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Police investigate the welfare of re-homed autistic child of YouTube influencers

<p><span>Police have confirmed they are looking into the welfare and whereabouts of the adopted son of YouTube couple Myka and James Stauffer, who they admitted they “re-homed” with another family.</span><br /><br /><span>Myka sparked fury online when she came forward on her YouTube channel to announce she had sent her adopted son Huxley, five, to live with another family after his special needs meant that they could no longer provide the best support for him.</span><br /><br /><span>The couple adopted Huxley from China in 2016, and did not shy away from sharing the process on Myka's YouTube channel.</span><br /><br /><span>Though they were told the boy suffered from brain tumours, it was later revealed to the family that the young boy has level three autism and a sensory processing disorder, the result of having a stroke in utero.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836396/myka-stauffer-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/410fbb6f9d404221ac32968c2f25ddaf" /></p> <p><em>Image: Instagram</em><br /><br /><span>Myka and James announced that they had sent Huxley to live with a family better equipped to handle his needs in a video that went viral last week.</span><br /><br /><span>Fans promptly accused the pair of "re-homing" him because of his autism.</span><br /><br /><span>It has also since raised questions about Huxley's whereabouts since leaving the Stauffer family.</span><br /><br /><span>The Delaware, US County Sheriff's Office is looking into the case alongside “several other agencies”, according to BuzzFeed News.</span><br /><br /><span>Tracy Whited, the office's community and media relations manager, said that the case is ongoing but was able to confirm that the five-year-old boy “is not missing”.</span><br /><br /><span>“All adoption cases are confidential, and must go through a thorough process, with specific requirements and safeguards,” Whited said.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7836397/myka-stauffer-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/64ab6f6e927345fa9b1eb7f6f5a2bda8" /></p> <p><em>Myka and her husband took to Youtube to reveal they had "rehomed" their son Huxley. </em><br /><br /><span>“In private adoptions there are the same legal requirements that must be adhered to. These include home studies as well as background checks on the adopting parent(s).”</span><br /><br /><span>She added that both parties are being represented by attorneys.</span><br /><br /><span>Last week lawyers for the Stauffer family released a statement addressing the backlash surrounding Myka and James' video.</span><br /><br /><span>“We are privy to this case, and given the facts at hand, we feel this was the best decision for Huxley,” lawyers Thomas Taneff and Taylor Sayers said.</span><br /><br /><span>“In coming to know our clients, we know they are a loving family and are very caring parents that would do anything for their children. Since his adoption, they consulted with multiple professionals in the health care and educational arenas in order to provide Huxley with the best possible treatment and care.</span><br /><br /><span>“Over time, the team of medical professionals advised our clients it might be best for Huxley to be placed with another family.”</span><br /><br /><span>Fans and critics asked to know how little Hux had been “re-homed”, as the details were never made clear.</span><br /><br /><span>Myka appears to have since removed all photos of Huxley from her Instagram account while images of her other four children remain.</span></p>

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Economic snap-back? Not so fast

<p>With the virus on the back foot, it’s tempting to declare victory. Provided we stay vigilant on the public health front, we do have a good chance of keeping the pandemic at bay. But there’s another enemy still to defeat.</p> <p>The public health measures have worked so much better and faster than expected that calls to reign in the economic measures have already begun. The prime minister has said he wants to get the patient <a href="https://theconversation.com/australian-economy-must-come-out-of-icu-scott-morrison-139347">out of the intensive care unit</a> as quickly as possible.</p> <p>But these calls take for granted an economic snap-back that is far from assured.</p> <p>Last month’s stunning revelation that the JobKeeper wage subsidy will cost <a href="https://theconversation.com/treasury-revises-jobkeepers-cost-down-by-massive-60-billion-sparking-calls-to-widen-eligibility-139231">A$60 billion less than expected</a> has been taken by many as good news.</p> <p>But this might not be because there is no need for further aid but rather because there are too many <a href="https://theconversation.com/performers-and-sole-traders-find-it-hard-to-get-jobkeeper-in-part-because-they-get-behind-on-their-paperwork-137997">barriers</a> to accessing it, or business owners have decided it is futile.</p> <p>Even with this underspend, JobKeeper is propping up the wages of a quarter of the workforce. An extra half a million Australians have lost their jobs. While JobKeeper has saved many businesses, still thousands have failed.</p> <p><strong>It’ll be a three-step recovery</strong></p> <p>Reserve Bank Governor Philip Lowe said last week it would be a <a href="https://parlinfo.aph.gov.au/parlInfo/download/committees/commsen/a3af0917-dc51-4d01-a86f-69153eb93040/toc_pdf/Senate%20Select%20Committee%20on%20COVID-19_2020_05_28_7741.pdf;fileType=application%2Fpdf#search=%22committees/commsen/a3af0917-dc51-4d01-a86f-69153eb93040/0000%22">mistake</a> to withdraw the fiscal stimulus too quickly.</p> <p><em>If the economy picks up more quickly, that can be withdrawn safely, but, if the recovery is very drawn out, then it’s going to be very important that we keep the fiscal support going.</em></p> <p>We see the battle plan for a full recovery progressing through three phases: (i) shutting down the economy until the pandemic is under control, (ii) bringing the economy out of the ensuing deep recession, and (iii) putting the economy back on a strong growth path.</p> <p>If we’re lucky, we’re nearing the end of phase one.</p> <p><strong>We’re ready for step two</strong></p> <p>This crisis is unusual. We deliberately engineered an enormous decline in activity in order to achieve the social distancing required to bring the pandemic under control.</p> <p>During this first phase, conventional stimulus would have been of limited help and could have been counterproductive. We needed tools such as JobKeeper to freeze much of the economy with the hope it would thaw once the pandemic was under control.</p> <p>The second phase is the more conventional vicious cycle of workers who lose income spending less causing other workers to lose income.</p> <p>It is best dealt with by fiscal stimulus.</p> <p>Broad-based cash transfers to households, like those implemented in the <a href="https://www.irs.gov/coronavirus-tax-relief-and-economic-impact-payments">United States</a>, would be a powerful complement to existing measures. They could paper over cracks in JobSeeker and JobKeeper over the coming months, and help prevent any relapse as those schemes expire.</p> <p>Economists <a href="https://theconversation.com/vital-signs-the-gfc-and-me-ten-years-on-what-have-we-learned-103514">widely acknowledge</a> the role of the cash stimulus component of the Rudd government’s response to the 2008 global financial crisis in helping Australia avoid recession. The Morrison government could pick the best part of that response while avoiding the less effective parts.</p> <p>Some worry about heightened levels of <a href="https://www.afr.com/policy/economy/kevin-rudd-did-not-save-the-economy-in-2008-20181015-h16ne3">government debt</a>.</p> <p>These concerns are unwarranted. Australia went into the crisis with low debt by international standards, and can borrow at historically low fixed interest rates.</p> <p>It can borrow for ten years at a rate close to 1%, less than the rate of inflation.</p> <p><strong>More debt, sooner, can cut debt</strong></p> <p>The more successful we are at getting the economy out of recession, the less we’ll spend on programs like JobKeeper and JobSeeker.</p> <p>Provided we keep the pandemic at bay, the quicker the economy recovers the sooner earnings and taxes will pick up and the sooner the budget will be back in black.</p> <p>A turn to austerity triggered by debt and deficit concerns of the kind seen in Europe after the global financial crisis could deliver us a <a href="https://www.kansascityfed.org/~/media/files/publicat/sympos/2017/auerbach-gorodnichenko-paper.pdf">slower</a> rather than a faster recovery in our debt to GDP ratio.</p> <p>Phase three in our recovery is the search for programs to increase the <a href="https://www.pc.gov.au/inquiries/completed/productivity-review/report">productive capacity</a> of the economy. They can help make up for lost time, getting the economy back to where it would have been without the crisis. And they can help deflate away the debt.</p> <p>How best to set our economy up for the decades ahead is an important debate. We look forward to it.</p> <p>But let’s not get ahead of ourselves. Now is the time to use the best recession-fighting tools we have to get the economy back on the path to recovery.</p> <p><em>Written by Steven Hamilton, Bruce Preston and Chris Edmond. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/economic-snap-back-not-so-fast-139855"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

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Why Prince William warns not to call healthcare workers “heroes”

