Retirement Life

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Husband and wife named oldest living couple in the world

<p><span>An American couple with a combined age of 211 years has been named the world’s oldest living couple by the Guinness Book of World Records.</span></p> <p><span>Charlotte Henderson is 105 and her husband, John is 106. The pair will celebrate their 80<sup>th</sup> marriage anniversary on December 15.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">With a combined age of 211 years, one couple in Austin, Texas, has been named the oldest living couple in the world, according to Guinness World Records. John Henderson is 106 and his wife, Charlotte, is 105. <a href="https://t.co/3piaX2cPak">pic.twitter.com/3piaX2cPak</a></p> — The Desi Times (@TheDesiTimes) <a href="https://twitter.com/TheDesiTimes/status/1192887507144368129?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 8, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>The two met in class at The University of Texas in 1934, where Charlotte was studying to be a teacher and John played football for the Longhorns. They tied the knot five years later during the Great Depression.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">Oldest living couple in the world live in Texas. On December 15, John Henderson, 106, and his wife, Charlotte, 105, will celebrate 80 years of marriage. HAPPY ANNIVERSARY! <a href="https://t.co/OXtUoIOHli">https://t.co/OXtUoIOHli</a> <a href="https://t.co/PgXrBO0N7F">pic.twitter.com/PgXrBO0N7F</a></p> — Day Trippin' Texas (@DayTrippinTexas) <a href="https://twitter.com/DayTrippinTexas/status/1192881208813854721?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 8, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>Ten years ago, the Hendersons moved into the Longhorn Village, a senior living community associated with a University of Texas alumni group.</span></p> <p><span>According to John, the secret to the longevity of their marriage is to live in moderation and be cordial to each other.</span></p>

Retirement Life

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How to ask for help as we age

<p>An inability to perform what used to be simple tasks such as preparing food, dressing or household chores can make life unpleasant and much more difficult than it should be. It can also feel like the thin end of the wedge, and the first step to losing our independence. <br />If you have ageing relatives the solution seems simple. The person in need should just simply open up and contact a family member or reach out for the home support they need. However, sometimes psychological barriers mean this doesn’t happen.</p> <p><strong>What are the barriers to asking for help?</strong> <br />According to psychologist Merryn Snare, from Merryn Snare Psychological Services, there can be a whole range of psychological barriers preventing people from taking action. These include a generational expectation that they have to do everything themselves, fear of losing independence and even fear of the financial cost of help.</p> <p>Sometimes, too, people who have realised they are not physically capable of doing what they used to do often suffer what Snare calls a kind of loss and grief – not in the context of having lost a loved one, but in that they often feel the oppressive symptoms of the loss of their own capability.</p> <p>“These things don’t even have to be major things, they can just be part of the general ageing process. Whether it’s a loss of physical capability or a loss of their eyesight, focusing on these issues can become almost oppressive because they’re tied in with the person’s idea of self worth,” says Snare.</p> <p><strong>Why do we have these barriers?</strong> <br />Most people have expectations about what they should be able to do and when they can’t do these things they can feel worthless, explains Snare.</p> <p>“If they feel as though they’re failing or they are not able to do what they want to do, it’s like a vicious cycle. They feel their sense of self value deteriorating or they feel that they’re worthless and that keeps them from seeking help to find that feeling of self worth,” adds Snare.</p> <p>Fear of losing independence and burdening loved ones is also a reason many remain tight lipped, says Snare. “It’s the idea that they will have to give up their lifestyle that they have enjoyed for so long or be forced into a living arrangement that would make that impossible or the idea that they will become their children’s problem,” says Snare.</p> <p>Loss of face can be another reason. “They don’t want to show that they can’t manage things themselves so there could be a fear of ridicule – it’s unlikely that they would be ridiculed, but it’s that expectation again that needs to be met,” says Snare.</p> <p>One often-overlooked reason is the worry about how safe it is to allow strangers into their home environment – their own haven. “As we age we often feel vulnerable and that vulnerability can lead to self isolation or reclusive behaviour. There can be a lack of trust and lack of faith in allowing other people into our homes to provide the care we really desperately need,” says Snare.</p> <p><strong>How can we achieve change?</strong><br />Ironically the psychological barriers that people impose on themselves have the very opposite effect that the person intends them to have. By not opening up and asking for help people often end up losing their independence, losing their quality of life and sometimes even their social contacts.</p> <p>As people allow help into their lives they can often reclaim many of the things they were unable to do beforehand and this invigorates their outlook on life. “When they find help it begins to actually meet their expectations and this can often be a great source of joy,” says Snare.</p> <p>Snare explains how that help doesn’t necessarily need to be a full time carer. It might be help with odd jobs around the home, someone coming to help cook a meal, tend to the vacuuming, or cleaning the house. “From my understanding there are different levels of help in the home. It’s often when people open up to this help, that they feel like a huge weight has been lifted from their shoulders and they are able to get on with enjoying life again,” Snare says.</p> <p><strong>Snare’s top tips to overcoming the barriers to asking for help</strong></p> <ul> <li><strong> Approach a GP </strong></li> </ul> <p>Your local GP is usually the first point of contact as you age so you most likely already have a close relationship with them, says Snare. Chatting with your GP about your concerns is a safe and anonymous way for people to talk about the things that they are deeply worried about. “GPs are often in contact with a lot of essential support services and they can usually direct the person to find the kind of help they really require,” says Snare.</p> <ul> <li><strong> Investigate what options are available</strong></li> </ul> <p>Gathering information about the types of help there might be out there for you is a great way of overcoming some of the anxieties that you may have. In-home care service providers are very approachable these days and are happy to answer any questions you may have over the phone. But if you don’t know where to start, a great place is your local council, says Snare. “Contacting the council is a good way to find out what services might already be available to people, and for little or no cost,” she says.</p> <ul> <li><strong> Consider what you might be missing out on</strong></li> </ul> <p>Snare says a good way to overcome psychological barriers is to reframe your current situation. To do this yourself look logically at all the things you would like to be able to achieve in a day and then a week and compare it to the number of things that you actually can do. “With my clientele I’ll look at everything they have got happening in their day or week and everything they might want to do and I’ll even use myself as an example to show them that I couldn’t possibly do everything they have in mind. I might say something like ‘Well it takes you a lot longer to do the housework or gardening now that you are older so you might need help with that’. By reframing the situation exactly how it is now, you can really help people see past the barriers,” Snare explains. If you need help doing this, a qualified psychologist or counsellor can help you achieve this, she says.</p> <ul> <li><strong> Take on a small amount of help to test the waters</strong></li> </ul> <p>Often a good compromise is to take on a small level of care that you know is not going to jeopardise your independence or make you feel like you are losing your sense of self worth, Snare explains. That may be getting meals delivered to your home, having someone come around and take you shopping once a week or just cleaning your windows or doing your gardening. “By testing the waters with a small level of care, something simple, you can get an indication about how the care will change your life and then might feel more comfortable about accepting more help later on down the track, “says Snare.</p> <p><strong>How in-home care service provider Just Better Care can help</strong><br />In-home care service provider, Just Better Care, can take away the anxiety and stress associated with asking for help by providing personalised advice and support. Just Better Care service providers offer in-home care services right around Australia. Their highly trained staff will work with the person needing care and provide guidance on the services that are available to best suit their individual needs, preferences and budget. Whether it’s help with the cooking, cleaning or simply help with shopping, Just Better Care provides tailored support options to assist individuals to remain living confidently in their own home.</p> <p><em>Written by Dominic Bayley. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/how-to-ask-for-help-as-we-age.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Is breakfast really the most important meal of the day?

