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“Bizarre” Home and Away impersonator loses court appeal

<p dir="ltr"><em>Content warning: This article includes mentions of suicide.</em></p> <p dir="ltr">A female ‘catfish’ who impersonated a <em>Home and Away </em>star to attract women online and was found guilty of stalking has failed in her bid to overturn her conviction.</p> <p dir="ltr">Lydia Abdelmalek was found guilty of six counts of stalking three years ago after she impersonated Lincoln Lewis, the star who played Geoff Campbell in the popular soap.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though she first launched her appeal in 2019, the guilty verdict was upheld in Victoria’s County Court on May 26, as reported by <em><a href="https://www.canberratimes.com.au/story/7754837/home-and-away-catfish-loses-court-appeal/?cs=14231" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Canberra Times</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I find the appellant was responsible for the stalking behaviour,” Judge Claire Quin told the court.</p> <p dir="ltr">Judge Quin described the case as “bizarre” and rejected evidence presented by Ms Abdelmalek.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I found her account confusing, deliberate and that she was deliberately evasive,” Judge Quin said. “Her account does not make sense.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The court also heard that a phone seized from Ms Abdelmalak’s home during the appeal in relation to another case contained “incriminating” evidence against her, according to the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2022-05-26/lydia-abdelmalek-lincoln-lewis-catfish-appeal/101099416" target="_blank" rel="noopener">ABC</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">The court heard that the phone contained a wealth of material that “supported the accounts provided by the victims”, including hundreds of texts and pictures sent to the women she stalked, intimate photos, and Mr Lewis’ real voicemail.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Much of this material was not available at the time of the Magistrates’ hearing,” Judge Quin said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The enormity of this behaviour could not be over exaggerated.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Abdelmalek impersonated the TV star and used other aliases to stalk seven people over a four-year period starting from May 2011, in what one victim called “sick mind games”.</p> <p dir="ltr">One of Ms Abdelmalek’s victims who died by suicide wrote a statement prior to her death where she outlined the trauma she experienced from being tricked into believing the actor was in love with her.</p> <p dir="ltr">She said she felt tortured for the “sick fascination, perverse pleasure and unhealthy satisfaction” of her tormentor.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another victim said she went from being the life of the party to a recluse after what the sentencing magistrate described as a “calculated and cruel” offence.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>If you are experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide, you can call Lifeline 131 114 or beyondblue 1300 224 636 or visit <a href="https://www.lifeline.org.au/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lifeline.org.au</a> or <a href="https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/national-help-lines-and-websites" target="_blank" rel="noopener">beyondblue.org.au</a>.</em></p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-809f9e68-7fff-e3b1-a053-0cfcec6ba428"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Heidelberg Magistrates Court</em></p>

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Kevin Spacey charged with four counts of sexual assault

<p>Kevin Spacey has been charged with four counts of sexual assault.</p> <p>The former Hollywood megastar, 62, was charged by London’s Metropolitan Police and is due to appear in court. All of the counts are alleged to have happened between 2005 and 2013.</p> <p>Four of the alleged offences are said to have taken place in London, while the other is alleged to have happened in Gloucestershire, in the south-west of England.</p> <p>Robert Ainslie, head of the UK Crown Prosecution Service’s (CPS) special crime division, said: “The CPS has authorised criminal charges against Kevin Spacey, 62, for four counts of sexual assault against three men.</p> <p>“He has also been charged with causing a person to engage in penetrative sexual activity without consent. The charges follow a review of the evidence gathered by the Metropolitan Police in its investigation.</p> <p>“The Crown Prosecution Service reminds all concerned that criminal proceedings against Mr Spacey are active and that he has the right to a fair trial.”</p> <p>Police opened an investigation into the House of Cards star in 2017, following this Spacey was interviewed under caution by the police in 2019.</p> <p>His House of Cards character, Frank Underwood, had to be killed off after he was booted from the series as allegations emerged. Shortly after Spacey was ordered to pay the studio that created the show $US43.7million ($A61.62m) last year over breach of contract following sexual harassment claims.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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“How to Murder Your Husband” author convicted for murdering husband

<p dir="ltr">An author who wrote an essay about “How to Murder Your Husband” has been convicted of murdering her husband.</p> <p dir="ltr">Nancy Crampton Brophy, 71, was found guilty on Wednesday of second-degree murder for shooting dead her chef husband Daniel Brophy, 63, back in June 2018. </p> <p dir="ltr">Prosecutors told the court that Crampton Brophy killed her husband to claim her husband’s $1.4 million life insurance policy. </p> <p dir="ltr">They said that she was collecting gun pieces in the moments leading to Daniel’s death before killing him at the Oregon Culinary Institute. </p> <p dir="ltr">Footage presented to the Multnomah County courtroom showed that Crampton Brophy in fact owned the same make and model of the gun that killed her husband.</p> <p dir="ltr">She was also seen driving to and from the culinary institute when Daniel was killed and found by his students. </p> <p dir="ltr">Her defence team argued that she was collecting them for a new book she was writing - about a woman who slowly collected gun parts to complete a weapon and get back at her abusive husband.</p> <p dir="ltr">They said that Crampton Brophy and Daniel were in a loving relationship for almost 25 years. </p> <p dir="ltr">The jury of five men and seven women deliberated the case for eight hours before delivering the guily verdict.</p> <p dir="ltr">One of Crampton Brophy’s attorneys, Lisa Maxfield said they are looking to appeal.</p> <p dir="ltr">Crampton Brophy is due to be sentenced on June 13.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Twitter</em></p>

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Pensioner catches closet thief red-handed