<p>Prince William has cautioned against calling health care workers “heroes” amid the coronavirus outbreak, saying it might put undue pressure on those working on the frontline to appear “strong” and deter them from seeking support.</p> <p>In an appearance on the BBC’s <em>One Show</em>, the Duke of Cambridge said some hospital staff and care workers he chatted with through video calls found it difficult to talk about their problems.</p> <p>“I think we’ve got to be very careful with the language that we use,” William said.</p> <p>“[Healthcare workers] should rightly be hailed as superstars, and brave, and wonderful staff – but I’m very conscious from a mental health point of view that we don’t alienate some of them.”</p> <p>The “hero” label might lead healthcare staff to believe they have to be “this strong pillar of strength” and prevent them from asking for mental health support, the duke said.</p> <p>He urged the United Kingdom’s National Health Service workers to look after themselves so that they could emerge from the pandemic “in one piece”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAvkP3oFEMq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAvkP3oFEMq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (@kensingtonroyal)</a> on May 28, 2020 at 12:26pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>William’s comments came ahead of the airing of the documentary <em>Football, Prince William and Our Mental Health</em>, where the royal discussed why “it’s OK to not be OK”.</p>

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Quaden Bayles helps struggling Aussies by delivering meals and groceries

<p><span>A bullied nine-year-old boy with dwarfism is doing his bit for the community and delivering home cooked meals and groceries to struggling Aussies.</span></p> <p><span>Quaden Bayles made international headlines in February when mother Yarraka posted a video of him distressed and saying he wanted to die after kids picked on him at school.</span></p> <p><span>Ever since the heartwrenching footage went viral, the Brisbane schoolboy has been inundated with support from celebrities, sportspeople and musicians from all over the world.</span></p> <p><span>On Monday, Ms Bayles shared a heartwarming photo of Quaden delivering groceries to those living in remote communities as part of a ‘Pay It Forward’ initiative with catering company Yarraka &amp; Family.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA2Ogzjnr2P/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CA2Ogzjnr2P/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Via • @murrimenu @quaden_the_kid helped to deliver to Stradbroke Island today. Are you or someone you know doing it tough? A family or friend in need? You can nominate to receive a care package as part of our “Pay it forward” program. Please email murrimenu@gmail.com</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/quaden_the_kid/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Keepin Up With Quaden</a> (@quaden_the_kid) on May 31, 2020 at 2:31am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span>“Quaden_the_kid helped to deliver to Stradbroke Island today,” read the caption, featuring a beaming Quaden pulling a trolley full of groceries.</span></p> <p><span>“Are you or someone you know doing it tough? A family or friend in need?</span></p> <p><span>“You can nominate to receive a care package as part of our 'Pay it forward' program.”</span></p> <p><span>Yarraka &amp; Family are “passionate First Nations foodie family who specialise in Indigenous infusions, grazing tables/platters and call your catering needs”.</span></p> <p><span>Quaden has been working alongside the family for three weeks, donating food to the less fortunate.</span></p>

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Life in lockdown has shown us our houses need to work harder for us

<p>As we’ve been <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/apr/24/how-do-teenagers-live-in-quarantine-photo-essay">living more closely</a> with families and house mates through COVID-19, the more intensive ways we’ve used our houses has perhaps exposed some of their shortcomings. Households have had relative freedom to interact with each other, but the <a href="https://theconversation.com/teens-are-wired-to-resent-being-stuck-with-parents-and-cut-off-from-friends-during-coronavirus-lockdown-136435">continual presence of our household</a> has also made us wish part of our house could somehow partition itself into another house – a <a href="https://www.legislation.nsw.gov.au/#/view/EPI/2009/364/part2/div2">second house</a> where we might retreat.</p> <p>Having to <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2020/mar/13/covid-19-could-cause-permanent-shift-towards-home-working">work</a> and <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-04-16/coronavirus-home-school-how-australian-parents-are-coping/12152790">school from home</a> has highlighted the need for the spaces we share to be more flexible. Occasionally, we need to be able to separate home spaces from each other. We’ve perhaps opportunistically <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-28/coronavirus-could-reshape-how-australians-work-forever/12097124">repurposed furniture</a>, made makeshift rooms and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2020/mar/22/bbc-hosts-improvise-home-studios-covid-19">stuffed blankets under locked doors</a> in an attempt to renegotiate territories within our house.</p> <p>But working in a home office or studio, finding independence as families grow and age, or being able to accommodate extended family and friends, are also usual ways we live in houses. Having a second smaller house, within or attached to the main house, would allow these ways of living to happen in happier ways.</p> <p><strong>How small a house?</strong></p> <p>A small house can be designed to feel more spacious than its small floor area suggests. They can make good use of <a href="https://architectureau.com/articles/cairo-apartment/">gardens</a>, <a href="https://assemblepapers.com.au/2018/04/05/big-messy-courtyard-micro-yuaner/">courtyards</a> and <a href="https://thelocalproject.com.au/galleries/gallery-of-islington-park-addition-by-curious-practice-the-local-project-newcastle-nsw-australia/attachment/islington-park-addition-by-curious-practice-in-newcastle-nsw-australia-11/?parent=34366">leftover space</a> around a house; use <a href="https://www.dezeen.com/2019/02/05/tiny-apartment-little-design-taipei-taiwan-micro-home/?li_source=LI&amp;li_medium=bottom_block_1">furniture</a> and storage walls to make a <a href="https://www.dezeen.com/2019/07/16/3500-milimetre-home-ago-architects-indonesia-skinny-house/?li_source=LI&amp;li_medium=bottom_block_1">small room more usable</a>; use well-designed windows to provide natural light, ventilation and views; and use the <a href="https://www.dezeen.com/2019/06/03/love2-house-takeshi-hosaka-micro-home-tokyo/">volume within a roof</a> for light and a sense of space.</p> <p>Some larger houses might already be organised well enough to effectively have a second house within them. But, in the context of regulatory approvals, this is where it begins to get tricky.</p> <p>Separate to the ways we might use our home, a house is also defined through legislation.</p> <p>Depending on where you live in Australia, it will be defined in subtly different ways. In <a href="https://www.legislation.nsw.gov.au/#/view/EPI/2006/155a/whole%23/part1/cl1.4">New South Wales</a>, a house is simply a room, or series of rooms, capable of being used as a home.</p> <p>While not describing what those rooms might be used for, <a href="https://www.lindsaytaylorlawyers.com.au/in_focus/unlawful-use-of-a-dwelling/">case law</a> suggests a house needs to at least maintain the facilities of a bathroom, a kitchen and a place to sleep. If these rooms were able to gain independent access to the street, they would then meet the legislative definition of a house.</p> <p>However, to be approved as a second house it would also need to comply with other legislative and <a href="https://www.legislation.nsw.gov.au/#/view/EPI/2009/364/part2/div2">planning</a> policies. These requirements can be complex and layered, as they interact with other <a href="https://ncc.abcb.gov.au/">codes</a>, but it’s the lot size of your property that will have the greatest effect on whether you’re allowed to have a second house.</p> <p>If you want to avoid the discretion of your local council assessing a development application that is outside <a href="https://www.legislation.nsw.gov.au/#/view/EPI/2009/364/part2/div2/cl22">minimum planning requirements</a>, your house (at least in NSW), will need to sit on more than 450 square metres of land. That’s substantially more than both most inner-city lots and <a href="https://udia.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/03/State-of-the-Land-2020_web.pdf">newly released</a> greenfield lots in Australia. That second house might be further away than you’d thought.</p> <p><strong>The second house and the affordability crisis</strong></p> <p>The flexibility for individual land owners to determine how their household lives within their house, and how they might contribute to making houses more affordable, has been given over to those who already own relatively large blocks of land. Those with smaller, more affordable lots are effectively prevented from leveraging the potential of their house as this type of asset. Those with more to spend on housing also stand to gain the most.</p> <p>Having <a href="https://grattan.edu.au/if-australians-want-cheaper-housing-we-have-to-build-more-of-it/">more houses</a> in places where we want to live, and in ways that maintain the character of those places, are critical ways of sustaining communities. The small size (20-50 square metres) of a second house often has little impact on the appearance of a house. And because they’re accommodating an existing household, they also have little impact on car parking.</p> <p>Rooms within houses can be made to work harder for the <a href="https://au.phaidon.com/agenda/architecture/articles/2016/january/14/why-2016s-pritzker-winner-makes-half-built-houses/">families they hold</a>, while the often wasted open space down the side of a house can be activated as courtyards and bathrooms. As a second house is on the same land title as the primary house, it can’t be sold as a separate house like a <a href="https://www.planning.nsw.gov.au/Policy-and-Legislation/Housing/Medium-Density-Housing/Design-Guides-for-Low-Rise-Medium-Density">duplex</a> might – it isn’t a commodity in itself. This positions the second house as a fundamental way of affordably meeting multiple needs:</p> <ul> <li>the lack of houses in urban areas at street level</li> <li><a href="https://theconversation.com/for-australians-to-have-the-choice-of-growing-old-at-home-here-is-what-needs-to-change-91488">ageing in place</a></li> <li>social cohesion</li> <li>the confidence Australians should have in well-designed small houses.</li> </ul> <p>As we begin to move out of our pandemic-related home-stays, perhaps the ways we’ve been intensively using our houses will linger a bit longer. And perhaps we’ll be in a better position to more seriously ask our house how it might also become a second.</p> <p>The broader question, of course, is for our various levels of government: why not allow small houses on small lots to help with the <a href="https://grattan.edu.au/report/housing-affordability-re-imagining-the-australian-dream/">housing affordability crisis</a>?</p> <p><em>Written by Chris Tucker. Republished with permission </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/life-in-lockdown-has-shown-us-our-houses-need-to-work-harder-for-us-138307"><em>of The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Mummy blogger who "rehomed" adopted autistic son speaks out after backlash