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A regular breakfast is important to staying healthy and feeling great. Here’s how!</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The good news is the vast majority (78%) of adults aged 55-69 consider breakfast as the most important meal of the day and it’s not just talk, 73% say they take the time to always eat breakfast, significantly more than 35-54 year olds (56%).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In fact, a regular breakfast habit may be the key to staying healthy and feeling great. Research shows people aged 65+ years who regularly eat breakfast have better diets and are more likely to rate their health as excellent or good compared to breakfast skippers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">We all know, the challenge as we get a little older is making sure each mouthful counts. Generally, we need fewer kilojoules and yet higher amounts of key nutrients to stay healthy, so, our food choices must be packed with nutrients.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Health -breakfast -fibre -wyza -com -au (2)Research shows people who eat breakfast regularly have better diets</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So, what nutrients are a must at breakfast and how can we make sure our brekkie choices deliver? Do we need to follow the healthy trend and be drinking green smoothies daily or will traditional brekkie favourites still give us what we need?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Advanced Accredited Practising Dietitian, and Director of the Australian Breakfast Cereal Manufacturers Forum, Ms Leigh Reeve says there are four must have nutrients to start the day and offers ideas for delicious brekkie options that provide nutritional bang for their buck. These are much loved brekkie staples that are great value for both your health and your wallet.</span></p> <p><strong>BEST BREKKIE CHOICES</strong></p> <p><strong>1. Get an easy fibre fix</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whether starting the day with cereal or toast, the key is to choose whole grain or high fibre options. They are an important source of fibre, which is a nutritional hero. As well as maintaining a healthy bowel, regularly eating high-fibre breakfast cereals have been shown to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes by 24% and reduces the risk of cardiovascular disease by up to 29%.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In fact, a diet high in cereal fibre may be the secret to longevity and has been linked to a reduced risk of premature death from cancer (15%); heart disease (20%); respiratory disease (21%); diabetes (34%).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When it comes to increasing your fibre it doesn’t need to be overloading on prunes.</span></p> <p><strong>Other tasty breakfast options include:</strong></p> <ul> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Experiment with high fibre or whole grain breakfast cereals until you find a favourite</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Top up your favourite cereal with a high fibre cereal or bra cereal</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Include cereal toppers for an extra fibre boost such as chia seeds, psylliumhusks, dried fruits or nuts</span></li> <li><span style="font-weight: 400;">Love toast? It’s as simple as making a switch from white bread to a whole grain variety. Generally the more visible grains or seeds the better</span></li> </ul> <p><strong>2. Milk it for better bones </strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Calcium is vital for staying strong and for maintaining the health of our bones. Yet the truth is most Australians are just not getting enough.</span></p> <p><strong>To bump up your calcium intake, the key is to:</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Enjoy more dairy products, or calcium-enriched milk alternatives. At breakfast, cereal and milk go hand-in-hand. People who regularly eat breakfast cereal are more likely to have better vitamin and mineral intakes, especially for calcium.</span></p> <p><strong>Try adding yoghurt to your cereal</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Prefer toast in the morning? Enjoy it with a milky coffee like a latte or a bowl of yoghurt on the side</span></p> <p><strong>Pump up the protein</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Protein is not just important for body builders or fitness fanatics. It is critical to support the body’s normal tissue maintenance. Australian’s aged 71+ years are the group that stand out as less likely to meet their protein requirements.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yet a higher protein brekkie can easily be achieved without expensive or unappealing protein shakes:</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Simply enjoy eggs on whole grain toast, muesli with Greek yoghurt or higher protein breakfast cereal options and dairy</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A sprinkle of nuts is another easy way to add protein</span></p> <p><strong>3. B2 is a must at brekkie</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Vitamin B2 is important for converting nutrients into forms that can be easily used by our bodies. As we get older, our bodies are less able to process nutrients from food.</span></p> <p><strong>Starting the day with a breakfast containing vitamin B2 is simple:</strong></p> <ul> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Use milk with your breakfast cereal</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Try yeast extract spreads on your toast</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Add some grilled mushrooms to your egg</span></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Or enjoy a handful of almonds at brekkie</span></li> </ul> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/is-breakfast-really-the-most-important-meal-of-the-day.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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These easy tips will save you hundreds on petrol

<p>Fuel costs can put a major dent in the family budget, but fortunately there are plenty of things you can do to reduce your consumption.</p> <p>The recent spell of low fuel prices has been welcome relief for many of us who depend on the car for transport, but sooner or later they will start heading north again. It makes a lot of sense, therefore, to do whatever you can to improve fuel efficiency. This can not only save you money, it will also reduce your carbon footprint. Here are a few pointers on what you can do to reduce your consumption.</p> <p><strong>Can LPG or diesel save you money?<br /></strong>This is often a hotly contested debate and the many variables involved can make it difficult to compare, but there is a strong argument that both diesel and LPG can be more budget friendly.</p> <p>LPG certainly uses more fuel to drive the same distance as petrol due to the lower energy content of LPG, but the cost of LPG compared to petrol more than offsets this disadvantage. The downside of LPG is that a car fitted with LPG is more expensive to buy and the cost of converting a car from petrol to LPG is no longer subsidised by the government. This means that the cost benefit of the fuel will take some time to make up for the upfront cost of purchase, but if you are doing a reasonable distance every year then it could well be worth the switch.</p> <p>Diesel too can offer potential savings. It has gone a long way to shedding its image as a smelly and noisy way to get around, thanks to improvements in engine technology over recent years. Diesel engines are getting quieter and cleaner and are now available even in many smaller cars, so it is not surprising that they are taking an increasing share of the new car market.</p> <p>Fuel efficiency is one of the key reasons for this, with diesel having a significant advantage in economy if all other factors are equal. In days gone by the cost per litre of diesel was prohibitive compared to petrol, but this balance has now well and truly swung the other way.</p> <p>The cost of a diesel car will still be greater than its petrol equivalent, but as with LPG, the more driving you do the quicker you will claw back the extra upfront cost.</p> <p><strong>How reliable are the fuel efficiency labels?<br /></strong>If you have been shopping for a new car you will be aware of the mandatory labels that now appear on the windscreen. These supposedly provide an indication of the fuel consumption for both urban and “extra urban” (country) driving.</p> <p>The manufacturers are responsible for testing their own cars and this is done according to conditions set by Australian Design Rules. What many people don’t realise, however, is that they are not done on the road, but rather are done on a dynamometer with artificially created air flow to simulate actual driving conditions.</p> <p>The controlled guidelines for the test mean that they are indeed a good way to compare different vehicles relative to each other, but their usefulness stops there. Because the test conditions are so artificial, they bear little resemblance to actual realistic driving conditions and consequently the results are generally a lot more favourable than what you will experience in reality.</p> <p>In short – you can use them to compare efficiency between different cars, but don’t use them to plan your weekly fuel budget!</p> <p><strong>9 ways to drive for better fuel efficiency<br /></strong>When it comes to the actual driving of your car from week to week, there are many ways to make a big difference to your fuel consumption. Here are our top tips:</p> <p>1. Lazy gear selection in a manual car can chew through the juice. Avoid sitting in a low gear once revs are sufficient to change up and also avoid sitting in a high gear when the engine is straining to maintain revs. </p> <p>2. When driving an automatic stay alert when using the accelerator and ease off slightly when you can hear the engine getting ready to change up.</p> <p>3. Erratic braking and acceleration guzzles fuel, so drive smoothly with gradual acceleration and avoid rushing to the speed limit if you can see that the traffic ahead will likely require you to brake. The extension of this rule is, of course, to avoid driving in heavy stop-start traffic where possible. </p> <p>4. Don’t hesitate to switch off the engine if you are stationary for any length of time – leaving a car idling uses up more fuel than you may think.</p> <p>5. Speed matters. If you are driving a 110 kph your car will use a lot more than it would travelling at 90 kph.</p> <p>6. Items such as roof racks and spoilers can add significantly to air resistance and this extra load will cost you at the bowser, so remove unnecessary accessories if not being used. </p> <p>7. Tyre inflation is essential to optimum operation, so keep the pressure checked regularly</p> <p>9. You can expect to use up 10 per cent extra fuel when operating your air conditioner at speeds of over 80 kph. </p> <p>9. Regular maintenance to keep your car well-tuned is also essential to ensure the engine is running to its optimum performance and using fuel efficiently.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/money/how-to-spend-less-on-petrol.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Life appreciation the key to better health

