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Australian jewellery store open since Queen Victoria's reign forced to close its doors

<p>It’s been around since Queen Victoria was the British monarch, but its reign as a long-serving, respected family business in Tasmania’s north-west is coming to an end.</p> <p>Originally named E A Joyce and Son, now known as Joyce Jewellers is preparing to close its doors for the last time after being in continuous operation since 1893.</p> <p>Current owner Jennifer Macartney said the downfall of the jewellery shop is due to a number of reasons, with the main being online shopping.</p> <p>“People used to come into town just for shopping or an experience,” she said.</p> <p>“They would come in on a regular basis … they’d look over all the stores and make their purchases.</p> <p>“But now people seem to have a fixed idea of what they want when they come into town and buy it and go home again.”</p> <p>Mrs Macartney is a fourth-generation member of the Joyce family, and inherited the business from her parents.</p> <p>She has fond memories of running through the store as a child. Mrs Macartney, who is the great-granddaughter of founder Edward Joyce, took over the business in the ‘90s when the store had a team of 10 staff members and business was booming.</p> <p>But as time went on, the store couldn’t keep up with the world’s advancements.</p> <p>“The economic climate is not good at the moment and the outlook is not good unfortunately,” she said.</p> <p>“I like to be optimistic, but it’s very difficult under these circumstances.</p> <p>“People are not coming into town to shop as much as they used to.”</p> <p>The store has a large fan base, with many taking to Facebook to voice their grievances over the closure.</p> <p>“Sad to hear this. I have shopped there for years. In fact, still have the paperwork of authenticity for my engagement ring 48 years ago!” wrote Christine Winskill.</p> <p>Debbie Cocks said: “Joyce’s Jewellers one of the very last of old school Burnie names and icons, so sad.”</p> <p>“Wow how sad. I got my ears pierced there in 1978,” said Carol O’Neill.</p> <p>Joyce Jewellers will close its doors on December 10.</p>

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Margaret Court dubbed the “racist grandpa” of Australian tennis

<p><span>Journalist Gideon Haigh has labelled Margaret Court the “racist grandpa” of Australian tennis after reports emerged that Tennis Australia plans to <a href="https://wwos.nine.com.au/tennis/tennis-legends-divided-over-margaret-court-grand-slam-celebrations/73346c2e-e629-4eef-8118-9d2f7ded0563">recognise but not celebrate</a> the tennis great’s achievements.</span></p> <p><span>Court won all four majors in a single calendar year in 1970 and ended her career with 24 grand slam singles titles, the most in history.</span></p> <p><span>The former tennis player has called on the sport’s governing body to <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/link/follow-20170101-p53821">celebrate her 50<sup>th</sup> anniversary of grand slam winning year</a> at next year’s Australian Open in the same way it honoured Rod Laver’s 1969 grand slam during this year’s tournament.</span></p> <p><span>However, the 77-year-old has attracted controversy for voicing opposition against homosexuality and same-sex marriage and saying tennis is “<a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/sport/tennis/margaret-court-lgbt-rights-tennis-lesbians-french-open-australian-a7765041.html">full of lesbians</a>”, prompting calls for her name to be removed from Melbourne Park’s Margaret Court Arena.</span></p> <p><span>Court said she had not been invited by the sport’s chiefs to attend the coming Australian Open, which is set to take place from January 20.</span></p> <p><span>“I think Tennis Australia should sit and talk with me,” Court told <em><a href="https://www.smh.com.au/link/follow-20170101-p53821">The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age</a></em>. “They have never phoned me. Nobody has spoken to me directly about it. I think they would rather not confront it.”</span></p> <p><span>Speaking on ABC’s <em>Offsiders </em>Sunday morning, Haigh said Court’s achievements should still be celebrated despite of her controversial views.</span></p> <p><span>“Margaret Court is tennis’ racist grandpa at Christmas,” Haigh said. “She’s a bit embarrassing, but, you know, you still love your grandpa and it is Christmas.</span></p> <p><span>“Court is a very great champion. She won more Grand Slams than [Rod] Laver; she’s been comparatively underrecognised too, because so has women’s sport.</span></p> <p><span>“You might find her opinions antediluvian, but if we anathematised every great athlete who had unfortunate opinions, opinions that we disagree with or an unattractive personality, then we might not have too many left, frankly.”</span></p> <p><span>Former Davis Cup champion and current government backbencher John Alexander also said Court’s legacy should not be dismissed.</span></p> <p><span>“What is popular and accepted these days may not be consistent with her views so she has been vilified,” Alexander told <em><a href="https://www.smh.com.au/sport/tennis/tennis-australia-will-recognise-but-not-celebrate-margaret-court-anniversary-20191107-p538hs.html">The Sydney Morning Herald and The Age</a></em>. </span></p> <p><span>“But to deprive her of any acknowledgement of what a great player she was is not right.</span></p> <p><span>“If you go back to the time when Billie Jean King was openly gay and left her husband for a woman Margaret would have been seen with her Christian virtue as a pillar of society. She hasn’t changed, but now we totally accept the right of people to marry someone of the same sex. Margaret hasn’t changed, but the times have changed.”</span></p>

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“It is disgusting”: Deputy PM calls out Greens member for linking bushfires to climate change

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Deputy Prime Minister Michael McCormack has fired up on </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC radio</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, saying that he finds it “galling” that people are linking bushfires to climate change.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"What people need now is a little bit of sympathy, understanding and real assistance. They need help, they need shelter," Mr McCormack said.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">It's been a weekend of destruction and devastation across NSW in the midst of a bushfire emergency but this morning we're being warned the worst is yet to come. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/9News?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#9News</a> <a href="https://t.co/uiWr7IYpKR">pic.twitter.com/uiWr7IYpKR</a></p> — Nine News Sydney (@9NewsSyd) <a href="https://twitter.com/9NewsSyd/status/1193622471968116736?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">10 November 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"They don't need the ravings of some pure, enlightened and woke capital city greenies at this time when they're trying to save their homes. It is disgusting and I will call it out every time.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"It's not about cheap political point-scoring. Not the ravings of some greenie in his apartment in Melbourne, crying about how bad coal is."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His response was pointed at Greens MP Adam Bandt, who has arguably been the most vocal person raising climate change policy in recent days.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">I’m deeply saddened by the loss of life. Hearts go out to all affected &amp; to brave firefighters.<br /><br />But words &amp; concern are not enough. <br /><br />The PM does not have the climate emergency under control.<br /><br />Unless we lead a global effort to quit coal &amp; cut pollution, more lives will be lost.</p> — Adam Bandt (@AdamBandt) <a href="https://twitter.com/AdamBandt/status/1193047780064759808?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">9 November 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">McCormack was ropable as he slammed Bandt directly, saying his comments were “stupid and callous”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is despicable,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“People who are at risk of losing their homes or people have already lost their homes or pets, indeed lost family members, don’t need to hear politicians coming out and starting to play the same game.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The fact is, the government does take climate change very seriously. The fact is we are meeting our international obligations and will continue to do so.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Australians get through these because we are a resilient bunch. We stick together, we band together, we make sure that we help those in need and comments coming from a little Melbourne apartment from a little individual with a little mind should not be accepted or tolerated at this time.”</span></p>

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Oh brother! Peter Stefanovic reveals why he won’t be watching Karl on the Today show

