgrace”.</p> <p>Journalist Troy Bramston also called out the behaviour, sharing a photo which showed that the “only government MP looking at Albanese is Frydenberg”, while author, presenter and political commentator Jamila Rizvi said “Frydenberg is all eyes and ears on Albo but most of the frontbench (including the PM) are on their phones.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Politics aside, with big speeches like the budget and budget reply, I like seeing politicians listen to each other. Basic old fashioned principles of respect. Frydenberg is all eyes and ears on Albo but most of the frontbench (including the PM) are on their phones. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/budgetreply?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#budgetreply</a></p> — Jamila Rizvi (@JamilaRizvi) <a href="https://twitter.com/JamilaRizvi/status/1314128631262662656?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 8, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Ordinary Aussies were quick to point out that it was "just plain rude".</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">These people have <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/no?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#no</a> respect for our democracy and are just plain rude. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/slobbyfromarketing?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#slobbyfromarketing</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/budgetreply?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#budgetreply</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/auspol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#auspol</a> <a href="https://t.co/IrqIhqEosV">pic.twitter.com/IrqIhqEosV</a></p> — Joe2 (@eatatjoe2) <a href="https://twitter.com/eatatjoe2/status/1314132734034374656?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 8, 2020</a></blockquote> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Am I wrong but I believe I saw our PM turned away from the budget in reply speech absorbed on his phone? If so I am disgusted at the lack of respect to our parliamentary process. Regardless of ideology or partisanship that was offensive and diminished our democracy. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/auspol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#auspol</a></p> — Lesley Howard (@adropex) <a href="https://twitter.com/adropex/status/1314130977841586177?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 8, 2020</a></blockquote> </div>

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