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s nothing new that our thoughts can shape how we feel. Just imagine how those positive </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">feelings are tingling through your body and telling you ‘this is going to be a great day!’ The problem is the positive feeling doesn’t seem to come on demand. But according to the </span><a href="http://www.heartmath.org/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Institute of HeartMath</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, you can take control of your feelings by practicing </span>Heartfelt Appreciation.</p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In fact they believe that heartfelt appreciation can facilitate the healing of the human body and spirit and that sincere heartfelt appreciation uplifts, inspires and drives us to achieve that which we did not think possible. It may be hard to believe that something as simple as appreciation can make you feel happier and even give your heart a healthy boost.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So keeping the potential benefits in mind let’s try a simple </span>Appreciation Exercise<span style="font-weight: 400;"> right now. It only takes a minute – and you may be surprised by the results.</span></p> <p><strong>Appreciation Exercise - Heart Breathing</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Focus your attention on your heart area, and breathe a little deeper than normal, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">in for 5 or 6 seconds and out for 5 or 6 seconds.  Heart Focus: Imagine breathing through your heart. Picture yourself slowly breathing in and out through your heart area.</span></p> <p><strong>Appreciation List</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Make a list of things you appreciate – people, places, activities, and pets –and choose </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">one or two each morning to hold in your heart during the day. Choose an item again at night to hold in your heart while you rest. How do you feel? Do you notice a greater sense of ease, wellbeing or relaxation?</span></p> <p><strong>Appreciation Breaks</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Take two or three appreciation breaks each day – ideally in early morning, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">during a midday break and upon returning home or before bed. Just follow the simple steps as above. It takes as little as two minutes to achieve mental, emotional and physical balance.</span></p> <p><strong>Appreciation in the Moment</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Keep your Appreciation List close all day, in a pocket or purse, by your </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">computer or elsewhere. In stressful moments, choose an item that can quickly evoke appreciation. It can turn a stressful day into one that flows – in 30 seconds or less.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Engage the power of your heart to generate and sustain feelings of appreciation to help increase your own wellbeing. Practicing these appreciation exercises accelerates your connection with your own heart. Appreciating ourselves and others helps restore the colour to our black-and-white perception of life. By simply activating a positive feeling of sincere appreciation, you can increase your heart rhythm coherence, reduce emotional stress and improve your health. Consider practicing appreciation every day. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reprinted with permission of Institute of HeartMath. © 2013 Institute of HeartMath</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Pernille. Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/life-appreciation-the-key-to-better-health.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></p>

Retirement Life

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The best foods for your heart

<p>Add these heart-healthy foods to your every day diet and feel the benefits.</p> <p><strong>Almonds</strong></p> <p>Almonds are a great source of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, says dietitian, Kristian Morey. “They are also high in fibre, which helps lower blood pressure and cholesterol.” High cholesterol and high blood pressure are major risks for heart disease. Almonds are also magnesium-rich, and magnesium helps protect the heart, according to a review article published in Nutrients. Grab a handful when you need a pick-me-up after a hard work-out.</p> <p><strong>Asparagus</strong></p> <p>Asparagus boasts high amounts of vitamin K, which may play a role in regulating calcium in the body to promote bone and cardiovascular health, Morey says. “Sauté it with sugar snap peas and toss with whole wheat pasta, olive oil, lemon juice, and a bit of freshly grated Parmesan cheese and pepper for a meatless meal fit for a (very healthy) king or queen.</p> <p><strong>Beans</strong></p> <p>These versatile legumes contain more protein than any other plant food – just one cup provides a quarter of what we need each day, Morey says. They also provide heart-healthy and stress-busting B vitamins, iron, and all-important calcium. Plus, they are considered ‘nature’s scrub brush’ because one serving’s 15 grams of fibre goes through the intestines and soaks up cholesterol and takes it away. Use beans in soups and stews or create a vegetarian chili with kidney beans, tomatoes, carrots, celery, and a little bit of hot pepper. Purée a rinsed and drained can of white beans with two tablespoons of olive oil, a small clove of garlic, and salt and pepper for a Mediterranean-style veggie dip.</p> <p><strong>Blueberries</strong></p> <p>Almost all fruit is good for you – cherries, strawberries, mangos, peaches – yum! But these blue-hued beauties work overtime to provide you with antioxidants and vitamin C, both potent stress busters, Morey explains. They’re low in kilojoules and sugar, so you can snack on them to your heart’s content without an ounce of guilt (or fat). Blueberries are also a good source of fibre, which can help relieve the cramps and constipation that can occur when you’re stressed out. Pile them on cereal, eat them fresh from the basket, or blend them with some plain yoghurt, a banana, and some ice for a fabulous smoothie.</p> <p><strong>Broccoli</strong></p> <p>Broccoli is packed with vitamins K and C, which is an antioxidant powerhouse, Morey says. Antioxidants soak up damaging free radicals that increase the risk for heart disease and other conditions. Steam broccoli in the microwave (rinse and chop it, place it in a glass or other nonreactive bowl, and cover it with a damp paper towel, not plastic wrap) for a few minutes for optimal nutrition. Add a squeeze of lemon juice, a drizzle of extra-virgin olive oil, and, if you dare, a sprinkle of red chilli flakes for punch, and you’ve got yourself a sublime yet simple side dish.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/heart-blood-pressure/the-50-best-foods-for-your-heart?slide=all"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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5 science facts you never learned in school

