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Elderly widow scammed out of $40K celebrates a win

<p>Janice Boyd, a widowed grandmother, was betrayed after lending a former friend Sean Brown $40,000.</p> <p>She took her story to <em>A Current Affair</em> and the show exposed that he failed to pay back any of the money Boyd had lent him.</p> <p>She said that Sean Brown had promised her that he would pay back the loan but had not made any repayments 18 months later.</p> <p>Within days of the <em>A Current Affair</em> episode going to air, Boyd had received $30,000 from Brown.</p> <p>"He sent the email saying that $30,000 had been deposited and 'I need time to pay the rest', so let's hope it all happens," Ms Boyd said.</p> <p>Boyd's granddaughter Elle said that they didn't think he'd ever pay the money back.</p> <p>"I think he took this opportunity and ran and maybe held a lot of guilt for it and he knew what the right thing to do was, which was repay the money," Elle said.</p> <p>"But I think until he could see Nanna … I think once he saw how upset Nanna was and how much she needed it, the guilt got the better of him."</p> <p>Boyd first received the funds as part of a compensation payout after her husband died in 2019.</p> <p>"We got it back Nanna," Elle said.</p> <p>"Thanks to you and to my gorgeous granddaughter," Ms Boyd said.</p> <p>"Thank you, <em>A Current Affair</em>. You've really done a good job."</p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://9now.nine.com.au/a-current-affair/development-for-aussie-elderly-widow-owed-40k-after-loan-betrayal/5a7aa6ae-0564-4066-aaff-a9df342cb9f2" target="_blank"><em>Photo credits: Nine News</em></a></p>

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NSW announces new restrictions as cases surge

<p>NSW has recorded another huge surge of COVID-19 cases, with 16 new infections recorded overnight.</p> <p>NSW Health announced 10 new locally acquired cases in the 24 hours to 8pm last night, seven of which were announced yesterday.</p> <p>There were also 13 new locally acquired cases confirmed after the official reporting period, meaning they will be included in tomorrow's numbers.</p> <p>There are now 37 cases linked to the Bondi cluster.</p> <p>A number of new restrictions have also been announced.</p> <p>From 4pm today the following restrictions will apply for Greater Sydney, Blue Mountains, Central Coast and Shellharbour:</p> <p>• No more than five visitors to any household, including children</p> <p>• All customers must be seated at hospitality venues</p> <p>• Masks will be compulsory in all indoor non-residential settings, including workplaces, and at organised outdoor events</p> <p>• No singing or dancing at venues, except weddings which can have 20 people on the dance floor at one time</p> <p>• The one person per four square metre rule will be reinstated</p> <p>• Outdoor seated events will be limited to 50% seated capacity</p> <p>• Dance and gym classes will be capped at 20, with masks required</p> <p>Anyone who lives or works in the City of Sydney, Waverley, Randwick, Canada Bay, Inner West, Bayside, and Woollahra LGAs cannot travel outside metropolitan Sydney for non-essential travel.</p> <p>Ms Berejiklian held off on announcing a lockdown, but urged all residents to “abandon non-essential activities” and not attend social gatherings unless absolutely necessary.</p>

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Stuart MacGill breaks silence on kidnapping

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stuart MacGill has spoken out, saying he is still shaken and reeling from the alleged kidnapping.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’ve thought about it probably 20 hours a day ever since,” he said in an interview with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Current Affair</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’ve thought maybe I could have done something different, but then I wouldn’t probably be sitting here talking to you.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MacGill was allegedly abducted on April 14 and is believed to be the target of alleged drug dealers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I found myself in a position I couldn’t do much about,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I was in a situation that’s foreign to me and I was physically and mentally intimidated.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I couldn’t have done anything differently, I don’t think.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When asked whether he feared for his life during the incident, MacGill said: “I just didn’t really know don’t what was going to happen, that’s all.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I sort of talk to myself all the … I was just running different scenarios </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I don’t really know whether or not I’m prepared to talk about that sort of thing at the moment, to be honest.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MacGill spoke out about the incident to assist detectives in their investigations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Detectives are currently searching for the three men they believe were involved in the incident. Police have released CCTV footage showing two men entering a Bunnings hours before the alleged abduction.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><img style="width: 396px; height:223px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841940/cctv-stuart-macgill.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/89069c31d88a4578877ddd777b826c74" /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Detective Superintendent Andrew Koutsoufis said the men had items with them that police believed were used to “intimidate” MacGill.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are very keen to identify and locate those two males,” he told 2GB radio on Tuesday.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A computer-generated image of a third man known both as “Sonny” and “Zac” has also been released by police. Detective Superintendent Koutsoufis said the third man was a “street level drug dealer” who frequents the Ryde area and drives a white Camry with a rideshare sticker.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He is described to be of Middle Eastern appearance, aged between 25 and 35, with a solid build, short dark-coloured hari and a brown and red coloured beard. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Four men, including Ms O’Meagher’s brother Marino Sotiropoulos were arrested and charged in May over the alleged kidnapping, and are still in custody until their next court appearance.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MacGill denied any involvement in the abduction or any knowledge of an alleged cocaine supply deal that was occurring when he introduced Ms O’Meagher’s brother to “Sonny”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I know that I have done nothing wrong, Maria has done nothing wrong,” MacGill said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“If people choose to think something contrary to what’s been presented by both myself and the police, then that’s up to them.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Images: A Current Affair</span></em></p>