<p>Peter Stefanovic says he won’t be waking up with the<span> </span><em>Today</em><span> </span>show after his brother Karl announced his return to the breakfast television program.</p> <p>Almost a year after he was brutally axed from the show while celebrating his wedding in Mexico, Channel Nine has reinstated the Gold Logie winner as co host alongside Allison Langdon from next year.</p> <p>Despite Karl staying with Nine for other projects, his younger brother Peter, who was co-hosting<span> </span><em>Weekend Today</em><span> </span>at the time, said goodbye to the network shortly afterwards.</p> <p>Peter says he doesn’t resent Nine for the decision, and now hosts his own breakfast show,<span> </span><em>First Edition</em><span> </span>on Sky News, alongside Laura Jayes.</p> <p>Which is why he won’t be able to support his older brother once he returns to the<span> </span><em>Today</em><span> </span>show as the two siblings go head to head in breakfast television in an Aussie first.</p> <p>According to Peter, bringing the ratings back up for the<span> </span><em>Today</em><span> </span>show won’t be an easy task, as currently the numbers are at an all-time low.</p> <p>“Anyone who knows us knows that we revel in sibling rivalry. This will be no exception … we have wrestled eyeballs of<span> </span><em>Today</em><span> </span>this year, and Karl is going to have to work his backside off to get them back. I’ll be doing my best to stop that,” Peter told<span> </span><em>The Australian</em>.</p> <p>He said that the two find great satisfaction in competing with one another and joked that if Karl needs advice to readjusting to 4 am starts, then he can give him a call.</p> <p>But despite the quip, Peter added that they don’t take themselves too seriously and used a sporting analogy to describe his brother’s chances of a successful return to breakfast television.</p> <p>“Let me put it this way. In 2001 the great Alfie Langer led Queensland to victory in the third and deciding Origin game,” he said.</p> <p>“It was a truly epic sporting comeback. Karl will need to invoke the legend of Langer, and I know he’ll give it a great crack.”</p>

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Australia could fall apart under climate change

<p>Four years ago in December 2015, every member of the United Nations met in Paris and agreed to hold global temperature increases to 2°C, and as close as possible to 1.5°C.</p> <p>The bad news is that four years on the best that we can hope for is holding global increases to around 1.75°C. We can only do that if the world moves decisively towards zero net emissions by the middle of the century.</p> <p>A failure to act here, accompanied by similar paralysis in other countries, would see our grandchildren living with temperature increases of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/may/18/climate-crisis-heat-is-on-global-heating-four-degrees-2100-change-way-we-live">around 4°C this century</a>, and more beyond.</p> <p>I have spent my life on the positive end of discussion of Australian domestic and international policy questions. But if effective global action on climate change fails, I fear the challenge would be beyond contemporary Australia. I fear that things would fall apart.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/300006/original/file-20191104-88368-nlzoz0.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <span class="caption">The Yallourn coal-fired power station in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">David Crosling/AAP</span></span></p> <p><strong>There is reason to hope</strong></p> <p>It’s not all bad news.</p> <p>What we know today about the effect of increased concentrations of greenhouse gases broadly confirms the conclusions I drew from available research in previous climate change reviews <a href="https://webarchive.nla.gov.au/awa/20190509030954/http://www.garnautreview.org.au/2008-review.html">in 2008</a> and <a href="https://webarchive.nla.gov.au/awa/20190509030847/http://www.garnautreview.org.au/update-2011/garnaut-review-2011.html">2011</a>. I conducted these for, respectively, state and Commonwealth governments, and a federal cross-parliamentary committee.</p> <p>But these reviews greatly overestimated the cost of meeting ambitious reduction targets.</p> <p>There has been an extraordinary <a href="https://www.csiro.au/en/News/News-releases/2018/Annual-update-finds-renewables-are-cheapest-new-build-power">fall in the cost of equipment</a> for solar and wind energy, and of technologies to store renewable energy to even out supply. Per person, Australia has natural resources for renewable energy superior to any other developed country and far superior to our customers in northeast Asia.</p> <p>Australia is by far the world’s largest exporter of iron ore and aluminium ores. In the main they are processed overseas, but in the post-carbon world we will be best positioned to turn them into zero-emission iron and aluminium.</p> <p>In such a world, there will be no economic sense in any aluminium or iron smelting in Japan or Korea, not much in Indonesia, and enough to cover only a modest part of domestic demand in China and India. The European commitment to early achievement of net-zero emissions opens a large opportunity there as well.</p> <p>Converting one quarter of Australian iron oxide and half of aluminium oxide exports to metal would add more value and jobs than current coal and gas combined.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/300005/original/file-20191104-88428-37vk3q.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;rect=15%2C7%2C5145%2C3437&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <span class="caption">Australia’s vast wind and solar energy resources mean it is well-placed to export industrial products in a low-carbon global economy.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Flickr</span></span></p> <p><strong>A natural supplier to the world’s industry</strong></p> <p>With abundant low-cost electricity, Australia could grow into a major global producer of minerals needed in the post-carbon world such as lithium, titanium, vanadium, nickel, cobalt and copper. It could also become the natural supplier of pure silicon, produced from sand or quartz, for which there is fast-increasing global demand.</p> <p>Other new zero-emissions industrial products will require little more than globally competitive electricity to create. These include ammonia, <a href="https://www.ceda.com.au/Digital-hub/Blogs/CEDA-Blog/August-2019/Unlocking-the-hydrogen-future">exportable hydrogen</a> and electricity transmitted by high-voltage cables to and through Indonesia and Singapore to the Asian mainland.</p> <p>Australia’s exceptional endowment of forests and woodlands gives it an advantage in biological raw materials for industrial processes. And there’s an immense opportunity for capturing and sequestering, at relatively low cost, atmospheric carbon in soils, pastures, woodlands, forests and plantations.</p> <p>Modelling conducted for my first report suggested that Australia would import emissions reduction credits, however today I expect Australia to cut domestic emissions to the point that it <a href="https://unfccc.int/international-emissions-trading">sells excess credits to other nations.</a></p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/300009/original/file-20191104-88382-eftevp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <span class="caption">Tall white gum trees in northern Tasmania. Australia has huge potential to store more carbon in forests and woodlands.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">BARBARA WALTON/EPA</span></span></p> <p><strong>The transition is an economic winner</strong></p> <p>Technologies to produce and store zero-emissions energy and sequester carbon in the landscape are highly capital-intensive. They have therefore benefited exceptionally from the historic fall in global interest rates over the past decade. This has reduced the cost of transition to zero emissions, accentuating Australia’s advantage.</p> <p>In 2008 the comprehensive modelling undertaken for the Garnaut Review suggested the transition would entail a noticeable (but manageable) sacrifice of Australian income in the first half of this century, followed by gains that would grow late into the second half of this century and beyond.</p> <p>Today, calculations using similar techniques would give different results. Australia playing its full part in effective global efforts to hold warming to 2°C or lower would show economic gains instead of losses in early decades, followed by much bigger gains later on.</p> <p>If Australia is to realise its immense opportunity in a zero-carbon world, it will need a different policy framework. But we can make a strong start even with the incomplete and weak policies and commitments we have. Policies to help complete the transition can be built in a political environment that has been changed by early success.</p> <p><strong>Three crucial steps</strong></p> <p>Three early policy developments are needed. None contradicts established federal government policy.</p> <p>First, the regulatory system has to focus strongly on the <a href="https://www.aemc.gov.au/energy-system/electricity/electricity-system/reliability">security and reliability</a> of electricity supplies, as it comes to be drawn almost exclusively from intermittent renewable sources.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/300010/original/file-20191104-88378-kx0r2f.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <span class="caption">A high-voltage electricity transmission tower in the Brisbane central business district.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Darren England/AAP</span></span></p> <p>Second, the government must support transformation of the <a href="https://www.aemo.com.au/Electricity/National-Electricity-Market-NEM/Planning-and-forecasting/National-Transmission-Network-Development-Plan">power transmission system</a> to allow a huge expansion of supply from regions with high-quality renewable energy resources not near existing transmission cables. This is likely to require new mechanisms to support private initiatives.</p> <p>Third, the Commonwealth could secure a globally competitive cost of capital by underwriting new investment in reliable (or “firmed”) renewable electricity. This was a recommendation by the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s <a href="https://www.accc.gov.au/media-release/more-work-needed-to-make-electricity-prices-affordable">retail electricity price inquiry</a>, and has been adopted by the Morrison government.</p> <p><strong>We must get with the Paris program</strong></p> <p>For other countries to import large volumes of low-emission products from us, we will have to accept and be seen as delivering on emissions reduction targets consistent with the Paris objectives.</p> <p>Paris requires net-zero emissions by mid-century. Developed countries have to reach zero emissions before then, so their interim targets have to represent credible steps towards that conclusion.</p> <p>Japan, Korea, the European Union and the United Kingdom are the natural early markets for zero-emissions steel, aluminum and other products. China will be critically important. Indonesia and India and their neighbours in southeast and south Asia will sustain Australian exports of low-emissions products deep into the future.</p> <p><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/300011/original/file-20191104-88387-16b3t9k.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /> <span class="caption">An electric car being charged. Australia has good supplies of lithium, used in electric vehicle batteries.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Ian Langsdon/EPA</span></span></p> <p>For the European Union, reliance on Australian exports of zero-emissions products would only follow assessments that we were making acceptable contributions to the global mitigation effort.</p> <p>We will not get to that place in one step, or soon. But likely European restrictions on imports of high-carbon products, which will exempt those made with low emissions, will allow us a good shot.</p> <p>Movement will come gradually, initially with public support for innovation; then suddenly, as business and government leaders realise the magnitude of the Australian opportunity, and as humanity enters the last rush to avoid being overwhelmed by the rising costs of climate change.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/300033/original/file-20191104-88419-ca9gci.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/300033/original/file-20191104-88419-ca9gci.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=237&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em> <span class="caption">The cover of ‘Superpower’ by Ross Garnaut.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Supplied</span></span></em></p> <p>The pace will be governed by progress in decarbonisation globally. That will suit us, as our new strengths in the zero-carbon world grow with the retreat of the old. We have an unparalleled opportunity. We are more than capable of grabbing it.</p> <p><em>Ross Garnaut conducted the 2008 and 2011 climate reviews for the Rudd and Gillard governments. His book <a href="https://www.blackincbooks.com.au/books/superpower">Superpower – Australia’s Low-Carbon Opportunity</a>, is published today by BlackInc with La Trobe University Press.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/126341/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ross-garnaut-237">Ross Garnaut</a>, Professorial Research Fellow in Economics, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-melbourne-722">University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/australia-could-fall-apart-under-climate-change-but-theres-a-way-to-avoid-it-126341">original article</a>.</em></p>