<p><span>The mummy blogger who “rehomed” her adopted son has been dumped by multiple brand deals after receiving huge backlash for the decision.</span></p> <p><span>Myka Stauffer was heavily criticised after revealing she and husband James had given up their son Huxley, four.</span></p> <p><span>The couple said the decision came after discovering he had “medical needs” that they weren’t aware of when they adopted him from China in 2017.</span></p> <p><span>Soon after justifying their decision, Stauffer defended their decision, saying her former son – who has autism and is non-verbal – “wanted” a new home and hinted at problems between him and their four other kids. </span></p> <p><span>Now, many brands have chosen to drop Stauffer.</span></p> <p><span>Stauffer who has a following of 162,000 on Instagram and 700,000 on YouTube, had formed partnerships with big-name companies like Big Lots, TJ Maxx and Danimals yoghurt.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4S4hBJgwI_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4S4hBJgwI_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">My favorite Starbucks barista 🧜🏻‍♀️☕️ You hold such a special place in my heart sweet boy! 💚#happyhalloween #halloween2019 #halloweencostume</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/mykastauffer/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Myka Stauffer</a> (@mykastauffer) on Oct 31, 2019 at 12:54pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span>But according to </span><em>People</em><span>, many have dumped the mummy blogger over the incident.</span></p> <p><span>Stauffer hit a second wave of backlash when she responded to a critic in the comments section of her video titled “an update on our family”.</span></p> <p><span>“We would never just give up a child with special needs, this is a personal matter to Hux. It had nothing to do with he just had Autism,” Stauffer wrote, defending the backlash.</span></p> <p><span>“Multiple scary things happened inside the home towards our other children, and if these events happened with one of my biological kids, after all the help and after the behaviours we witnessed sadly we would have no other choice then to seek help and get their needs met.”</span></p> <p><span>She goes on to say Huxley “wanted this decision 100%” explaining she “saw” it when he was with his new “family” as the child was not able to communicate with speech.</span></p> <p><span>“He constantly chose them and signed and showed tons of emotion to show us and let us know he wanted this,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>However, not many were convinced, branding the defence as “disgusting”.</span></p> <p><span>“Oh yes. Non-verbal Huxley told you I don’t want to live with you guys no more send me to these strangers so that I can be traumatised even more in my little life,” one wrote.</span></p> <p><span>“It’s so disgusting. Why adopt a child you knew was going to have problems just to toss them away?” another said.</span></p> <p><span>“OMG she’s so delusional,” one scoffed.</span></p> <p><span>While one said: “Obviously having a child with disabilities is incredibly challenging and can certainly present difficulties with other children but to say that this kid is some kind of sinister, dangerous figure is so irresponsible.”</span></p> <p><span>Some of Stauffer’s subscribers accused her of using Huxley solely to gain a bigger following and earn more money on her YouTube channel.</span></p> <p><span>Some declared the decision “awful” for both Huxley and the pair’s four other children: Kova, Jaka, Radley and Onyx.</span></p> <p><span>“@MykaStauffer adopted an autistic child from China and after years of having him, she gave him up for adoption because he had ‘bad behaviour’ after using him for $$$ on her YouTube channel,” wrote one user.</span></p> <p><span>“What Myka Stauffer and her husband did is awful. You don’t just give a child back … “ one tweeted.</span></p> <p><span>“She adopted a child for views and then got rid of him and treated him like a brand deal,” another said.</span></p> <p><span>There are even calls to have the family’s sponsors pulled, with angry internet justice seekers calling to #cancelstauffers.</span></p> <p><span>In the video where the Stauffer’s talk about “rehoming” Huxley, the pair said the child had autism and brain damage.</span></p> <p><span>“Numerous medical professionals have felt that he needed a different fit. He needed more,” Stauffer says while fighting back tears in the video filmed in the couple’s bed.</span></p> <p><span>She added that an adoption agency had helped place Huxley with his “forever family.”</span></p> <p><span>“He’s thriving, he’s doing really well, and his new mummy has medical, professional training,” she added.</span></p>

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Whoever invents a coronavirus vaccine will control the patent – and who gets to use it