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Concern over dropped charges against Dr Charlie Teo’s daughter

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The daughter of neurosurgeon Charlie Teo has had charges against her for dangerous driving withdrawn by the Crown.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nicola Teo was accused of dangerous driving after she crashed into former Comancheros boss Jock Ross in Sydney’s northwest in 2019.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 26-year-old was driving on the wrong side of the road when her Toyota Landcruiser collided head-on with Ross’ motorcycle.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The bikie boss was airlifted to Westmead Hospital in a critical condition.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Teo faced a maximum of seven years imprisonment and had pleaded not guilty to four charges, including negligent driving and dangerous driving occasioning grievous bodily harm.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The trial, which was scheduled for Monday, May 21, was delayed for a psychiatric report to be prepared.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On Tuesday, NSW District Court Judge Warwick Hunt dismissed the case and told Teo she was now “free to go and get on with your life” after the Crown withdrew the charges.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Speaking after court on Tuesday, Mr Ross’s distraught daughter Holly Gittany said the family was concerned at the way in which the charges were suddenly dropped.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She told reporters her father was still suffering from the lingering effects of the crash.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ms Gittany said Mr Ross, now in his late 70s, had been forced to quit his job with the Rural Fire Brigade due to his injuries.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What happened today was not right,” she said. “My Dad’s never been the same again. My Dad was severely injured. He was hit head-on.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: news.com.au</span></em></p>

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Tragic end to search for missing grandma

<p>A Victorian grandma who was missing for 11 days has tragically been found.</p> <p>84-year-old Rosie McLean’s body was located lying next to a burnt-out car after last being seen on June 10 leaving her house.</p> <p>Police confirmed on Tuesday morning that Ms McLean’s body had been found in Wickliffe, around 100km from her home in Timboon.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841951/rosie-mclean-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d39356f552974fd08c73c4b6bd2d6e52" /></p> <p><em>Image: Supplied</em></p> <p>The body was found by a local at a property in Chatsworth-Wickliffe Rd, near Karmala Lane, at 3 pm on Monday.</p> <p>Leading Senior Constable Natalie Dean said the body is yet to be formally identified, however police believe it is that of Ms McLean.</p> <p>Constance Dean said Ms McLean’s Maltese shih tzu dog named Bindi, was found safe and near the location of her body.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7841952/rosie-mclean.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/edb87bbe86ca41dba769a7528d81ee42" /></p> <p><em>Image: Supplied</em></p> <p>“The exact circumstances regarding the death are yet to be determined, and the investigation remains ongoing,” Constable Dean announced.</p> <p>It is not yet known by the public if the burnt-out vehicle was Ms McLean’s 2010 grey Holden Commodore sedan.</p> <p>Investigators carried out an extensive search around Southern Grampians, Moyne, Warrnambool and Corangamite during the 11 days she could not be found.</p> <p>Her family even hired a plane to search the region.</p> <p>Ms McLean’s daughter Susan took to Facebook to tragically confirm the news on Tuesday morning.</p> <p>“Bindi stayed with mum until they were found and we take some comfort in that knowledge,” she said.</p> <p>“We are truly grateful that you all cared for our mum and Bindi.</p> <p>“We thank you from the bottom of our hearts.”</p> <p>Social media has erupted in support and mourning for Ms McLean, with many of those who helped during the search leaving their deepest condolences to her family.</p>

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Alan Jones joyous at Barnaby Joyce's return