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Creator of Uluru’s Field of Light launches new exhibition in Darwin

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Prolific light artist Bruce Munro is back again to dazzle tourists and locals alike in Darwin with his latest light-driven installation.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The latest exhibit stretches across 2.5kms around Darwin’s city centre and features eight illuminated sculptures by Munro, whose a world renowned artist.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B3w58f5lhfl/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B3w58f5lhfl/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Bruce Munro: Tropical Light opens November 1st Darwin, Australia.Fireflies, copyright © 2019 Bruce Munro. All rights reserved. Photography by Mark Pickthall.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/brucemunrostudio/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Bruce Munro</a> (@brucemunrostudio) on Oct 18, 2019 at 8:12am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Munro was inspired by the Northern Territory’s capital city and is the first citywide exhibition in the world.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The collection reflects Munro’s personal history of visiting Australia as well as the Northern Territory.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“This is a collection of smaller installations and a very different experience to Field of Lights,” Mr Munro told </span><a href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/australian-holidays/northern-territory/creator-of-ulurus-field-of-light-launches-new-exhibition-in-darwin/news-story/003b3522311a1e3d4d96b451c20ed9d0"><span style="font-weight: 400;">news.com.au</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BnmRCh7BFaQ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BnmRCh7BFaQ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">One of my favourite Fields of Light, Uluru, Australia - Jane OConnor, Bruce Munro Studio. Photographs by Mark Pickthall and Serena Munro</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/brucemunrostudio/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Bruce Munro</a> (@brucemunrostudio) on Sep 11, 2018 at 12:40pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Those coming to Darwin for Tropical Lights will experience the beautiful city … which has everything a big city has but slightly more condensed. This exhibition is not about me plonking sculptures from (the) other side of the world and putting them in Darwin, the sculptures are inspired by Darwin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“So I am interested to see if people enjoy it and feel and think the same as I did when I first came here.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4VKb-HlSw6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4VKb-HlSw6/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Bruce Munro: Tropical Light, Darwin Australia. November 1st 2019 - April 30th 2020. Photography by Serena Munro, copyright © 2019 Bruce Munro. All rights reserved. A huge thank you to @fusionexhibitionandhire &amp; @NTmajorevents an install we will never forget ❤️@tropicallights.darwin</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/brucemunrostudio/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Bruce Munro</a> (@brucemunrostudio) on Nov 1, 2019 at 10:09am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The Tropical Light exhibit in Darwin is open until the 30th of April 2020. </p>

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Qantas crack crisis: Airline admits three planes found with damage

<p>Cracks have been uncovered on three Qantas planes in the “ickle fork” which connects the wings to the body of the aircraft. </p> <p>33 Boeing 737s were inspected for hairline cracks and engineers found three of the jets have had to be grounded for urgent repairs as the busy Christmas season approaches. </p> <p>“Of the 33 of Qantas' 737 aircraft that required inspection, three were found to have a hairline crack in the pickle fork structure,” Qantas said in a statement on Friday morning. </p> <p>The three aircraft’s will remain out of service until the end of 2019, as Qantas works with the Civil Aviation Safety Authority to resolve the safety issue. </p> <p>The chief executive of the airline's Domestic wing, Andrew David, said the inspections had been brought forward by seven months purely as a safety inspection. </p> <p>“We would never fly an aircraft that wasn't safe,” he said.</p> <p>“Even where these hairline cracks are present they’re not an immediate risk, which is clear from the fact the checks were not required for at least seven months.”</p> <p>The Australian Licensed Aircraft Engineers Association on Thursday said a second Qantas 737 was found to have a “cracked primary wing structure”, which sparked a call for the entire fleet to be grounded. </p> <p>“These aircraft should be kept safe on the ground until urgent inspections are completed,” Steve Purvinas, the union’s secretary said. </p> <p>The airline has 75 Boeing 737 aircraft in its fleet.</p> <p>Mr David has accused the trade union of misrepresenting the facts.</p> <p>“Those comments were especially disappointing given the fantastic job our engineers have done to inspect these aircraft well ahead of schedule, and the priority they give to safety every day of the week,” he said.</p> <p>The US Federal Aviation Administration ordered American airlines to check if all of the 737s had been checked for cracks by completing more than 30,000 take-offs and landings, better known as cycles. </p> <p>In Australia, the Qantas planes had completed about 27,000 cycles. </p> <p>Qantas ordered inspections on any aircraft that had flown 22,600 cycles.</p> <p>Inspections began after hairline cracks were found on an aircraft with just under 27,000 cycles.</p>

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New study shows 80 per cent of Aussie household water goes to waste