<p dir="ltr">A pensioner has caught his neighbour stealing money from him after installing a camera in his wardrobe. </p> <p dir="ltr">John Rennie is legally blind and thought he was going insane when his money kept disappearing from his wardrobe.</p> <p dir="ltr">After installing a camera, the 79-year-old was shocked to find his neighbour, rummaging through his wardrobe and safe stealing his money. </p> <p dir="ltr">"I was gutted when I saw who was coming into my home and taking my cash," he told <a href="https://9now.nine.com.au/a-current-affair/cairns-mans-awful-discovery-neighbour-cctv/ba5cd542-70b7-4d7e-a2d7-4dd03be2f804" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A Current Affair</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Pav Taak, his 47-year-old neighbour who would occasionally come look after him, was caught four times stealing money. </p> <p dir="ltr">John said that he would forget his key sometimes and left a spare in the garden and believes that’s how Taak was able to get in.</p> <p dir="ltr">The passcode for the safe was also written down which gave Taak easy access.</p> <p dir="ltr">One hundred dollars that was put aside for John’s daughter’s birthday was stolen, as well as $400 that was left inside a suit pocket. </p> <p dir="ltr">John and his son presented the CCTV footage to police and Taak was charged with three counts of entering a premises with intent and one count of burglary.</p> <p dir="ltr">Taak pleaded guilty and was given a nine-month prison sentence that was immediately suspended. He was also ordered to pay back $200 in compensation. </p> <p dir="ltr">John said that “that’s no justice” and that Taak got away “scott-free”. </p> <p dir="ltr">"He's shown no remorse at all and he's still out there driving a cab, even though his family told me he'd lose his licence because of the conviction.” </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: A Current Affair</em></p>

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“I want my story to be heard”: Detained woman’s chilling words before her death revealed

<p><em>Content warning: This article includes mentions of suicide and mental health struggles.</em></p> <p>A woman who died of a suspected suicide in an Australian immigration detention centre has been identified as a New Zealand mum of two, who had her mental health medication restricted and pleaded with fellow detainees to tell her story just hours before she died.</p> <p>It is understood the woman was a 53-year-old from Christchurch (Ōtautahi), as reported by <em>TeAoMāori.news</em>.</p> <p>It has also been reported that the woman’s cell was raided by guards, who removed a stray cat she had adopted during her time at the centre, hours before her death on Saturday.</p> <p>She had been held at Sydney’s Villawood Immigration Detention Centre for six months under the controversial <a href="https://humanrights.gov.au/our-work/2-when-can-visa-be-refused-or-cancelled-under-section-501" target="_blank" rel="noopener">501 deportation program</a> - which allows for non-Australian citizens to be subject to deportation if their criminal record includes a prison sentence of 12 months or more.</p> <p>During the woman’s stay, fellow detainees said her mental state rapidly deteriorated.</p> <p>“The treatment she received was not human,” a source inside the facility who was familiar with its operations and her situation, told <em>Māori TV</em>.</p> <p>The source said Serco, the centre’s private operator, is failing to tackle mental illness among detainees.</p> <p>“With mental health concerns, basically it’s the same approach for everyone. Heavily sedate them so they shut up.”</p> <p>Ian Rintoul, a member of the advocacy group Refugee Action Coalition, told <em>Māori TV</em> the fellow detainees and the woman herself pleaded with Serco to get her help.</p> <p>Both she and a few other detainees had told Serco and Border Force (that) she needed help and should not be in detention. Her mental illness was very obvious,” Rintoul said.</p> <p>Friends of the woman have remembered her as “gorgeous, with a beautiful wairua”, per <a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/501-deportee-who-died-in-australian-custody-was-christchurch-mother-of-two/I2TQLNEHOLVNWN7KVVIVZBOYZA/" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>NZ Herald</em></a>.</p> <p>“I was concerned about her, about her mental health, especially in that place,” one said.</p> <p>The day after her death, detainees told The Guardian that she had been fighting to get access to her mental health medication earlier in the day and that she wanted her story to be told.</p> <p>“She told me that she needs to have some medication at 8am in the morning but they’d give her medication like at 11am or 11.30am. And that makes her feel bad,” one detainee told the publication.</p> <p>“She was telling us last night, ‘I want my story herald. I want the people to know what happened to me. I want to tell the people what these detention centres do to people,” another recalled.</p> <p>One detainee said one of the likely “final straws” was when guards took the cat she adopted, which had been roaming the facility.</p> <p>“She was pretty obsessive, attached, and they knew that. They broke her spirit,” they said.</p> <p>Her fellow deportees also said the woman was trying to get in touch with her two sons, one of whom lives in Sydney, but she believed guards were preventing her from doing so.</p> <p>According to Māori TV, the Australian Border Force took more than 12 hours to get in touch with the woman’s family after she died, while Aotearoa’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade said on Monday night that it hadn’t been notified of a death of a New Zealand woman in an Australian detention centre.</p> <p>Her death also comes within days of Australia’s change in leadership, wth incoming Prime Minister Anthony Albanese signalling that the 501 program would continue but that there might be more consideration for the time someone has lived in Australia and whether they have ties to New Zealand.</p> <p>New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has welcomed potential reforms to the program, which disproportionately affects Māori, and said she will raise the grievances related to the program “no matter whom the leader is in Australia”.</p> <p>“We accept because we do it too, circumstances under which people will be deported … we have always reserved the right for New Zealand to do that,” Ms Ardern said in her weekly post-Cabinet press conference.</p> <p>“The area we have had grievance is where individuals are being deported who have little or no connection to New Zealand.</p> <p>“I will be utterly consistent no matter whom the leader is in Australia with raising that grievance.”</p> <p><em>If you are experiencing a personal crisis or thinking about suicide, you can call Lifeline 131 114 or beyondblue 1300 224 636 or visit <a href="https://www.lifeline.org.au/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">lifeline.org.au</a> or <a href="https://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/national-help-lines-and-websites" target="_blank" rel="noopener">beyondblue.org.au</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p> </p>

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Richard Pusey fronts court accused of sharing graphic images