<p>Controversial commentator Alan Jones has hailed Barnaby Joyce's return to politics as a move that will "paradoxically save" Prime Minister Scott Morrison after a "rather tumultuous political day in Canberra”.</p> <p>Barnaby Joyce has resumed his former position as Deputy Prime Minister after three years on the backbench when he resigned due to expecting a child with a former staff member.</p> <p>Joyce defeated Michael McCormack in a party room spill and has returned as Nationals leader as well as the Deputy PM.</p> <p>Jones slammed Mr McCormack, saying “anyone who thinks that McCormack was a leader is in serious need of medication”.</p> <p>“Rural Australia has had a gutful of no leadership and the National Party were staring into political oblivion,” Mr Jones said.</p> <p>Sky News' Peta Credlin was thrilled about Joyce's return and said that he's a "great retail politcian".</p> <p>“He’s gregarious, he actually likes people. He’s a lot smarter than his detractors give him credit for and he works hard,” she said on her program Credlin.</p> <p>However, she said that Joyce could be "ill disciplined" and "prone to shooting his mouth off before he thinks, or worse, doesn't do his homework to actually get the detail right".</p> <p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison has welcomed Joyce to the role, saying that he looks forward “working closely together to ensure Australia continues its recovery from Covid-19 and the recession it caused”.</p> <p>Joyce has also made an effort to "acknowledge my faults".</p> <p>"Well, I acknowledge my faults," he said.</p> <p>"And I resigned as I should and I did.</p> <p>"I've spent three years on the backbench and you know, I hope I come back a better person.</p> <p>"I don't walk away from the fact that you have to have time to consider, not only the effect on yourself, but more importantly, the effect on others.</p> <p>"I've done that. I don't want to dwell on the personal, except to say hopefully one learns from their mistakes and makes a better person of themselves."</p>

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Ben Roberts-Smith makes explosive claims about mistress

<p>Ben Roberts-Smith believed his former girlfriend was "manipulating" him by faking a pregnancy so he sent a private investigator to follow her to an abortion clinic, a court has heard.</p> <p>The high profile soldier has denied hitting the woman after a glamorous party in Canberra, telling the Federal Court that the allegation "ruined my life".</p> <p>On Tuesday afternoon, Mr Roberts-Smith detailed how he had started a relationship with a woman known as Person 17 a few weeks after separating from his wife in late 2017.</p> <p>Around Christmas, he said, Person 17’s husband called him and made “bizarre” comments.</p> <p>“(Person 17’s husband) was aware we were having a relationship,” Mr Roberts-Smith said.</p> <p>“He thought Person 17 would be better off with me... It was quite a bizarre phone call.”</p> <p>In January 2018, Mr Roberts-Smith said he visited Singapore with his wife and children to try and discuss whether their marriage should continue.</p> <p>The retired soldier told his wife about Person 17 and he promised to break it off so he could rejoin his family.</p> <p>Mr Roberts-Smith said he told Person 17 their relationship needed to end and, the month after, she sent him worrying messages while on a family holiday of her own in London.</p> <p>Mr Robert-Smith told the court he concluded Person 17 was about to self-harm, she didn't speak to him for over 24 hours even after her panicked husband called.</p> <p>Eventually Mr Roberts-Smith got Person 17 on the phone, he said.</p> <p>“My response was that she needed to go home to let her husband know she was all right... She needed to go be with her kids,” he said.</p> <p>That same month, Person 17 told Mr Roberts-Smith she was pregnant and they decided to terminate, he told the court.</p> <p>He went on to say Person 17 flew to Brisbane so she could visit a hospital clinic and he could take care of her after the invasive procedure.</p> <p>But he said he didn't believe she was pregnant and sent private investigator John McLeod to tail Person 17 to the hospital clinic.</p> <p>Mr Roberts-Smith said Mr McLeod sent him a video of Person 17 leaving the hospital looking fine and carrying her own bag.</p> <p>But she arrived at their hotel meeting point looking “frail” and with a bandage on her arm where a drip might have gone.</p> <p>Mr Roberts-Smith said he showed her the video of her leaving hospital and her reaction was “enough to make me realise she wasn’t telling me the truth”.</p> <p>“She started to cry and said ‘I didn’t have the procedure, I had the procedure up in Townsville’,” Mr Roberts-Smith told the court.</p> <p>“I said ‘Townsville doesn’t have a clinic’ she said ‘I had a miscarriage’ so now I had three stories as to what was going on.”</p> <p>“(It) gave me great concern that I was being manipulated so I’d stay in the relationship.”</p> <p>The SAS veteran strongly denied striking Person 17 at a hotel room in Canberra following a glitzy dinner with the Prime Minister weeks later.</p> <p>He told the court Person 17 had been so drunk she fell down the stairs in Parliament House and he took her home to ice her head.</p> <p>Nine alleged Mr Roberts-Smith had struck her after she complained about the pain in her head from the staircase fall.</p> <p>He denied that.</p> <p>“My mother and father brought me up with a good set of values… l have no tolerance for anyone who would raise a hand against a woman. I find it a disgusting act of cowardice,” he said.</p> <p>Mr Roberts-Smith is suing Nine for allegations he committed war crimes in Afghanistan and that he assaulted Person 17.</p> <p>“That particular allegation (of assault,) I feel, coupled with being called a war criminal, ruined my life,” Mr Roberts-Smith said.</p> <p>“For a long time I found it really difficult to leave the house after that.”</p> <p>Mr Roberts-Smith said he spoke with Person 17 after she fell down the stairs about how he knew her husband would believe she’d been hit.</p> <p>“I said to her ‘(your husband) is going to think I’ve struck you, you’re going to have to tell him you fell down the stairs and we were together’,” he said.</p> <p>Mr Roberts-Smith said it was the final straw for their relationship but he saw Person 17 once more, in Brisbane.</p> <p>He told the court she saw him board a flight to Canberra and he later realised Person 17 had booked a hire car to drive to his marital home.</p> <p>The soldier said he only realised that when his wife texted him to say Person 17 had showed up at their door.</p> <p>Mr Roberts-Smith claimed there was a "whispering campaign" between journalists Chris Masters and Nick McKenzie and members of the SAS.</p> <p>He then said he feared his phone was tapped by the media or by specialist soldiers.</p> <p>He said he again turned to Mr McLeod and asked him to find the home addresses of six individuals so he could alert the Department of Defence they were illegally speaking with journalists.</p> <p>“I wanted to be able to provide that information to Defence so they could take the appropriate action and stop them talking to the media,” he told the court.</p> <p>Mr Roberts-Smith denied intimidating any of the former SAS soldiers, or surveilling them.</p> <p>He explicitly denied having Mr McLeod send threatening letters to one soldier in particular, as alleged by Nine.</p>