<p>With research laboratories around the world racing to develop a coronavirus vaccine, a unique challenge has emerged: how to balance intellectual property rights with serving the public good.</p> <p>Questions of patent protection and access to those patents has prompted an international group of scientists and lawyers to establish the <a href="https://opencovidpledge.org/">Open COVID Pledge</a>.</p> <p>This movement calls on organisations to freely make available their existing patents and copyrights associated with vaccine research to create an <a href="https://www.taylorwessing.com/en/insights-and-events/insights/2020/04/patent-pools---an-easy-licensing-option-for-covid-19-drugs-and-sars-cov-2-vaccines">open patent pool</a> to solve a global problem.</p> <p>The EU is <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-15/coronavirus-vaccine-patent-pooled-guarantee-who/12250186">leading the charge</a> to create such a pool by drafting a resolution at the World Health Organisation. The US, UK and a few others have been <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/may/17/us-and-uk-lead-push-against-global-patent-pool-for-covid-19-drugs?CMP=share_btn_tw">opposed to this idea</a>.</p> <p>For now, however, there are very few pharmaceutical and biotechnology corporations participating in the pledge, raising questions over whether the initiative will work.</p> <p>Instead, universities, publicly funded research institutes and pharmaceutical and biotechnology corporations are working on vaccine research through international consortia or public-private <a href="https://www.clinicaltrialsarena.com/analysis/covid-19-pharmaceutical-company-partnerships-for-coronavirus-vaccines-development/">partnerships</a>.</p> <p>If one group does develop a viable vaccine, this raises other questions that will soon need to be addressed:</p> <ul> <li>who is funding the research, and who has the rights to any patents coming out of it?</li> <li>can governments compel the owners of those patents to license other manufacturers to make the vaccines or medicines?</li> </ul> <p><strong>What are patent rights and why are they important?</strong></p> <p>Patent rights are a form of intellectual property rights. They provide creators of new inventions, like novel vaccines and medicines, with a limited-term monopoly over those inventions in the marketplace to help recover the costs of research and development.</p> <p>In other words, patents are an incentive to invent or innovate.</p> <p>Patents are granted by individual nations, but don’t apply across borders. To gain global protection, an inventor needs to apply for patents in every country – something that could be critical when it comes to vaccines. The <a href="https://www.wipo.int/treaties/en/registration/pct/">Patent Cooperation Treaty</a> helps to streamline the process, but it is still expensive and time-consuming.</p> <p>The limited-term monopoly on the market is balanced by the requirement that patent holders share information about their inventions in a register to make it available for anyone to use after the patent protection expires. The <a href="http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/pa1990109/s67.html">term of a standard patent</a> is usually 20 years.</p> <p>During the patent period, patent holders have exclusive rights to manufacture and sell their inventions. Or, they can choose to license the technology to others to manufacture and sell to the public.</p> <p>Such licences include a specified time limit and geographical area to exploit the patent. In return, the patent holder receives royalties or licence fees, or both.</p> <p>So, the race to develop a vaccine for COVID-19 is not just about saving lives during a pandemic, it’s also about owning the patent rights. This gives the owner control over the manufacturing and distribution of the vaccine in the countries where the patent rights are granted.</p> <p><strong>Who is currently researching a coronavirus vaccine?</strong></p> <p>The race currently includes universities, publicly funded research institutes and pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, <a href="https://www.clinicaltrialsarena.com/analysis/covid-19-pharmaceutical-company-partnerships-for-coronavirus-vaccines-development/">some working in partnership</a> with government institutions.</p> <p>The company that <a href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/coronavirus-vaccine-human-trials-by-moderna-show-promising-results-c-1045340">just announced early positive results</a> on a vaccine is Moderna, a biotech company based in the US, which is working with the National Institutes of Health. A <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/health/2020-05-24/coronavirus-vaccine-race/12277558">number of other developers</a> are also doing human trials globally, including many in China.</p> <p>When private companies and government institutions partner on developing a vaccine, it may result in joint ownership of a patent. This gives each owner the <a href="http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/pa1990109/s16.html">right</a> to manufacture the vaccine, but only together they can license the manufacturing to third parties.</p> <p><strong>What about the rights of nations?</strong></p> <p>Even if patent ownership is in the hands of private companies, the state may still have the right to use them for its <a href="http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/pa1990109/s163.html">own purposes</a> or in the case of <a href="http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/pa1990109/s163a.html">emergencies</a>. Many countries have specific laws to facilitate these arrangements.</p> <p>In the US, the <a href="https://www.unemed.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/35-U.S.C.-200-212-Bayh-Dole-Act.pdf">Bayh-Dole Act 1980</a> ensures the government retains sufficient rights to use patents resulting from federally supported research.</p> <p>Under these rights, <a href="https://www.unemed.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/35-U.S.C.-200-212-Bayh-Dole-Act.pdf">the government can be granted</a> a free license to use the patent itself or the right to arrange for a third party to use the patent on its behalf.</p> <p>In cases where the patent holder of a publicly funded invention refuses to licence it to third parties, the Bayh-Dole Act gives the government <a href="https://www.unemed.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/35-U.S.C.-200-212-Bayh-Dole-Act.pdf">“march-in” rights</a>.</p> <p>Under specific guidelines, this means a forced licence can be granted to a third party on reasonable terms. This includes in cases when the “action is necessary to alleviate health or safety needs” or to ensure the patented invention is actually manufactured within a reasonable time.</p> <p>In the case of COVID-19 research, this means the US government could order a corporation or university that invents a vaccine with federal funding to license the patent to others to make it.</p> <p>In Australia, the government can exploit the patented inventions of others under right of “<a href="https://www.alrc.gov.au/publication/genes-and-ingenuity-gene-patenting-and-human-health-alrc-report-99/26-crown-use-and-acquisition/crown-use/">crown use</a>”. In these cases, the patent holder is <a href="http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/pa1990109/s165.html">entitled to financial compensation</a> from the government.</p> <p>Like most other members of the World Trade Organisation, Australia also has compulsory licensing rules in its <a href="https://www.alrc.gov.au/publication/genes-and-ingenuity-gene-patenting-and-human-health-alrc-report-99/27-compulsory-licensing/compulsory-licensing/">patent law</a> that force inventors to license their patents to third parties on reasonable terms in specific circumstances.</p> <p>In reality, though, such compulsory licences are under-utilised in countries like Australia, New Zealand, the UK and Japan, and rarely granted, if at all.</p> <p><strong>Working together for the common good</strong></p> <p>This brings us to the <a href="https://opencovidpledge.org/">Open COVID Pledge</a>, which is designed to make the relevant intellectual property freely available under an <a href="https://opencovidpledge.org/licenses">open licence</a>.</p> <p>Such open-access licensing has been used in the publishing industry for years, for example with <a href="https://creativecommons.org/about/program-areas/open-access/">Creative Commons</a> publications online, and in the technology industry through <a href="https://opensource.com/resources/what-open-source">open-source</a> licences.</p> <p>If more of the public-private partnerships working on a coronavirus vaccine do sign up to the pledge, perhaps it will be one of the positives to come out of the pandemic. It could allow open-access licences for lifesaving technologies to become accepted practice.</p> <p><em>Written by Natalie Stoianoff. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/whoever-invents-a-coronavirus-vaccine-will-control-the-patent-and-importantly-who-gets-to-use-it-138121">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Grandfather recovering from COVID-19 treated to special surprise

<p>A German grandfather who contracted coronavirus whilst on-board a cruise ship has celebrated a life milestone in hospital as he recovers.</p> <p>Johann Steinborn was one of 81 passengers and crew who contracted the virus, despite having no symptoms beforehand.</p> <p>Steinborn’s health quickly took a turn for the worse and he was evacuated and put on an incubator.</p> <p>"I only remember I was brought here from the ship and had to wait in a special room, then nothing – cut off, complete black," he told<a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/coronavirus-wa-artania-cruise-ship-fremantle-hospital-grandfather-recovery-80th-birthday-surprise-covid-19/02fdec57-4ecb-4cec-8ec6-8a45642d12dc" target="_blank"><span> </span>9News</a>.</p> <p>"I don't know what happened to me."</p> <p>His wife was flown home to Germany as she was healthy, but Johann remained behind as he has spent the last three weeks in a coma.</p> <p>"Four weeks ago, I couldn't stand," he said.</p> <p>"After lying in a coma, (my) muscles had disappeared."</p> <p>After recovering from coronavirus, he is celebrating his 80th birthday and despite being away from his family, the nurses who are caring for him surprised him with photos from home and his favourite traditional treats.</p> <p>Steinborn said that there were no signs of sickness during his time on the Artania until it docked in Sydney, where it took on an extra 100 passengers.</p> <p>When the boat had reached Perth, the virus had rapidly spread, with almost 15 percent of Western Australia’s cases being linked to the cruise ship.</p> <p>Three people died from the virus on-board.</p>

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Roger Federer congratulates Alan Jones for stellar radio career

<div class="body_text "> <p>Tennis legend Roger Federer sent a surprising congratulatory message to radio heavyweight Alan Jones as he prepares for his final show on 2GB on Friday.</p> <p>Jones announced earlier this month that he was retiring from his popular breakfast show for health reasons, explaining that doctors had warned him: “If you don’t stop, you’ll drop.”</p> <p>The video message to Jones was aired on Sky News, where Jones also works as a TV host.</p> <p>“Alan, it’s Roger here. I wanted to wish you all the very best for what’s to come, and many congratulations on an amazing 35-year career in the media business,” Federer said.</p> <p>“Take care and all the best.”</p> <p>Olympic sprint king Usain Bolt also sweetly sent Jones an audio message earlier, congratulating Jones on retiring at the “top of his game”.</p> <p>“I just want to say congratulations on retiring at the top of your game,” he said.</p> <p>“Thirty-odd years on the radio, you were magnificent, you impacted so many lives so continue doing what you’re doing and stay up, alright.”</p> <p>Jones’ heavy workload in the media combined his radio, TV and print commitments, which doctors advised him stepping back for the sake of his health.</p> <p>“I don’t want to dramatise this, but he (his doctor) said to me: ‘If you don’t stop, you’ll drop’,” the 79-year-old told The Australian. “There’ll come a time that your system will say it’s too late. You might be walking down the street when it happens.”</p> <p>Jones also thanked his loyal listeners as he announced his retirement on-air two weeks ago.</p> <p>“When the program ends at 9:00, it doesn’t end,” he said. “Another world begins. I’ve always taken the view that my listeners are my best researchers. The correspondence is given relevance and strength to the program content but answering it is immensely demanding.</p> <p>“I’m immensely grateful for the opportunities I’ve been given to share ideas, help people and even argue with people on behalf of someone else. These are privileges in this industry that should never be taken for granted.”</p> </div>

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Mum discovers daughter’s stomach ache was deadly brain cancer