<p dir="ltr">Richard Pusey has been denied bail as police fear they have a series of graphic images of the horrific Eastern Freeway crash that killed four officers that cannot be accessed.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 43-year-old was denied bail by a magistrate in Sunshine, Victoria, on Monday partly because they can’t access the password-protected phone and tablet it’s believed the images are stored on, as reported by <em><a href="https://7news.com.au/news/crime/pusey-allegedly-posted-graphic-crash-pics-c-6900547" target="_blank" rel="noopener">7News</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s alleged that Pusey attached an image of the April 2020 crash in an email sent to the Australian Financial Complaints Authority (AFCA) last December.</p> <p dir="ltr">They are also accused of attaching a crash photo - which also shows the dying victims - in a review on the homepage of the Porsche car dealership in Collingwood, Melbourne.</p> <p dir="ltr">Pusey faces two charges of using a carriage service to harass as a result of these two incidents.</p> <p dir="ltr">They are also accused of committing offences while on bail, and if convicted, could face an additional 12 months imprisonment for each charge.</p> <p dir="ltr">The charges come just a year after <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/a-new-low-richard-pusey-arrested-on-fresh-charge" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Pusey was sentenced to 10 months in prison</a> for the rare charge of outraging public decency, after they filmed the aftermath of the crash, which occurred after police pulled them over for speeding in a Porsche.</p> <p dir="ltr">Prosecutors say they have a strong case, considering that Pusey’s personal details - such as name, address, email and phone number - were included in the AFCA email and their insurance policy was referenced in the review.</p> <p dir="ltr">Police are also opposed to Pusey’s release and told the Sunshine Magistrates Court that the release of crash images caused widespread distress to individuals and families and that there was an unacceptable risk of Pusey reoffending if they had access to the images.</p> <p dir="ltr">The court heard that in order for officers to gain access to the images in question, they will need to go through Apple to access Pusey’s iCloud account because they can’t access password-protected devices.</p> <p dir="ltr">Pusey, who represented themself in the bail application, argued they had been unable to properly defend their matter while in prison and unable to photocopy documents or view electronic material, including their police interview and body-cam footage.</p> <p dir="ltr">Magistrate Michelle Mykytowycz acknowledged Pusey’s concerns and said their access to phones and the prison library had been reduced due to COVID-19.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, Magistrate Mykytowcyz wasn’t satisfied by Pusey’s argument that the delays would cause them to spend more time in custody than if they were found guilty.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-de3c3273-7fff-74bc-7a48-8a41b8080626"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: 10 News First (Twitter)</em></p>

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Lynette’s former colleague “saw bruises” on her throat

<p dir="ltr">Lynette Dawson’s former colleague has claimed she saw bruises on the nurse's throat before she disappeared 40 years ago. </p> <p dir="ltr">Chris Dawson has pleaded not guilty to murdering his wife Lynette, who went missing from the family home in Sydney's Northern Beaches in January 1982. </p> <p dir="ltr">Annette Leary, Lynette’s former colleague, told the NSW Supreme Court that she had asked Lynette about the bruises on her neck after the pair had attended a couple’s counselling session. </p> <p dir="ltr">"She said that Chris had grabbed her throat and shook her a little and said 'if this doesn't work, I'm getting rid of you...I am only doing it once'," Leary told the court, Nine News reported.</p> <p dir="ltr">A few days after their conversation, Lynette’s contract with the hospital ended following a phone call from Dawson saying she needed time away.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Lyn had gone away, she needed some time out and he didn't know when she was coming back,” centre director Barbara Cruise recalled at court.</p> <p dir="ltr">Cruise told the judges that she was doubtful that Lynette had left on her own accord and looked up her mother’s phone number before raising the alarm. </p> <p dir="ltr">It comes as the former babysitter, who became Dawson's mistress and then his wife, has taken the stand at his murder trial.</p> <p dir="ltr">The woman, who has been known only as JC throughout the high-profile trial, first met Dawson in 1980 when he was her Year 11 sports teacher at Cromer High School.</p> <p dir="ltr">The following year, the teenager had moved in with Dawson, his wife Lynette, and their two children to work as their live-in babysitter.</p> <p dir="ltr">She told the judges that Dawson had driven her to a pub in western Sydney, claiming to have wanted to hire a hitman to kill Lynette. </p> <p dir="ltr">"I went inside to get a hitman to kill Lyn and then I decided I couldn't do it because innocent people could be hurt,” JC said.</p> <p dir="ltr">The conversation was kept private until 1990, when Dawson and JC split - she rejects claims that she made it up during the divorce and custody battle. </p> <p dir="ltr">The trial continues. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Nine News</em></p>

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Alcohol marketing has crossed borders and entered the metaverse – how do we regulate the new digital risk?