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Chance of COVID emerging naturally is “one in a million”

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As COVID-19 vaccinations continue to be administered and the number of coronavirus cases remains low in Australia (or New Zealand), scientists are looking to answer one remaining question: where did the virus come from?</span></p> <p><strong>The lab leak theory</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Steven Quay, the chief executive of biopharmaceutical company Atossa Technologies and former faculty member at Stanford University’s School of Medicine, said the probability of SARS-CoV-2 emerging naturally was “literally one in a million”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Presenting at a conference organised by the Hudson Institute in Washington DC alongside astrophysicist Professor Richard Muller, the pair accused Chinese scientists of concealing the origins as a manufactured virus.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The increased interest in the origin of the virus comes after the US government ordered its intelligence agencies to investigate the origins of COVID-19.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dr Quay said the </span><a href="https://www.who.int/publications/i/item/who-convened-global-study-of-origins-of-sars-cov-2-china-part"><span style="font-weight: 400;">report conducted by the World Health Organisation</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">, tabled in March, had “censored” the earliest cases of COVID-19 outside of the Wuhan wet market.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is not science, this is obfuscation,” he added.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Professor Muller said there were concerns scientists who pursued the “lab leak” theory would be “blacklisted and labelled an enemy of China”.</span></p> <p><strong>An alternative theory</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Others theorise that the Wuhan Institute of Virology had been performing “gain of function” experiments - where a virus is manipulated to make it more infectious.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This kind of research has been conducted at labs around the world, according to Professor Dwyer.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The institute haven’t published anything significant on gain-of-function studies. I’m not an expert in that area, but my understanding is they weren’t doing gain-of-function work that has been obviously traceable.”</span></p> <p><strong>Flaws in the theory</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though some have labelled the WHO report as inconclusive, the 17 international experts who produced the report concluded the most likely origin of the pandemic came from the virus jumping between species - possibly from bats to pangolins - and then to humans.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Professor Dwyer, director of public health pathology in NSW and one of the experts who contributed to the report, said the key flaw in the lab leak theory was there was no evidence the Wuhan Institute of Virology had the virus before the pandemic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The laboratory leak, for that to be the origin … meant they must have had the virus to begin with, and we don’t have evidence of that,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The lab leak sits there, but you need some sort of evidence to take it further.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The institute had been working to find and publish papers on new bat coronaviruses, including a virus that is the closest known match to COVID-19 so far, and Professor Dwyer said it was unlikely the institute would have had SARS-CoV-2 and not published anything about it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“They are a pretty prominent research institute. They publish a lot of very good papers and have collaborations with people around the world. If they had it, there was no reason to hide it from a scientific or intellectual point of view.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Additionally, some have argued that the lack of an identified intermediate host for the coronavirus supports the lab leak theory, with science journalist Nicholas Wade claiming the SARS intermediate was found within four months of that outbreak.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">But, Professor Dwyer said it actually took 15 years to find the animal source of SARS.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“These things can take time,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We felt transmission from bat to some sort of intermediate animal to humans was the most likely because it has occurred before - and not just once before, but several times.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Based on history, based on things like what markets are like in Wuhan and other neighbouring countries … that seems to be the most likely scenario for it to develop.”</span></p>

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Natasha Beth Darcy found guilty of murder