<p>A mother-of-two was horrified to discover her three-year-old daughter’s seemingly innocent stomach ache was actually caused by an aggressive brain cancer.</p> <p>Brooke Mcllroy was feeding her daughter Luca breakfast when the toddler started throwing up and was “a little unsteady on her feet” at their Perth home on May 4.</p> <p>Quickly rushing to the hospital, doctors discovered that Luca was suffering from a deadly brain cancer, and had fears that she wouldn’t survive.</p> <p>After taking her to Perth Children’s Hospital, Luca was diagnosed with atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumour (ATRT) – an aggressive form of cancer.</p> <p>The tumour was pressing on Luca’s brainstem and cerebellum, the part of the brain that sends and receives messages to the rest of the body.</p> <p>Little Luca underwent seven hours of neurosurgery to remove the tumour on May 7 and is now recovering at home.</p> <p>Speaking to<span> </span><em>Daily Mail Australia</em>, Ms Mcllroy said she initially thought her daughter had a stomach bug or delayed concussion.</p> <p>“A couple weeks leading up to that (her diagnosis), she would vomit at breakfast every day,” she said. </p> <p>“She would trip over things she wouldn't normally and talking to her dad, we thought she had a fall that gave her delayed concussion.</p> <p>“I also thought she had a stomach bug so I stopped dairy products, thinking it's dietary and was trying all of these things.”</p> <p>When she visited the GP, a CT scan was conducted which ruled out the concussion.</p> <p>Fortunately, the scan picked up the tumour, allowing the doctor to discover the cancer.</p> <p>“That doctor is an absolute hero. If it wasn't for that scan, we wouldn't have found out about Luca's tumour,” Ms McIlroy said.</p> <p>After the terrifying diagnosis, Ms Mcllroy thought she would have lost her daughter forever.</p> <p>“I was terrified. I thought we were going to lose her (Luca) and I didn't know how to explain it to her sister, or to my ex-husband,” she said. </p> <p>But thankfully, after a surgery on May 7, Luca has learnt to walk again as she recovers at home with the rest of her family.</p> <p>“She has learnt to sit up again, and not vomit. She is starting to walk again now but she needs help with balance,” Ms McIlroy said. </p> <p>“Her left arm is a bit slower but with rehab, it’s better than it was.”</p> <p>But Luca still has a long road of intensive treatment ahead of her.</p> <p>She will begin seven months of intensive treatment made up of of high-dose chemotherapy and radiation therapy from Tuesday, June 2. </p>

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Princess Beatrice opens up about troubled childhood: “They were so far ahead”

<p>Princess Beatrice has everything to look forward to, but she has touched upon her childhood days in a heartfelt clip for charity.</p> <p>The royal opened up about her own “challenges” with dyslexia while studying in school in a new interview, where she admitted what she would want to tell her younger self.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAQr0Q-HkiB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CAQr0Q-HkiB/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Royal Families_Turkey (@royal_families_turkey)</a> on May 16, 2020 at 12:36pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“I was very lucky, I got to go to a school that was very nurturing and supporting [but] I would describe the actual day-to-day learning side of things — very challenging,” the 31-year-old said.</p> <p>Princess Beatrice who is the Patron for Made By Dyslexia spoke on an experience she had as a child: "We had different coloured books to describe where your reading levels had got to, and I was always on the white books and my best friends were always on the yellow books or the green books, they were so far ahead.</p> <p>"And I think at that stage, those moments of doubt just pop into your head: 'I'm not good enough, I'm not smart enough, why am I not like the others?' I think when you're in the classroom those moments are very defining," she admits.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CAp3u5fHjp8/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CAp3u5fHjp8/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The British Royal Family (@the_mountbatten_windsors)</a> on May 26, 2020 at 7:23am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Princess Beatrice continued on by admitting she would tell her younger self to take challenging experiences as “lessons.”</p> <p>"I think if I were to say to my younger self 'do not be defined by those moments that happened to you in that exam or that classroom, because they are life-long learnings'. They are lessons you carry with you and they build you up to be who you are."</p> <p>The royal finished the clip with an emotional sentiment: "It is not something that is wrong with you.</p> <p>"It's a great part of how your brain works and everybody's brain works incredibly differently. There is nothing wrong, there is just everything that is so right."</p> <p> </p>

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Coronavirus: Worrying figure looms over Australia's recovery

<p>As Australian states and territories are slowly rolling back their coronavirus restrictions, a concerning figure has loomed over the country’s chance at recovery.</p> <p>According to figures released by the Department of Health on Tuesday, 732 confirmed COVID-19 cases – or about 10.3 per cent of all cases nationally – have been locally acquired with unidentified contact.</p> <p>This means hundreds of people have been infected in Australia, but the source of virus is not known.</p> <p>“Knowing the source of infection assists in stopping the spread of COVID-19,” the department said.</p> <p>In April, Prime Minister Scott Morrison said nationwide restrictions could be eased only when contact tracing capability is improved among others.</p> <p>“If we can get that in place, if we can get our tracing capability up from where it is, then that is going to give us more options and Australians more freedoms,” Morrison said <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/coronavirus-scott-morrison-reveals-three-things-needed-to-ease-nationwide-restrictions">then</a>.</p> <p>On Wednesday morning, the PM warned people against overreacting to a coronavirus outbreak on a live export ship in Western Australia.</p> <p>Six crew members of the vessel docked at Fremantle Port tested positive for the virus on Tuesday.</p> <p>“We’ve got the systems in place and they can be managed and they can be protected,” Morrison told Sky News.</p>

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Hugh Jackman reveals secret self-isolation project to help people in need

<p>Hugh Jackman is using his time self-isolating in New York to help others in need.</p> <p>After becoming an ambassador of mental health organisation Gotcha4Life in 2017, the actor has been hosting a number of secret of web seminars to promote “messages of connection and conversation” through the charity.</p> <p>I've learned so much from being on the board and we are planning on more of those talks,” Hugh told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.news.com.au/entertainment/tv/bad-education-star-hugh-jackmans-secret-lockdown-project-to-help-others-in-need/news-story/76eac4b15332829128673ea36b623945" target="_blank"><em>News Corp Australia</em> </a>on Sunday of his passion to help people. </p> <p>Gotcha4Life was founded in 2017 by Hugh’s best friend, Gus Worland.</p> <p>“Gus has been incredible … [mental health] is something we really need to pay attention to in the world and Australia, a lot,” added Hugh. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-Rri9YDA2f/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-Rri9YDA2f/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">No matter where you are in the world, please listen to your officials. Please stay home and, if you do go out, practice proper social distancing. Thank you to all the first responders, doctors, nurses, sanitation workers, the truck drivers, etc ... all of you who take away from your own family to care for others. You are the real heroes.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/thehughjackman/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Hugh Jackman</a> (@thehughjackman) on Mar 28, 2020 at 4:55am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Our need to look after each other, not just financially and physically, but mentally is a priority. There's a lot of loneliness out there and this only adds to that.”</p> <p>Hugh urged people to take care of their mental wellbeing as he promoted Gotcha4Life and the work they do.</p> <p>“I've been a board member since @Gotcha4Life was created,” began Hugh.</p> <p>“It's extremely important that we pay attention to our mental health. Now more than ever. Please contact your family, friends and neighbours. A call could save a life.”</p> <p>The Hollywood heavyweight and his wife Deborra-Lee Furness were in Melbourne with their children Oscar and Ava when COVID-19 was declared a pandemic in March.</p> <p>They initially flew there from New York on a work trip as Deborra-Lee directed several episodes of<span> </span><em>Neighbours</em>. They then returned to America after just four days.</p> <p>“No one really knew what was going on… it was all a bit of a shock,” said Hugh after he was urged to return to America before the borders closed.</p>

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Here’s how to stay safe while buying groceries amid the coronavirus pandemic