<p>The World Health Organization’s newly <a href="https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/9789240046504" target="_blank" rel="noopener">released report</a> on regulating cross-border alcohol marketing raises the alarm for countries like Australia and New Zealand, given their light touch towards alcohol advertising.</p> <p>Alcohol is widely consumed in Australasia but there is ongoing tension over how much restraint, if any, should be placed on the marketing of these products.</p> <p>Australia and New Zealand are at the unrestrained end of the marketing continuum. Both countries rely on industry-led policy in the form of voluntary codes – an approach identified as insufficient by the WHO report.</p> <p><strong>What is cross-border alcohol marketing?</strong></p> <p>Alcohol marketing, created and disseminated in one country and spread across borders into others, is commonly used by multinational corporations striving to increase sales and normalise alcohol as an everyday product. Much of this advertising is taking place in the digital media sphere.</p> <p>The increased use of these media platforms by alcohol corporations allows them access to cheap advertising opportunities. For as <a href="https://au.reset.tech/uploads/resettechaustralia_profiling-children-for-advertising-1.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">little as US$2</a>, an advertising campaign based in Australia could reach a thousand young people profiled as interested in alcohol, for example.</p> <p>Marketing across digital media has also increased the impact of those messages.</p> <p>Brands interact with users on social media platforms, encouraging the posting, sharing and liking of <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33573719/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">branded images and messages</a>. Higher user engagement is associated with <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32079562/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">more drinking</a>.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464113/original/file-20220518-21284-beeqsu.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="AB InBev logo behind a smartphone also showing the logo" /><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Multinational corporations like AB InBev have been quick to embrace digital platforms as a new way to advertise alcohol products.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.gettyimages.com.au/detail/news-photo/in-this-photo-illustration-an-ab-inbev-logo-is-seen-on-a-news-photo/1234971135?adppopup=true" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Pavlo Gonchar/Getty Images</a></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>Targeting the individual</strong></p> <p>The increased power of these advertisements reflects the effectiveness of “personalised marketing”. Companies can now target individuals and “look alike” audiences.</p> <p>This approach is made possible thanks to the enormous amount of data collected as we interact together, purchase products and indicate our interests and passions through our clicks and likes.</p> <p>This data is extremely valuable to marketers and alcohol corporations. It gives them insight into the best time of day, the best brand of alcohol and the best type of marketing message to send our way.</p> <p>All groups across society are vulnerable to being bombarded by messages encouraging the purchase and consumption of alcohol.</p> <p>Digital advertising can target everyone: teenagers looking for brands which exemplify their identity; young adults, the heaviest “occasion drinkers” in Australia and New Zealand, some of whom are developing drinking habits that may be hard to change in later life; and adults of all ages who wish to reduce their consumption, often for health reasons.</p> <p>Digital media has become an all-encompassing marketing environment in which the “buy” button – with home delivery and often no checks on age or intoxication – provides a seamless marketing and distribution system.</p> <p>In New Zealand, <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/dar.13222" target="_blank" rel="noopener">online sales</a> increased significantly during the COVID-19 lockdowns, particularly among heavier drinkers.</p> <p><strong>Entering the metaverse</strong></p> <p>The alcohol industry is now showing its initiative by entering the emerging <a href="https://www.ypulse.com/article/2022/02/03/metaverse-mansions-more-tiktok-how-brands-are-marketing-for-this-years-super-bowl/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">metaverse</a>. To understand the metaverse, <a href="https://thedecisionlab.com/insights/technology/brave-new-world-how-the-metaverse-may-shape-our-psychology" target="_blank" rel="noopener">according to one commentator</a>, you should</p> <blockquote> <p>take today’s social media, add a splash of sophisticated 3D, fold in a plethora of options for entertainment and gaming, garnish it all with data-driven personalisation, and you are all set to take away your order of a supersized social media network, the metaverse.</p> </blockquote> <p>In terms of marketing, this provides a new opportunity. The biometric data essential to a virtual reality experience is also available to develop “<a href="https://scholarship.law.vanderbilt.edu/jetlaw/vol23/iss1/1/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">biometric psychographics</a>”, allowing for the even greater personalisation of advertising.</p> <p>Virtual alcohol brands created and used by avatars in the metaverse support the development of brand allegiance in real life, and virtual reality will transform e-commerce experiences and increase the power of sponsorship.</p> <p>AB InBev, the largest global alcohol corporation, was an early adopter of the metaverse. One of its brands, <a href="https://sifted.eu/articles/metaverse-brands-nft/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stella Artois</a>, is sponsoring the Australian Zed Run platform on which virtual horses can be raced, bred and traded. The Zed Run platform experienced 1,000% growth in early 2021.</p> <figure class="align-center "><em><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/464116/original/file-20220518-23-f6cjil.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="Two people stand in front of a screen with a digital image of a horse." /></em><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Digital horse racing game Zed Run has exploded in popularity, with alcohol companies using the digital platform to reach a new audience.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.gettyimages.com.au/detail/news-photo/performers-tyra-cartledge-and-kendall-drury-takes-part-in-a-news-photo/1329475903?adppopup=true" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Lisa Maree Williams/Getty Images</a></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>Regulating to reduce alcohol harm</strong></p> <p>The digital world is extremely dynamic. It is also opaque to most policy makers and public health practitioners. It is telling that there is no reference to the metaverse as a cross-border alcohol marketing opportunity in the WHO report.</p> <p>There is an urgent need for debate regarding how policy makers should better understand the risks involved with the targeted marketing of hazardous products such as alcohol.</p> <p>The WHO report outlines various partial and unsuccessful approaches to regulating marketing in the digital media.</p> <p>Attempts, such as <a href="https://helda.helsinki.fi/bitstream/handle/10138/303690/Alcohol_marketing_on_social_media_sites_in_Finland_and_Sweden_2019.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Finland’s</a> regulation of user-shared branded material, have failed because they did not interfere with the basic architecture of the social media platforms, which is predicated on engagement via sharing and liking.</p> <p>The most successful examples offered by the WHO report have been countries like Norway, which have imposed a complete ban on alcohol marketing including in the digital media.</p> <p>The report emphasises the need for surveillance and enforcement, suggesting ways in which alcohol companies could be penalised for marketing breaches.</p> <p>The support provided by international agreements such as the <a href="https://fctc.who.int/who-fctc/overview" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Framework Convention on Tobacco Control</a> is identified as a possible template for future discussions.</p> <p>The response to tobacco marketing provides a good and largely effective model for officials and policy makers. That said, the public health goal for alcohol is not equivalent to the smokefree goal. Advocates are not trying to eliminate alcohol altogether.</p> <p>However, there are parallel arguments in favour of creating a healthier media environment through regulation to prevent the promotion of alcohol products via increasingly sophisticated technological and psychological tools.</p> <p>These products are significant causes of reduced well-being, and this marketing increases consumption and therefore harm. The messages of the WHO report are timely and should be heeded.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/183334/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/sally-casswell-862029" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sally Casswell</a>, Professor of public health policy, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/massey-university-806" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Massey University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/alcohol-marketing-has-crossed-borders-and-entered-the-metaverse-how-do-we-regulate-the-new-digital-risk-183334" target="_blank" rel="noopener">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Three men handed jail sentences after careless, drunken act in a national park