<p>As regional Australian towns face the prospect of <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/nsw/plan-c-is-a-problem-a-town-without-ground-water-nears-day-zero-20191022-p53334.html">running out of water</a>, it’s time to ask why Australia does not make better use of recycled wastewater.</p> <p>The technology to reliably and safely make clean, drinkable water from all sources, including sewage, has existed for <a href="https://www.applied.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/04/drinking-water-through-recycling-full-report.pdf">at least a decade</a>. Further, <a href="https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/completed/water-reform/national-water-initiative-agreement-2004.pdf">government policy</a> has for a long time allowed for recycled water to ensure supply.</p> <p>The greatest barrier to the widespread use of recycled wastewater is community acceptance. Research from around the world found the best way to overcome reluctance is to embrace education and rigorously ensure the highest quality water treatment.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/298470/original/file-20191024-31434-187ua6o.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/298470/original/file-20191024-31434-187ua6o.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <em><span class="caption">In 2006 Toowoomba voted against introducing recycled water, despite extensive drought gripping the area.</span> <span class="attribution"><a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/allanhenderson/2351100815/in/photolist-nQkp38-4zL1mX-aDPpEZ-aDPpLV-fEdSCh-hvcdT7-nQiamA-o7ESdb-fEdQK7-NyMorG-o7Mtex-hvcFhN-nMBXnf-29iZvnt-uobZDu-uEkpLu" class="source">Allan Henderson/Flickr</a>, <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/" class="license">CC BY</a></span></em></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><strong>Why not use stormwater?</strong></p> <p>Many people are happy to use recycled stormwater, while being reluctant to cook, drink or wash with recycled household wastewater. But there are technical, cost and supply issues with relying on stormwater to meet our country’s water needs. Stormwater has to be cleaned before it is used, the supply can be irregular as it is reliant upon rain, and it has to be stored somewhere for use.</p> <p>On the other hand, household wastewater (which is what goes into the sewerage system from sinks, toilets, washing machines and so on) is a more consistent supply, with <a href="https://blogs.ei.columbia.edu/2011/04/04/from-wastewater-to-drinking-water/">80% or more</a> of household water leaving as wastewater.</p> <p>Furthermore, wastewater goes to treatment plants already, so there is a system of pipes to transport it and places which already treat it, including advanced treatment plants that can treat the water to be clean enough for a range of purposes. There are strong economic, environmental and practical arguments for investing more effort in reusing wastewater to meet our water supply needs.</p> <p>This water can be used for households, industry, business and agriculture, greening public spaces, fighting fires, and topping up rivers or groundwater.</p> <p><strong>The water cycle</strong></p> <p>Technically, all water is recyled; indeed we are drinking the <a href="https://www.xplorationstation.com/">same water as the dinosaurs</a>. Put very simply, water evaporates, forms clouds and falls as rain, and is either absorbed into the earth and captured underground or filtered through rock and goes back again into oceans and rivers.</p> <p>When we capture and reuse water, we are not making more water, but speeding up the water cycle so we can reuse it more quickly.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/298473/original/file-20191024-31471-1tnktt1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/298473/original/file-20191024-31471-1tnktt1.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <span class="caption">Not pictured: the many, many animals and people every drop of water has passed through over millennia.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Wikimedia Commons</span>, <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/" class="license">CC BY-SA</a></span></p> <p>We do already <a href="http://www.awa.asn.au/AWA_MBRR/Publications/Fact_Sheets/Water_Recycling_Fact_Sheet/AWA_MBRR/Publications/Fact_Sheets/Water_Recycling_Fact_Sheet.aspx?hkey=54c6e74b-0985-4d34-8422-fc3f7523aa1d">reuse wastewater</a> in Australia, with many parts of regional Australia cleaning wastewater and releasing it into rivers. That water is then extracted for use by places downstream.</p> <p>Despite this, there have been significant community objections to building new infrastructure to reuse wastewater for household use. In 2006, at the height of the Millennium drought, Toowoomba <a href="https://www.bbc.com/future/article/20160105-why-we-will-all-one-day-drink-recycled-wastewater">rejected the idea</a> entirely.</p> <p>However, since then a scheme has been <a href="https://www.watercorporation.com.au/water-supply/our-water-sources/recycled-water">successfully established</a> in Perth. We must examine these issues again in light of the current drought, which sees a number of Australian regional centres facing the prospect of <a href="https://meltwaternews.com/ext/mediac/213698325.pdf">running out of water</a>.</p> <p><strong>Lessons from overseas</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/298467/original/file-20191024-31453-10p3sbb.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/298467/original/file-20191024-31453-10p3sbb.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="" /></a> <span class="caption">Singapore has had enormous success in reusing wastewater for all kinds of purposes.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">EPA/HOW HWEE YOUNG</span></span></em></p> <p>Despite initial reluctance, many places around the world have successfully introduced extensive wastewater recycling. Places such as Singapore, Essex, California, New Mexico, and Virginia widely use it.</p> <p>Recent research from the <a href="https://www.wsaa.asn.au/publications">Water Services Association of Australia</a>, working with other research bodies, found several key lessons.</p> <p>Firstly, the language we use is important. Phrases like “<a href="https://www.afr.com/companies/toilettotap-back-on-the-agenda-as-nsw-looks-again-at-recycled-water-20180919-h15kqh">toilet to tap</a>” are unhelpful as they don’t emphasise the extensive treatment processes involved.</p> <p>The social media and news outlets can play an significant role here. In Orange County, California, wastewater was introduced through a slow process of building acceptance. Influential individuals were enlisted to explain and advocate for its uses.</p> <p>Secondly, communities need time and knowledge, particularly about safety and risks. Regulators play an important role in reassuring communities. In San Diego, a demonstration plant gave many people the opportunity to see the treatment process, drink the water and participate in education.</p> <p>We need to go beyond information to deep consultation and education, understanding where people are starting from and acknowledging that people from different cultures and backgrounds may have different attitudes.</p> <p>El Paso successfully introduced wastewater through strong engagement with the media and significant investment in community education, including explaining the water cycle.</p> <p>Finally, quality of the water needs to be great and it needs to come from a trustworthy source. The more it happens, and people know that, the more likely they are to feel reassured.</p> <p>It’s clear the public expect governments to plan and act to secure our future water supply. But we can’t just impose possibly distasteful solutions – instead, the whole community needs to be part of the conversation.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/125798/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/roberta-ryan-172068">Roberta Ryan</a>, Professor, UTS Institute for Public Policy and Governance and UTS Centre for Local Government, <a href="http://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-technology-sydney-936">University of Technology Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/80-of-household-water-goes-to-waste-we-need-to-get-it-back-125798">original article</a>.</em></p>

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“What white privilege looks like”: How the world has reacted to the Uluru climbing ban

<p>Media outlets around the world have reacted to the permanent closure of public access to Australia’s most iconic landmark, Uluru.</p> <p>After decades of tourists climbing the enormous rock, rangers have finally put an end to it at 4 pm Friday, after the ban was unanimously voted on in 2017.</p> <p>A new sign was set up on the base of the rock, letting visitors know that the climb was permanently closed – 34 years after the Anangu people, the traditional custodians of the land, were handed back the title to Uluru.</p> <p>Starting from today, those who are caught breaking the rules would be issued a fine of $6,300.</p> <p>But not everyone is happy about the decision, as Australians and others around the world are divided on the history-making decision.</p> <p>Yesterday, Uluru was inundated with tourists wanting to climb the rock for the very last time, to which a<span> </span><em>New York Times</em><span> </span>writer described as “a reminder that a segment of the population remains resistant to some of the decisions Indigenous people make when ownership of land is returned to them.”</p> <p>“They have absolutely no shame,” wrote one person on Twitter on the flock of climbers.</p> <p>“This is what white privilege looks like in Australia.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">They have absolutely no shame. This is what white privilege looks like in Australia.</p> — Princess Buttercup ☠🎗️ (@sckitupbuttercp) <a href="https://twitter.com/sckitupbuttercp/status/1187607049607102464?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">25 October 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“The lengthy queue of people waiting for one last crack at violating Indigenous rights before the white government finally puts an end to it is pretty depressing,” wrote another commenter on the publication’s website.</p> <p>While the ban is “a once-unimaginable act of deference to a marginalised population,” wrote the story’s author Jamie Tarabay, it is “a partly symbolic gesture that does nothing to address the myriad social problems endured by Indigenous Australians.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet tw-align-center" data-lang="en-gb"> <p dir="ltr">Like little ants trail. Not for survival, not climbing up from floods or anything. Paying their way from their earnings to disrespect a sacred site.</p> — J. Xuan (@HazelONeil16) <a href="https://twitter.com/HazelONeil16/status/1187673547193212928?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">25 October 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“Many of the Anangu themselves live in a trash-strewn community near the rock that is closed to visitors, a jarring contrast to the exclusive resorts that surround the monolith, where tourists seated at white tablecloths drink sparkling wines and eat canapes as the setting sun turns Uluru a vivid red.”</p> <p>Certain parts of Uluru are considered so scared that the Anangu people don’t want it to be photographed or even touched, writes Tarabay, although tourists are permitted to “tool around its base on camels or Segways, or take art lessons in its shadow.”</p>

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“I never knew this”: Simple road rules quiz sparks debate amongst drivers

