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Contamination experiment shows why social distancing is important

<p>As the new coronavirus continues to spread around the world, social distancing has become the new normal. We have been accustomed to sanitising our hands, coughing under cover, and keeping at least 1.5 metre away from others in shops and on the street.</p> <p>However, these guidelines are often forgone during visits to family’s or friends’ house as people let their guard down and interact freely.</p> <p>In light of this phenomenon, a 2010 clip from the Discovery Channel television series <em>Mythbusters</em> has once again been circulated around the Internet to warn the public about how easily the virus might be spread in close vicinity.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/k1j8bh8_O_Q"></iframe></div> <p>In the video, host Adam Savage performed a dinner party experiment. Savage put on a small rig filled with fluorescent dye – which was invisible to the naked eye – by his nose and went on to host the party for six guests while pretending to have a cold.</p> <p>Some of the things Savage carried out during the experiment included pouring alcohol, handing out plates and shaking hands.</p> <p>The UV light later revealed that the nasal secretions significantly contaminated five out of the six dinner guests. The sixth guest, Kari, was aware of the experiment and said she was a germaphobe.</p> <p>One of the more recent comments on the video said: “What a great way to show how easily our nose goo can spread to others. If you are sick, please keep others safe and self-quarantine!”</p>

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Federer and Nadal step up with life-saving pandemic efforts

<p>Roger Federer and his wife, Mirka are donating more than $1 million to Swiss families in need amid the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>The tennis champion took to Instagram to announce the generous gesture on Wednesday, revealing that the couple will donate 1 million Swiss Francs to help “the most vulnerable families in Switzerland.”</p> <p>“Our contribution is just a start,” wrote Federer. “We hope that others might join in supporting more families in need. Together we can overcome this crisis! Stay healthy!”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-J7SYHlIjl/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B-J7SYHlIjl/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">These are challenging times for everyone and nobody should be left behind. Mirka and I have personally decided to donate one million Swiss Francs for the most vulnerable families in Switzerland. Our contribution is just a start. We hope that others might join in supporting more families in need. Together we can overcome this crisis! Stay healthy! Dies sind herausfordernde Zeiten für uns alle und niemand sollte zurückgelassen werden. Mirka und ich haben beschlossen, persönlich eine Million Schweizer Franken für die am stärksten gefährdeten Familien in der Schweiz zu spenden. Unser Beitrag ist nur ein Anfang. Wir hoffen, dass sich andere anschließen, um noch mehr bedürftige Familien zu unterstützen. Gemeinsam können wir diese Krise überwinden! Bleibt gesund! Nous vivons une période difficile pour nous tous et personne ne doit être laissé pour compte. Mirka et moi avons décidé de personnellement faire don d'un million de francs suisses aux familles les plus défavorisées en Suisse. Notre contribution n'est qu'un début. Nous espérons que d'autres se joindront à nous pour aider encore plus de familles dans le besoin. Ensemble, nous pouvons surmonter cette crise! Restez en bonne santé!</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/rogerfederer/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Roger Federer</a> (@rogerfederer) on Mar 25, 2020 at 4:33am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>As of Friday morning, Switzerland has 11,811 reported coronavirus cases and 191 deaths.</p> <p>And the 38-year-old isn’t the only athlete to lend a helping hand, as Spanish sports stars Rafael Nadal and Pau Gasol have launched a fund raising drive in order to give back to their nation which has been badly affected by the pandemic.</p> <p>Together, they are aiming to raise 11 million euros ($20 million).</p> <p>“The Spanish people have never let us athletes down. We are what we are because of them,” said Nadal.</p> <p>“We cannot let them down now.”</p> <p>Nadal said he came up with the idea and called his fellow Spaniard and friend Gasol to help promote his drive.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/B-A3UVNoXcq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/B-A3UVNoXcq/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Mensaje a todos de ánimo y fuerza. #yomequedoencasa #iostoacasa #tuttoandràbene #jerestechezmoi #istayhome</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/rafaelnadal/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Rafa Nadal</a> (@rafaelnadal) on Mar 21, 2020 at 4:08pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Spanish athletes have always tried to make our nation proud, today we want to go beyond that,” said double NBA champion Gasol.</p> <p>“We want to raise 11 million euros and help 1.34 million people, those hardest hit by coronavirus.</p> <p>“My contribution and Rafa’s too have already been made and I hope the whole of Spanish sport will rally behind us.”</p> <p>The pair have been praised for the enormous gesture, with World Cup winning goalkeeper Iker Casillas tweeting: “It’s the time for Spanish sport and it’s up to us to do our part.</p> <p>“I have already contributed."</p> <p>Sevilla coach Julen Lopetegui, a former Spain manager, posted his support on Nadal’s Instagram account.</p> <p>“I hope all athletes will join this initiative and we can return, even if in a small amount, all that support that we have all enjoyed in our careers.”</p>

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Should Australia ‘shut down’ for 30 days?