<p>Wear a mask, but skip the gloves. Don’t sanitize the apples. And if you are older than 65, it’s probably best to still order your groceries online.</p> <p>As a food virologist, I hear a lot of questions from people about the coronavirus risks in grocery stores and how to stay safe while shopping for food amid the pandemic. Here are answers to some of the common questions.</p> <p><strong>Can I touch the tomatoes?</strong></p> <p>What you touch on the grocery shelves is less of a concern than who breathes on you and other surfaces you might come in contact with in a store. In fact, there is <a href="https://www.fda.gov/news-events/fda-voices/fda-offers-assurance-about-food-safety-and-supply-people-and-animals-during-covid-19">currently no evidence of the virus being transmitted by food</a> or food packaging.</p> <p>You may have heard about <a href="https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMc2004973">studies showing that the virus can remain infectious</a> for up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to 72 hours on plastic or stainless steel. These are controlled laboratory studies, in which high levels of infectious virus are applied to the surfaces and humidity and temperature held constant. In these experiments, the level of infectious virus – virus capable of causing disease – decreased even after a few hours, indicating that the virus does not survive well on these surfaces.</p> <p>The highest risk is close contact with other people who may be shedding virus in droplets as they <a href="http://doi.org/doi:10.1001/jama.2020.4756">sneeze</a>, <a href="https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2006874117">talk or breathe</a> nearby.</p> <p>Next would be high-touch surfaces, like door handles, where someone not practicing good hand hygiene might have transferred the virus to the surface. In this scenario, you would have to touch this surface and then <a href="https://www.who.int/news-room/commentaries/detail/modes-of-transmission-of-virus-causing-covid-19-implications-for-ipc-precaution-recommendations">touch your own mucus membranes</a> – your eyes, mouth or ears – to contract the illness.</p> <p>Think about how often a surface is touched, and then decide if you can avoid the riskiest spots or use <a href="https://ucfoodsafety.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk7366/files/files/page/UCDavis-Handling%20Groceries_COVID-19_Flyer_040220.pdf">hand sanitizer after touching them</a>. Significantly more people touch door handles and credit card machines compared to a tomato in a bin.</p> <p><strong>Do I need to sanitize my food when I get home?</strong></p> <p>No, you do not need to sanitize your food when you get home, and trying to do so can actually be dangerous.</p> <p>Chemicals and soaps are not labeled for use on food. This means we do not know if they are safe or even effective when directly applied to food.</p> <p>Moreover, some of these practices might create food safety hazards. For example, if you filled a sink with water and then submerged your vegetables in it, pathogenic microorganisms in your sink – say, trapped in the drain from the raw chicken you cut up the night before – might contaminate your produce.</p> <p>You should instead <a href="https://foodsafety.ces.ncsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2020/04/Retail-Produce_Food-Safety_COVID-19_Flyer.pdf?fwd=no">wash your produce</a> under cool running water and then dry it with a clean towel.</p> <p>You don’t need to wait to unpack groceries or boxes when you arrive home. Instead, <a href="https://ucfoodsafety.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk7366/files/files/page/UCDavis-Handling%20Groceries_COVID-19_Flyer_040220.pdf">after unpacking, wash your hands</a>.</p> <p>Washing your hands frequently, using soap and water and drying with a clean towel, is really the best defense for protecting yourself from this virus and many other infectious diseases that might be on a surface or package.</p> <p><strong>Should I wear gloves in the grocery store?</strong></p> <p>Gloves are <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/gloves.html">not currently recommended</a> for a visit to the grocery store, in part because they may help spread germs.</p> <p>If you are wearing gloves, know that disposable gloves are meant for a single use and you should throw them out after you are done shopping.</p> <p><a href="https://s3.amazonaws.com/kajabi-storefronts-production/sites/91734/themes/1815492/downloads/r73ENmbsSI2VBgOK6XB2_COVID-19_School_Food_Service_Safety_Precautions.pdf">To take off gloves</a>, grab the band at the wrist on one hand, making sure not to have gloved fingers touch your skin, and pull the glove up over your hand and fingers turning it inside out as you remove. Best practice is to wash your hands after the gloves are removed. If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer.</p> <p><strong>How should I deal with other people?</strong></p> <p>We wear masks to protect others. You can have COVID-19 and <a href="https://theconversation.com/infected-with-the-coronavirus-but-not-showing-symptoms-a-physician-answers-5-questions-about-asymptomatic-covid-19-137029">not know it</a>, so <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-wear-face-masks-in-public-heres-what-the-research-shows-135623">wearing a mask</a> can help keep you from spreading the virus if you’re asymptomatic.</p> <p>Wearing a mask can also provide some level of protection to the person wearing it, but it does not keep out all droplets and is not 100% effective in preventing disease.</p> <p>Wearing a mask helps reduce how far droplets that can carry the coronavirus travel when the wearer talks or sneezes. <a href="http://gettyimages.com/">John Paraskevas/Newsday via Getty Images</a></p> <p>Following <a href="https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/social-distancing.html">social distancing guidelines</a> – keeping 6 feet between you and the next person – is very important when you are in a store or any other space with other people.</p> <p>If you’re over 65 or have a compromised immune system, see if the grocery has special hours for high-risk populations, and consider having groceries delivered to your home instead.</p> <p><strong>Can I still bring my own bags?</strong></p> <p>Many grocery stores have stopped allowing the use of reusable bags because of the potential risks to their workers.</p> <p>If you are using a reusable nylon or plastic bag, <a href="https://ucfoodsafety.ucdavis.edu/sites/g/files/dgvnsk7366/files/files/page/UCDavis_Reusable%20bags_COVID-19_Flyer.pdf">clean inside and outside of the bag</a> with soapy water and rinse. Spray or wipe down the bag inside and out with diluted bleach solution or disinfectant, then allow the bag to air dry completely. For cloth bags, wash the bag in warm water with normal laundry detergent, then dry it on the warmest setting possible.</p> <p>Everyone has to be more aware of their surroundings to stay safe during this pandemic. Remember to wear your mask and keep your distance from others and you can minimize the risks.</p> <p><em>Written by Erin DiCaprio. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/heres-how-to-stay-safe-while-buying-groceries-amid-the-coronavirus-pandemic-138683"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

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“Miracle” coronavirus survivor released after four weeks in coma

<p>South Australia’s last remaining COVID-19 patient has been released from the Royal Adelaide Hospital after spending four weeks on a ventilator.</p> <p>Paul Faraguna, 68, was the first coronavirus patient to be admitted to intensive care in the state and the last to walk out.</p> <p>He was admitted to hospital over two months ago after contracting the virus on the Ruby Princess cruise ship. At least <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/australia-covid-19-death-toll-reaches-100-20200519-p54uhb.html">22 passengers have died since disembarking the vessel in Sydney</a>.</p> <p>Faraguna was rushed to intensive care six days later and placed in an induced coma and on a ventilator for about four weeks. During this period, he started to suffer multiple organ failure.</p> <p>“The doctors were unable to say what my future would be if I survived, even suggesting that I may have brain damage and be permanently disabled,” he said in a statement.</p> <p>“I remember that, after awakening from my coma, virtually every doctor and nurse consistently telling me that my recovery was a miracle.”</p> <p>On Thursday afternoon, he was farewelled by staff from the infectious diseases ward</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">The last patient recovering from COVID-19 left the RAH today. Paul contracted COVID-19 on the Ruby Princess. He was so ill he was in the ICU in an induced coma and on a ventilator for 4 weeks. He's still recovering and now receiving care closer to home at Modbury Hospital ❤️ <a href="https://t.co/NwcZ1ippPJ">pic.twitter.com/NwcZ1ippPJ</a></p> — SA Health (@SAHealth) <a href="https://twitter.com/SAHealth/status/1263396492577959936?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 21, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Faraguna thanked the medical staff for the “caring treatment” he received.</p> <p>“I don’t particularly enjoy being in hospital for such a long time, but the experience of being looked after by the wonderful staff has made it far better,” he said.</p> <p>“I will never be able to repay all of the dedicated medical staff, but I give you my heartfelt thank you.”</p> <p>The hospital’s Nurse Unit Manager, Karen Shutz, said Faraguna’s recovery was “a huge boost” to the medical team.</p> <p>“We honestly didn’t think he’d make it through, but to see him come out the other side is just the most amazing gift you can have out of this pandemic,” she told the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-21/last-coronavirus-patient-leaves-rah/12273918">ABC</a></em>.</p> <p>“It was just such a huge boost that somebody had made it out the other side who was really sick, so yeah, there were a few tears as he was walking out this afternoon.”</p>

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Kyle Sandilands emotionally reveals secret health battle