<p>A simple road rules question has left drivers stunned as it’s sparked a heated debate online.</p> <p>A picture of a truck and a motorcycle at an intersection was posted on the Queensland Department of Transport and Main Roads Facebook page and asked the audience which vehicle has right of way.</p> <p>In the picture, both vehicles are at the intersection with the truck behind a stop sign and the motorcycle facing the give way sign.</p> <p>The Department baited their audience with the caption “You know your road rules and now’s your chance to prove it.”</p> <p>“The truck is facing a 'Stop' sign and the motorcycle is facing a 'Give Way' sign at the intersection. Who must give way?”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FTMRQld%2Fphotos%2Fa.295748123801411%2F2581009211941946%2F%3Ftype%3D3&amp;width=500" width="500" height="639" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>Many drivers thought that the truck should give way as it is facing a stop sign and is required to come to a complete stop before moving. This would then give the motorcycle time to move forward through the intersection.</p> <p>“The truck must give way!,” one user wrote. “Because the compulsory stop sign is also a give way sign too, except that ''stop'' has more traffic force than the give way sign on its own.”</p> <p>“I would have thought the truck should give way as he has to come to a complete stop,” another person added.</p> <p>However, one person argued that the motorcycle gives way to the truck.</p> <p>“Motorcycle gives way to the truck. When I was working, I encountered this scenario daily. Almost every day I gave up waiting for the vehicle who has right of way to move, so I would end up just going (I was in the bikes position),” one person commented.</p> <p>Another person argued that both have to give way.</p> <p>“Both have to give way,” they commented.</p> <p>“The bike should slow down and give way to ensure the truck will stop and then proceed once the truck has stopped and out of gear.”</p> <p>The Department quickly posted the correct answer.</p> <p>“The answer is that the motorcycle must give way to the truck,” the Department wrote.</p> <p>“A stop sign is not more powerful than a give way sign.</p> <p>“When two motorists arrive at stop or give way signs, the signs cancel each other out and the normal give way rules apply. Under these rules, if a motorist is travelling straight ahead, they must give way to any vehicle approaching from the right.</p> <p>“The motorcycle must give way to the truck because the truck is on their right.”</p> <p>Commenters were shocked with the result.</p> <p>“I got run over by the truck,” one commenter joked.</p> <p>“Why would you make such a confusing road rule?” another user posted.</p> <p>Others said that they are scared with the answers as they are on the road with the drivers who got the answer right.</p> <p>“I am scared with some of the answers on here I cannot believe that some people have a license and are on the road,” one comment reads.</p> <p>“These questions are a perfect opportunity to take down names - revoke licenses and force refresher courses on drivers,” another said.</p> <p>“Scary to think they drive among us.”</p>

Domestic Travel

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This is spook-tacular! Haunted Halloween house in Queensland bound to give you chills

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A Gold Coast family has turned their suburban house into a Stephen King-inspired mansion.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The homeowners, known to locals by pseudonyms Mr and Mrs Strapleberry, are once again opening the doors to their house of horror in Pacific Pines, just in time for Halloween.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ‘Neibolt Well House’ was inspired by the abandoned home where IT lived and featured boarded-up windows, broken shutters, overgrown grass and vinces, and rusty metal fences as well as a life-size figure of Georgie from King’s story.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The couple first held the extravaganza last year, allowing children and adults to celebrate the festivities and try mazes with special effects and scares.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He spoke to </span><a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7603803/Family-transforms-humble-property-incredible-horror-house-just-time-Halloween.html?fbclid=IwAR31j101Mj6zt6LXu3iNCnoT-JvjurCxXz4tdOdtpPu4MoAfRFOHf_jofWQ"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Daily Mail Australia</span></em></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> about how the creepy Halloween house all started.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We put out a smoke machine and some cheap spider webs a few years ago and noticed how many families and children were out trick-or-treating,” he explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was wonderful to see excited kids out having fun, so we decided we could do more.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Due to the success of last year’s attempt, this year’s idea ended up snowballing quickly into “<a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/Panic-on-Pandora-260293314625500/posts/?ref=page_internal">Panic on Pandora</a>”.</span></p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2F260293314625500%2Fvideos%2F505896146632451%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We didn’t know if anybody would show, but ended up with more than 600 happy families and haunters,” said Mr Strapleberry.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We are firm believers to the idea that you should be the change you want to see in the world,” the father-of-one explained.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Seeing the streets filled with children and families enjoying time together.. children genuinely excited, neighbours talking/meeting each other.. it's just an incredible atmosphere of the community coming together.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the Strapleberry family have kept quiet about just how much this all costs, Mr Strappleberry has joked that “it was either a jet-ski for me or a Halloween event for everyone”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The house has continued to bring joy to locals for two years in a row, and with the extensive effort gone into the designs, it’s easy to see why.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll through the gallery to see the spooky transformation. </span></p>

Domestic Travel

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Climb fever: Last day of Uluru climb brings in thousands

<p>The decision to ban people from climbing Ayers Rock has divided a nation, and with its last day on the books, big numbers are expected to swarm in before a permanent closing of the climb. </p> <p>The 33 degrees forecast for Friday means the climb will be open all day after extreme heat this week. </p> <p>On Thursday the hours to scale up Uluru were restricted between 7 am and 8 am due to a sweltering 40 degree day. </p> <p>After the last of the climbers come down, workers will immediately start removing all evidence climbing was ever allowed on the 348-metre high red sandstone rock. </p> <p>Uluru is arguably one of Australia’s most famous landmarks. </p> <p>The chain handhold that was built in 1964 for visitors to get up and down the steep western face will also be removed. </p> <p>Photos and videos of massive queues of people waiting to climb up the rock  - against the wishes of local Indigenous people - has surfaced on social media, garnering heavy criticism as a result. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">One day out from Uluru climb closure, this is the line at 7am. <a href="https://t.co/fxs344H6fV">pic.twitter.com/fxs344H6fV</a></p> — Oliver Gordon (@olgordon) <a href="https://twitter.com/olgordon/status/1187149946731937793?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 23, 2019</a></blockquote> <p>“If native aboriginal people fought to ban climbing on their extremely sacred rock, why would you still want to climb it, you asinine tourists!” wrote actor and rock climber Sebastian Roché on Twitter.</p> <p>“Imagine learning Uluru was being shut off for climbing because it’s sacred to the Aboriginal culture, and instead of respecting that, you spend the final day before it closes doing... this,” another person said. </p> <p>The National Park board decided in 2017 to ban the climb from Saturday. </p> <p>It marks 35 years since the land title to the Anangu was given back on October 26, 1985.</p> <p>Earlier this week, tourist Tegan McLellan, 28 scaled the massive landmark with her partner in a bid to get in before the practice is banned. </p> <p>The veterinary nurse and social media influencer said climbing to the top of Uluru has always been on her bucket list but it wasn’t until she heard the climb would be closed for good that she decided to make the journey to the Red centre. </p> <p>“Uluru has always been on my list of places to visit but was always a ‘some day’ trip,” she told<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/australian-holidays/northern-territory/influencers-reason-for-deciding-to-climb-uluru-before-the-ban/news-story/b53928ee54800a6070bc0670b1679356" target="_blank">news.com.au.</a></p> <p>“Uluru is an icon of Australia and an important part of our history.</p> <p>“Since hearing that the climb was closing I decided to make it a priority to visit before the opportunity was gone.”</p> <p>Ms McMlellan says she found the climb to be “difficult” despite being a pretty fit person. </p> <p>“It’s very steep in some parts … and you can easily lose your footing. Your shoes slip easily, so you have to pull yourself up using the chain, but the chain was also slippery from everyone’s suncream and sweaty hands,” she explained. </p> <p>The Queensland-based nurse said the “tough climb” should have regulations in place for people. </p> <p>“It’s a very tough climb with no shade and even the way down is just as tough,” she said.</p> <p>“You have people going up, people coming down and people sitting and resting, all along a very steep slope on a narrow track.</p> <p>“I heard that one lady got stuck halfway up and sat there for two hours in the scorching sun because she couldn’t get down.”</p> <p>Uluru is a sacred site and holds great spiritual significance to local Aboriginal communities, including the Pitjantjatjara Anangu traditional owners who live in nearby Mutitjulu.</p> <p>"It is just a blip in the middle, this whole climb thing, it is going back to normal by banning the climb,” said Mutitjulu resident and Central Land Council chair Sammy Wilson</p> <p>The Anangu people will celebrate with a ceremony at the rock on Sunday night.</p> <p><span>Scroll through the gallery above to see Tegan McLellan's climb through pictures. </span><span>Images: @teganmclellan </span></p>

