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Fragments of a dying comet might put on a spectacular show next week – or pass by without a trace

<p>As Earth orbits the Sun, it ploughs through dust and debris left behind by comets and asteroids. That debris <a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-why-meteors-light-up-the-night-sky-35754" target="_blank" rel="noopener">gives birth to meteor showers</a> – which can be one of nature’s most amazing spectacles.</p> <p>Most meteor showers are predictable, recurring annually when the Earth traverses a particular trail of debris.</p> <p>Occasionally, however, Earth runs through a particularly narrow, dense clump of debris. This results in a meteor storm, sending <a href="https://blogs.loc.gov/headlinesandheroes/2020/09/how-newspapers-helped-crowdsource-a-scientific-discovery-the-1833-leonid-meteor-storm/#:%7E:text=The%20Leonid%20meteor%20storm%20was,know%20more%20about%20this%20phenomenon." target="_blank" rel="noopener">thousands of shooting stars streaking across the sky each hour</a>.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465041/original/file-20220524-23-pixuou.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465041/original/file-20220524-23-pixuou.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465041/original/file-20220524-23-pixuou.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=919&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465041/original/file-20220524-23-pixuou.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=919&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465041/original/file-20220524-23-pixuou.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=919&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465041/original/file-20220524-23-pixuou.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=1154&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465041/original/file-20220524-23-pixuou.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=1154&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465041/original/file-20220524-23-pixuou.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=1154&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="Artist's impression of the great Leonid meteor storm of 1833" /></a><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Artist’s impression of the 1833 Leonid meteor storm.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Adolf Vollmy (April 1888)</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p>A minor shower called the Tau Herculids could create a meteor storm for observers in the Americas next week. But while some websites promise “the most powerful meteor storm in generations”, astronomers are a little more cautious.</p> <p><strong>Introducing comet SW3</strong></p> <p>The story begins with a comet called <a href="https://cometography.com/pcomets/073p.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">73P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 3</a> (comet SW3 for short). First spotted in 1930, it is responsible for a weak meteor shower called the Tau Herculids, which nowadays appears to radiate from a point about ten degrees from the bright star Arcturus.</p> <p>In 1995, comet SW3 <a href="https://cometography.com/pcomets/073p.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">suddenly and unexpectedly brightened</a>. A number of outbursts were observed over a few months. The comet had <a href="https://ui.adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1996A%26A...310L..17C/abstract" target="_blank" rel="noopener">catastrophically fragmented</a>, releasing huge amounts of dust, gas, and debris.</p> <p>By 2006 (two orbits later), comet SW3 had disintegrated further, into <a href="https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/Comet_73P.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">several bright fragments accompanied by many smaller chunks</a>.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465044/original/file-20220524-16-tuml3t.gif?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465044/original/file-20220524-16-tuml3t.gif?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465044/original/file-20220524-16-tuml3t.gif?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=576&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465044/original/file-20220524-16-tuml3t.gif?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=576&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465044/original/file-20220524-16-tuml3t.gif?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=576&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465044/original/file-20220524-16-tuml3t.gif?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=723&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465044/original/file-20220524-16-tuml3t.gif?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=723&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465044/original/file-20220524-16-tuml3t.gif?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=723&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="Animated images of comet 73P as seen by the Hubble Space Telescope" /></a><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Fragments of comet 73P seen by the Hubble Space Telescope in 2006.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">NASA, ESA, H. Weaver (APL/JHU), M. Mutchler and Z. Levay (STScI)</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><strong>Is Earth on a collision course?</strong></p> <p>This year, Earth will cross comet SW3’s orbit at the end of May.</p> <p>Detailed computer modelling suggests debris has been spreading out along the comet’s orbit like enormous thin tentacles in space.</p> <p>Has the debris spread far enough to encounter Earth? It depends on how much debris was ejected in 1995 and how rapidly that debris was flung outwards as the comet fell apart. But the pieces of dust and debris are so small we can’t see them until we run into them. So how can we get an insight into what might happen next week?</p> <p><strong>Could history repeat itself?</strong></p> <p>Our current understanding of meteor showers began 150 years ago with an event quite similar to SW3’s story.</p> <p>A comet called <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/061078c0" target="_blank" rel="noopener">comet 3D/Biela</a> was discovered in 1772. It was a short-period comet, like SW3, returning every 6.6 years.</p> <p>In 1846, the comet began to behave strangely. Observers saw its head had split in two, and some described an “archway of cometary matter” between the pieces.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465046/original/file-20220524-18-2sg6h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465046/original/file-20220524-18-2sg6h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465046/original/file-20220524-18-2sg6h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=283&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465046/original/file-20220524-18-2sg6h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=283&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465046/original/file-20220524-18-2sg6h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=283&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465046/original/file-20220524-18-2sg6h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=356&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465046/original/file-20220524-18-2sg6h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=356&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465046/original/file-20220524-18-2sg6h.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=356&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="Sketch of a comet split into two pieces, each with its own tail." /></a><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Sketch of comet 3D/Biela in February 1846, after it split into (at least) two pieces.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Edmund Weiß</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p>At the comet’s next return, in 1852, the two fragments had clearly separated and both were fluctuating unpredictably in brightness.</p> <p>The comet was never seen again.</p> <p>But in late November of 1872, an unexpected meteor storm graced northern skies, stunning observers with rates of more than 3,000 meteors per hour.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465047/original/file-20220524-22-d7c5zp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465047/original/file-20220524-22-d7c5zp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465047/original/file-20220524-22-d7c5zp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465047/original/file-20220524-22-d7c5zp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465047/original/file-20220524-22-d7c5zp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=453&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465047/original/file-20220524-22-d7c5zp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465047/original/file-20220524-22-d7c5zp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465047/original/file-20220524-22-d7c5zp.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=569&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="A paiting showing meteors raining down over mountains" /></a><figcaption><em><span class="caption">The meteor storm of 1872.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Amedee Guillemin</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p>The meteor storm occurred when the Earth crossed 3D/Biela’s orbit: it was where the comet itself should have been two months earlier. A second storm, weaker than the first, occurred in 1885, when the Earth once more encountered the comet’s remains.</p> <p>3D/Biela had disintegrated into rubble, but the two great meteor storms it produced served as a fitting wake.</p> <p>A dying comet, falling apart before our eyes, and an associated meteor shower, usually barely imperceptible against the background noise. Are we about to see history repeat itself with comet SW3?</p> <p><strong>What does this suggest for the Tau Herculids?</strong></p> <p>The main difference between the events of 1872 and this year’s Tau Herculids comes down to the timing of Earth’s crossing of the cometary orbits. In 1872, Earth crossed Biela’s orbit several months <em>after</em> the comet was due, running through material lagging behind where the comet would have been.</p> <p>By contrast, the encounter between Earth and SW3’s debris stream next week happens several months <em>before</em> the comet is due to reach the crossing point. So the debris needs to have spread <em>ahead</em> of the comet for a meteor storm to occur.</p> <p>Could the debris have spread far enough to encounter Earth? Some models suggest we’ll see a strong display from the shower, others suggest the debris will fall just short.</p> <p><strong>Don’t count your meteors before they’ve flashed!</strong></p> <p>Whatever happens, observations of next week’s shower will greatly improve our understanding of how comet fragmentation events happen.</p> <p>Calculations show Earth will <a href="https://www.imo.net/files/meteor-shower/cal2022.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">cross SW3’s orbit at about 3pm, May 31 (AEST)</a>. If the debris reaches far enough forward for Earth to encounter it, then an outburst from the Tau Herculids is likely, but it will only last an hour or two.</p> <p>From Australia, the show (if there is one) will be over before it’s dark enough to see what’s happening.</p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><em><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465059/original/file-20220524-22-pmvu1v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465059/original/file-20220524-22-pmvu1v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465059/original/file-20220524-22-pmvu1v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=322&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465059/original/file-20220524-22-pmvu1v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=322&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465059/original/file-20220524-22-pmvu1v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=322&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465059/original/file-20220524-22-pmvu1v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=405&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465059/original/file-20220524-22-pmvu1v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=405&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465059/original/file-20220524-22-pmvu1v.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=405&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="View of the night sky showing the Tau Herculids radiant" /></a></em><figcaption><em><span class="caption">For observers across Australia, the Tau Herculids radiant is low in the northern sky around 7pm local time.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Museums Victoria/stellarium</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p>Observers in north and south America will, however, have a ringside seat.</p> <p>They are more likely to see a moderate display of slow-moving meteors than a huge storm. This would be a great result, but might be a little disappointing.</p> <p>However, there is a chance the shower could put on a truly spectacular display. Astronomers are travelling across the world, just in case.</p> <p><strong>What about Australian observers?</strong></p> <p>There’s also a small chance any activity will last longer than expected, or even arrive a bit late. Even if you’re in Australia, it’s worth looking up on the evening of May 31, just in case you can get a glimpse of a fragment from a dying comet!</p> <p>The 1995 debris stream is just one of many laid down by the comet in past decades.</p> <p>During the early morning of May 31, around 4am (AEST), Earth will cross debris from the comet’s 1892 passage around the Sun. Later that evening, around 8pm, May 31 (AEST), Earth will cross debris laid down by the comet in 1897.</p> <p>However, debris from those visits will have spread out over time, and therefore we expect only a few meteors to grace our skies from those streams. But, as always, we might be wrong - the only way to know is to go out and see! <!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/182434/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <figure class="align-center zoomable"><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465061/original/file-20220524-23-ilm484.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465061/original/file-20220524-23-ilm484.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/465061/original/file-20220524-23-ilm484.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=322&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465061/original/file-20220524-23-ilm484.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=322&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465061/original/file-20220524-23-ilm484.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=322&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465061/original/file-20220524-23-ilm484.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=405&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465061/original/file-20220524-23-ilm484.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=405&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/465061/original/file-20220524-23-ilm484.png?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=405&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="The night sky at midnight, showing the Tau Herculids radiant." /></a><figcaption><em><span class="caption">By midnight (local time), the Tau Herculids radiant will have moved to the north-western sky, seen from across Australia.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">Museums Victoria/Stellarium</span></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/jonti-horner-3355" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Jonti Horner</a>, Professor (Astrophysics), <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-southern-queensland-1069" target="_blank" rel="noopener">University of Southern Queensland</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/tanya-hill-121214" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Tanya Hill</a>, Honorary Fellow of the University of Melbourne and Senior Curator (Astronomy), <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/museums-victoria-1116" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Museums Victoria</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/fragments-of-a-dying-comet-might-put-on-a-spectacular-show-next-week-or-pass-by-without-a-trace-182434" target="_blank" rel="noopener">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Here’s what happening across New Zealand in June