<p>Prime Minister Scott Morrison has announced a major boost to social security recipients and for those who lose their jobs as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, which represents a turnaround from its previous determination not to increase the Newstart allowance.</p> <p>After declaring last year that the ‘the best form of welfare is a job’, the PM is now having to swallow those words as his Government comes to the realisation that sometimes, circumstances are out of people’s control, and gainful employment is not always attainable.</p> <p>Of course, these are unprecedented times, but what is being hailed as ‘one of the largest increases to social security benefits in Australia’s history’, requiring the government to spend $14 billion over six months. This couldn’t have come at a more welcome time, particularly as Australia also copes with the economic impact of recent droughts, bushfires and floods too.</p> <p>But many believe that in addition to these measures, Australia should follow the lead of other nations such as New Zealand by ‘shutting down’ the nation for a month by implementing what are known as ‘level 4 measures’ – which involves ceasing all non-essential services, essentially resulting in most businesses either having their employees work from home or, if this is not possible, not working at all over that time.</p> <p><strong>The ‘Coronavirus supplement’</strong></p> <p>In a bold move, the government is <a href="https://treasury.gov.au/sites/default/files/2020-03/Fact_sheet-Income_Support_for_Individuals.pdf">establishing a new time-limited coronavirus supplement</a> to be paid at a rate of $550 per fortnight for the next six months.</p> <p>This will effectively double the current rate of Newstart, which is being renamed the jobseeker payment. (The rebranding was already under way.) and eligible income support recipients will receive the full amount of the $550 coronavirus supplement on top of their payment each fortnight. It’s available for existing and new recipients of the jobseeker payment, youth allowance jobseeker, parenting payment, farm household allowance and special benefit and will be paid on top of these fortnightly payments.</p> <p>The government will also waive the asset test in many cases along with waiting periods. What’s more it has expanded both Jobseeker Payment and Youth Allowance Jobseeker criteria to provide payment access for permanent employees who are stood down or lose their employment; sole traders; the self-employed; casual workers; and contract workers – this could also include someone who needs to stop work to care for someone affected by the Coronavirus.</p> <p><strong>The $750 payment</strong></p> <p>In the first package, the government announced that 6.5 million lower-income Australians would receive a one-off $750 payment. The payment – which will be made from 31 March – will be made to all social security, veteran and other income support recipients and eligible concession card holders. This includes those on Newstart, those who have commonwealth seniors health cards, and families receiving family tax benefits.</p> <p>This second payment will be made automatically from 13 July 2020 to around five million social security, veteran and other income support recipients and eligible concession cardholders.</p> <p>This won’t be available if you get the coronavirus supplement, but if you are eligible, you will receive the payment automatically.</p> <p><strong>Tap into your Superannuation</strong></p> <p>Under the changes announced in the second package, the government will allow individuals “in financial stress” as a result of the coronavirus downturn to have limited access to their superannuation savings, capped at up to $10,000 in 2019-20 and a further $10,000 in 2020-21.You can apply online through MyGov for access to your super but must do so before 1 July 2020. Any money released will be tax free and won’t affect Centrelink or veterans’ affairs payments.</p> <p><strong>Aged pensioners and retirees</strong></p> <p>The Government is also introducing changes that will affect self-funded retirees and people who receive the aged-pension, enabling them more cash at this time.</p> <p><strong>Students</strong></p> <p>It has also been announced 230,000 full time students will have their <a href="https://7news.com.au/lifestyle/health-wellbeing/students-included-in-coronavirus-package-c-759139">benefits increased by $550 per fortnight</a>.</p> <p><strong>Concerns and lack of clarity</strong></p> <p>Some concerns do, however, remain about the job seeker payment (formerly Newstart). Given the financial boost is only for a limited time – what happens after 6 months – <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/desperate-and-hungry-struggling-to-survive-on-newstart/">do recipients go back to living on less than $40 a day?</a></p> <p>Most of these payments can be accessed online, and the government says the application process will be streamlined. But, given the automation of the system, people are also naturally concerned in the wake of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/centrelinks-flawed-robo-debt-system-is-killing-our-most-vulnerable/">mistakes, miscalculations and confusion created by ‘Robodebt,</a>’  whether Centrelink’s processes and procedures will be sophisticated and robust enough to cope with the significant influx of demand expected over the coming weeks, as thousands of Australians access Centrelink, many for the first time in their lives.</p> <p>After axing thousands of jobs in recent years, employing short-term contractors instead, the Government has now pledged an additional 5,000 staff to Services Australia, which runs Centrelink to be able to meet the needs of Australians engaging with the Centrelink service.</p> <p><strong>A complete shutdown?</strong></p> <p>And while the measures are welcomed by many, the voices calling for a nationwide shutdown of essential services, such as that being implemented by New Zealand for 30 days, seem to be increasing – the reasoning being that such a measure could result in a shorter period of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/theres-a-deafening-silence-on-the-current-debt-and-deficit-crisis/">economic crisis</a>.</p> <p><em>Written by Sonia Hickey. Republished with permission <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/should-australia-shut-down-for-30-days/">of Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</a></em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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“We stay here for you. Please stay home for us”