<p>Three tourists who were filmed getting too close to feeding brown bears in the wild have been handed prison sentences and the additional punishment of thousands of dollars worth of fines.</p> <p>David Engelman, 56, from Sandia Park, New Mexico, and Ronald J. Engelman, 54, and Steven Thomas, 30, both from King Salmon, Alaska, pleaded guilty to leaving the trail in Alaska’s Katmai Park to get closer to the animals.</p> <p>The men were identified after they were captured on a park webcam as they waded out into a salmon run to take selfies as the bears were feeding.</p> <p>All three men were fined $US3000 each ($A4260) and given a year probation. David and Ronald Engelman were sentenced to one week in prison, while Steven Thomas received a 10-day sentence.</p> <p>In addition, each man is prohibited from entering any national park for one year.</p> <p>Judge Matthew Scoble called their behaviour “drunken capering, and a slap in the face to those who were there”.</p> <p>The proceeds from the fines would go towards the Katmai Conservancy, a non-profit that looks after the running of the park.</p> <p>The incident happened in Autumn of 2018, causing outage. The men were eventually identified by the National Park Service Investigative Services, with help of the livestream footage.</p> <p><iframe title="YouTube video player" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/F8qkHl18xf0" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>“The conduct of these three individuals not only endangered other visitors and wildlife officers at Brooks Falls, they also potentially endangered the life of the bears,” lawyer S. Lane Tucker said.</p> <p>Had the incident resulted in death or injury, Mr Tucker argued it would have had a huge impact on tourism to the area and the animals would have had to be killed.</p> <p>The National Park Service were alerted to the incident by viewers of their ‘bear cam’ which was being broadcast live to YouTube.</p> <p><em>Images: YouTube</em></p>

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Reader response: What is one thing you wish the government would address?

<p dir="ltr">As decision time draws near as to who will lead Australia, there’s no more important time for people to weigh in on the most important issues of the day.</p> <p dir="ltr">To that end, we asked our readers: What is the one thing you wish the government would address? </p> <p dir="ltr">Affordable housing, homelessness, the rise in the rental crisis and public housing are the topics that have received the most traction among our readers. </p> <p dir="ltr">Many are in agreement that housing should become more affordable and as a nation we should work towards zero homelessness. This ties in with the rising cost of living as well.  </p> <p dir="ltr">Aged care and the pension rate were also big issues, with many feeling they’ve been ripped off by the means-tested pension system and others feeling concerned by the state of the medicare system, particularly for mental health care. </p> <p dir="ltr">From climate action to affordable housing and more, here are just some of the hot-button issues you would like to see put front and centre in the coming years.   </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Pam Miller: </strong>The needs of the people they are meant to represent rather than their own avaricious desires.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Nicola Miller</strong>: Medicare. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Jill Doolan:</strong> Aged care facilities. Not just a little talk but a lot of action. The bottom line should not be their profit but the care and dignity of the elderly in their care.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Sheila Beaven:</strong> Raise pension payments to minimum wage and have couples paid from Centrelink as two separate people not 1.5 people.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Roswitha Stewart: </strong>Affordable housing and increase in rent allowances for private renters.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Val Quinn:</strong> More public housing. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Lizzie Barlett: </strong>How difficult it is for some people with serious mental health problems to negotiate Centrelink to claim entitlements that they desperately need.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Joan Garfui:</strong> Hospitals and schools.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong> Dorothy Estelle Winks: So</strong> many things to choose from. Top priority, climate action. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Robert Warner:</strong> Affordable dental health across the board covered by Medicare..!</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Christine Higgs Warby</strong>: A rise in the aged pension.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Susan Burton: </strong>Housing and aged care.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Andy Mills:</strong> When politicians receive a pay increase, emergency services personnel should get the same percentage rise.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty</em></p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-fab83449-7fff-9479-8608-67f8a22bd23a"></span></p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 2.04; background-color: #ffffff; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 18pt;"> </p>

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Voting? Here’s how to make sure yours counts this election

<p dir="ltr">After an endless stream of campaigning, gaffes and debates, election day is upon us – and it’s time for Australians to cast their votes for the next government.</p> <p dir="ltr">Unless you’re one of the 4,617,905 or 1,644,061 Australians who have voted at a pre-poll centre or by postal vote as of May 20, you’ll likely be lining up at your local polling place (or the nearest one to you if you’re out of area), buying a democracy sausage, and casting your vote.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though it might be tedious to navigate the crowd of party supporters outside, answer the same three questions and fill in the ‘tablecloth’ (Senate) ballot paper once you’re inside, it’s all part of having our voices heard (all while avoiding the $50 fine for not voting).</p> <p dir="ltr">Having personally worked during the last two federal elections (and preparing to work in this one), here’s what you need to know and some tips for making sure your vote counts this time around.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What happens after you vote</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Once it hits 6pm, polling booths close and the paperwork begins, with staff then sorting and counting the ballot papers, collating results, and calling in these results to be displayed on the AEC website.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-2ed0b468-7fff-66dc-f736-45497d315bbb"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">If it’s getting close to 6pm and you haven’t voted yet, you still can. If you’re in the queue to vote once 6pm hits, a staff member will stand at the end of the line and everyone ahead of them will be allowed to vote before the polling booth closes.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/election-day1.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: AEC</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>How to make your House of Representatives vote count</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">This small, green ballot paper lists all the candidates that want to represent your local electoral division in the House of Representatives, and there are a few ways to ensure your vote is considered formal and counted towards the candidate of your choice.</p> <p dir="ltr">For the <a href="https://www.aec.gov.au/Voting/How_to_Vote/Voting_HOR.htm" target="_blank" rel="noopener">House of Representatives</a>, you’ll need to number every box, with number one in the box next to your first preference, number two next to your second preference, and so on.</p> <p dir="ltr">Staff are trained to err in the favour of voters when deciding if a vote is formal or informal, so if you make a mistake on your ballot - or even change your mind about how to number your preferences - make sure your numbering of candidates is clear (or ask for a new one).</p> <p dir="ltr">Your vote will be considered informal if:</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">It’s blank or unmarked</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Numbers are repeated</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">You use ticks or crosses</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">There is anything written on it that identifies who you are</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">It’s missing your first preference or any other numbers from the sequence</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">It’s important to note that you can ask for a new ballot from the person who originally gave you the ballot papers, and that you can ask for help to complete the vote.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What about the Senate?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">The white ballot paper - sometimes fondly referred to as the “tablecloth” - is the same no matter where you are in your state or territory. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Senate ballot is split into two sections, giving you the choice to vote above the line or below the line. You can either vote for parties or groups, listed above the line, or for individual candidates listed below the line.</p> <p dir="ltr">To <a href="https://www.aec.gov.au/Voting/How_to_Vote/Voting_Senate.htm" target="_blank" rel="noopener">vote formally</a>, you’ll need to either number at least six boxes above the line or at least 12 below the line in order of your preference.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you have numbered boxes both above and below the line, your below-the-line preferences will be the ones that are counted.</p> <p dir="ltr">As with the House of Representatives ballot, if you make a mistake you can ask for a fresh ballot, and you can ask for help completing the ballot if you need it.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What if I have Covid and I’m in isolation?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">If you have tested positive for COVID-19 and will still be in isolation on election day, that doesn’t mean you can’t still vote.</p> <p dir="ltr">The AEC has made it so that Covid-positive voters can vote over the phone, as long as they register online, make a declaration and provide evidence of a positive RAT or PCR test result.</p> <p dir="ltr">To find out more about voting by phone and registering, head <a href="https://www.aec.gov.au/election/covid19-affected.htm" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>I’m not in my division on the day - can I still vote?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Short answer: yes. Longer answer: yes, and you’ll need to complete a declaration vote. This will require you to make a declaration that you are entitled to vote. Once you’ve voted, your ballots will be sealed in an envelope with your details and sent to your local electoral division to be counted.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, if you’re not in your home state on election day, you won’t be able to vote at just any polling place. If you do attend a local polling place, the staff member in charge will direct you to your closest interstate voting centre, which you can also find <a href="https://www.aec.gov.au/election/voting.htm#start" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-51263298-7fff-8ff7-6c5f-4eefcba0b2a5"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: AEC</em></p>