<p dir="ltr">Winter is rapidly approaching, but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to do during the chilly season.</p> <p dir="ltr">From food festivals to celebrations of the Māori new year, here are three events you won’t want to miss this June.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Taste of Pasifika Festival</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">A festival celebrating Auckland’s Pasifika community will be heading to the city this June for three days of performances, food, art, sport and wellness.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-b4d4ea03-7fff-2121-9775-7916e5b558c7"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Running from 10am-6pm on June 4-6, the <a href="https://www.aucklandnz.com/pasifika/taste-of-pasifika-festival" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Taste of Pasifika Festival</a>’s two stages will feature a varied program of performances from members of 10 Pacific nations, with a live art installation on Saturday night, a soul session on Sunday afternoon, and an open mic and backyard session of Māori waiata on Monday.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/nz-june2.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland</em></p> <p dir="ltr">The festival grounds will also host a marketplace selling kai (traditional Māori cuisine), crafts and other items, as well as activities such as weaving, Hawai’i lei making and block printing, and an exhibition of works from Pasifika artists who used artmaking to find balance and order during the pandemic.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Winter Food and Wine Classic</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Head to Hawke’s Bay for a taste of the region’s food and wine spread across four weekends.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-d2c14158-7fff-ab01-5679-d17ceb7aff14"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Along with plenty of morsels to taste at various degustations and venues across the region, the Winter <a href="https://www.fawc.co.nz/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Food and Wine Classic</a> will include a series of hands-on cooking classes, where you can learn everything from how to debone a chicken or prune fig trees to learning how to cook various cuisines - with most including a luxe lunch.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/nz-june3.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: fawcnz (Instagram)</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Film buffs can also enjoy food-related movies, screening at the MTG Century Theatre, and a series of wine-fuelled film nights at the Smith &amp; Sheth studio theatre.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Matariki Festival</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-dcc1d127-7fff-fc26-53ce-dbb7ef099471">The highlight of Auckland’s winter festivities, <a href="https://www.matarikifestival.org.nz/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Matariki Festival</a> is returning from June 21 to July 16, bringing with it 80 events across the region to celebrate Māori new year which starts with the first rising of the Matariki (the Pleiades star cluster).</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/nz-june1.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Matariki Festival</em></p> <p dir="ltr">This year also marks the first time that Matariki will be celebrated as an official public holiday, and this year’s festival lineup is just as exciting, with highlights including a street party featuring Māori musicians, light shows, kite flying, kai and cultural events.</p> <p dir="ltr">Matariki will also be celebrated across the country, with the annual light festival <a href="https://toiotautahi.org.nz/views/tirama-mai-bringing-the-light/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Tīrama Mai</a> returning to Christchurch, and fireworks planned for the Central Otago town of Lake Wānaka.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-65a110fb-7fff-245c-28d5-f143f90461fc"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Matariki Festival</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Here’s what’s happening across Australia in June

<p dir="ltr">Winter is almost here, bringing shorter days and chillier nights - but that doesn’t mean there’s nothing to do except sit inside.</p> <p dir="ltr">In fact, winter celebrations are happening across the country, with art installations taking over cities and performances of all sorts planned.</p> <p dir="ltr">From immersive art festivals and cabaret shows to desert racing and food festivals, here’s what’s happening across the country this month that you won't want to miss.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>23rd Sydney Biennale</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Though the <a href="https://www.biennaleofsydney.art/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Biennale</a> began in March, there’s plenty of events left to check out in June. </p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-70e3f5e9-7fff-c008-5a46-360ed4ff6dbd"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">This year’s edition of the international art festival is titled <em>rīvus</em>, meaning ‘stream’ in Latin, and features over 330 artworks responding to the theme of water ecology and relationships with the natural world.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/animal-orchestra.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>The Australian premiere of ‘The Great Animal Orchestra’ is open daily and one of the must-see installations at Sydney Biennale. Image: @biennalesydney (Instagram)</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Highlights of the 2022 program include:</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">The Australian premiere of <em>The Great Animal Orchestra</em>, an immersive installation in Barangaroo that uses recordings of 15,000 species of animal recorded in the field in a call to action to preserve Earth’s wild places</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>He Toka Tū Moana | She’s a Rock</em>, a woven installation created by a collaboration of four Māori women called Mata Aho Collective, referencing the meeting place of fresh and salt water.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>Art After Dark</em> - Every Wednesday night, the exhibition will stay open until late and be accompanied by a changing weekly program inspired by the festival’s works and theme.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>Space In Between</em>, a series of self-guided mindful walks and exercises connecting the various Biennale venues that includes unexpected listening points.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">A posthumous presentation of Naziha Mestaoui’s <em>One Beat, One Tree</em> project, where audiences plant a virtual tree and watch it grow with their body movement (and a real tree will be planted for every virtual one).</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Photographic prints of environmental activist Lille Madden, and her grandfather, Gadigal Elder, Uncles Charles (Chicka) Madden on the grass at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, created by English duo Ackroyd & Harvey.</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">To see the full list of events at Barangaroo, the Art Gallery of New South Wales, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Pier 2/3, and the National Art School, head <a href="https://www.biennaleofsydney.art/events/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Adelaide Cabaret Festival</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Curated by Aussie icon Tina Arena, AM, this year’s <a href="https://www.adelaidecabaretfestival.com.au/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Adelaide Cabaret Festival</a> will feature 377 artists and musicians performing in 97 performances between June 10-25.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-afa8c78c-7fff-f1ce-3a4b-3afdf73b431e"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">The lineup will include variety shows, comedy, intimate performances, life drawing classes, and nostalgic concerts - including <em>Songs My Mother Told Me</em>, headlined by Tina Arena herself.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/cabaret.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Take a trip back in time or simply enjoy a few laughs at the Adelaide Cabaret Festival. Image: @adelaidecabaret (Instagram)</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Though most events are just for one night (or two), some will run for the duration of the festival, including: </p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>The Funhouse,</em> led by Paul McDermott, the show promises comedy, music and spectacle with a different lineup of special guests each weekend.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>Cirque Bon Bon</em> runs from June 15-19 and includes acrobatics, contion, aerial shows, and more, hosted by comedian emcee Mario.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>The Pina Colada Room</em> runs from June 10-25 in both an Adelaide exclusive and world premiere. Described as a “decadent homage” to disco icons with a rotating roster of DJ’s and cabaret stars, it’s a chance to get down on the dancefloor and boogie the night away.</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">For a full schedule of events during this year’s festival, head <a href="https://www.adelaidecabaretfestival.com.au/search/?t=events&a=-1%2C19" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Dark Mofo</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><a href="https://darkmofo.net.au/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Dark Mofo</a>, Tasmania’s annual winter festival, returns for another season from June 8-22 with a program jam-packed with art, installations and performances.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-d7bf9aad-7fff-3c72-b949-a6d0e22706fa"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">During Week One, the festival’s full art program will be launched, Tasmania’s Mona gallery will be open late for three new exhibitions, and The Blue Rose Ball, Dark Mofo’s costume event, will be returning.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/dark-mofo.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Art and music will be at the forefront of the winter festivities at Dark Mofo. Image: Jarred Seng (Tourism Tasmania)</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Week Two will focus on music, with the world premiere of several shows from German musician Nils Frahm, titled <em>Music For Hobart</em>, being one of the major highlights.</p> <p dir="ltr">The festival is also welcoming the return of the City of Hobart Winter Fest, Night Mass: Transcendence, and the Nude Solstice Swim.</p> <p dir="ltr">For a full rundown of events happening at Dark Mofo, head <a href="https://darkmofo.net.au/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>RISING:</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-d11ee726-7fff-9082-1a1c-3e358eb7cac9"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">A festival three years in the making, <a href="https://rising.melbourne/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">RISING:</a> will take over Melbourne with 225 events for 12 nights, with public art installations, intimate theatre performances, dance, and music all on the cards.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/rising-the-return.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Jason Tamiru’s experience as a repatriation worker will be one of three stories weaved together in ‘The Return’. Image: Shortcut Creative</em></p> <p dir="ltr">Top picks from the festival lineup include:</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>Golden Square</em>, an installation that will transform a car park into three levels of art, performances and parades - with a rooftop bar as the icing on top.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>The Invisible Opera</em>, a public performance that will bring immersive sound design and live vocal performance - which relies on CCTV cameras and hidden microphones - to Federation Square, showing viewers the city in a brand new light.</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><em>Maureen: Harbinger of Death</em>, a bohemian performance that sees writer and performer Jonny Hawkins take on the character of Maureen, a sharp-tongued doyenne inspired by a friend of his, in a celebration of the rich lives of older women.</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">First Nations artists and performers will also play a vital part in the festival, with Yorta Yorta producer Jason Tamiru’s experiences as a repatriation worker among the three narratives presented in <em>The Return</em>, and trams featuring First Nations artists’ designs among the highlights.</p> <p dir="ltr">To find out more about RISING:, which kicks off on June 1, head <a href="https://rising.melbourne/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Tatts Finke Festival</strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-2e206cf2-7fff-d4cb-c491-487397544e4e"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Fans of off-roading will be sure to enjoy the iconic <a href="https://www.finkedesertrace.com.au/index.php" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Finke Desert Race</a>, a two-day off-road, multi–terrain race across desert country held every year on the Queen’s Birthday long weekend.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/desert-race.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>The Tatts Finke Festival will see racers of various stripes descend on Alice Springs this June. Image: Tourism Australia</em></p> <p dir="ltr">The race from Alice Springs to the community of Aputula (Finke) attracts top Australian and international racers, and is said to be one of the most difficult off-road races in the world.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kicking off from June 10-13, the race is open to bikes, cars, buggies and quads, with spectator tickets costing between $10 to $20 and available to book <a href="https://www.finkedesertrace.com.au/news/media-releases" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a>. </p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-8c8926a8-7fff-1c86-1698-196f71e4b242"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Nick Buckley</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Why the penguins are out in record-breaking numbers