<p>The world has many strange but amazing true facts making it a really marvellous and mysterious place. </p> <p><strong>The human stomach can dissolve razor blades</strong></p> <p>On the rare occasion that you swallow a razor blade, don’t fret. The human body is more capable than you think. Acids are ranked on a scale from 0 to 14 – the lower the pH level, the stronger the acid. Human stomach acid is typically 1.0 to 2.0, meaning that it has an impeccably strong pH. In a study, scientists found that the “thickened back of a single-edged blade” dissolved after two hours of immersion in stomach acid.</p> <p><strong>A laser can get trapped in water</strong></p> <p>Yes, really. A cool thing called total internal reflection is applied when pointing a laser beam through a container of water. When light travels through water, it’s slowed by the heavier particles in water, as described here. Thus, the laser beam effectively gets “trapped” in the water.</p> <p><strong>Earth’s oxygen is produced by the ocean</strong></p> <p>Ever stopped to think where oxygen comes from? Your first thought may be a rainforest, but marine organisms take the bait. Plankton, seaweed and other photosynthesisers produce over half of the world’s oxygen.</p> <p><strong>Animals use Earth’s magnetic field for orientation</strong></p> <p>Lost land animals may not be able to find their way home, but sea animals might. According to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), “there is evidence that some animals, like sea turtles and salmon, have the ability to sense the Earth’s magnetic field and to use this sense for navigation.”</p> <p><strong>A cloud can weigh over a million pounds</strong></p> <p>Your childhood dreams of floating on a weightless cloud may get rained on with this fact: the average cumulus cloud can weigh up to a million pounds. A million pounds! That’s about as heavy as the world’s largest passenger jet.</p> <p><em>Written by Claire Nowak. This article first appeared in </em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/25-science-facts-you-never-learned-in-school?slide=all"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a><em>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </em><a href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V"><em>here’s our best subscription offer.</em></a><span></span></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

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Elderly care staff accused of running a dementia patient fight club

<p><span>Three employees at an American assisted living facility have been accused of running a fight club, where police say dementia patients were encouraged to fight.</span></p> <p><span>Marilyn Latish McKey, 32, Tonacia Yvonne Tyson, 20, and Taneshia Deshawn Jordan, 26 were arrested and charged with assault on an individual with a disability in connection to the elder abuse at the Danby House in North Carolina.</span></p> <p><span>According to court documents reviewed by the <em><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/health/2019/10/14/elderly-care-staff-accused-pitting-residents-against-each-other-dementia-fight-club/">Winton-Salem Journal</a></em>, the three women encouraged two residents – aged 70-year-old and 73-year-old – in the house’s “special care unit” for dementia patients to fight each other as they watched and filmed on a phone.</span></p> <p><span>The accounts reported by the <em>Journal </em>alleged that one of the fighters was heard yelling, “Let go! Help me! Help me! Let go!”</span></p> <p><span>In response, one of the three staffers could be heard saying “stop screaming”, while another attempted to confirm that the phone was actually recording the clip so that it could be sent to her later.</span></p> <p><span>In a separate occasion, one of the employees reportedly physically assaulted a resident by shoving her into her room, while the other two recorded and did not offer help to the woman.</span></p> <p><span>Police announced the three healthcare workers’ arrests on Friday following an investigation into a tip received in June.</span></p> <p><span>“When you’re talking about someone who can’t take care of themselves, we’ve got to give specific attention to that,” Lt Gregory Dorn told <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/work/at-work/assisted-living-facility-accused-of-running-fight-club-with-dementia-patients/news-story/81859addf7a652241523f7a4317847f9">Fox 8</a></em>.</span></p> <p><span>Danby House said the three employees were fired in June when managers were alerted on the events.</span></p> <p><span>“Danby House has a zero-tolerance policy for the mistreatment of those in our care and as such, McKey, Tyson, and Jordan were terminated immediately in June when community management was alerted to this situation,” the facility said.</span></p> <p><span>“Administrators have been working closely with the Winston-Salem Police Department throughout its investigation to ensure justice is served. Additional staff training and a more rigorous vetting process for all new and existing employees at Danby House has been implemented.</span></p> <p><span>“Danby House has undergone leadership changes in recent months, and we look at situations like these as opportunities to improve upon the high standard of care we provide for our residents.”</span></p> <p><span>The three women face Class A misdemeanours, with a maximum penalty of 150 days of incarceration and a discretionary fine. They have been released on bond and are due to appear before court on November 14.</span></p>

Retirement Life

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Dream retreat: The country farmstay that comes with 500 animal residents

<p>When it comes to back-to-nature getaways, some things are to be expected – fresh air, impressive countryside sceneries and a sky full of stars. However, the Edgar’s Mission Tiny Houses take it a step further, allowing guests to stay with more than 450 rescued farm animals on a 153-acre haven near Lancefield, Victoria.</p> <p>The houses offer sweeping views of the Macedon Ranges, with sheeps and goats roaming around the backyard for the guests to observe, interact and feed with the Weetbix provided at the paddocks.</p> <p>Across the grounds also live pigs, chickens, cows, turkeys, rabbits and geese that have been rescued and housed the Edgar’s Mission sanctuary. Among the animals are Leon Trotsky the piglet and Tim Tam the goat, who have been equipped with customised wheelchairs to enable them to make their way around independently.</p> <p>Edgar’s Mission was established in 2003 by Pam Ahern, who was seeking to care for a Landrace/Large White cross piglet she procured from a commercial piggery. Since then, the tiny piglet has grown into a 400-plus kilogram pig, and the sanctuary community population has risen to hundreds.</p> <p>“We often laugh, saying that Edgar’s Mission grew exponentially pretty much like the eponymous Edgar Alan Pig,” said digital communications manager Kyle Behrend.</p> <p>In 2014, the not-for-profit organisation was looking for a new place to house their extended family of furry friends after having outgrown their original 60-acre space – and that was when they found the Macedon Ranges, Behrend said.</p> <p>The team soon saw the potential of the area to further their cause. “Daily we look out over the beautiful surrounding vistas. This is such a treasure we want to share with the world,” said Behrend.</p> <p>“I guess the idea of the tiny homes, grew out of a tiny thought several years ago on seeking more creative ways to capitalise of the tourism aspect of not only Edgar’s Mission but the greater Macedon Ranges.”</p> <p>The three tiny houses are also designed to reflect the organisation’s values. No animal fibres are used for bedding and soft furnishings, and all the stocked products are sourced from environmentally-friendly companies such as Aesop and Earth Choice.</p> <p>Despite the small size, all the houses pack a kitchenette, mini library, sleeping and living quarters, self-contained bathroom and a deck on which to sit back and soak up the sunlight.</p> <p>“The Tiny Houses are a tool in showing that we can have everything we need in a small space whilst reducing our impact on the environment,” said Behrend.</p> <p>“We trust the Tiny Houses will afford our guests the opportunity to connect with nature, animals and themselves.”</p> <p>In return, guests are expected to be mindful about what they bring to the lodging. “We do ask that when guests come, they don’t bring any animal products out of respect for our animals here,” Behrend said.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the pictures from the Tiny Houses.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: Edgar’s Mission</em></p>

Retirement Life

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Adventure is waiting, so bring it on