Domestic Travel

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Discover Arnhem Land on an exclusive wilderness adventure

<p>On an exclusive <a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/destinations/arnhem-land/">Outback Spirit adventure</a> to this remote wilderness, you’ll be granted access to a part of Australia few people ever get to see: a sacred and mystical land occupied by Aboriginal people for more than 60,000 years. As the only tour company with permission to travel right through the heart of Arnhem Land, Outback Spirit delivers an extraordinary experience that no other tour company can provide.  </p> <p>Beginning in Nhulunbuy in east Arnhem Land, <a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/destinations/arnhem-land/">Outback Spirit’s 13-day adventure</a> travels west through Ramingining, Maningrida and Gunbalanya before heading north up the Cobourg Peninsula. Along the way, you’ll stay in luxury wilderness lodges and safari camps, established in consultation with Traditional Owners and the Northern Land Council. Situated in spectacular locations, these camps and lodges have enabled a journey that will awaken new perspectives and foster a deeper understanding of this pristine, ancient landscape. A landscape in which rugged coastlines, towering escarpments, remote islands, lush rainforests, idyllic billabongs and rivers teeming with fish are only just the beginning.</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery to see the natural wonders that await you in Arnhem Land.</p> <p><strong>The oldest surviving culture in the world</strong></p> <p>Travelling through Arnhem Land is an adventure in culture, and it is the insights from local Aboriginal guides that form one of the biggest highlights of Outback Spirit’s adventures. Traditional Owners continue their Indigenous culture and ancient ceremonies to this day, and as a guest with Outback Spirit you’re invited to experience this through activities such as a 'Welcome to Country' ceremony on the beach at Cape Wirrwawuy, where you’ll be welcomed by the land’s original custodians to begin your journey of discovery. Locals share stories of their culture, custom and ancient traditions, including a bush medicine demonstration, all of which serves to help guests understand the deep connection to country held by Indigenous Australians.</p> <p>Over two memorable days at Davidson’s Arnhem Land Safaris, Mount Borradaile you’ll be guided by local experts to explore some of the best-preserved rock-art galleries in the world. Artwork dating back over 50,000 years includes a six-metre rainbow serpent snaking across the sandstone roof and vivid yellow and red handprints, portraying the world of its ancient inhabitants and inspiring awe and wonder.</p> <p><strong>Astonishing natural surrounds</strong></p> <p>Arnhem Land is abundant in wildlife and offers a wealth of natural riches. Besides the famous saltwater crocs, its coastal regions are important conservation areas for dugongs (often referred to as sea cows and even mermaids), nesting turtles and migratory birds.</p> <p>On this adventure you’ll discover the vast and sacred Arafura Swamp on a wetland cruise and 4WD safari, as Indigenous guides explain why this spectacular area is so significant to them. Covering 1,300 square kilometres, the wetland supports up to 300,000 water birds. Brolgas wade on spindly legs in the shallows and flocks of magpie geese skim across the top of the water. This was the location for the acclaimed film <em>Ten Canoes</em>, and it’s every bit as captivating in real life.</p> <p>Meanwhile, anglers will be privy to the best that Australian fishing has to offer, with the Tomkinson and Liverpool rivers teeming with barramundi, longtail tuna, giant trevally and more. Access to these regions is tightly controlled, but Outback Spirit’s special permits and licences at the Arnhem Land Barramundi Lodge once again afford guests a once-in-a-lifetime experience. Here, you’ll be accompanied by expert fishing guides as you navigate pristine rivers in state-of-the-art boats.</p> <p>In one of the least inhabited spots on earth, the Cobourg Peninsula, you’ll spend three exclusive nights exploring the treasures of the Garig Gunak Barlu National Park and the Cobourg Marine Park Sanctuary, where dolphins, dugongs and turtles ply the turquoise waters. Barramundi and other tropical species afford an unforgettable angling experience from one of Outback Spirit’s fishing boats, while the historic Victoria Settlement at Port Essington, the multi-hued cliffs of Rainbow Beach and the palm-covered bushland surrounding Seven Spirit Bay, all offer transformative experiences that will remain with you forever.</p> <p><strong>Unique lodgings </strong></p> <p>A highlight of the tour through Arnhem Land, and exclusive to Outback Spirit passengers, is the stunning accommodations – a network of luxurious, eco-friendly wilderness lodges and safari camps. On the banks of the Arafura Swamp is Outback Spirit’s stunning Murwangi safari camp, where your deluxe safari suite offers all the welcome inclusions you could want while barely making a footprint on the pristine surrounds.</p> <p>At the Arnhem Land Barramundi Lodge near Maningrida, you can have the chef expertly cook up your catch of the day, while on the Cobourg Peninsula you’ll enjoy three nights in Outback Spirit’s flagship lodge; Seven Spirit Bay. Here, you’ll be amazed at the 5-star offering in such a remote location, with accommodation consisting of stunning Habitat Villas overlooking Coral Bay. As each day draws to a close, retreat to the Wawidada Pavilion for breathtaking sunsets, beautiful sea breezes and exceptional cuisine.</p> <p><strong>Early bird sale on <em>now</em>! </strong></p> <p>Don’t wait! <a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/destinations/arnhem-land/">Book a trip to Arnhem Land with Outback Spirit before 31 December 2019 and save up to $1,400 per person twin share</a>.</p> <p><strong>Outstanding value inclusions </strong></p> <ul> <li>Small Group Size – 22</li> <li>All meals provided while on tour</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Spend 7 nights in Outback Spirit’s network of luxurious safari camps and wilderness lodges, including 3 nights at the iconic Seven Spirit Bay.</li> <li>Spend 2 nights at Davidson’s Arnhem Land Safaris, Mount Borradaile</li> </ul> <ul> <li>Travel aboard a 5-star 4WD Mercedes Benz Coach</li> <li>All activity and attraction fees</li> <li>All permit fees to enter Aboriginal Land</li> <li>Escorted by expert tour guides</li> <li>Outback Spirit Explorer Pack featuring handy travel items</li> </ul> <p><strong>About Outback Spirit</strong></p> <p>Founded in 2000 by brothers Andre and Courtney Ellis, Outback Spirit is a multi-award-winning business and Australia’s largest premium small group outback tour operator.</p> <p>Outback Spirit strives to stay ecologically sustainable and limit its impact on the environment through good practice, innovation, and by providing financial support to the Australian Wildlife Conservatory. It also supports remote Indigenous communities across the Kimberley and Arnhem Land through employment opportunities, community sponsorships and support for Indigenous-owned businesses. Outback Spirit has been acknowledged for consistently delivering professional and authentic adventures to remote destinations of Australia.</p> <p>Why would you travel through outback Australia with anyone else?</p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with </em><a href="https://www.outbackspirittours.com.au/"><em>Outback Spirit</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Blinker wars: Quiz on correct roundabout rules sparks intense debate