<p dir="ltr">Australia’s Phillip Island, home to the world’s smallest penguins, has been the site of a record-breaking “penguin parade”, with over 5,200 birds crossing the beach in a single night.</p> <p dir="ltr">Every day at dusk, some of these penguins make the trip to their nesting grounds on-shore after hunting for fish, squid, kill and small crustaceans in the ocean in an event that regularly draws large numbers of tourists.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Penguin viewing has occurred at the same location for over 50 years and the birds have been habituated to nightly activity over time,” Paula Wasiak, a Phillip Island Nature Parks field researcher, told <em><a href="https://www.livescience.com/record-breaking-penguin-parade-australia" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Live Science</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">On May 3, 5,219 of the 40-centimetre-tall penguins stormed the beach toward their burrows in less than an hour.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We couldn’t believe our eyes when more than 5,000 penguins came out of the water in less than an hour,” Wasiak said in a <a href="https://www.penguins.org.au/about/media/latest-news/new-news-page-36/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">statement</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">The penguin extravaganza comes just a week after the record for the island’s largest penguin parade was broken, when 4,592 penguins came ashore all at one on April 29 according to Wasiak.</p> <p dir="ltr">Overall, May has seen multiple parades with surprisingly high numbers, with 3,000 to 5,000 birds marching each night.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s been a penguin party night after night, which is unusual for this time of year, let alone in record numbers like we are seeing now,” Wasiak said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Historically, the larger parades tend to take place in November and December during peak breeding season, according to the Penguin Foundation.</p> <p dir="ltr">As for why they’re coming together in such large numbers lately, it might be to do with this year’s La Niña event.</p> <p dir="ltr">Little penguins primarily eat small fish, such as anchovies, which can only live in a narrow temperature range, according to Wasiak.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It suggests that during La Niña years, the ocean conditions around Phillip Island are often ideal for an abundant supply of fish/food close to shore,” she told Live Science.</p> <p dir="ltr">But, Wasiak said the turnout could also be related to another phenomenon called the “autumn breeding attempt”, where older penguins attempt to breed outside of mating season and results in more penguins heading out to forage, or improvements in the island’s habitat.</p> <p dir="ltr">“One of the main areas we’re seeing an increase in penguin attendance is to the east of the colony. In the past, poor habitat erosion in this area meant penguins had difficulty accessing and nesting there,” she explained.</p> <p dir="ltr">“A lot of work has gone into improving dune structure, creating penguin pathways and restoring habitat, which is now paying off.”</p> <p dir="ltr">If you can’t make it to the island for the nightly parades, you can also watch livestreams on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/phillipislandnatureparks" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Facebook</a> and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/user/pipenguinparade" target="_blank" rel="noopener">YouTube</a>.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-34818260-7fff-38dc-9520-442a4219e3ca"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Phillip Island Nature Parks</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Elvis takes centre-stage in unlikely destination

<p dir="ltr">A blockbuster exhibition of all things Elvis Presley is taking over the regional Victorian city of Bendigo, with over 30 activities featuring across the four month celebration.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-e2855737-7fff-6496-3e4e-e95a964df353"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Elvis: Direct From Graceland has taken over Bendigo Art Gallery displaying about 300 personal items on loan from Graceland, Memphis, including Presley’s military uniforms, jumpsuits, his wedding suit and Priscilla’s wedding gown and veil, and their daughter’s toys.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CbWu5Y4twRG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CbWu5Y4twRG/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Bendigo Art Gallery (@bendigoartgallery)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Even the King’s vehicles have made the journey, with his custom Harley Davidson and the red convertible from the film Blue Hawaii - the only car Elvis actually owned from his movies - included in the display.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-72aa5824-7fff-8be8-fb5d-2fbc697e22e9"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">One room is dedicated entirely to his outfits, including the one he wore to meet President Nixon, an array of his bedazzled Vegas suits, and casual off-stage outfits.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/elvis-bendigo1.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Elvis’ personal items, including an array of his dazzling suits, are also on display. Image: @bendigoartgallery (Instagram)</em></p> <p dir="ltr">But, the Elvis-themed festivities extend beyond the gallery, with appropriately themed cuisine appearing in the local restaurants and Bendigo Central’s chocolatier.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ca309c2b-7fff-9f96-9a2a-9c3b3279d53b"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Hustler, Bendigo’s modern American diner, has added two burgers to its menu: the Burning Love burger and the Fool’s Goldburger, featuring a 150g beef patty, crisps, peanut butter and raspberry jelly between a doughnut bun.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CbcDAGZrZrJ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CbcDAGZrZrJ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Hustler (@hustlerbendigo)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-45413cd0-7fff-ddd8-6e60-edc664959410"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Another highlight is the Shake, Rattle and Roll tram, a moving bar operating every weekend and offering Love Me Tender cocktails to sip on as you trundle along the picturesque cityscape with a soundtrack of Elvis classics.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/elvis-bendigo2.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>The Shake, Rattle and Roll tram makes its way through the city streets every weekend. Image: Supplied</em></p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-1b8d5a86-7fff-f037-f508-14530678ffbd"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">The conservatory in Rosalind Park has also been transformed to include interactive displays that pay homage to Elvis’ favourite hangouts, while performers and screening of Elvis movies descend on Hargreaves Mall.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/elvis-bendigo3.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Elvis’ wedding suit and Priscilla Presley’s gown on display at the gallery. Image: @bendigoartgallery (Instagram)</em></p> <p dir="ltr">So whether you’re a die hard Elvis fan or are looking for a unique weekend away, Bendigo will be the place to head to until July 17, when the King heads home once again.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-299505cc-7fff-311f-0183-65dc7bbcb0d2"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: @bendigoartgallery (Instagram)</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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How “liveable” are Australian cities, really? Not at all, if you want to walk