<p>Being bold isn’t just for the young. In fact, everywhere you look it seems like those with more than a few miles on the clock are rediscovering that a good life is a bold life. Stereotypes of how we should age are being smashed and people in their 60s, 70s, 80s and even 90s are grabbing life in both hands – and shaking it up.</p> <p>The inspiring Judi Dench was still keeping James Bond in line at 80 and this year she stepped out of her comfort zone to star as Old Deuteronomy in the film adaptation of <em>Cats</em>. David Attenborough is making waves and taking on world leaders at 93. And <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.feroscare.com.au/" target="_blank">Feros Care's</a> Dee describes herself as being “more flamingo than bingo” at 89.</p> <p>Ask those who are cherishing their current stage of life about what drives them and the common thread is having a purpose and knowing they are valued in the community. For every person, that purpose will be different. For some it will be maintaining their role in the workforce; for others it’s about remaining nimble enough to chase the grandchildren or fit enough to walk the Camino de Santiago. It might mean volunteering for a cause close to your heart, pursuing a new hobby or simply connecting with friends.</p> <p>There’s nothing more liberating than being the custodian of your own future. After all, you’re at an age where you have nothing to prove and everything to gain. So live fearlessly – seek new challenges and experiences every day. It takes courage to challenge conformity, but the reward is living an authentic life that renews and prioritises the parts of you that may have been neglected.</p> <p>Revel in the contentment of your accrued wisdom, but remember not to take life too seriously! Have fun, find your tribe of likeminded people and give yourself permission to get swept up in life. Turn ageing into an artform as you explore your creative side, ignite your curiosity and embrace enriching pursuits.</p> <p>At <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.feroscare.com.au/" target="_blank">Feros Care</a>, we have the privilege of supporting seniors who are determined to squeeze the most out of every day. But if you open your eyes, you’ll find them all around you. Seniors who live by the daily mantra of get up, get out and do the things that bring them joy. For 77-year-old Berenice that means daily ocean swimming; for Nina who is 98 years young it’s drumming and dancing; and for Klass, 87, it’s kayaking, entertaining and going to the gym.</p> <p>There’s no definitive formula for living well, but there are many defining truths. Lighten up, dream every day, get your feet wet and your hands dirty. Laugh, maintain friendships, shake things up and face the future with confidence.</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.feroscare.com.au/" target="_blank">Feros Care </a>is fuelling a revolution where seniors genuinely embrace the inspiring adventure that is ageing. By exploring what growing bold means to you, we can help you live fearlessly too – from wellbeing programs that help you stay active, to support services that allow you to live well at home and stay connected.</p> <p>If you need some inspiration to help find your purpose, <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.feroscare.com.au/feros-stories/articles/finding-purpose-over-70" target="_blank">this great article</a> could be your starting point.</p> <p>Or discover more about seniors living life on their own terms by enjoying our Fearless Films at <em><a rel="noopener" href="http://www.feroscare.com.au/fearlessfilms" target="_blank">feroscare.com.au/fearlessfilms.</a></em></p> <p>Then let <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.feroscare.com.au/" target="_blank">Feros Care</a> help you find your bold self, by calling 1300 763 583.</p>

Retirement Life

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Fibre-rich breakfast ideas

<p><span class="image-caption">Courtesy of Sanitarium.</span><span></span></p> <p>These breakfast ideas contain fibre which keeps you feeling full for longer and is great for digestion too. It can be hard finding ways to incorporate fibre into your diet in sufficient quantities but adding it to your breakfast means you’re off to a great start!</p> <p>If you’re looking for an easy and wholesome way of starting your day, a breakfast smoothie is a quick and tasty fix. Likewise, the bircher muesli is prepared the night before and just needs a few blueberries or <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/pick-the-right-fruit-for-better-health.aspx" title="Pick the right fruit for better health">your choice of fruit</a> added before serving. <span>The corn fritters would make a delightful addition to a weekend brunch. </span></p> <p><strong>Breakfast Smoothie</strong><br />Serves 4 <br />Ingredients:</p> <ul> <li><span>2 cups FibreStart </span></li> <li><span>1 cup frozen mixed berries </span></li> <li><span>1 ripe banana, peeled </span></li> <li><span>1 Weet-Bix, broken </span></li> <li><span>1 tbsp honey </span></li> <li><span>½ cup crushed ice </span></li> </ul> <p>Method: <br />Place all ingredients in a blender and mix until smooth. <br />Divide between glasses, serve and enjoy!</p> <p><strong>Berrylicious Bircher Muesli</strong><br /><span>Serves 4 <br /></span><span>Ingredients: </span></p> <ul> <li><span>1½ cups rolled oats </span></li> <li><span>½ cup dry roasted almonds, roughly chopped </span></li> <li><span>¼ cup sultanas </span></li> <li><span>1½ cups FibreStart, plus extra to serve </span></li> <li><span>1 cup Greek style yoghurt </span></li> <li><span>125g blueberries </span></li> </ul> <p>Method: <br />Place the oats, almonds and sultanas in a large bowl. <br />Add FibreStart and yoghurt and stir to combine. <br />Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate overnight. <br />When ready to serve, add the blueberries. <br />Serve in bowls, adding extra FibreStart to achieve your preferred consistency.</p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/nutrition/fibre-rich-breakfast-ideas.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Centrelink accused of “disability bullying” after man receives a $15,000 debt

<p>Centrelink has been accused of “disability bullying” after an intellectually disabled man was told he owed a $15,000 “robodebt”.</p> <p>Christopher Pascoe, a 53-year-old man with epilepsy and an intellectual disability, received a debt of $15,537.62 from the Department of Human Services in July 2018.</p> <p>The department alleged he declared a lower income than he actually earned between 2013 and 2016.</p> <p>The <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-07/centrelink-accused-of-disability-bullying-over-$15,000-robodebt/11570920">ABC</a></em>’s <em>7.30 </em>reported that Christopher does not declare his income to Centrelink, which is a common practice for people with a disability that limits their ability to handle their own finances.</p> <p>“The unfairness in the fact that Christopher knew nothing about it,” his mother, Yvonne Pascoe said.</p> <p>“The facts were just presented to us about 18 months ago as, you know, this is a complete deal.”</p> <p>After she spent “hundreds of hours” on phone calls seeking explanation from Centrelink, the welfare agency later admitted it had made mistakes in calculating the debt against Christopher. In a further debt letter dated February 2019, Christopher’s debt was reduced to a little under $11,000.</p> <p>“It’s really disability bullying to me because it’s just gone on,” she said.</p> <p>After <em>7.30</em> reached out to the department for comment, Christopher received a letter from a Centrelink legal officer offering to waive the remainder of his debt.</p> <p>However, Yvonne said she was still undecided whether to accept the offer.</p> <p>“It seems unreal and that’s why I’m being, I suppose, a bit mistrustful. I want it explained to me in detail the why’s and how’s of how this has happened and who has decided to do this,” she said.</p> <p>“I just can’t understand how it could have gone on so long and no one’s happened to notice.”</p> <p>Earlier this year, two federal court cases were launched against the automated Centrelink debt – also known as robodebt – scheme, spearheaded by <a href="https://www.legalaid.vic.gov.au/about-us/news/it-felt-like-guilty-until-proven-innocent-new-test-case-against-centrelinks-robo-debt-system">Victoria Legal Aid</a>.</p> <p>“More than 500,000 robo-debts have now been raised by a process that is opaque and unfair,” the firm’s executive director Rowan McRae said.</p> <p>“We know it’s unfair … we also think the scheme is unlawful and we’d like a court to test that.”</p> <p>Last month, Bill Shorten announced that he will be pursuing a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/money-banking/bill-shorten-announces-class-action-into-centrelink-robo-debt-system">class action suit</a> against the scheme with law firm Gordon Legal. “The scheme – including its reverse onus of proof – is at best legally dubious and should rightly have its legality determined by a court,” Shorten said.</p>

Retirement Life

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10 key questions to ask your parents today