<p>A simple question about the right way to indicate on a roundabout has sparked a debate after some drivers disagreed with the correct answer.</p> <p>The Department of Transport and Main Roads Queensland (TMR) tested its Facebook users on their road rules knowledge by posting a photo of a blue car entering a roundabout.</p> <p>“The blue car wants to travel straight ahead at the roundabout. How should they indicate?”</p> <p>The post garnered hundreds of comments and despite majority of users getting the answer right, it was alarming how many people failed the simple test.</p> <p>Some believed the driver wasn’t required to indicate at all when driving straight through the roundabout, a mistake that could result in a $393 fine.</p> <p>“No blinker required,” said one person.</p> <p>“Who in Qld uses an indicator when going straight and exiting … no one, no need to start today,” said another.</p> <p>Other people were certain that indication was required when entering and exiting the roundabout.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FTMRQld%2Fposts%2F2560010187375182&amp;width=500" width="500" height="639" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media"></iframe></p> <p>“Yes the car should indicate when entering and exiting the roundabout as it has two lanes,” one motorist wrote.</p> <p>Another driver said the motorist going straight through has the option to indicate right on entry but is obligated to indicate left when leaving the roundabout.</p> <p>One user agreed, saying they were sure it was “right on entry and left on exit”, but changed their mind after searching up the rule.</p> <p>“Ugh. Just checked. Looks like I was wrong. I will track down my driving instructor from a billion years ago and have a word with him. Jerk shouted at me when I didn’t indicate on entry going straight ahead,” they wrote.</p> <p>TMR later on revealed the correct answer, saying the driver only has to indicate when exiting the roundabout.</p> <p>“Because they’re travelling straight through, the driver of the blue car *doesn’t* need to indicate when they enter the roundabout,” the post read.</p> <p>“They do though need to flick on the left indicator to exit the roundabout (and off again once they’ve exited).”</p>

Domestic Travel

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Top 5 new and exclusive experiences to add to your 2020 bucket list

<p><em>Dreaming of a long weekend getaway? Or an escape for several weeks? You’ll be blown away by the incredibly diverse array of unique tours available right in your own backyard.</em></p> <p>Whether you’re looking to immerse yourself in food and wine culture, reconnect with nature at a national park, or simply explore a new destination, AAT Kings’ range of Guided Holidays has something for every traveller.</p> <p>Because we all dream a little differently, AAT Kings offers two distinct styles of Guided Holiday to dozens of destinations in the new 2020/2021 brochure. Choose a <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/first-choice/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs"><strong>First Choice</strong></a> Guided Holiday for premium inclusions and more downtime, or take a <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/best-buys/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs"><strong>Best Buys</strong></a> Guided Holiday for ultimate flexibility and must-see sights.</p> <p>Can’t decide where to go first? We have listed our top five destinations you need to add to your 2020 holiday to-do list.</p> <p><strong>1. Margaret River, a food and wine lovers paradise</strong></p> <p>Discover the incredible scenic landscapes, natural wonders and food and wine culture of Western Australia on the <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/tours/western-wonderland/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs">15 day Western Wonderland Best Buys Guided Holiday</a>. For the food and wine lovers, AAT Kings have added a brand-new experience to delight the senses and allow you to dine at the region’s best.</p> <p>While taking in the scenery of gorgeous <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/destination/regions/margaret-river/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs">Margaret River</a>, you will enjoy a private wine tasting and three-course lunch, tastefully paired with the region’s finest wines, at the Brookland Valley Estate. And as the Guided Holiday experts, AAT Kings take care of everything, so all you have to do is sit back with a glass of wine and relax with your fellow travellers.</p> <p><strong>2. The Magnificent Kimberley</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7832032/aat-kings.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a430d6dcb3d74b82b5675200950f7a77" /></strong></p> <p>On an AAT Kings holiday, you won’t just visit the bucket list sights, you will become immersed in the cultures and lifestyles of the distinctly unique destinations you visit. The Kimberley region of Western Australia is one of these unique destinations, and one that is unlike anywhere in the world. The unbelievable natural wonders such as the Bungle Bungles are truly otherworldly.</p> <p>On the <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/tours/wonders-of-the-west-coast-and-kimberley/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs">21 day Wonders of the West Coast &amp; Kimberley First Choice Guided Holiday</a>, guests will be able to meet the artists of the Mangkaja Arts Resource Agency and Gallery, a fine art gallery, specialty store and studio space located in the centre of Fitzroy Crossing. A guided tour hosted by the Centre Curator provides an opportunity to not only view the incredible artworks, but to see the local artists working in the studio. You can purchase art directly from the local Aboriginal artists which contributes to the running and operating of the arts centre.</p> <p><strong>3. Iconic North Island of New Zealand</strong></p> <p>Immerse yourself in the Maori culture and history as you venture from Auckland down to Wellington. Experience the North Island’s most iconic sights in this <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/tours/iconic-north/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs">7-day First Choice Guided Holiday</a>. As you make your way down the coast, you’ll stop off for an exclusive lunch at a private Waikato dairy farm, learn insider knowledge from your experienced guides, and immerse yourself in the centuries-old traditions of New Zealand’s indigenous people, including a cultural evening at Tamaki Maori Village. At Rotorua, you will choose from a range of sightseeing experiences, including a tour of the Hobbiton movie set, a tour of Waitomo Glowworm caves, or exploring Rotorua and its lakes in an amphibious WWII-era craft.</p> <p><strong>4. New Zealand’s Sensational South</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7831983/aat-kings.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0a2670a80dc74b1e83ab2361b4f23e57" /></strong></p> <p>If you prefer to delve into the heart of New Zealand’s renowned food and wine country, you must add this <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/tours/sensational-south/">11-day Spectacular South</a> tour to your list – starting in Wellington, where you’ll go on a guided walking tour with a foodie twist to get your senses tingling. The tour winds down the South Island’s east coast to Christchurch before branching off to Mount Cook, where you’ll join a local expert at New Zealand’s longest glacier, the Tasman Glacier. You’ll then head to picturesque Queenstown, embark on a scenic journey through Fiordland National Park, and travel to the magnificent wild West Coast and mesmerising Milford Sound. Culinary highlights include dinner at a top winery in Marlborough, a Be My Guest lunch at Morelea, and a farewell dinner at the Boatshed restaurant in Queenstown.</p> <p><strong>5. New Zealand Uncovered</strong></p> <p><strong><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7831981/aat-kings-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/e5d0eafaf9f748478f9bde67d578b97d" /></strong></p> <p>Can’t decide between which island to visit next? Why not experience the best of both islands on AAT Kings’ <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/tours/new-zealand-uncovered/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs">17-day New Zealand Uncovered First Choice Guided Holiday</a>? Explore from Auckland down to Christchurch, experience the contrasts between the two islands: travel through picturesque Hinuera Valley, journey through farmland to the turquoise waters of Huka Falls, and explore magnificent Milford Sound on a nature cruise. See the scenery magically change from alpine to magnificent rainforests and the wild West Coast when crossing over the Haast Pass. Iconic destinations this Guided Holiday will take you to include: the Bay of Plenty, Rotorua, Lake Taupo, Charlotte Sound, Fiordland National Park, Milford Sound, Queenstown, Franz Josef Glacier and Punakaiki – to name but a few.</p> <p>A journey through the North and South Islands of New Zealand is best undertaken with the experts. Delve into New Zealand’s national identity and explore the country’s Maori culture and history. Enjoy lunch at a dairy farm and Monteith’s Brewery, cruise across Lake Wakatipu for a gourmet dinner at Walter Peak Farm, and experience a Hangi feast at the Tamaki Maori Village. There is truly something to appeal to every traveller on this 17-day journey through the incredible North and South Islands of New Zealand.</p> <p>Start planning your 2020/21 escape now and save 10% with <a href="https://www.aatkings.com/earlybird/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs">Early Bird Savings</a> on all First Choice Guided Holidays in Australia and New Zealand when booked by 31 January 2020 and travel dates up to 31 March 2021. <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PMWdUqmsOdY?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs">Need more reason to book? Click here.</a></p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with </em><a href="https://www.aatkings.com/?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=online_ebs"><em>AAT Kings</em></a><em>.</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Christmas decorations at Australian stores in October spark online debate