<p>Australian cities are not designed to make their residents healthy – and nor do they have adequate policies in place to improve the health of their residents.</p> <p>Despite being frequently touted as “liveable”, Melbourne, Adelaide and Sydney’s low density and walkability mean they fail to meet health and sustainability thresholds – according to <em>The Lancet Global Health’s </em>new <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/series/urban-design-2022" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Urban Design, Transport and Health Series</a>.</p> <p>This means that residents of these cities often live in areas where it’s difficult to walk or cycle to shops and services, and access healthy food – so the chances of meeting the World Health Organisation’s physical activity guidelines are stacked against them.</p> <p>“It’s easy to say that people should change, but if they can’t walk anywhere, if there’s no public transport, then you can say whatever you like, but it’s very difficult for people to change,” says lead researcher Distinguished Professor Billie Giles-Corti, director of the Healthy Liveable Cities Lab at RMIT University.</p> <p>The series, which is an update to a <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/series/urban-design" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">2016 assessment</a>, examined <a href="https://www.healthysustainablecities.org/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">25 cities around the world</a> for their public health policies, as well as a number of geographical and built environment indicators. These indicators included things like population density, walkability, percentage of the population with access to frequent public transport and fresh food. Many of the metrics were based on indicators from the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, although often with more detail.</p> <p>“Many cities talk about wanting to be healthy, sustainable and liveable in general terms, but they often don’t have the policies in place to deliver that aspiration,” says Giles-Corti.</p> <p>“Our central argument is that if you want to have healthy cities downstream, you’ve got to think about what’s upstream, and the policies that create the intervention.”</p> <p>A full list of the 25 cities, and their scorecards, can be seen at the <a href="https://www.healthysustainablecities.org/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">Global Observatory of Healthy and Sustainable Cities</a> website.</p> <p>The three Australian cities in the study – Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney – all scored poorly on density, connectivity and walkability.</p> <p>For instance, only 53.7% of Adelaide residents, 49.4% of Melbourne residents, and 57.7% of Sydney residents live within 500 metres of a public transport stop that’s serviced at least every 20 minutes.</p> <p>Cities like Sao Paulo (94%), Hong Kong (83%) and Lisbon (93%) all compare favourably. The 11 European cities in the study, in fact, outperformed the Australian cities on nearly every indicator.</p> <p>The results stand in stark contrast to things like the Economist Intelligence Unit’s <a href="https://www.eiu.com/n/campaigns/global-liveability-index-2021/" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">index of liveability</a>, which Australian cities frequently top.</p> <p>“The Economist Intelligence Unit is not telling you anything about the lived experience of the average person in the city,” says Giles-Corti.</p> <p>“What it’s telling you about is what it’s going to be like for an executive who’s going to live in the inner city, where it is probably very walkable.”</p> <p>The much lower density of Australian cities, by contrast, makes them less liveable for most residents.</p> <p>“If you want to have some vibrancy, if you want to have shops and services nearby, if you want to have public transport, there’s a minimum level of density that’s required to be able to deliver that,” says Giles-Corti.</p> <p>“Australian cities have, since the last World War, become very low density. We’ve got this incredible urban sprawl. And that means that shops and services are very spread out.”</p> <p>She says that other surveys she and her colleagues have done in Brisbane and Perth indicate that this isn’t how most Australians want to live – a majority would rather be closer to shops and services.</p> <p>“The reason why it’s very expensive to live in Fitzroy is because lots of people want to live there. So I don’t think we should just assume that, because people live in outer suburban areas, that’s their first choice.”</p> <p>The researchers are hoping that the study will allow people to see which policies are better at improving urban health.</p> <p>“What we need to have is policy and spatial indicators that we can use to benchmark and monitor cities over time,” says Giles-Corti.</p> <p>“That way, we can actually see: do we have the policy and frameworks in place to deliver the cities that we need? And how well are they performing?”</p> <p>This will have environmental, as well as health-based, implications.</p> <p>“Many of the lower-middle income countries are rapidly urbanising,” says Giles-Corti.</p> <p>“If they follow what we’ve done in Australia, the US and New Zealand, and create these very car-dominated cities, that is very bad for the world. That’s a lot more cars on the road, a lot more greenhouse gas emissions, and a lot more congestion that’s going to slow cities down.”</p> <p><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=191121&amp;title=How+%E2%80%9Cliveable%E2%80%9D+are+Australian+cities%2C+really%3F+Not+at+all%2C+if+you+want+to+walk" width="1" height="1" data-spai-target="src" data-spai-orig="" data-spai-exclude="nocdn" /></p> <div id="contributors"> <p><em><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/news/liveability-walkability-australia-cities/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/ellen-phiddian">Ellen Phiddian</a>. Ellen Phiddian is a science journalist at Cosmos. She has a BSc (Honours) in chemistry and science communication, and an MSc in science communication, both from the Australian National University.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> </div>

Domestic Travel

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New Zealand’s borders to open earlier than expected

<p dir="ltr">New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern has confirmed that New Zealand’s border will be open to all visitors from July 31 - two months earlier than expected.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-dbea8701-7fff-c58d-99ec-45bddeacb5ad"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">While speaking at a Business NZ lunch in Auckland on Wednesday, Ms Ardern confirmed the new date for reopening, initially set for October, which will see all visa categories be allowed in.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CdZ_FWOsVC5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CdZ_FWOsVC5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Grounded Kiwis (@groundedkiwis)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Ms Ardern also announced changes to immigration, including pathways for highly skilled workers in global demand to gain residency, as reported by the <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/covid-19-omicron-outbreak-jacinda-ardern-confirms-new-zealands-borders-fully-reopen-from-july-31/XF6OWFMGGLRGXTENVOSRQKGV5U/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZ Herald</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">“New Zealand is in demand and now fully open for business,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This will be welcome news for families, businesses and our migrant communities. It also provides certainty and good preparation time for airlines  and cruise ship companies planning a return to New Zealand in the peak spring and summer seasons.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The changes will also be welcomed by the tertiary education sector - who can now welcome back international students, as well as industries suffering from worker shortages and split migrant families who need visas and have been separated for over two years.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-d5a93264-7fff-db7a-b2a6-ce020df09509"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Celebrity chef Kylie Kwong shares her top Aussie travel picks

<p dir="ltr">Kylie Kwong has shared her fondest memories of holidaying in Byron Bay, some top choices from her travel bucket list, and tips for travelling and dining sustainably that you can use on your next Aussie holiday.</p> <p dir="ltr">The celebrity chef, TV presenter and author spoke to <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/travel/chef-kylie-kwongs-top-recommendations-for-australia-holidays/XR346QGAU6KQXLTBITXKJPKC4Q/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZHerald</a> </em>about her unmissable destinations, including returning to the Northern Territory.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I want to visit the spirited outback centre of Mbantua (Alice Springs) in the Northern Territory,” she told the publication. “Many years ago I stayed in Arnhem Land yet since then I have made so many Aboriginal friends and learnt so much more about their traditions and culture. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I would welcome this visit to explore the Red Centre, its contemporary and traditional art, natural wonders including the East and West MacDonnell Ranges, Uluru (Ayers Rock), Kata-Tjuta (Olgas) and Watarrka (Kings Canyon) and to gain more of an understanding and appreciation of the ancient wisdom of First Nations people of Australia.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Other experiences and destinations Kwong hopes to tick off her list include lunching at Pipit, in the Northern Rivers region, doing a masterclass with Rodney Dunne at The Agrarian Kitchen, Tasmania, and staying at Brigitte Hafner’s Tedesca Osteria in the Mornington Peninsula.</p> <p dir="ltr">Kwong also shared her fondest memory of weeks-long holidays in Byron Bay with her extended family, where they spent “every waking hour” at Clarkes’ Beach and devoured plenty of seafood.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We spent every waking hour on the beach and when it was time for lunch, my mum’s sister, Aunty Jane, would hang a beach towel on the apartment balcony and we would all race up the beach like little soldier crabs to enjoy freshly peeled, super sweet school prawns jam-packed between pillowy-soft white sliced bread, tomato sauce and iceberg lettuce,” Kwong recalled.</p> <p dir="ltr">“My Uncle Johnny and his family lived in Yamba so they would join us - he is a keen fisherman and would arrive with an esky overflowing with live mud crabs and one of the family highlights was cooking and feasting upon Black Bean and Chilli Mud Crab together!”</p> <p dir="ltr">Walking the tracks of Tasmania’s Bay of Fires and Cradle Mountain, exploring Barossa Valley, and spending a week swimming and fishing for barramundi in The Kimberley Ranges were also among Kwong’s great holiday experiences.</p> <p dir="ltr">As for those wanting to travel and support sustainable eateries, Kwong shared a few choice options from around the country.</p> <p dir="ltr">“NSW’s south coast beaches and seafood are pristine,” Kwong said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The Bay of Fires, Cradle Mountain and walking tracks in Tasmania; also the pristine wild islands of King Island and Flinder’s Island and their incredible seafood.</p> <p dir="ltr">“In South Australia, head to the Summertown Aristologist in Adelaide Hills for locally sourced produce and locally crafted natural wine.”</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-182e4948-7fff-428d-87ca-082c7be44e83"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: @kylie_kwong (Instagram)</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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A new light festival is heading to Sydney Zoo