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New twist to Craig McLachlan’s defamation case

<p dir="ltr">Craig McLachlan has suddenly dropped his defamation case against the <em>ABC</em>, <em>Sydney Morning Herald</em> and actress Christie Whelan-Browne on the same day the first of 11 women was due to give evidence against him.</p> <p dir="ltr">McLachlan launched the case in the NSW Supreme Court in relation to articles accusing him of touching, kissing and groping actresses without permission while working on<em> The Rocky Horror Show</em>, <em>Neighbours</em>, <em>City Homicide</em> and <em>The Doctor Blake Mysteries</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Barrister Michael Hodge QC told the court on Friday that he had “just been given notice that Mr McLachlan is applying for leave to discontinue the proceedings”.</p> <p dir="ltr">After adjourning for discussions, the court resumed at 2pm for the case to be withdrawn.</p> <p dir="ltr">Costs will also be determined against McLachlan.</p> <p dir="ltr">On Thursday, actor and friend of McLachlan Daniel Thompson told the court his friend was loved by everyone in the industry until media reports accusing him of sexual assault and harrassment caused him to be shunned.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I was fearing the worst,” Thompson said, who was the second person to testify about worrying McLachlan could take his own life.</p> <p dir="ltr">Thompson described McLachlan as “a very sensitive person” and said he was worried the reports would destroy him.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though McLachlan agreed he had made sexual jokes and pranks during his time on <em>The Rocky Horror Show</em>, including deep-throating bananas, he has denied the allegations made in 2018.</p> <p dir="ltr">He has also accused Ms Whelan Browne and two other women of approaching the media for notoriety or money.</p> <p dir="ltr">The <em>ABC</em>, Nine (who owns <em>The Sydney Morning Herald</em>) and Ms Whelan Browne have defended their stories as true.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-17674dc7-7fff-f80b-fb0d-9fffe344cfc5"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Facebook</em></p>

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Rebel Wilson comes forward about sexual harassment

<p>Rebel Wilson has claimed a former male co-star sexually harassed her and then attempted to “destroy” her career.</p> <p>She claims the unnamed man “called me into a room and pulled down his pants” and then, in front of his friends, asked her to perform a lewd act.</p> <p>“It was awful and disgusting,” the 42-year-old she said, opting not to reveal his name or even what film it was.</p> <p>“And all the behaviour afterwards — this was all before #MeToo — where they kind of tried to destroy me and my career. If it had happened after #MeToo, then I could have just blasted them.”</p> <p>The actress, who has a law degree from the University of New South Wales, did what she could to document the incident for legal purposes and immediately called her representatives.</p> <p>“I got certain things in writing about what happened,” she said. “Definitely among industry circles, I made sure people knew what happened.”</p> <p>Rebel she should have left the movie when it happened, admitting that staying “wasn’t worth it.”</p> <p>“But at the same time, I was like, ‘Oh well, do the right thing, be a professional and finish the movie.’ Now I would never do that,” she explained.</p> <p>“I thought even complaining to my agency was a big step. And to complain to the studio. I found out I was like the fourth person to complain about the guy. Such gross behaviour, but a lot of women have had it way worse.”</p> <p>Wilson also said she would stand up for herself “even more” if something similar happened today.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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Guy Sebastian questioned over home intruder head-butt

<p>Guy Sebastian has been grilled in court over claims he head-butted an intruder who broke into his Sydney home while his wife and newborn son were sleeping. </p> <p>The singer recalled the incident while being cross-examined at the embezzlement trial of his former manager Titus Day.</p> <p>“I had a newborn who was sleeping, I was at my recording studio … I received a call from my wife about this person who was trying to get into our house through my little boy’s window and as a result I arrived home,” Mr Sebastian told the court on Tuesday.</p> <p>“By the time I got home the guy trying to break in was still there. I chased after him.”</p> <p>However, the court heard different stories about what the singer told people happened next. </p> <p>When asked repeatedly if he head-butted the intruder, Mr Sebastian said he had not.</p> <p>But he agreed with Dominic Toomey SC, who is acting for Mr Day, that’s what he told people afterwards.</p> <p>“While I was holding him he was trying to grab me … elbowing and kicking me … he grabbed my [motorbike] helmet,” Mr Sebastian said.</p> <p>“I’ve told people that I knocked him out … I didn’t head-butt him … I agree I’ve told people that I head-butted him."</p> <p>“You’re implying I head-butted him as an intentional act but it just didn’t happen like that.”</p> <p>The incident was brought up in relation to its inclusion in an Apprehended Violence Order taken out by Titus Day.</p> <p>Mr Sebastian was served with the AVO application two days before he reported Mr Day to police over the allegations of embezzlement.</p> <p>Mr Sebastian said his former manager was trying to “weaponise” the incident by including it in his AVO.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Court hears Chris Dawson was "always angry" in damning letter