<p>Christmas is still more than two months away – and some Aussies are not ready yet to embrace the spirit of the festivities.</p> <p>An online debate has been kicked off over whether it is too soon to bring out the Christmas decorations after a Sydneysider shared a picture on<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.reddit.com/r/sydney/comments/dkh2nu/oh_no_its_begun_macquarie_centre/" target="_blank">Reddit</a><span> </span>of workers preparing to install a Christmas tree at the city’s Macquarie Centre mall.</p> <p>Other people shared that the trend extended to other shopping centres as well.</p> <p>“Is there some universal signal? North Rocks Shopping centre was setting up too,” one informed.</p> <p>“Myer at Parramatta has basically the entire bottom floor as Christmas stuff, has been for at least a few weeks as well,” another wrote.</p> <p>Some argued that the decorations should wait at least until after Halloween wrapped up.</p> <p>“This time of year you see retail places trying to service both Halloween and Christmas being just around the corner,” one wrote. “It’s the weirdest crossover. ‘Don’t forget the birth of our lord and saviour, Jesus Christ but also zombies!’”</p> <p>“Couldn’t they at least wait until November? Really ruins the whole Christmas charm when you’re advertising over 2 months in advanced,” another commented.</p> <p>Some joked that the Christmas ornaments meant that Easter was coming soon.</p> <p>“You know what that means, a month or two away from hot cross buns in Woolies,” one wrote, with another responding, “And mini eggs!”</p>

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Irwin family in mourning after loss of beloved family animal

<p>Bindi Irwin is in mourning following the death of one of her animal-obsessed family’s most beloved pets. </p> <p>Piggy, the Irwin’s 13-year-old chicken passed away earlier this week - a remarkably long life-span for a bird of her species. </p> <p>“For nearly 13 years you made us smile through life’s ups and downs,” Bindi wrote in a heartfelt Instagram photo of the pair, adding “Rest In Peace my lovely girl.”</p> <p>In a public show of support, Bindi’s fiance Chandler joined in on the chorus of support and commented a love heart to his partner. </p> <p>The youngest member of the Irwin family, Robert, shared his own sweet tribute to his beloved chicken, telling fans just how much she meant to his family. </p> <p>“Saying goodbye to one of our dearest friends. Almost 13 years ago, ‘Piggy’ came into our family and brought so much joy to everyone who knew her over the years,” he wrote.</p> <p>“I’ve never known a chicken with the character and personality that this hen had, she was one of a kind. We’ll miss you little Pig.”</p> <p>At 13-years-old, it is likely the sweet bird entered the Irwins’ life soon after dad Steve passed away in 2006.</p> <p>Despite the bittersweet memories attached to Piggy, and the death of crocodile hunter Steve, Bindi says she is hoping to implement her father’s presence at her wedding to Chandler next year. </p> <p>“I really want to include Dad on the day and make sure that he is with us in some way,” Bindi previously told<span> </span><em>People</em>.</p> <p>“Just little bits of Dad that will make it feel like he’s there with us.”</p> <p>The conservationist says she and her fiance are to hold a candle lighting ceremony. </p> <p>“So we’ll be able to all get up as a little family and light a candle in his honour and share a few words on what an amazing dad he was and still is.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the Irwin family with their beloved pet. </p>

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Hopping wet: Stubborn kangaroo jumps back into river after police rescue

<p><span>Police on a jetski were filmed rescuing a kangaroo who went for a swim in a lake in ACT yesterday.</span></p> <p><span>The video of the attempted rescue was filmed on the edge of Lake Burleigh Griffin and featured a very happy marsupial just going for a swim.</span></p> <p><span>Police officers on a jetski pulled the kangaroo onto their jetski in an attempted rescue and dumped the animal on shore, hoping it would hop away to safety.</span></p> <p><span>However, the kangaroo had other ideas.</span></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ul087KosE8g"></iframe></div> <p><span>As soon as the kangaroo was put onto shore, he turned around and jumped back into the water and swam away.</span></p> <p><span>The video ends with disgruntled police officers jetting back to the marsupial.</span></p> <p><span>Commenters were thrilled with the animals determination to keep swimming, as many had never seen a kangaroo in the water before.</span></p> <p><span>“Obviously wants to get to the other side! Kangaroos are great swimmers,” one commenter said.</span></p> <p><span>“Feet like flippers,” another said.</span></p> <p><span>ACT Police spoke to </span><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/science/animals/police-jetski-rescue-foiled-by-stubborn-swimming-kangaroo/news-story/c8d10ff0ae037d66c0b4b15d6044671b" target="_blank">news.com.au</a> </em><span>about the incident, saying that after the camera stopped rolling, the kangaroo was rescued again and taken to the bush.</span></p> <p>“ACT Water Police officers were alerted to a kangaroo in the Central Basin of Lake Burley Griffin,” a spokesperson said.</p> <p>“Officers rescued the kangaroo from the lake, and handed it to parks workers who relocated the kangaroo to a bushland location.”</p>

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New plan unveiled to reduce traffic congestion

<p><span>As congestion continues to persist across Australia, a major new report by think tank Grattan Institute has flagged ‘skinny lanes’ as one of the possible solutions.</span></p> <p><span>According to <a href="https://grattan.edu.au/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/923-Why-its-time-for-congestion-charging.pdf">the report</a>, the narrow lanes would reduce congestion and improve driving safety.</span></p> <p><span>Under the plan, the standard Australian lane width of 3.5 metre could be reduced by up to 14 per cent to accommodate more cars without taking up more road space.</span></p> <p><span>The report argued that skinny lanes could be safer for the motorists sharing the road.</span></p> <p><span>“Larger cars cause more congestion than smaller cars. They not only occupy more space, but also induce other drivers to slow down, partly because they impede the sight lines of those in smaller cars, and partly because those in smaller vehicles know that they are likely to come off worse in any collision,” the report read.</span></p> <p><span>The plan would also encourage more Australians to opt for smaller cars, the report said.</span></p> <p><span>“Australians have increasingly chosen bigger vehicles, as their price has come down and our incomes have gone up,” the report said.</span></p> <p><span>It noted that the ‘reference’ car width used by Austroads is 1.9 metres, corresponding to large vehicles such as a Holden Commodore or a Jeep Cherokee. In comparison, the cars in Europe and Asia are “substantially smaller”, with Japan seeing the rising popularity of 1.48-metre wide ‘kei’ cars.</span></p> <p><span>“Drivers who choose a smaller car would have the advantage of a safer, less crowded lane. Over time, more drivers would choose to buy smaller, less-congesting cars.”</span></p> <p><span>The National Roads and Motorists’ Association (NRMA) said the think tank’s proposal was “pretty alarming”, with spokesperson Peter Khoury questioning the plan’s feasibility in Australia.</span></p> <p><span>“I don't think this idea will get much traction. It won’t really solve the congestion problem,” Khoury told <em><a href="https://www.news.com.au/technology/innovation/motoring/on-the-road/plan-to-speed-up-cities-by-altering-width-of-road-lanes/news-story/8d62acf17a7596538c579e64b2396c92">news.com.au</a></em>.</span></p> <p><span>“You can’t narrow the lanes of say the Sydney Harbour Bridge, for instance, because there are already concerns about trucks, cars and buses sharing the road safely.”</span></p> <p><span>Khoury said Australian drivers are unlikely to follow other countries’ lead in shifting to smaller vehicles due to different circumstances.</span></p> <p><span>“You can’t compare Australia to Sweden or Japan. Australians buy cars for very different reasons from people overseas. We have fewer public transport options, so the family car is not just something to drive the kids to school in, it has to do everything.”</span></p> <p><span>Apart from road alteration, the think tank also suggested introducing a congestion charge into the CBDs of Australia’s capital cities during peak hours to ease heavy traffic. </span></p> <p><span>While the report did not specify a price, Grattan’s transport and cities program director Marion Terrill said the charge should be <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-10-13/should-australia-have-a-congestion-charge/11597022">similar to the cost of taking public transport</a>.</span></p> <p><span>“Our plan tackles congestion without asking communities to pay billions of dollars for major new roads,” said Terrill.</span></p> <p><span>“New York, London, Beijing, Singapore, Stockholm, Milan, and Jakarta all have congestion charging or are heading that way. It’s time for Australian cities to embrace the idea.”</span></p>

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