<p dir="ltr">Sydney’s newest zoo is welcoming a festival of lights that promises to rival the annual Vivid festival with dazzling exhibitions and a chance to get up close to some iconic critters.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-7e369fc9-7fff-34bd-6b21-7ab03378e625"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">GLOW will be taking over the Western Sydney zoo in Bungarribee nightly between Friday, May 13 and Sunday, June 5.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CdIVzWDqMPo/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CdIVzWDqMPo/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Sydney Zoo 🦁 (@thesydneyzoo)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The star of the show will be the GLOW Light Walk, which takes visitors on a full tour of the zoo complete with giant glowing animal lanterns and sculptures, and past the festival’s other attractions, including a12-metre tunnel of fairy lights, and a giant glowing Ferris wheel.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-999ef17b-7fff-5aa2-77cb-1020dec7dfb5"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Fans of creepy crawlies can also enjoy the Reptile &amp; Nocturnal house - the biggest in the country - and come face-to-face with snakes and glowing UV scorpions.</p> <p dir="ltr"><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/05/glow-1.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>GLOW’s extensive list of attractions include real-life UV scorpions (left) and towering interactive installations such as Trumpet Flowers (right). Images: Sydney Zoo</em></p> <p dir="ltr">The neon festival will also include the Glow Zone, featuring an ice rink, golf course, and Octopoda, a giant statue with eight tentacle-drums that light up, as well as plenty of food and drink.</p> <p dir="ltr">GLOW has also been designed to be as accessible and inclusive as possible with no hills of steps to grapple with.</p> <p dir="ltr">Tickets start at $25 online - which you can book <a href="https://sydneyzoo.com/glow" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a> - or $30 at the gate, while babies under two enter for free.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-09f693ab-7fff-720f-8380-e9042b4dbaac"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Sydney Zoo</em></p>

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Learn something new at a Pint of Science event near you

<p dir="ltr">Global science festival <a href="https://pintofscience.com.au/festival/2022/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Pint of Science</a> is back for 2022, with in-person and online events across 23 pubs and breweries from May 9-11.</p> <p dir="ltr">As the name suggests, Pint of Science takes scientific talks - tackling everything from tarantulas and time travel to 3D-printing body parts and the afterlife of stars - into a community environment to drive our appreciation of all things science.</p> <p dir="ltr">This year’s program sees a return of talks to venues across <a href="https://pintofscience.com.au/locations/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">11 Australian cities</a> and one New Zealand location, including:</p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Melbourne</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Brisbane</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Sydney</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Adelaide</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Perth</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Canberra</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Hobart</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Darwin</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Cairns</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Newcastle</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Geelong</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Palmerston North</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">The festival’s online component will see scientists take over podcasts and radio shows to talk about their field, and will include interviews and articles diving into science, and Pod of Science, a piece of festival you can listen to wherever you are via <a href="https://soundcloud.com/user-307180657" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Soundcloud</a>. </p> <p dir="ltr">“After two years of being able to enjoy Pint of Science in your comfy loungeroom, we’re stoked to welcome you back to your local pub,” Pint of Science CEOs Jin-oh Choi and Chanel Egan <a href="https://pintofscience.com.au/festival/2022/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">said in a statement</a> on Pint of Science’s website.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The brilliant thing about Pint of Science is that everyone learns from the events - the attendees learn about current research, the speakers gain experience in presenting their research, the local volunteers meet like-minded people and have fun organising events, and the national volunteers gain experience about how a not-for-profit works behind the scenes to facilitate a banger of a festival.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The entire festival is run entirely by volunteers, with this year’s program enlisting the help of 38 national volunteers, 100 event volunteers, and 120 speakers.</p> <p dir="ltr">To find out what’s happening near you and buy tickets, click <a href="https://pintofscience.com.au/locations/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a> for Australia’s program or <a href="https://pintofscience.nz/locations/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">here</a> for New Zealand’s. </p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-c85afb15-7fff-185e-2cf3-a17b2b539c7a"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Pint of Science AU (Facebook)</em></p>

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Satellites interfere with Indigenous astronomy