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As your parents get older, it’s important you have a clear understanding of their end-of-life wishes and their financial situation. Why? Because as their future guardian, it’s vital you have all of this information at your fingertips so you can help them as they get older. Then you know your family is prepared for the unexpected.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The biggest trap you can fall into is putting off these important questions until it’s too late. As we all know, it’s so easy for time to slip by and then you’ll find these important questions haven’t been asked. So what’s the best way to go about asking your parents these important questions?</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">First, you need to make a time to sit down with them and check they have all of their legal documents in place. Second, ask them if it is okay that you have access to all of these documents.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The next step is to sit down with your parents and go through it step-by-step. It’s never going to be easy to ask your parents questions about their end-of-life wishes, but if you keep in mind this will be a huge help to them in the later stages of their lives, this should make it a bit easier.</span></p> <p><strong>Question 1. Do your parents have an enduring power of attorney?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Your parents will need to fill out an enduring power of attorney, which is a legal document that designates who will take care of their affairs if they are unable to decide for themselves, for example if they become mentally or physically incapacitated.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">More than one person can be designated to take care of your parents’ affairs on this form. So you need to decide who these people are going to be – more than one person is probably best if possible. The power of attorney form must be signed by these designated people and your parents, and then it has to be witnessed by a lawyer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You need to get this form completed as soon as possible as you are not legally able to help your parents with their financial affairs without it.</span></p> <p><strong>Question 2. What are your parents' end-of-life wishes?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An advanced care directive – also known as a living will – is a document which states your parents’ end-of-life wishes. For example, they can state whether they’d like a ventilator and feeding tube to keep them alive in the event of an irreversible coma. They can also choose how long they would stay on a ventilator in this situation. They can also choose if they want to have CPR initiated if their heart stops. There are other directives they can give as well such as whether they would like to donate their organs once they pass on.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If your parents haven’t made these choices and they don’t have an advanced care directive yet, be sure to ask the questions and keep a record their wishes. You’ll also need to ensure the people named on your parents’ power of attorney are aware of these decisions.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It is important to discuss your parents' end-of-life wishes to be aware of what they want. </span></p> <p><strong>Question 3. Do your parents have a will?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A will is the legal document used to designate what happens to your parents’ money and possessions after they pass on. Your parents should have one already but check to make sure they are happy with it and it has been updated recently.</span></p> <p><strong>Question 4. Do your parents have enough funds for aged care?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Moving into aged care is not cheap but there’s help from the government if your parents qualify. You need to be aware of your parents’ financial situation so if something happens to their health, you know how much money is available.</span></p> <p><strong>Question 5: Do your parents have a preference for an aged care facility?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s best to ask your parents if they have some preferences for aged care before a crisis hits. This gives them the opportunity to be involved in the process, rather than just having to hand everything over to you.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There may be an aged care facility they’ve seen which they like and if you know this, it’ll make everything a whole lot easier later on.</span></p> <p><strong>Question 6: Is someone advising your parents on financial matters?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Older parents can be very independent regarding their finances and this is totally understandable. But at the same time, it’s important you ask your parents if they are getting advice from anyone about their financial situation and if they are following any sort of program. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are a lot of scams around so if you find out they do have an advisor or an accountant they deal with regularly, make sure you check them out to see if they’re reputable. This will also make it easier to get in touch with this person in the case of an emergency.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As your parents get older, it’s important you have a clear understanding of their financial situation</span></p> <p><strong>Question 7: Who are the medical professionals your parents are currently seeing?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You need to know the names of the medical specialists your parents are seeing as well as their main doctor. If one of your parents becomes hospitalised, information from one of these doctors could be critical so you will need all of their contact details.</span></p> <p><strong>Question 8: Can your parents cope with their medications?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many older people end up on some complicated protocols involving a number of medications. If you sit down with them and ask them to let you know exactly what they’re on, this should help you gauge whether your parents are able to manage their medications themselves or not.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You need to have this information just in case you need to provide it to hospital staff in case of an emergency.</span></p> <p><strong>Question 9: Are all of these documents current?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">All of the documents we’ve mentioned so far need to be up-to-date for them to work properly. Encourage your parents to keep all of these documents together and it’s best you go through these documents with them once each year, just to check that everything is up-to-date.</span></p> <p><strong>Question 10: Where are these documents kept so they can be accessed if needed?</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Probably one of the most important things to keep in mind in all of this is where all of these documents are going to be kept so you can find them in an emergency. It’s best that a few people know where these documents are kept in case something happens to your parents while you are away.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Many people decide to keep the original documents in a safe or a designated safe place – so that everyone who needs to know where they are can access them when needed.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Pamela Connellan. Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/preparing-for-the-unexpected-important-questions-to-ask-your-parents.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Tips and traps when moving in with your children

<p>The Australian Bureau of Statistics tells us that 6.9% of people aged 65+ already live with their children. No doubt many more are actively considering it as an option, but before making the move it’s important to consider the pros and cons.</p> <p>The reasons for moving in with children may vary widely. It could be a financially based decision, helping one or both parties to consolidate their cost of living. For others it may be due to the adult children deciding to offer care for a parent with a physical impairment or illness. On the other side of the coin, it may be driven by the adult children needing the assistance of retired parents in taking care of grandchildren. Think back to the hilarious movie (pictured), <em>Parental Guidance</em>. </p> <p>While there are some obvious benefits to sharing living costs and improving family connections, there are some issues and difficulties that may not be so apparent at the outset. Here are some handy hints on what you need to consider to help make it a success.</p> <p><strong>The danger of making assumptions</strong><br />The concept of moving in with your children may happen in a number of ways. You might offer to use your own money to build a granny flat on their property or to make renovations or extensions onto their home to accommodate you. Another scenario is for both parties to sell their homes and buy a new property together, which is better suited to shared living.</p> <p>While these arrangements may seem fair and practical for both parties it is vital that great care is taken to protect your financial stake in the venture. While things may start out rosy, the reality is that there can be conflicts, misunderstandings, divorce or other family disruptions that can put your financial contribution at risk if things are not spelled out clearly at the outset.</p> <p>Imagine if the child you move in with ends up in an acrimonious divorce. The property settlement may involve the need to sell the home and if there is no documented evidence of your stake in the ownership, there could be a risk of you losing your money or having to go through legal action to reclaim it.</p> <p><strong>Make sure there is an agreement in writing</strong><br />Any arrangement that involves a large amount of money or the exchange of property needs to have a written agreement drawn up. It doesn’t matter how good the family relationship is or how much trust exists, it is simply a matter of practicality. A written agreement does not indicate a lack of trust, but simply makes it clear to both parties what the expectations are. It brings clarity and prompts both sides to more fully consider all future possibilities.</p> <p>Putting things in writing will naturally help everyone to look at things objectively. Once it is in writing and signed by both parties then there is a basis for impartially sorting out future eventualities and a clear reference for any possible legal claims.</p> <p><strong>Obtain your own legal advice</strong> <br />Getting legal advice on the written agreement can help uncover issues you may not have considered and will help to express the spirit of the agreement in concrete and unambiguous terms.</p> <p>In doing this, however, don’t simply rely only on one side making the legal arrangements. You should enlist your own legal adviser who you consult separately and privately to ensure your needs and wishes are properly reflected in the agreement. This may seem pedantic at the time, but can prevent a lot of heartache down the track if the unexpected happens.</p> <p><strong>Some of the major areas that an agreement should cover:</strong></p> <ul> <li>What will happen if relationships change, such as you or your children going through divorce or starting new relationships?</li> <li>What is the nature of your financial contribution? Is it a gift or a loan? Should the property title be changed to recognise your shared ownership?</li> <li>How will you be compensated if you change your mind and want to move out? How will financial interests be calculated?  </li> <li>What will be done financially and practically if your health deteriorates and you need extra care to stay in your shared accommodation or if you need to move to residential aged care?</li> <li>If there are other children outside of the agreement, how will their inheritance be affected by the agreement? Is there a need to adjust wills to reflect the desired outcomes?</li> <li>Is there an expectation of personal care being supplied by the child as part of the agreement? How will this be dealt with if your personal needs change or increase in the future? </li> </ul> <p><strong>Your pension may be impacted too</strong><br />If you are receiving a pension, the written agreement may also be important for the purposes of calculating your pension entitlements. Centrelink have specific rules on granny flat arrangements that need to be taken into account. More information on this can be found at their <u><a href="http://www.humanservices.gov.au/customer/enablers/assets/granny-flats">website</a></u>.</p> <p><strong>What should you do if disputes do occur?</strong> <br />It is important to get prompt legal advice as soon as any disagreement arises. Any delay may reduce your ability to protect your legal interests. Sharing accommodation with children can have many mutual benefits, but planning is essential to make it a successful move.</p> <p><em>*Australian Bureau of Statistics Report - Reflecting a Nation: Stories from the 2011 Census, 2012–2013</em></p> <p><em>Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/relationships/tips-and-traps-when-moving-in-with-your-children.aspx">Wyza.com.au. </a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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How a simple hearing test can transform your life