<p>NSW woman Natasha Beth Darcy has been found guilty of murdering her sheep farmer partner Mathew Dunbar.</p> <p>After sedating and gassing Dunbar, Darcy allegedly screamed at paramedics to perform CPR on him after declaring him dead.</p> <p>Darcy told authorities and first responders that he had killed himself, but after more than two days of deliberations, a NSW Supreme Court Jury found the 46-year-old woman guilty of murder.</p> <p>Dunbar was found dead on his bed in his property in the Northern Tablelands town of Walcha on August 2nd, 2017.</p> <p>The pair met on a dating site, but the Crown alleges that it didn't take long for Darcy to push Dunbar to change his will so that she would inherit his $3.5 million property.</p> <p>Prosecutor Brett Hatfield said that it didn't take long for Darcy to research ways to kill Dunbar, with numerous Google searches on topics including "how to commit murder", redback spiders and suicide.</p> <p>“He may have desperately wanted love and a family, but what did he get?” he said.</p> <p>“A cold and calculating person who was determined to kill him and inherit his wealth.”</p> <p>It was also revealed that Darcy's estranged husband, paramedic Colin Crossman, had a close call with death as she hit him on the head with a hammer in 2009 and days later, sedated him and burnt down their house as he slept.</p> <p>Referring to a $700,000 life insurance policy on his life, Hatfield said it showed Darcy had a “tendency to sedate and inflict serious harm on her domestic partners for financial gain”.</p> <p>However, Justice Julia Lonergan directed the jurors to put the idea of assisted suicide out of their minds as there was an absence of any evidence about such a scenario.</p> <p>Lonergan said that Hatfield "exploited" Dunbar's depression to kill him in a way that made it look like a suicide.</p> <p>Darcy was accused of sedating her partner using a Nutribullet to blend a cocktail of sedatives, before moving a gas tank in his room and gassing him in his bed.</p> <p>She told police of finding him unresponsive in his bed, saying “This is the hardest bit of all. I can’t get the image out of my head.”</p> <p>“It is killing me,” Darcy said.</p> <p>She will face a sentencing hearing on October 1.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: <a rel="noopener" href="https://7news.com.au/politics/law-and-order/verdict-in-for-nsw-woman-accused-of-gassing-partner-to-death-in-bed-in-walcha--c-3115261" target="_blank">7NEWS</a></em></p>

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Sacked journalist hits back over "racist" royal tweet

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A columnist who was fired from </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Telegraph</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> over a “racist” tweet about Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s baby has released a follow-up essay blaming “snowflake sociopaths” and “cancel culture” for her firing.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Julie Burchill lost her job after mocking the name of the Sussexes’ daughter Lillibet Diana on Twitter.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What a missed opportunity,” she wrote. “They could have called it Georgina Floydina!”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The journalist took to Facebook to announce she had been sacked after working for </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Telegraph</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> for five years, claiming she had been complaining about the paper rejecting her “edgy column ideas” recently.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Burchill reiterated that she wasn’t “upset in the least” about losing her column in a </span><a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9686037/JULIE-BURCHILL-reveals-wont-silenced.html"><span style="font-weight: 400;">new essay</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> published in </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Daily Mail</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Newspapers with no original voices will decline even more rapidly than they would anyway in the digital age. It’s ironic that a conservative newspaper which castigates cancel culture cancelled me for castigating wokery.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Burchill insisted her tweet was “sober, wry and entirely without racist intent”, and that she could not “stress enough how much I deplore the murder of George Floyd”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“What I was mocking was the type of people who - like H&amp;M - live in gated communities while espousing BLM’s politics of social upheaval, without giving any thought to the damage that pro-BLM riots do to poor and black Americans.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This goes against research conducted by </span><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/10/16/this-summers-black-lives-matter-protesters-were-overwhelming-peaceful-our-research-finds/"><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Washington Post</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> last year which found the Black Lives Matter protests involved very little violence and property damage from protesters. Instead, most of the violence reportedly came from police or counterprotesters directed at BLM protesters.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She has attributed the backlash to a “sexist and misogynist element” within “wokeness”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We live in an age of cultural insanity, a topsy-turvy land where men are women, harassment is justice and the Left are jostling to tug their forelocks and call for those of us who criticise royalty to be punished,” she said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Burchill also touted her new publication on Substack - an online platform that allows writers to create and send email newsletters to paying subscribers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In the autumn, I’ll be back with my book, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Welcome To The Woke Trials</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">,” she wrote.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And thanks to Twitter, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Telegraph</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and a pair of hypocritical fibbers whose fantasy land is so fragile brilliant journalists (me) must be silenced in order to maintain the illusion - it will have a whole new ending.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Daily Mail</span></em></p>