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Controversial radio star Kyle Sandilands is set to break down in tears as he appears to reveal to co-host Jackie O that he has been battling a “serious” health issue in secret.</p> <p>The duo sat down with Sandiland’s close friend Karl Stefanovic for an in-depth<span> </span>60 Minutes<span> </span>interview that airs this Sunday.</p> <p>In a new promotional piece for the show, Sandilands tears up as he tells his co-host about the “condition I’ve been diagnosed with”.</p> <p>“I love you and it’s been wonderful,” he begins, looking at Jackie O. “(But) there’s a condition I’ve been diagnosed with that I haven’t spoken to anyone about.”</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">Chaos, controversy and undeniable chemistry. <a href="https://twitter.com/kyleandjackieo?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@KyleandJackieO</a> have ruled the Australian airwaves for 20 years. SUNDAY on <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/60Mins?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#60Mins</a>, how the King and Queen of radio have turned being outrageous into a hundred million dollar business. <a href="https://t.co/k87KnPgqrd">pic.twitter.com/k87KnPgqrd</a></p> — 60 Minutes Australia (@60Mins) <a href="https://twitter.com/60Mins/status/1263037988583337984?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">May 20, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Jackie O is wiping away tears as she prepares herself for Sandiland’s confession, but the preview ends after that so it’s unclear what he is referring to.</p> <p>The pair discussed the show on the<span> </span>Kyle and Jackie O<span> </span>radio show, with Sandiland’s asking Jackie O whether she thought “that really inappropriate joke I did with you where everyone started crying” would run in the final edit of<span> </span>60 Minutes.</p> <p>Jackie quickly cut him off, saying not to “give that away” before the episode aired.</p> <p>“But do I think it will run? Yes, I know it will run, because I actually asked Karl,” she told him.</p> <p>Jackie continued: “I was worried about that segment, that part of the interview. I just said, ‘What are you going to do with that?’ and he said, ‘I don’t know – but we’re definitely running it.’”</p> <p>The pair talk about how it’s hard staying at number 1 as the pair have dominated the FM radio airwaves for the last 20 years.</p> <p>Jackie O admitted she was “always worried” about Sandilands saying something troublesome on air that will “ruin” him.</p> <p>“Staying at number one is harder than getting to number one,” she said.</p> <p>However, Kyle responded that he “doesn’t give a f**k”.</p> <p>“Millions of dollars of marketing has been spent on me being a bastard,” he told her with a laugh.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: <a rel="noopener" href="https://twitter.com/60Mins/status/1263037988583337984" target="_blank">60 Minutes</a>   </em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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A thousand yarns and snapshots – why poetry matters during a pandemic

<p>Why do we have the arts? Why do they seem to matter so much? It is all very well muttering something vague about eternal truths and spiritual values. Or even gesturing toward Bach and Leonardo da Vinci, along with our own Patrick White.</p> <p>But what can the poets make of, and for, our busy, present lives? What do they have to say during grave crises?</p> <p>Well, they can speak eloquently to their readers for life, in writing from the very base of their own experiences. Every generation has laid claim, afresh, to its vital modernity. In the 17th century, Andrew Marvell did so with witty lyrical elegance in his verse <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44688/to-his-coy-mistress">To a Coy Mistress</a>. Three centuries later, the <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/rene-char">French poet René Char</a> thought of us as weaving tapestries against the threat of extinction. Accordingly, <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1668153.Hypnos_Waking">he wrote</a>:</p> <p><em>The poet is not angry at the hideous extinction of death, but confident of his own particular touch, he transforms everything into long wools.</em></p> <p>In short, the poet will, at best, weave lasting, memorable, salvific tapestries out of words. The poems in question will come out live, if the poet is lucky, and possibly as disparate as the sleepy, furred animals caged in Melbourne Zoo.</p> <p>What is truly touching or intimate need not be tapped by elegies, for all that they can fill a mortal need. Yet the great modern poet <a href="https://www.poetryfoundation.org/poets/w-h-auden">W. H. Auden</a> <a href="https://books.google.com.au/books?id=Iae_YsTmAT8C&amp;pg=PA231&amp;lpg=PA231&amp;dq=%22only+one+object+in+his+world+which+is+at+once+sacred+and+hated%22&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=Ib10mT6Q8x&amp;sig=ACfU3U38Y8tHrdfsSqHYljJa1Rz9RdHG8Q&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwipmZGf4rTpAhVF7HMBHU2NDFkQ6AEwAHoECAEQAQ#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">wrote in memory</a> of poet, writer and broadcaster John Betjeman:</p> <p><em>There is one, only one object in his world which is at once sacred and hated, but it is far too formidable to be satirizable: namely Death.</em></p> <p>As William Wordsworth and Judith Wright both well knew, in their separate generations – and quite polar cultures – the best poetry grasps moments of our ordinary lives, and renders them memorable.</p> <p>Poetry can give us back our dailiness in musical technicolour: in a thousand yarns or snapshots. Poems sing to us that life really matters, now. That can emerge as songs or satires, laments, landscapes or even somebody’s portrait done in imaginative words.</p> <p>Yes, verse at its finest is living truth “done” in verbal art. The great Russian playwright Anton Chekhov once insisted “nothing ever happens later”, and the point of poetry in our own time – as always, at its best – is surely to shine the light of language on what is happening now. The devil is in the detail, yes. But so is the redemptive beauty, along with “the prophetess Deborah under her palm-tree” in the words of the Australian poet, <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/glutton-for-words-crafted-rare-prose-20120702-21d2a.html">Peter Steele</a>.</p> <p>Poetry sees the palm tree, and the prophetess herself, vividly, even in the middle of a widespread epidemic.</p> <p>Modern poetry is an art made out of living language. In these times, at least, it tends to be concise, barely spilling over the end of the page: too tidy for that, unlike the vast memorised narratives of the Israelites, the Greeks or even the Icelanders. But what it shares with the ancient, oral cultures is its connection with wisdom, crystallising nodes of value, fables of the tribe, moments or decades that made us all.</p> <p>In the brief age of a national pandemic, poetry’s role and its duties may come to seem all the more important: all the more civil and politically sane. The poem – even in the case when it is quite a short lyric, even if comic – carries the message of moral responsibility in its saddle bag. Perhaps all poets do, even when they are also charming the pants off their willing readers.</p> <p><em>Written by Christopher Wallace-Crabbe. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/a-thousand-yarns-and-snapshots-why-poetry-matters-during-a-pandemic-138723">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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One, then some: How to count like a bee

<p>If you were a honeybee, how would you choose where to find flowers? Imagine your first flight out of the hive searching for food. What would you do if you saw flower patches with one flower, or three, or twelve, or twenty?</p> <p>Our new study, published in the <a href="https://jeb.biologists.org/content/223/9/jeb223610">Journal of Experimental Biology</a>, tested honeybees on exactly this question. We wanted to understand how honeybees choose where to forage in environments like greenhouses where our food is pollinated, in local parks, or in our own backyards.</p> <p>Specifically, our research looked at whether honeybees with no specific numerical training could choose a flower patch based on the quantity of flowers it had.</p> <p>We found the bees could tell the difference between groups of 1 vs 4 flowers – but not between, say, 4 vs 5. Basically, they couldn’t differentiate between groups of 2 or more flowers.</p> <p><strong>A mathematical matter of life and death</strong></p> <p>The ability to tell the difference between two quantities can mean life or death for an animal. “Quantity discrimination” can be vital for survival in tasks including:</p> <ul> <li>resource comparison: choosing a larger quantity of food</li> <li>aggressive interactions: choosing to avoid conflicts with larger groups of individuals, and</li> <li>avoiding predators: choosing to stay with a larger group of animals of the same species to reduce your chance of being eaten.</li> </ul> <p>We are gaining a better understanding of quantity discrimination across the animal kingdom. <a href="http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20150826-the-animals-that-can-count">Primates and other mammals, amphibians, reptiles, birds and fish</a> all display some form of quantity discrimination in day-to-day tasks. For example, <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoaling_and_schooling#Predator_avoidance">fish</a> use quantity discrimination to stay in larger groups to reduce the chance of being eaten by a predator.</p> <p>However, little is known about spontaneous number choices by insects.</p> <p><strong>How do bees choose where to forage?</strong></p> <p>Honeybees assess the available flowers based on several factors, including <a href="https://theconversation.com/plants-use-advertising-like-strategies-to-attract-bees-with-colour-and-scent-92673">scent, colour</a>, <a href="https://academic.oup.com/cz/article/65/4/457/5244969">shape</a> and <a href="https://digital.library.txstate.edu/handle/10877/2557">size</a>.</p> <p>Honeybees typically visit around 150 individual flowers per flight from the hive to collect resources such as nectar or pollen. For a honeybee, a high quantity of flowers in a single area would mean less energy exertion than having to fly to many flower patches with less flowers.</p> <p>Using different numbers of artificial flowers, we wanted to test whether individual honeybees could discriminate between a range of quantities, and how they might determine the quality of a flower patch.</p> <p>Our honeybees were shown pairs of flower quantities ranging from easier number comparisons (such as 1 flower vs 12 flowers) to more challenging scenarios (such as 4 flowers vs 5 flowers).</p> <p>Interestingly, despite previous findings that trained honeybees can discriminate between <a href="https://theconversation.com/bees-can-learn-higher-numbers-than-we-thought-if-we-train-them-the-right-way-124887">challenging quantities</a> and can also learn to <a href="https://theconversation.com/can-bees-do-maths-yes-new-research-shows-they-can-add-and-subtract-108074">add and subtract</a>, the bees performed poorly in our spontaneous number task.</p> <p>We found they were only able to discriminate between 1 vs 3, 1 vs 4, and 1 vs 12 flowers – wherein they preferred the larger quantity. When 1 flower was an option they succeeded, but confused any comparisons between groups of 2 flowers or more.</p> <p>This result suggests flower patch choice based on numerical-type cues is difficult for honeybees. And this has implications for how flower displays are interpreted.</p> <p>With today being <a href="https://blog.publish.csiro.au/world-bee-day/">World Bee Day</a>, why not take the opportunity to discover what bees are doing in gardens near you. Chances are they’re going to any flower patch with more than one flower, rather than paying much attention to absolute numbers.</p> <p><em>Written by Scarlett Howard and Adrian Dyer. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/one-then-some-how-to-count-like-a-bee-138815">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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Doctor who cared for Australia's first COVID-19 fatality opens up as national death toll hits 100