<p>During the highly publicised trial of Chris Dawson, the court has been told that Lynette Dawson told her sister that her husband Chris was “angry with her all the time” and thought he needed to see a doctor.</p> <p>Chris Dawson is standing trial in the NSW Supreme Court over the alleged murder of Lynette, four decades after her disappearance from Sydney's Northern Beaches.</p> <p>The former teacher and rugby league player has pleaded not guilty, denying killing her and disposing of her body.</p> <p>Mr Dawson's defence have claimed that he had no reason to want her to disappear and have denied allegations that he wanted to hire a hitman.</p> <p>On the second day of evidence, Ms Dawson’s sister Patricia Jenkins told the court she last spoke to Ms Dawson in early January 1982, just weeks before her disappearance. </p> <p>The court was told the Mr Dawson developed a sexual relationship with one of his students, who later moved into the Dawson's home as a babysitter.</p> <p>Just before Christmas in 1981, Mr Dawson left his home with the girl, who can only be known as JC for legal reasons, leaving Lynette with her two young children.</p> <p>However, he retuned several days later. </p> <p>Ms Jenkins told the court that Ms Dawson found out about Mr Dawson leaving when she arrived home to find his clothes and pillow gone and a note on the bed.</p> <p>“Don’t paint too dark a picture of me to the girls,” the note read, Ms Jenkins said.</p> <p>Ms Jenkins said when she spoke to her sister prior to Christmas in 1981, Ms Dawson had expressed concern about Mr Dawson’s health because she thought he was often “angry”.</p> <p>“She said to me he was always so angry with her all the time,” Ms Jenkins said.</p> <p>“Her descriptive words were ‘his black eyes flashing’. And she thought he needed to go see a doctor to see if it was some physical cause that he would react to her in such an angry way.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Nine News</em></p>

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Readers respond: If you were prime minister, what would your first rule be?

<p dir="ltr">Millions of Aussies will be heading to the polling booth on May 21st to vote for either the same government or a new one.</p> <p dir="ltr">There is also a possibility of a hung parliament with many Aussies furious with the two major parties. </p> <p dir="ltr">So the balance of power could be held by the Greens or Independent candidates. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, with the election just around the corner, we asked you to tell us what your first rule would be if you became prime minister.</p> <p dir="ltr">Dianne received the comment with the most likes calling for a cut in all wages for politicians by up to 25 per cent.</p> <p dir="ltr">She said this cut is not limited to certain politicians but goes to all at local, state and federal levels. </p> <p dir="ltr">Dianne went a step further but also called for their pensions to be cut by at least 50 per cent and that politicians must serve at least two full terms to be eligible and that they should pay all their own expenses unless they are for government events. </p> <p dir="ltr">Grahame responded to Dianne’s comment and said that politicians should in fact not receive a pension until they reach the pension age “just like the rest of us”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The second most supported comment came from Donna who called for the abolishment of pension entitlements and make politicians self-funded retirees.</p> <p dir="ltr">She explained that by doing this, politicians will face the same pension entitlements as all other Australians. </p> <p dir="ltr">Fellow Aussie Carol supports the scrapping of perks for all politicians, having to be means tested to receive their pension like everyone else.</p> <p dir="ltr">“They are after all employees of the Australian people,” she said. </p> <p dir="ltr">Edith responded to Carol’s perk comment saying politicians have to stop with increasing their pay while not doing anything to support the rest of the country.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also said politicians should use their own cars, pay for their own fuel and have their daily spending rate cut. </p> <p dir="ltr">Another topic that received a lot of traction came from Carmen who called for pensioners to be brought above the poverty line.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Everyone cries about the minimum wage, forgetting that pensioners are below it! I would raise the pension to affordable living so the elderly don't have to suffer In many ways for being poor!”</p> <p dir="ltr">On the other side, Robyn said she would ensure that all politicians would actually be qualified in the position they are given. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Finances should have an economic degree, medical should be a doctor.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Agree it has always believed this should be a prerequisite,” Dorrell replied. </p> <p dir="ltr">Australians will head to the polls on May 21.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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Marvel actress and husband sentenced to 8 and 14 years jail

<p dir="ltr"><em><strong>Content warning: This article includes descriptions of child sexual abuse.</strong></em></p> <p dir="ltr">Actress Zara Phythian, who appeared in Marvel’s 2016 film <em>Doctor Strange</em>, has received an eight-year prison sentence for child sexual abuse offences.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 38-year-old was <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/doctor-strange-star-and-husband-found-guilty-of-child-sex-abuse" target="_blank" rel="noopener">found guilty</a> by a jury last week of historical sexual abuse of a girl, aged between 13 and 15, and sentenced in the UK on Monday.</p> <p dir="ltr">Her 59-year-old husband, Victor Marke, was also found guilty of jointly abusing the same girl, as well as indecently assaulting a second, and sentenced to 14 years in prison.</p> <p dir="ltr">Both Phythian and Marke will be on the sex offender’s register for life and will be referred to the disclosure and barring service to prevent them from working with children ever again.</p> <p dir="ltr">Judge Mark Watson, who presided over the proceedings and handed down the sentences, said he believed Marke and Phythian’s abuse of the victim was pre-planned.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I regard you as the driving force behind the abuse,” Judge Watson told Marke.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Most people have held, and continue to hold you in high esteem. That’s due to the positive impact of your work [as martial arts instructors].</p> <p dir="ltr">“Whilst that may help in mitigation, that is also why you were able to groom and corrupt the victims in this case and why you got away abusing them for so long.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Marke reportedly cried during the sentencing and paced the court in a tracksuit, while Phythian reportedly smiled and waved to someone in the public gallery, though her face was said to be pale and tear-streaked, per <em><a href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/3am/celebrity-news/breaking-doctor-strange-actress-zara-26975792" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Mirror</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Judge Watson also said Phythian’s “deviance” was influenced by the hold Marke had on her from an early age - with the couple marrying when she was in her 20s after Marke had been her martial arts instructor from when she was a young teen.</p> <p dir="ltr">During the trial, the couple denied the accusations they were jointly convicted of, and the survivor, who they abused before Phythian found acting fame, gave testimony from behind a curtain in the witness stand.</p> <p dir="ltr">She said what happened to her, which the couple repeatedly told her not to tell anyone about, was her “deepest, darkest secret”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I think they saw a vulnerability in me and preyed on that,” she said in a police interview.</p> <p dir="ltr">The second survivor of Marke’s assaults, said that he touched her leg after she accidentally touched his leg, before kissing her on the lips and neck and causing her feelings of confusion, according to her police interview.</p> <p dir="ltr">At other times, Marke also kissed her, before having sex with her when she was 16.</p> <p dir="ltr">Though the age of consent in the UK is 16, under section 15.3 of the <a href="https://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2000/44/notes" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Sexual Offences (Amendment) Act 2000</a> a person over the age of 18 who is in a “position of trust” to someone under 18 - such as being a martial arts instructor - would be committing an offence by having sex with them.</p> <p dir="ltr">Prior to sentencing, prosecutor Ahmed Hossain QC read out victim statements, where the survivor abused by Phythian and Marke said they “corrupted my development” and “robbed me of my innocence”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You showed you liked a very advanced naughty side that satisfied your urges,” she said in the statement via Hossain.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also spoke of feeling intimidated and scared by the couple and stated that she didn’t want to keep being “[their] puppet”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I have become an adult now. All the pain, anger and disgust and shame I felt is now on you. Both of you.”</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-61edcadd-7fff-e407-ec99-7a1d210505bf"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Supercheap Auto hero finally speaks