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Tamil family to reunite on mainland

<p>A family of Tamil asylum seekers that have been detained on Christmas Island since 2019 will be allowed to live in Perth temporarily.</p> <p>Immigration Minister Alex Hawke said that he used his powers under the Migration Act to allow the Murugappan family to live in Perth while four-year-old Tharnicaa Murugappan.</p> <p>"The family will now reside in suburban Perth through a community detention placement, close to schools and support services, while the youngest child receives medical treatment from the nearby Perth Children's Hospital and as the family pursues ongoing legal matters," he said in a statement.</p> <p>"Today's decision releases the family from held detention and facilitates ongoing treatment, while they pursue ongoing litigation before the Administrative Appeals Tribunal, Federal Court and High Court.</p> <p>"Importantly, today's decision does not create a pathway to a visa."</p> <p>The Murugappan family were removed from their home in Biloela in 2018 when their visas expired.</p> <p>Angela Fredericks, a family friend and organiser of the group Home to Bilo, said that it was up to Mr Hawke and the Department of Home Affairs to determine the family's future in Australia.</p> <p>"The Minister's power to grant visas is completely independent from the decisions of any court," Ms Fredericks said in a statement.</p> <p>"We cannot say what — or who — is preventing Minister Hawke from bringing this family home to Bilo. But it is not this court matter."</p> <p><em>Photo credits: <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-06-15/tamil-family-murugappan-christmas-island/100215160" target="_blank">ABC</a></em></p>

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Chris Dawson to stand trial for murder of his wife

<p>Chris Dawson is headed to trial on allegations he murdered his wife on Sydney's Northern Beaches nearly 40 years ago.</p> <p>The former Newtown Jets rugby league player has pleaded not guilty to killing his wife Lynette, who was last seen at their Bayview home in 1982.</p> <p>He has repeatedly claimed she is alive.</p> <p>Mr Dawson applied for a permanent stay of proceedings, citing extensive pre-trial publicity through a podcast and the delay in charging him.</p> <p>"Mr Dawson argued that these matters, either alone or together, would render any trial necessarily unfair and that if he were convicted, this would bring the administration of justice into disrepute," a judgement summary read.</p> <p>But an order from a Supreme Court judge ordered he should and trial and that decision was upheld today by the Court of Criminal Appeal.</p> <p>"The Court agreed with the primary judge that the prejudice to Mr Dawson caused by the pre-trial publicity and delay in this case is very serious," the summary read.</p> <p>"However, it also held that such prejudice to Mr Dawson is able to be remedied or sufficiently ameliorated by careful directions which the judge at the trial will give to the jury, as was found by the primary judge."</p> <p>Chief Justice Bathurst also said while fairness to the accused is a consideration, they also had to consider the community's interest in bringing those charged with serious criminal offences to trial.</p> <p>The 72-year-old was the subject of the Teacher's Pet podcast, which put the case on the map.</p>

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New penalties for animal abusers

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post-body-container"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>NSW has become the first state in Australia to automatically ban anyone convicted of serious animal abuse to ever own or work with animals ever again.</p> <p>The government bill introduced tougher penalties for animal cruelty and bestiality after two years of intense work by Animal Justice Part MP Emma Hurst.</p> <p>"We have witnessed some chilling cases over the past two years where animal abusers have been allowed to continue to breed animals, work alongside animals and even buy animals after their convictions," she said in a statement.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CP7sKWNJQR7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CP7sKWNJQR7/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Emma Hurst (@emma.hurst)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"There have been far too many cases where the punishments simply do not match the crimes.</p> <p>"Animal cruelty is hard to think and talk about- but it is happening."</p> <p>The NSW legislation is unique in which the ban is for a lifetime and automatically imposed upon conviction and Hurst hopes other states will follow suit.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Nurse swipes credit card from dead patient and USES it in vending machine

<p>UK healthcare worker, Ayesha Basharat, has been slammed as she stole a dead patient's card and used it at the hospital's vending machine.</p> <p>She had taken an 83-year-old woman's card from her room in the heartlands Hospital's COVID-19 ward and used the card six times at the vending machine, making contactless payments.</p> <p>Basharat had stolen the card from the woman just moments after she died on January 24th, according to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://west-midlands.police.uk/news/hospital-worker-used-dead-patients-bank-card-buy-sweets-and-fizzy-pop?fbclid=IwAR0zaC47A9DaQWcq_aaGVGjmJOOV9ccbobeGBpAjHpu-SHpTsADEfOmeqso" target="_blank">West Midlands Police</a>.</p> <p>Police caught up to her after she continued to use the credit card despite the family of the woman cancelling it.</p> <p>Basharat has been given two concurrent jail terms of five months each, both of which were suspended for 18 months.</p> <p>Detective Constable Andrew Snowdon said the act was an "abhorrent breach of trust".</p> <p>“This was an abhorrent breach of trust and distressing for the victim’s family," he said.</p> <p>“They were having to come to terms with the death of a loved one from Covid when they found the bank card missing – and then of course the realisation that the card was taken by someone who should have been caring for her.</p> <p>“I wish the family all the best for the future and with this conviction hope they can move on from this upsetting episode.”</p>