<p>Since time immemorial, Indigenous peoples worldwide have observed, tracked and memorised all the visible objects in the night sky.</p> <p>This ancient star knowledge was meticulously ingrained with practical knowledge of the land, sky, waters, community and the Dreaming — and passed down through generations.</p> <p>One of the most well-known and celebrated Aboriginal constellations is the Emu in the Sky, which appears in the southern sky early in the year. It is an example of a dark constellation, which means it’s characterised by particularly dark patches in the sky, rather than stars.</p> <p>Conversely, space technology companies such as Starlink are increasingly competing to dominate the skies, and potentially change them forever.</p> <p>The modern-day space race has led to thousands of satellites being scattered through Earth’s outer orbits. If left unchallenged, these companies risk overpopulating an already crowded space environment – potentially pushing dark skies to extinction.</p> <p><strong>Mega-constellations</strong></p> <p>Mega-constellations are groupings of satellites that communicate and work together as they orbit Earth.</p> <p>Since 2018, the Starlink project, run by Elon Musk’s SpaceX, has launched about 1,700 satellites into low Earth orbit. The company plans to launch another <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2021/08/19/spacex-starlink-satellite-internet-new-capabilities-starship-launch.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">30,000 over the next decade</a>.</p> <p>British company OneWeb has launched nearly 150 satellites, with plans <a href="https://www.spaceconnectonline.com.au/launch/5111-oneweb-to-deploy-over-half-its-constellation-satellites-this-month" target="_blank" rel="noopener">for another 6,000</a>. And Amazon intends to launch an additional <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2021/11/01/amazons-project-kuiper-launching-first-internet-satellites-in-q4-2022.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">3,000 satellites</a> into multiple orbits.</p> <figure class="align-center "><em><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/458059/original/file-20220414-20-rmk6kw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/458059/original/file-20220414-20-rmk6kw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=337&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458059/original/file-20220414-20-rmk6kw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=337&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458059/original/file-20220414-20-rmk6kw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=337&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458059/original/file-20220414-20-rmk6kw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=424&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458059/original/file-20220414-20-rmk6kw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=424&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458059/original/file-20220414-20-rmk6kw.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=424&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="A satellite hovering in orbit above Earth." /></em><figcaption><em><span class="caption">A growing number of Starlink satellites can be found in low orbit around Earth.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-illustration/minsk-minskiy-district-belarus-19-january-2110892792" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Shutterstock</a></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p>Each of these companies is taking to the skies to increase internet access across the globe. But even if they deliver on this, sky gazers — and especially Indigenous peoples — are left to wonder: at what cost?</p> <p><strong>Streaks in the night</strong></p> <p>People across the globe began noticing streaks across our skies not long after the first Starlink launch in May 2019. They were unlike anything anyone had seen before.</p> <p>Astronomers are very used to viewing the sky and dealing with interference, often originating from aircraft or the occasional satellite. However, the goal of mega-constellations is to engulf the entire planet, <a href="https://spacenews.com/spacex-launches-another-set-of-starlink-satellites-as-it-nears-global-coverage/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">leaving no place untouched</a>. Mega-constellations alter our collective view of the stars. And there is currently no known way to remove them.</p> <p>One mega-constellation has been observed to <a href="https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2020/1/7/21003272/space-x-starlink-astronomy-light-pollution" target="_blank" rel="noopener">produce up to 19 parallel streaks</a> across the sky. These streaks disturb astronomical observations, and a significant amount of scientific data can be lost as a result.</p> <figure class="align-center "><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/458060/original/file-20220414-17-8ym1fy.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/458060/original/file-20220414-17-8ym1fy.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458060/original/file-20220414-17-8ym1fy.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458060/original/file-20220414-17-8ym1fy.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458060/original/file-20220414-17-8ym1fy.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458060/original/file-20220414-17-8ym1fy.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458060/original/file-20220414-17-8ym1fy.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="Satellites leaving streaks in the night sky." /><figcaption><em><span class="caption">Satellites can leave streaks in the night sky.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/starlink-satellites-summer-night-sky-1753118759" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Shutterstock</a></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p>As they travel across the entire sky, scattering the Sun’s light, dark constellations become even fainter — further desecrating Indigenous knowledge and kinship with the environment.</p> <p><a href="https://academic.oup.com/mnrasl/article/504/1/L40/6188393" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Further research</a> on the impacts of mega-constellations have found that as they orbit Earth, the Sun’s rays are reflected off them and scattered into the atmosphere.</p> <p>The authors of that study conclude we are collectively experiencing a new type of “skyglow” as a result: a phenomenon in which the brightness of the sky increases due to human-made light pollution.</p> <p>Initial calculations indicate this new source of light pollution has increased the brightness of night skies globally by about 10%, compared with the natural skyglow measured in the 1960s.</p> <p>Currently, the upper limit of light pollution tolerable at observatories <a href="https://www-cambridge-org.virtual.anu.edu.au/core/journals/transactions-of-the-international-astronomical-union/article/commission-50-identification-and-protection-of-existing-or-potential-observatory-sites-identification-et-protection-des-sites-dobservatoires-existants-ou-potentiels/5483EC52C57F73B2246AF593513A2D9D" target="_blank" rel="noopener">is 10% above the natural skyglow</a>, which suggests we have already reached the limit.</p> <p>In other words, scientific observations of the sky are already at risk of being rendered redundant. If this excess skyglow increases even more, observatories are at serious risk.</p> <p><strong>Indigenous sky sovereignty</strong></p> <p>Indigenous knowledge systems and oral traditions teach us about the intricate and complex relationships Indigenous peoples have with the environment, including the sky.</p> <p>For example, many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cultures have no concept of “outer space”. They only have a continuous and connected reality where coexistence with all things is paramount.</p> <p>As captured by the <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0962629818304086?via%3Dihub" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Bawaka Country</a> group, based in northeast Arnhem Land:</p> <blockquote> <p>…to hurt Sky Country, to try and possess it, is an ongoing colonisation of the plural lifeworlds of all those who have ongoing connections with and beyond the sky.</p> </blockquote> <p>Desecrating the sky impacts Indigenous sovereignty as it limits access to their knowledge system, in the same ways desecrating the land has removed First Peoples from their countries, cultures and ways of life.</p> <p>For example, the Gamilaraay and Wiradjuri peoples of New South Wales observe the Emu in the Sky to gauge when it is time to hunt for emu eggs — and most importantly, when it is time to stop. How would the Gamilaraay know when to stop collecting eggs, or when to conduct annual ceremonies signalled by the Celestial Emu, if it was no longer visible?</p> <p>Similarly, important parts of the Jukurrpa, or Dreaming of the Martu people of Western Australia is embedded in the Seven Sisters constellation. How would they keep this knowledge safe if they can’t locate any of the Sisters?</p> <p>Indigenous histories teach us about the devastating consequences of colonialism, and how the impacts of the colonial agenda can be mitigated through prioritising the health of country and community.</p> <p>In the words of <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-020-01238-3" target="_blank" rel="noopener">astronomer Aparna Venkatesan and colleagues</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>…the manner and pace of ‘occupying’ near-Earth space raise the risk of repeating the mistakes of colonisation on a cosmic scale.</p> </blockquote> <p>Active Indigenous sky sovereignty acknowledges the interconnected nature between land and sky, and that caring for country includes sky country. By doing so, it challenges <a href="https://digitalrepository.unm.edu/amst_etds/81/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">the otherwise unimpeded authority</a> of technology corporations.</p> <p><strong>Harming fauna, harming ourselves</strong></p> <p>By understanding that the world (and indeed the Universe) is interconnected, we see that no living creature is immune to the consequences of polluting the skies.</p> <p>Currently, native fauna such as the tammar wallaby, magpie, bogong moth and marine turtles are experiencing a <a href="https://www.awe.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/national-light-pollution-guidelines-wildlife.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reduction in populations and quality of life</a> due to the impacts of light-pollution.</p> <figure class="align-center "><em><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/458063/original/file-20220414-30327-7xnlx8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" sizes="(min-width: 1466px) 754px, (max-width: 599px) 100vw, (min-width: 600px) 600px, 237px" srcset="https://images.theconversation.com/files/458063/original/file-20220414-30327-7xnlx8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 600w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458063/original/file-20220414-30327-7xnlx8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1200w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458063/original/file-20220414-30327-7xnlx8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=600&amp;h=400&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 1800w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458063/original/file-20220414-30327-7xnlx8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=1 754w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458063/original/file-20220414-30327-7xnlx8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=30&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=2 1508w, https://images.theconversation.com/files/458063/original/file-20220414-30327-7xnlx8.jpg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=15&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;h=503&amp;fit=crop&amp;dpr=3 2262w" alt="A tammar wallaby with young in its pouch." /></em><figcaption><em><span class="caption">The tammar wallaby is just one Australian species affected by light pollution.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="source" href="https://www.shutterstock.com/image-photo/wallaby-young-animal-pouch-undergrowth-1840354798" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Shutterstock</a></span></em></figcaption></figure> <p>Migratory species are particularly affected by light pollution, which can result in them losing access to their migratory route. This is a crisis Australia’s fauna has faced since before the introduction of mega-constellations.</p> <p>With more skyglow and light pollution, positive outcomes for native fauna and migratory species diminish.</p> <p><strong>Going forward</strong></p> <p>Several companies have made attempts to reduce the impact of mega-constellations on skyglow.</p> <p>For example, OneWeb has opted to rollout fewer satellites than initially proposed, and has designed them to be positioned at a higher altitude. This means <a href="https://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/2012/2012.05100.pdf" target="_blank" rel="noopener">they will produce less skyglow</a>, while also covering a larger area.</p> <p>Starlink, on the other hand, has not shown any public interest in operating at higher and less impactful altitudes, for fears it will <a href="https://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2021/04/fcc-lets-spacex-cut-satellite-altitude-to-improve-starlink-speed-and-latency/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">impact the Starlink network’s speed and latency.</a></p> <p>That said, they have attempted to reduce their satellites’ luminosity by painting them with a novel anti-reflective coating. Coating techniques have demonstrated a reduction in reflected sunlight by up to 50%. Unfortunately, not all wavelengths of <a href="https://arxiv.org/abs/2010.04655" target="_blank" rel="noopener">light being scattered are reduced using this method</a>. So multi-wave astronomy, and different species of animals, are still at risk.</p> <p>We’ll need more solutions to navigate our increasingly polluted atmosphere, particularly if communication monopolies continue to rein over near-Earth space.</p> <p>Just as some companies have started considering tactics to avoid increasing skyglow, all space tech companies must be held responsible for adding to an already polluted space.</p> <p>Guidelines such as those set by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee offer solutions to this problem. They suggest lowering the height of a satellite’s orbit when it’s no longer needed, <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-06170-1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">allowing it to disintegrate as it falls</a> down to Earth.</p> <p>However, these are international guidelines, so there’s no legal framework to enforce such practices.</p> <p>And given that near-miss collisions have already <a href="https://techcrunch.com/2019/09/03/near-miss-between-science-craft-and-starlink-satellite-shows-need-to-improve-orbital-coordination/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">taken place between some mega-constellations</a>, and an estimated 20,000 pieces of space debris already floating above, reducing orbital pollution must also now be a priority.</p> <p>Reducing air pollutants has also been shown to drastically <a href="https://doi.org/10.1093/mnrasl/slab030" target="_blank" rel="noopener">decrease natural sky brightness</a>, offering a potential solution for improving night sky visibility — not to mention cleaner breathing air for all.</p> <p>In valuing Indigenous knowledge systems, that value must be extended to the natural environment in which that knowledge is embedded and founded upon. In Australia, preserving dark skies is not just vital for the continuation of Indigenous knowledge and astronomers — it benefits us all.</p> <p>A major tenet of life for Indigenous peoples is valuing the sustainability of one’s actions. By adopting this at a larger scale, we could create a reality in which we’re not a threat to our own survival.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/173840/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/karlie-noon-1310291" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Karlie Noon</a>, Astronomer, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/australian-national-university-877" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Australian National University</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/thousands-of-satellites-are-polluting-australian-skies-and-threatening-ancient-indigenous-astronomy-practices-173840" target="_blank" rel="noopener">original article</a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p>