<p>A respiratory physician who treated Australia’s first recorded coronavirus fatality has spoken up about her experience as the national death toll reaches 100.</p> <p>Respiratory doctor Fiona Lake treated 78-year-old James Kwan, who was a passenger on the Diamond Princess cruise ship.</p> <p>Kwan died at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth on March 1.</p> <p>“The thing about this virus is that people can deteriorate quite late between days five and ten of the illness, so you are looking after them, but expecting they may get worse later on,” Dr Lake told <em><a href="https://www.sbs.com.au/news/as-australia-reaches-100-coronavirus-deaths-a-physician-who-cared-for-the-country-s-first-fatality-looks-back">SBS News</a></em>.</p> <p>“He didn’t have any complaints when he came into the hospital, we could see that his lungs weren’t working normally, but only very late in the course of the illness did he have problems such as shortness of breath, at which stage he was in quite severe respiratory failure.”</p> <p>Kwan’s wife Theresa, who was recovering from COVID-19 at the same hospital, was not allowed to be by his side.</p> <p>“The difficulty with the infectious nature of COVID is that puts the rest of the family at risk, so even when people are dying we are behind screens, windows and things like that,” Dr Lake said.</p> <p>Kwan was a tourism business operator and founder of WA-based inbound travel agent Wel-Travel.</p> <p>He was noted for his work in developing tourism to Australia from many Asian markets, the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-05-19/coronavirus-covid-19-100-deaths-australia/12216018">ABC</a> </em>reported.</p> <p>“He had a really innovative mind, very hardworking, but very pleasant man to work with as well,” Australian Tourism Export Council managing director Peter Shelley told the outlet.</p> <p>“James was always willing to share his knowledge and help others in the industry grow, [and] often mentored young and aspiring members of the tourism industry.”</p>

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Just how hot will it get this century? Latest climate models suggest it could be worse than we thought

<p>Climate scientists use mathematical models to project the Earth’s future under a warming world, but a group of the <a href="https://www.carbonbrief.org/cmip6-the-next-generation-of-climate-models-explained">latest models</a> have included unexpectedly high values for a measure called “climate sensitivity”.</p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/explainer-what-is-climate-sensitivity-18815">Climate sensitivity</a> refers to the relationship between changes in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and warming.</p> <p>The high values are an unwelcome surprise. If they’re right, it means a hotter future than previously expected – warming of up to 7℃ for Australia by 2100 if emissions continue to rise unabated.</p> <p><a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2019EF001469">Our recent study</a> analyses these climate models (named <a href="https://www.carbonbrief.org/cmip6-the-next-generation-of-climate-models-explained">CMIP6</a>), which were released at the end of last year, and what insights they give for Australia.</p> <p>These models contain the latest improvements and innovations from some of the world’s leading climate modelling institutes, and will feed into the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) <a href="https://www.ipcc.ch/report/sixth-assessment-report-working-group-ii/">Sixth Assessment Report</a> in 2021.</p> <p>But the new climate sensitivity values raise the question of whether previous climate modelling has underestimated potential climate change and its effects, or whether the new models are overdoing things.</p> <p>If the high estimate is right, this would require the world to make greater and more urgent emission cuts to meet any given warming target.</p> <p><strong>What is climate sensitivity?</strong></p> <p>Climate sensitivity is one of the most important factors for climate change, strongly influencing our planning for adaptation and mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions.</p> <p>It’s a standardised measure of how much the climate responds when carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere double. There are a few indices of climate sensitivity that the scientific community uses, and perhaps the most commonly used is “equilibrium climate sensitivity”.</p> <p>We can estimate equilibrium climate sensitivity by raising carbon dioxide concentrations in models abruptly and then calculating the warming experienced after 150 years – when the atmosphere and ocean would return to a temperature balance.</p> <p>In other words, giving the climate a “push” with more carbon emissions and waiting until it settles down into a new state.</p> <p>The previous generation of models (<a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1029/2012GL051607">CMIP5</a>) had equilibrium climate sensitivity values between 2.1℃ to 4.7℃ global temperature change. The values for the latest models (CMIP6) are from 1.8℃ to 5.6℃.</p> <p>This includes a cluster of models with sensitivity of 5℃ or more, a group of models within the previous range, and two models with very low values at around 2℃.</p> <p><strong>What this means for our future</strong></p> <p>Higher equilibrium climate sensitivity values mean a hotter future climate than previously expected, for any given scenario of future <a href="https://theconversation.com/reducing-emissions-alone-wont-stop-climate-change-new-research-45493">emissions</a>.</p> <p>According to these new models, Australian warming could crack more than 7℃ by 2100 under a scenario where greenhouse gas emissions continue to increase through the century.</p> <p>These higher temperature changes are not currently presented in the <a href="https://www.climatechangeinaustralia.gov.au/en/">national climate projections</a>, as they didn’t occur under the previous generation of models and emission scenarios.</p> <p>So what does this mean in practice?</p> <p>Higher climate sensitivity means increases to heat extremes. It would mean we’ll see greater flow-on changes to other climate features, such as extreme rainfall, sea level rise, extreme heatwaves and more, reducing our ability to adapt.</p> <p>High equilibrium climate sensitivity would also mean we need to make bigger cuts to our greenhouse gas emissions for a given global warming target. The Paris Agreement aims to keep global warming well under 2℃ since pre-industrial times.</p> <p><strong>Should we be worried?</strong></p> <p>These are credible models, representing the new generation versions of top performing modelling systems, developed over decades at high-ranking research institutions globally. Their results cannot be rejected out of hand just because we don’t like the answer.</p> <p>But – we shouldn’t jump on this piece of evidence, throw out all others and assume the results from a subset of new models is the final answer.</p> <p>The weight and credibility of each piece of evidence must be carefully assessed by the research community, and by scientists putting together the upcoming IPCC assessment.</p> <p>We’re only just starting to understand the reasons for the high sensitivity in these models, such as how <a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2019GL085782">clouds</a> interact with particles in the air.</p> <p>And there are other lines of evidence underpinning the IPCC estimate of equilibrium climate sensitivity.</p> <p>These include the warming seen since the last ice age around 20,000 years ago; measurements of warming seen over recent decades from greenhouse gases already emitted; and understanding different climate feedbacks from field experiments and observed natural variability. These other lines of evidence may not support the new model results.</p> <p>Essentially, the jury is still out on the exact value of equilibrium climate sensitivity, high values can’t be <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00382-019-04991-y">ruled out</a>, and the results from the new models need to be taken seriously.</p> <p>In any case, the new values are a worrying possibility that no one wants, but one we must still grapple with. As researchers in one <a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/2019GL083978">study</a> conclude: “what scares us is not that the models’ [equilibrium climate sensitivity] is wrong […] but that it might be right”.</p> <p><em>Written by Michael Grose and Julie Arblaster. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/just-how-hot-will-it-get-this-century-latest-climate-models-suggest-it-could-be-worse-than-we-thought-137281">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

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