<p>We often don’t want to admit that there could be a problem with our hearing, and even if we do, many people fear the stigma that they think comes with having hearing loss and wearing a hearing aid.</p> <p>However, attending to your hearing loss by taking the simple step of getting your hearing checked can transform your life for the better and help restore the active social life you once had.</p> <p><strong>What’s involved in a hearing test?</strong><br />A hearing test only takes roughly 20 minutes to an hour. Audiologist and clinician at leading provider ihear Toowoomba, Marguerite Dunstan, says the ihear test is simple and has three parts.</p> <p>For the first part you simply listen and respond to a number of beeps. In the second part you repeat back a series of words to the clinician. This test helps the clinician determine how well you are hearing the clarity of speech and words being spoken to you.</p> <p>In the third part of the test, the audiologist will print out a graph called an audiogram that tells them the extent of your hearing loss.</p> <p>They will then discuss with you whether you need to follow up with an ear, nose and throat specialist or doctor to have a better look at the anatomy of your ear, and whether you need to get a hearing aid.</p> <p><strong>Why you shouldn’t worry about being judged</strong> <br />The testing process is carried out with the utmost professionalism by trained experts, says Dunstan. “There is absolutely no judgement. Audiologists will assess your situation by asking you questions about your health and then they will adapt what they learn about your hearing loss to your specific life requirements to help find a solution to your hearing loss,” she says. </p> <p><strong>Will wearing a hearing aid be difficult?</strong><br />It may take some adjusting to, but in the long run you will be much better off. Hearing aids allow people with hearing loss to hear better and therefore communicate better. Quite often audiologists see their patient’s confidence and self-esteem shoot up as they feel as if a weight is lifted off their shoulders. They usually find they can once again interact effectively with family, friends and colleagues.</p> <p>“Getting a hearing aid can even have a positive financial impact on the family if that person is able to work again,” says Dunstan.</p> <p><strong>The good news about hearing aids</strong> <br />The image of a big unwieldy, whistling hearing aid is now a thing of the past, says Dunstan. Modern hearing aids are discreet in size, have advanced technologies inside them that filter out sound so they don’t whistle and they can even be personalised to fit the shape of your ear. There are even different colours available for the fashion conscious. There is really no reason to fear what having a hearing aid might do to your social life.</p> <p><strong>How might you know you need a hearing test?</strong><br />It’s not always easy to know when you need a test. “The average time it takes someone with hearing loss to get checked is usually six years,” Dunstan says. If you often think people are mumbling, have difficulty hearing when there is background noise, or if a loved one has trouble getting a message across to you, these are all signs you may need a hearing test.</p> <p><strong>Why should you act sooner rather than later?</strong><br />Audiologists are now recommending people have hearing tests in their 50s and 60s as well as in their 70s. The reason for this is that the brain is more changeable in your 50s and 60s than later on and is a lot more accepting of the hearing aid. “It also means health-related issues associated with hearing loss such as memory loss and depression can be treated earlier on – so don’t wait, get your hearing checked today,” advises Dunstan.</p> <p>To begin your transformation, visit <a href="http://www.ihear.com.au/Book%20free%20hearing%20check">www.ihear.com.au</a> and book a free hearing check today.</p> <p><strong><em>Written by Dominic Bayley. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/how-a-simple-hearing-test-can-transform-your-life.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></strong></p>

Retirement Life

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An all-time low for Centrelink? Man with Parkinson’s disease denied disability support

<p>Jamie Tartoosie, a man suffering from Parkinson's Disease, says he is “not getting better”. </p> <p>For the past 11 years, Mr Tartootise has been an employee with Woolworths but eventually was left no choice but to resign when his condition became so intense, he physically could not complete the required tasks asked of him after collapsing. </p> <p>“I’m not going to get better, it’s gradual, I’ll go downhill, bit by bit. Getting out of bed or up, out of a chair – that’s a struggle,” he told<span> </span>A Current Affair.</p> <p>The man said it was suggested he look into receiving a Disability Support Pension - however, Centrelink firmly denied the request.</p> <p>“It’s at least 18 months, or even up to two years sometimes before I even get considered for the DSP and until then I’ve got to go on Newstart,” he said.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">TONIGHT. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/9ACA?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#9ACA</a>.<br />Jamie suffers from Parkinson's. <br />So how come he can't get the disability support pension? <a href="https://t.co/A9fRxbBTiy">pic.twitter.com/A9fRxbBTiy</a></p> — A Current Affair (@ACurrentAffair9) <a href="https://twitter.com/ACurrentAffair9/status/1176357502323056641?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 24, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>Despite his crippling disability and employer support stating it was unsafe for him to work, Centrelink did not approve his application. </p> <p>The welfare department stated he would have to complete workplace training for a minimum of 18 months to be considered eligible. </p> <p>Tartootise said he was placed into “job support training”, and is now on a newstart allowance of $250 a week. </p> <p>The lowly-paid welfare payment is a controversial topic among many who are divided on whether it is a fair amount to give any unemployed person. </p> <p>“Who’s going to employ someone with Parkinson’s, knowing that they’re only going to get worse and not better?” he said. </p> <p>Since speaking with<span> </span>A Current Affair,<span> </span>Tartootise had support  to convice Centrelink to assist him financially. </p> <p>He has now been placed on the Disability Support Pension after further investigation determined he was, in fact, too ill to work.</p>

Retirement Life

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“Dancing was my secret weapon in managing diabetes!”