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Here’s how to support farmers and the environment on National Banana Day

<p dir="ltr">Though <a href="https://abgc.org.au/2021/04/30/banana-growers-celebrate-national-banana-day/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">95 percent</a> of Aussie households buy an average of 800 grams of bananas each week, there’s one variety that most of us have seen but don’t know much about: red-wax tipped bananas.</p> <p dir="ltr">Most of us will have seen them in our local supermarket, but research suggests that only 4 percent of us know what the significance of the wax is.</p> <p dir="ltr">For National Banana Day on May 1, members of the Australian banana industry are urging fans of the potassium-packed fruit to show their support for farmers doing their bit for the environment, and all we need to do is pick these eye-catching bananas.</p> <p dir="ltr">The red wax on the ends of these bananas signifies that they’re grown using Ecoganic farming methods, which avoids synthetic and organic fertilisers and is certified by the Great Barrier Reef Foundation.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Ecoganic farming explained</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">This style of farming, conceptualised and perfected by Australian growers Frank and Diane Sciaccia, seeks to avoid the environmental impacts that traditional farming has.</p> <p dir="ltr">Since fertilisers can impact the health of soil, waterways, and wildlife, Mr Sciaccia was inspired to develop ways of farming that use products that have a minimal impact and allow the biodiversity and health of the soil to improve, with an overarching goal of having zero impact on nearby waterways.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We wanted to farm differently, with nature at the heart of what we do,” Mr Sciaccia said in a statement.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Nature keeps everything in balance, and understanding the natural capital you have available to you enables you to get rid of all the harmful chemicals. </p> <p dir="ltr">“The result is a farming method that is good for the environment and at the same time produces far superior bananas, just as nature intended."</p> <p dir="ltr">Certified growers are required to undertake fortnightly monitoring of biodiversity levels, as well as audits every six months and annual carbon testing.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to the Ecoganic <a href="http://www.eco-banana.com.au/ecoganic/wordpress/index.php/ecoganics/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">website</a>, growers regularly supply soil samples that are “tested and verified by independent agencies” to verify that growers aren’t using synthetic or organic chemicals.</p> <p dir="ltr">As a result, the red-tipped bananas are guaranteed to be free of harmful pesticides and grown using environmentally-conscious methods.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-d3449862-7fff-d39f-245f-c3470ee71034"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Supplied</em></p>

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72-year-old hiker begins 22,000km trek following in footsteps of Marco Polo

<p dir="ltr">A 72-year-old Italian hiker has begun a 22,000 kilometre trip from Venice to Beijing, following in the footsteps of her hero, Marco Polo.</p> <p dir="ltr">Vienna Cammarota started her journey from the explorer’s birthplace on Wednesday, April 27, and is planning to travel across 15 countries while following the medieval trade route.</p> <p dir="ltr">If all goes to plan, Ms Cammarota will be arriving in Beijing by December 2025, as reported by <em><a href="https://www.nzherald.co.nz/travel/italian-grandmother-sets-off-on-22000km-walk-in-footsteps-of-marco-polo/VACLCVOHGBPAC4QU5OG5R5HWAE/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">NZ Herald</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Following the route taken by Marco Polo 750 years ago, Ms Cammarota will be supported on her trip by her three daughters and grandchildren, who will send parcels of food and clothes as she needs them.</p> <p dir="ltr">But you can’t undertake such a trip without some cash, and Ms Cammarota told local media she has saved a total of 40,000 Euros ahead of the trek.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But I will look for hospitality to save as much as I can and where I can,” she added.</p> <p dir="ltr">This historically-inspired trip isn’t the first Ms Cammarota has taken, but it’s definitely her most ambitious.</p> <p dir="ltr">The experienced hiker previously walked the length of Nepal to Everest, followed Jesus’ Biblical route through Palestine, and trekked across the Italian Alps in the footsteps of German philosopher Goethe.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I love history, culture and archaeology, and I walk in order to see and recount, but above all to listen,” she explained. </p> <p dir="ltr">To make her journey less monotonous, she told the Euro-Cities blog she would spend the time reading her copy of Marco Polo’s diary and by performing mental arithmetic.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-5590d24e-7fff-fc7f-109a-ec4e91353bc4"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Vienna Cammarota (Facebook)</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Commuters rejoice! Auckland’s first electric ferries to set sail in 2024

<p dir="ltr">Two electric ferries are expected to be in the waters of Auckland by 2024 after the New Zealand government announced it would contribute $27 million in funding for the project.</p> <p dir="ltr">Minister of Energy and Resources Megan Woods made the announcement outside Auckland’s downtown ferry terminal, confirming that the funds would come from the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Authority, as reported by <em><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/environment/climate-news/128452777/government-commits-27m-for-electric-ferries-in-auckland" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Stuff</a></em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">The funds will also cover the majority of the project’s costs and will account for approximately 75 percent of the cost to build the two ferries.</p> <p dir="ltr">“This project will be a major boost to the rapidly developing maritime clean technology sector in New Zealand and will further upskill the maritime transport sector in New Zealand,” Ms Woods said. </p> <p dir="ltr">“This is a boost for our climate goals and our economy, which is especially vital as we continue our economic recovery from COVID-19.”</p> <p dir="ltr">With the city’s current, ageing fleet of ferries accounting for nearly seven percent of public transport journeys and about 20 percent of public transport emissions, Climate Change Minister James Shaw said the new ferries were “another important step” in working towards a low emissions future.</p> <p dir="ltr">“As a harbour city, getting around by ferry is the norm for many thousands of Auckalnders,” Mr Shaw said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Today’s announcement means that instead of fossil fuels powering many of those journeys, people will be getting around in ways that help create a climate-friendly, prosperous future for New Zealand.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The ferries, developed by Auckland-based <a href="https://evmaritime.com/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">EV Maritime</a>, will also contribute to Auckland City Council’s commitment to halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2030, which requires transport emissions to be slashed by 64 percent.</p> <p dir="ltr">They have been developed with a range capable of covering several routes in Auckland’s inner and mid-harbour with a design similar to the electric ferry running in Wellington.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Woods announced the government would also be supporting 15 big businesses to move away from using fossil fuels in their production processes, providing $13 million in funding that will be matched by $32.66 million from private industry.</p> <p dir="ltr">“In partnering with the private sector through the third round of the Government Investment in Decarbonising Industry (GIDI) Fund we’re helping clean up production processes, and helping business stay ahead of the curve.”</p> <p dir="ltr">It comes just months after the first electric passenger ferry in the Southern Hemisphere <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/wellington-top-stories/127908781/electric-ferry-makes-maiden-passenger-voyage-across-wellington-harbour" target="_blank" rel="noopener">made its maiden journey</a> across Wellington’s harbour.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Ika Rere (“flying fish”) in Wellington can carry a maximum of 135 passengers - compared to the 99-person limit of its diesel predecessors - while its Auckland counterparts will seat up to 200 people.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-996c629c-7fff-77cd-49bf-fe52f45e6d96"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: EV Maritime (Facebook)</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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The stunning tourist spot that gives you that sinking feeling

<p dir="ltr">Umpherston Sinkhole, also known as the Sunken Garden, is fast becoming a “must-see” tourist destination for local explorers of South Australia and its beautiful surrounds. </p> <p dir="ltr">The stunning garden used to be a limestone cave in Mount Gambier, and is a five-hour drive from Adelaide or Melbourne.</p> <p dir="ltr">The sinkhole became a garden in 1886 when Scottish emigrant farmer James Umpherston purchased the land after the cave’s chamber collapsed. </p> <p dir="ltr">A gorgeous picturesque landscape, the sinkhole offers stunning views of a fountain, hydrangeas and tree ferns. Sheltered areas and easily accessible barbecue facilities make it the ideal place for a picnic – but be warned that unfortunately, access to the Garden is not currently pram or wheelchair friendly.</p> <p dir="ltr">The garden is open every day from dawn till dusk, with possums emerging from their hiding spots to eat. Guests are even welcome to bring their own snacks to feed them.</p> <p dir="ltr">City of Mount Gambier Mayor Lynette Martin said the Garden is a place to enjoy a unique experience.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Set in a beautifully maintained park, this century-old Sunken Garden is home to an oasis of flowering hydrangeas,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Appreciate its size from the viewing platforms at the top then wander down into the sinkhole to take in all its beauty. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Enjoy a unique experience with a picnic or barbecue in the gardens and return at dusk to meet the resident possums who enjoy being fed fresh fruit.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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What makes doctors likely to stay in the countryside?