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COVID couple to face heavy punishment

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post-body-container"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A Melbourne couple who broke lockdown and travelled through NSW and Queensland could be facing punishments from all three states, including jail time.</p> <p>Queensland is dealing with two interstate-acquired cases after the 44-year-old woman and her husband left Victoria while unknowingly infected and went on a road trip up the Sunshine Coast.</p> <p>The pair left Victoria on June 1st, just days after the statewide lockdown had been enforced and travelled through NSW and Queensland before the woman tested positive to COVID-19 on June 8.</p> <p>Queensland Health confirmed yesterday that her husband had also tested positive for the virus, with the pair currently in isolation at the Sunshine Coast University Hospital.</p> <p>Queensland's chief health official Dr Jeannette Young confirmed that the couple did not have an exemption to enter the state and questions are being raised about why there was not a two-week hotel quarantine upon entry.</p> <p>Health Minister Yvette D’Ath said on Thursday there was a “range of penalties” for people who broke travel border rules.</p> <p>Breaching border requirements in Queensland could result in an on-the-spot fine of 4,003, a court-imposed penalty of up to $13,345 or six months' imprisonment.</p> <p>Not complying with an NSW public health order could result in the maximum penalty of six months imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $11,000.</p> <p>Dr Young said that on Thursday that it appeared that the couple were both towards the end of their infectious period, but it's still important for residents to come forward and get tested.</p> <p>“It’s still there, and I still need everyone to come forward who develops any symptoms at all who lives in the Sunshine Coast, or Goondiwindi or Toowoomba – it’s very, very important,” she said.</p> <p>“We’ve seen a lot of testing already started. That needs to continue, just so we can make sure that there hasn’t been any transmission out there.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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Clive Palmer's COVID-19 vaccine death claims gain momentum

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post-body-container"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>A radio commercial that was authorised by Clive Palmer and played on Queensland radio stations claiming that there have been 210 Australian deaths due to the COVID-19 vaccine has been debunked by the Therapeutic Goods Administration.</p> <p>The commercial begins by saying that Australia has recorded one COVID-19 associated death in 2021.</p> <p>“Australia has had one Covid-19 associated death in 2021,” the ad said. “But the TGA [Therapeutic Goods Administration] reports that there’s been 210 deaths and over 24,000 adverse reactions after Covid vaccinations. Authorised by Clive Palmer, Brisbane," the full ad reads.</p> <p>The TGA slammed the radio advertisement, saying that the “misinformation, in the course of the Covid-19 pandemic, poses an unacceptable threat to the health of Australians”.</p> <p>“The Therapeutic Goods Administration is seriously concerned about misleading information, authorised by Mr Clive Palmer that has recently been broadcast on radio stations in the Grant Broadcasters radio network and which provides an incorrect picture of the safety of Covid-19 vaccines,”<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.tga.gov.au/media-release/misleading-radio-messages-about-covid-19-vaccine-safety" target="_blank">the medicines regulator said.</a></p> <p>The inaccurate claim that COVID-19 vaccines have caused more than 200 deaths refers to the number of people who have died after being vaccinated but apart from one case, none have been linked by the TGA to the vaccine.</p> <p>The same claim has gained momentum on social media by anti-vaccine campaigners, but the social media posts have since been removed.</p> <p>A day after the TGA raised concerns, the radio broadcaster that ran them had announced that they've stopped.</p> <p>“Our radio stations strongly support their local communities and that includes fully supporting initiatives that keep our community safe, like the federal and state government Covid-19 vaccination programs,”<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.grantbroadcasters.com.au/broadcasting/qld" target="_blank">the regional broadcaster said</a><span> </span>on Wednesday.</p> <p>“The advertisements are no longer running across our network.”</p> <p>The broadcaster said that the Palmer ads were subject to the laws of political advertising, which didn't include the ability to "restrict the contents of a political advertisement".</p> <p>“We also have a responsibility to allow lawful public debate about matters of public importance,” the regional broadcaster said.</p> <p>“The Therapeutic Goods Administration has acknowledged the concerns we raised regarding this messaging and we are grateful to the TGA for stepping up to provide a clear statement of the federal government’s position on this type of political advertising.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div>

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New details on Dan Andrews conspiracy theory