<p>Dubbed the ‘Silent Pandemic’ of our times, type 2 diabetes is a huge health issue in our country – and around the world. So many have it, but don’t realise it. Currently, 1 in 4 adults are living with diabetes or pre-diabetes – with the largest proportion of Australians with type 2 diabetes in the 50-79 age bracket according to the National Diabetes Service Scheme.</p> <p>The good news is, diabetes can be managed – if you educate yourself, take steps to change your diet and shoehorn more activity into your day. Here’s how Yvonne Appleby, ambassador for Diabetes NSW / ACT, changed her life after being diagnosed with type 2 in 2011.</p> <p>“I was ill on and off for a long time before I discovered I had type 2 diabetes. I kept getting sore throats, and earaches, and I gained 20 kilos over 4 years, which was significant as I’d been a size 8-10 most of my life. I was getting really bad headaches and migraines and I felt something wasn’t right.</p> <p>“One early blood test showed my blood glucose levels were a bit high, but my GP just said if I dieted and exercised it would go down. I know now that I was pre-diabetic then, but I trusted my doctor. She did ask if I was peeing a lot or thirsty all the time and I wasn’t, so she told me ‘it couldn’t be diabetes’. It didn’t occur to me to get a second opinion. I just assumed she knew what she was talking about.</p> <p> “Finally I couldn’t handle being so unwell anymore and asked for another blood test. It then showed up that I had type 2 diabetes and at that point I had been sick on and off for 6 or 7 years. I know now that not everyone gets typical symptoms. Some people have zero symptoms. If I had my time again, I wouldn’t have left it so long. I would’ve gotten a second opinion, or changed doctors (I have now). I know you can take steps to prevent the onset of type 2 diabetes.</p> <p>“When I was diagnosed, I didn’t know much about diabetes. I’d heard the horror stories, but I didn’t know it was common in the older age group – like 50 and over. And my doctor wasn’t a lot of help. She just said, ‘You’ve got diabetes, go to the chemist and get a blood glucose monitor’. I also went on Metformin and as soon as I was on that, I started feeling better within three days.</p> <p>“At first, I had no idea what I was doing. I was testing my glucose levels for about a week thinking, ‘I’m writing all these numbers down but what do they mean? Are they low? High? Normal?’ I remember one time my sugar dropped to 4.3mmol and I panicked and started eating nuts and it just went lower. I rang the Diabetes NSW customer care line and they said, ‘Oh no. Nuts will just lower your glucose levels – you need a bit of orange juice or some lollies to bring it back up’. It was all very trial and error getting to know what worked for me. I was lucky to know a lady who works at Diabetes NSW and I rang her and told her I’d just been diagnosed. She asked me to come in and talk to someone.</p> <p>“I did an 8-week education course there, which was hugely helpful. We had an exercise physiologist, a dietitian and a diabetes educator talk to us. They taught us how to read nutritional panels, which is something I never did before. We had to put cereal boxes in a line according to how much sugar they had in them and Nutrigrain was something like 46 per cent sugar! That’s really stuck with me.</p> <p>“My diet before was bad. Lots of sugar. Now, I make much more sensible choices. Lots of vegies and swaps to low-GI foods. I’ve totally changed how I think about food. I no longer skip meals either, which I’d had a tendency to do.</p> <p>“I also took up dancing and at one stage I was dancing 9-10 hours a week, doing rock’n’roll and Latin dance. I became an assistant dance teacher and I lost 15kg just from dancing and eating well. I even got to dance with Robbie Kmetoni, former winner of <em>So You Think You Can Dance Australia</em>, for the Move4Diabetes campaign. Two years after being diagnosed, my sugars were stable, I was the fittest I’d ever been and I was even off my meds. My doctor was very pleased.</p> <p> “I’ve had some health problems since including a serious respiratory infection and some knee issues. As a result I’ve been on steroids and haven’t been able to exercise as much, but my HbA1c levels were still that of a non-diabetic person – around 5.5mmol when I was last tested. When I was diagnosed they were 9mmol! I’m back on the meds to keep my glucose levels stable, but when I’m better I’ll be getting back into dancing and getting back on track.</p> <p>“My advice to anyone who’s newly diagnosed is to go to the Diabetes NSW and ACT webpage. Ring the customer care line. They saved my skin a lot of times because I had no idea where to turn. They also have amazing recipes and advice. You can ask questions and talk to an expert. I also think it’s important for everyone to get routinely tested because there are so many people out there with diabetes who don’t know they have it. If you have prediabetes, losing just 10 percent of your body weight can stop you developing type 2 diabetes. So early diagnosis is really important.”</p> <p><em>Written by Rachel Smith. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/health/secret-weapon-in-managing-diabetes.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

Retirement Life

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Nurse banned from practice for taking $1.5 million from 92-year-old man

<p>A nurse has been banned from practicing after swindling $1.5 million from a 92-year-old Melbourne man.</p> <p>Bachelor Lionel Cox went into Cambridge House care home in Collingwood in July 2015 after his health deteriorated, with plans to stay “until the cold months were over”.</p> <p>Cox was left in care of nurse Abha Kumar, who heard that he owned a house, had no friends or family, and had not made a will. Within days of meeting Cox, Kumar helped him hand-write a will to make her the sole beneficiary to his $1.5 million estate. She then forced a staff member to witness the signing without telling them she was the beneficiary.</p> <p>Kumar also travelled with Cox by taxi to his house to collect various items and $4,500 in cash.</p> <p>After Cox died on August 9, 2015 of natural causes, Kumar went on to sell his Fitzroy home for $1.117 million in November 2016 and other belongings for $39,000.</p> <p>On Tuesday, the Victorian Civil and Administrative Tribunal handed down orders on the three allegations made against Kumar by the Nursing and Midwifery Board.</p> <p>Kumar was found to be engaging in professional misconduct and forcing staff to aide her. She was banned from being a registered health practitioner and from working or volunteering in any aged care capacity for five years.</p> <p>Tribunal members Elisabeth Wentworth, Mary Archibald and Pamela Barry described Kumar as <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/victoria/nurse-who-helped-man-write-will-is-banned-by-vcat-but-keeps-his-1-5m-20190925-p52uwx.html" target="_blank">a risk to the public</a>.</p> <p>“The conduct in this case constituted determined, goal-directed actions by Ms Kumar to ensure that Mr Cox – a vulnerable, elderly man in her care – made a will in her favour, and that no-one knew he had done so until after he died,” they wrote.</p> <p>“Instead of refusing the benefit under the will, she has retained it, thereby profiting from her misconduct.”</p>

Retirement Life

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Listen up, young folk: Words of advice from care home residents goes viral

<p>Senior residents at a nursing home have gone viral after sharing their wisdom and advice for the younger generation on Facebook.</p> <p>St Clair Nursing Center in Missouri, US has helped pensioners share their messages to young people in its ‘advice of the day’ series.</p> <p>Since last month, the care home has been sharing pictures of the elderly residents holding a whiteboard with their name, age and unique insight.</p> <p>The initiative was created by activities manager Debbie Michael, who chose a resident to participate each day and took the pictures for the centre’s Facebook page.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FStClairNursingCenter%2Fphotos%2Fa.2179977855376867%2F2937791032928875%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="594" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>91-year-old resident Bob has captured the attention of people around the Internet with his advice: “Find someone to love, and keep on loving them”. His picture has gained more than 14,000 comments and 129,000 shares, and kickstarted a #BeLikeBob campaign with merchandise sales.</p> <p>81-year-old Rose advised the youth to “get a good education”, while 92-year-old Waunita encouraged everyone to “eat, drink and be merry”.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to read the advice from the residents.</p> <p><em>Photo credit: <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.facebook.com/StClairNursingCenter" target="_blank">St. Clair Nursing Center</a></em></p>

Retirement Life