<p>A <a href="https://doi.org/10.5694/mja2.51476" target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">study</a> published this week in the <em>Medical Journal of Australia</em> (MJA) investigates the factors that make Australian doctors more likely to practice in rural communities after graduation.  </p> <p>“An adequate rural medical workforce is critical for continuity of care and the health and wellbeing of rural communities,” the study authors write.</p> <p>The research looked at data from doctors trained at 11 Australian medical schools, tracking how many of them were practicing medicine in metropolitan, regional or rural areas of Australia five and eight years following their graduation in 2011.</p> <p><strong>Rural origins and training experiences are key</strong></p> <p>Medical graduates who came from a rural background themselves, or who had undertaken extended rural placement during their training, were significantly more likely to move to or remain in rural practice.</p> <p>Graduates who fulfilled both categories – who were of rural origin <em>and</em> had extended rural training experience – were about 3.6 times as likely to be working in regional areas and 4.8 times as likely to be working in rural areas eight years after graduation, compared to graduates who came from cities and had not completed extended rural placement.</p> <p>Katie Willson, a GP junior registrar currently working in Murray Bridge, fits this description. She grew up in Toowoomba before moving to Brisbane and then Adelaide, studying medicine through a special rural stream at Flinders University.</p> <p>“As a trainee, I really liked that you were so hands-on,” Willson explains. “A lot of my [metropolitan] colleagues were just trailing at the end of the team in a big hospital.</p> <p>“In the country, I was the one working with the doctor. I found that my skills and knowledge progressed way faster than I expected.”</p> <p>The new study also found that graduates who were not of rural origin but had an extended rural training experience were 2.7 times as likely to be practicing in rural areas eight years after graduation, compared to their metropolitan fellows who had not had this experience.</p> <p><strong>Moving from rural to metro and back again</strong></p> <p>Between the five-year and eight-year timepoints, comparatively few graduates moved from metropolitan to rural locations or vice versa.</p> <p>However, the authors noted that the overall proportion of 2011 graduates practicing in rural locations rose during the study period, from 7.6% at five years post-graduation to 9.4% eight years post-graduation. This suggests doctors may be moving to rural communities after completing training that is more accessible in the cities.</p> <p>Sarah Trewren, originally from Berri in the SA Riverland, completed her medical degree in 2020 and is currently working at the Royal Adelaide Hospital. However, she hopes to return to rural practice in her future career.</p> <div class="newsletter-box"> <div id="wpcf7-f6-p187890-o1" class="wpcf7" dir="ltr" lang="en-US" role="form"> </div> </div> <p>“My dad was a rural GP in Berri – he worked there for all my life,” she explains.</p> <p>Trewren moved to Adelaide to attend medical school and participated in the John Flynn placement program, which included a two-week rural placement every year for the first four years of her degree. She went on to complete her fifth-year training in a town in SA’s Barossa Valley.</p> <p>“I have no doubt I will end up rural at some point in life,” Trewren says. “I really love the community feel you get in a rural town and getting to know patients a bit better at the GP clinic.”</p> <p>However, both Trewren and Willson agree that rural practice can be daunting at times for junior doctors.</p> <p>“I think isolation and lack of support is definitely a challenge, and it can be hard keeping up your training and education,” Willson says.</p> <p>“In the city, it’s very much a hierarchical-type situation, so as junior doctors you’ve always got someone above you who you can call,” says Trewren. “You can bounce ideas off each other.”</p> <p><strong>Supporting the rural medical workforce</strong></p> <p>The new research findings point to promising strategies to increase a sustainable rural medical workforce in Australia.</p> <p>“This study confirms what previous research had suggested – that we can potentially grow the rural medical workforce by increasing the proportion of rural origin students admitted to medical schools,” says Georgina Luscombe, an associate professor at the University of Sydney’s School of Rural Health and senior author on the new study.</p> <p>“But also, by increasing opportunities for students originating from metropolitan areas to have those extended placement opportunities in clinical schools in places like Dubbo, Orange and Broome.”</p> <p>That conclusion chimes well with both Trewren and Willson’s experiences.</p> <p>“It just seems that the rural kids are the ones more willing to do the rural placements and the rural experiences and actually enjoy it … they know what to expect in terms of lifestyle and distance,” Trewren says.</p> <p>Willson credits her extensive rural training experience, in particular, for setting her on her current path.</p> <p>“The thing that really changed my view in my whole career trajectory was placement,” she says.</p> <p>“Coming from a rural background, you might have developed that initial interest and passion, but if you didn’t get a good experience during training as a doctor then you’re less likely to choose it.”</p> <p><img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=187890&amp;title=What+makes+doctors+likely+to+stay+in+the+countryside%3F" width="1" height="1" data-spai-target="src" data-spai-orig="" data-spai-exclude="nocdn" /></p> <div id="contributors"> <p><em><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/people/society/retain-rural-medical-workforce/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/matilda-handlsey-davis" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Matilda Handsley-Davis</a>. Matilda is a science writer at Cosmos. She holds a Bachelor of Arts and a Bachelor of Science (Honours) from the University of Adelaide.</em></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> </div>

Domestic Travel

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Salvador Dali exhibition heads to New Zealand

<p dir="ltr">The works of surrealist artist Salvador Dali are the subject of a new multimedia exhibition headed for Auckland and Christchurch that promises to wow art connoisseurs and first-timers alike.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-9847cd07-7fff-bb62-5654-0c315ef447f7">Inside Dali comes from the same team behind last year’s Van Gogh Alive exhibition which has appeared in capital cities across New Zealand and Australia over the past year, per <em><a href="https://concreteplayground.com/auckland/arts-entertainment/a-breathtaking-multimedia-exhibition-of-salvadore-dalis-work-is-coming-to-new-zealand-this-year-2" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Concrete Playground</a></em>.</span></p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cb_QyP0P_cQ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cb_QyP0P_cQ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Inside Dalí NZ (@insidedalinz)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The exhibition, which comes directly from its current home in Florence, promises to take visitors on a chronological trip through Dali’s life through floor-to-ceiling moving images, real-life objects, and interviews.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-cbe122c3-7fff-d3fa-5a2e-627878e5106a"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">There are five rooms to explore, including the celebration of Dante’s Inferno in the Divine Comedy Room with 100 colourful wooden engravings of the epic poem, and a surreal 360-degree mirror room where you’ll be surrounded by moving imagery of his masterpieces.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cb8fMVkLClF/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cb8fMVkLClF/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Inside Dalí NZ (@insidedalinz)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The exhibit is expected to <a href="https://blog.ticketmaster.co.nz/arts-attractions/inside-dali-new-zealand-3011" target="_blank" rel="noopener">open</a> first in Auckland from May 28 until June 30, before it takes up residence at the Air Force Museum of New Zealand in Christchurch from July 11.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-783a0a79-7fff-f03a-ff4e-376cdf0b7264"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Ticketmaster</em></p>

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Taronga Zoo unveils HUGE new addition

<p dir="ltr">The Sydney zoo has welcomed a new animal to its menagerie, but it isn’t like the other residents of the zoo - it’s a giant statue of a gorilla.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-ca19db92-7fff-8e07-1a3e-b37d790ed72d"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>King Nyani</em>, the world’s largest gorilla sculpture, landed at Taronga Zoo after travelling all the way from New York and was brought to the zoo on the flatbed of a large truck.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CcM-E-_rm8L/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CcM-E-_rm8L/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Taronga Zoo (@tarongazoo)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The bronze statue, created by public artists Gillie and Marc Shattner, was inspired by King Kong and depicts a stretched out gorilla with hands that up to three people can sit in.</p> <p dir="ltr">The huge gorilla, which weighs 2.2 tonnes and is 30-metres long, was created to spread awareness of conservation efforts for gorillas and is the third in a series of giant gorillas.</p> <p dir="ltr">The first appeared in New York City in 2020 and now sits in Chicago’s Brookfield Zoo, while the second is due to be installed at the Bruce Museum in Greenwich, Connecticut.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We decided to create three editions after seeing the unbelievable response to the original Nyani in NYC. We knew that this was a cause that many people were willing to get behind," Gillie explained.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-ec851743-7fff-b6fd-5d95-8fea0a61d49b"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">"This was a chance to inspire three times as many people to protect gorillas to save them from extinction.”</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CcPgribhXfr/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CcPgribhXfr/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Taronga Zoo (@tarongazoo)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“We wanted to create a sculpture where the public could really get close to the silverback, both physically and emotionally,” Gillie said. “Being able to sit in his hand and look up into his gentle face, we hope they will fall in love and join the movement to save the gorillas.”</p> <p dir="ltr">King Nyani now sits next to the Centenary Viewing Platform, metres away from the zoo’s breathtaking harbour views.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-358a035f-7fff-cc08-abed-5dc98e568701"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Taronga Zoo</em></p>

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