<p>Darren Woolfe – the former Supercheap Auto worker who found viral fame recently – has finally broken his silence.</p> <p>After being labelled a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/supercheap-auto-hero-flooded-with-job-offers-after-being-stood-down" target="_blank" rel="noopener">hero by many</a>, with the clip of him apprehending an alleged shoplifter amassing more than 7 million views – he remains remarkably humble, saying he was just doing his job.</p> <p>“You don't expect that to happen when you go to work, you don't expect someone to be filming something like that. You go in and do your job and go home,” he shared.</p> <p>His employer was not so quick to praise, however, and temporarily stood him down from his role – which he revealed, even two weeks on, has been especially hard.</p> <p>“It's been a struggle, a huge impact on myself and my family... they are my number one focus at the moment.”</p> <p>Supercheap Auto have been widely slammed online over standing Mr Woolfe down but said it had policies in place that prevent confronting alleged shoplifters for everyone's safety.</p> <p>The owner of rival store Autobarn at Burleigh Heads, Michael Farrar, said that he has lost more than $15,000 worth of goods to shoplifters in the last year.</p> <p>And so Mr Woolfe has now taken up new job with the new company.</p> <p>'In businesses you can measure a lot of things with KPIs like performance, but loyalty you can't measure,' Mr Farrar said.</p> <p>'So I thought he's a very loyal kind of guy and the sort of person I want on my team.'</p> <p>Mr Woolfe shared that he is looking forward to clocking in at his new job at Autobarn, and finally putting his viral fame behind him.</p> <p>'It's a new start for me... I just want this finished,' he said.</p> <p><em>Image: Nine </em></p>

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Craig McLachlan's tearful partner takes the stand

<p dir="ltr">Craig McLachlan’s long-term partner has burst into tears in court as she recalled the moment he told her he was accused of sexual harassing his co-workers.</p> <p dir="ltr">Vanessa Scammell, McLachlan’s partner since 2021, took the stand at the NSW Supreme Court as the second week of the defamation trial begins.</p> <p dir="ltr">McLachlan is suing Christie Whelan Brown and media outlets ABC and Fairfax for defamation claims made in 2018 over reports of assault, indecent assault, harassment and exposing himself to female cast members of the <em>The Rocky Horror Show</em> during the 2014 production of the musical.</p> <p dir="ltr">He has continued to deny the allegations as the media outlets defend their claims on the basis of truth.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Scammell told the court that the cast of <em>The Rocky Horror Show</em> were affectionate with each other and would often greet each other with hugs and kisses.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also said that Ms Whelan Brown would “flick the elastic” on McLachlan’s shorts while making “interesting remarks”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“She would make references to what was underneath the boxer pants and would flick him with a towel,” Ms Scammell told the court, <a href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/actor-craig-mclachlan-sent-videos-of-himself-pretending-to-masturbate-to-female-costar/news-story/a77110fa715bacd9f68c13fce404fb71" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a> reported.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Scammell also revealed that Ms Whelan Brown would “flick Craig in the groin or backside” and saw her give him a “solid slap to the buttocks” backstage at a show in Melbourne.</p> <p dir="ltr">McLachlan’s partner was asked about how the pair felt when the accusations came out from ABC and Fairfax noting that he was “devastated, humiliated and destroyed”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He was incapable of answering and I was worried about his mental state,” an upset Ms Scammell said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“He was so damaged that I could barely get a constructive sentence out of him”.</p> <p dir="ltr">The court heard that the couple only saw each other a week after the allegations broke.</p> <p dir="ltr">They ran into each other’s arms and fell to the ground where they “didn’t speak for 40 minutes”.</p> <p dir="ltr">McLachlan had earlier finished giving evidence for the fifth day of the trial where he told the court he sent videos of himself pretending to masturbate to Ms Whelan Brown.</p> <p dir="ltr">The actors had most recently worked together on the Network Ten television series The Wrong Girl from 2016 to 2017 and would use crude, sexual nicknames such as “gobbler and blumpkin”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Defence barrister Michael Hodge QC questioned McLachlan if the nicknames prompted him to send the videos.</p> <p dir="ltr">McLachlan once again said in the video he was pretending to masturbate and wasn’t in the toilet.</p> <p dir="ltr">He told the court that he would prank and make sexual jokes on the set of the musical like deep throating bananas, masturbating on crew members’ arms and using the nicknames.</p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Hodge questioned whether he would peel the banana to make it appear as a phallus, to which McLachlan said: “Well the banana is already the appropriate shape, but yes.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The trial continues.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Nine News (2020)</em></p>

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