<p>Victoria Premier Daniel Andrews has moved to quash growing speculation over his fall at a Mornington Peninsula holiday home that left him with a fractured vertebra and ribs, leaving him unable to work for three months.</p> <p>The state's Liberal party ramped up their scrutiny of Mr Andrews' account on Monday when Shadow Treasurer Louise Staley released a list of questions surrounding the timeline of his fall she wanted the premier to answer before he returns to work.</p> <p>"Nobody's got really any idea where it happened and this is a very visual world these days, where we seem to have everything out there on the media but not this," she said on Tuesday in defence of her demand.</p> <p>In the hopes to quash rumours, Andrews granted Victoria Ambulance permission to release an in-depth account of the events in the wake of his call to emergency services.</p> <p>Ambulance Victoria received a triple zero call for an ambulance at 6.36 am on Tuesday 9 March 2021 for a patient who had fallen on steps at a house in Sorrento," its statement began.</p> <p>As Mr Andrews' injuries weren't life-threatening, his call underwent secondary triage deeming an ambulance was needed, which arrived at 7.01 am at the address, Ambulance Victoria said.</p> <p>"The patient was assessed by treating paramedics as having suspected fractured ribs, and pain relief was provided. The patient requested to attend a local hospital in order for the attending crew to remain within the area once cleared from the case," the statement continued.</p> <p>"Peninsula Private Hospital Emergency Department was determined in consultation with the patient and treating paramedics."</p> <p>Staley denied she was peddling conspiracy theories, she said "lots of Victorians" were seeking answers to her questions.</p> <p>Acting Premier James Merlino slammed the Liberal party on Tuesday, calling their response a "disgraceful act".</p> <p>"I treat it with the contempt that it deserves. This is more about how the Liberal Party treat people. No decency, no respect, they should be ashamed of themselves," he said.</p> <p>Treasurer Tim Pallas labelled such rumours as "nonsense".</p> <p>"It's QAnon craziness peddled around the community to create an atmosphere of uncertainty."</p>

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Ben Roberts-Smith's parents speak out

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ben Roberts-Smith’s parents have released a statement ahead of the high-profile defamation case involving their son.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We never expected our son would be unfairly attacked in this manner, after he served his country in Afghanistan with distinction - and risked his life,” they said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Roberts-Smith is suing The Sydney Morning Herald, The Age, and The Canberra Times over articles he says accused him of committing war crimes during 2009 to 2012 tour of Afghanistan and assaulting a woman in Canberra in 2018.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Victoria Cross recipient denies all claims made against him.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mr Roberts-Smith’s parents Len and Sue said the allegations destroyed his life and have “affected us every day for the last several years”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It is a relief that Ben’s legal team have finally been able to get his case before the Federal Court,” they said in a statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It will now be for the judge to hear the evidence and deliver judgement in due course.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The trial is due to commence on Monday, June 7 and will be heard by Justice Anthony Besanko over an estimated eight to ten weeks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A lengthy opening address is expected to be given by Mr Roberts-Smith barrister Bruce McClintock SC, before Mr Roberts-Smith is called as the first witness.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His former wife, Emma Roberts, was initially expected to give evidence on his behalf but will instead be a witness for Nine.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Witnesses will also include local and overseas soldiers.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the case proceeds, the former special forces corporal will be on leave from his position as general manager of Channel Seven in Queensland.</span></p>

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New unusual lead in Madeleine McCann case

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The investigation into the whereabouts of Madeleine McCann has taken an unusual turn, with reports authorities are investigating a clairvoyant’s claim that he knows where the toddler is buried.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">McCann was three when she went missing in 2007 while holidaying with her family in Portugal.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The mystery has since captivated people around the world, with many wondering where the missing toddler could be.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Well-known clairvoyant Michael Schneider has now provided authorities with the exact coordinates where he believes her body will be found.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Though sceptics have been quick to dismiss the clairvoyant’s claims, German prosecutor Hans Christian Wolters is open to pursuing it.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wolters told local media that clairvoyants have been successfully used in past investigations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Schneider said he is confident Maddie is buried about 10 kilometres away from where her family was holidaying in Praia da Luz.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I do not give out such information lightly and without constantly questioning myself because I am very well aware of the responsibility of what I do,” Schneider told </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Mirror</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Earlier this year, the team investigating the disappearance asked for more funding.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">At the time, Wolters said they had “gathered new evidence that adds further to the case” they are building against their main suspect, Christian Brueckner.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I’m afraid I cannot tell you what it is but it strengthens our work,” he told local media.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I cannot disclose the type of evidence we have been given, it is not forensic I can tell you that, but it is new circumstantial evidence which all adds to the working theory that he is the man responsible.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Brueckner is currently serving seven years in jail for a crime that took place two years before Maddie disappeared.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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