<p>A group of doctors have called on Australians to stay at home to help control the spread of the new coronavirus.</p> <p>The video is introduced by Australian Medical Association (AMA) WA president Andrew Miller, who urged the government to impose a national lockdown.</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fmichelle.musca.7%2Fvideos%2F10158152860511354%2F&amp;show_text=0&amp;width=560" width="560" height="315" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>“I’m calling on the government to jump on the brakes,” Dr Miller said.</p> <p>“This virus is out of control and we’ve really got to stop it to avoid a lot of unnecessary deaths, not only of healthcare workers but also people out there in the community.</p> <p>“We want people to stay home and for the government please to impose a lockdown until we’ve got this under control.</p> <p>“We know the people will understand.”</p> <p>The doctors in the video asked members of the public to “keep our distance”.</p> <p>“We can do this so our country can go back to normal soon,” they said. “Stay home.”</p> <p>Doctors around the world have also made similar calls for people, with <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.wptv.com/news/local-news/water-cooler/please-stay-home-for-us-nurses-make-plea-for-you-to-stay-home-amid-coronavirus" target="_blank">pictures</a> and <a rel="noopener" href="https://kwwl.com/2020/03/24/uihc-urging-people-to-stay-home-we-stay-at-work-for-you-please-stay-home-for-us/" target="_blank">social media posts</a> saying: “we stay here for you, please stay home for us”.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 236.439px; display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835314/bb11gzik.jpeg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/a1d1dfca1450436190e44e9b1bf31c43" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Source: Nine</em></p> <p>The clip came after 5,000 medical doctors signed a <a href="https://www.smh.com.au/national/thousands-of-doctors-sign-petition-calling-for-national-lockdown-now-20200324-p54dgy.html">petition pleading for a nationwide lockdown</a>.</p> <p>In the <a href="https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfBy610VGu_lUZ9hm_ahGgO4CL7ZXqd3wN0gysT_s6BiCiikg/viewform">petition</a>, the doctors asked the government to establish more measures, including “a national shutdown of non-essential services and enforcement of strict social distancing” to slow or halt the virus transmission.</p> <p>“Doctors are not activists; they don’t put their names or emails or roles to petitions,” said intensive care specialist Greg Kelly. “To have thousands of my colleagues sign it indicates just how united we all are on this and how worried we are about it.”</p> <p>The AMA has encouraged the government to introduce “more and stronger social isolation measures”, including further closure of non-essential services.</p> <p>“It is a big call for governments to direct the population to cease work, suspend schools, and only leave home for essential needs, but the AMA will back governments in making this call,” said federal president Dr Tony Bartone.</p> <p>“New Zealand has adopted broad community isolation measures. The United Kingdom has instructed its population to stay home except to shop and seek medical help.</p> <p>“It’s time for governments to act on their local evidence, while avoiding further confusion, to increase home isolation. More people need to be at home to flatten the escalation curve.”</p>

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Coronavirus distancing measures: Here are 3 things to ask yourself before you see someone

<p><em>This article is based on the coronavirus and COVID-19 situation as of March 23. It’s important to remember that the situation is rapidly developing and official advice may change.</em></p> <p>If the flurry of new orders released in the last 24 hours has you feeling confused about what’s OK and what’s not when it comes to social contact, you’re not alone.</p> <p>It’s so difficult to adopt a set of hard and fast rules with the advice changing so quickly. Government departments have put out detailed guidance but that won’t cover all situations. Experts in the public sphere will give different advice.</p> <p>The fact is, if there’s an activity you want or need to do and you’re not sure if it’s advisable, often you’ll have to make a call. After ensuring that it doesn’t breach public orders, your decision will need to be based on your assessment of the risks and benefits.</p> <p>Whatever activity you’re considering, it can help to first clearly list your options. For example, if I’m talking to a friend with kids, we could organise to meet at the park, in a house, online or not at all. Or if I want to catch up with my sister, I could do it in person or on the phone.</p> <p>Then ask yourself some important questions as you consider your options.</p> <p>Here are three considerations that should help you make an informed decision on behalf of your family and the wider community.</p> <ol> <li><strong> What’s the latest advice of my state or territory health department?</strong></li> </ol> <p>The first is to look to the latest advice for your state and territory health department, and be aware that they may change from day to day or even within a day. So keep checking.</p> <p>Some departments are now developing quite detailed lists of dos and don'ts that are being updated as quick as is humanly possible.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Do I know the latest on how the virus moves between people?</strong></li> </ol> <p>Understanding as much as you can about the way that the virus moves between people can help you make an informed decision about whether an activity you’re considering doing poses a higher risk of passing coronavirus on or picking it up.</p> <p>The coronavirus causing COVID-19 is currently thought to be passed on through contact and droplet transmission. It comes from the mucous membranes (meaning the wet parts of your face - mouth, nose and eyes). A person with the infection might cough or sneeze or touch their mouth or nose and then touch another surface where it can remain infectious for a time.</p> <p>The virus is able to move to another person through direct contact with droplets from the cough or sneeze or if they touch that surface with their hands then touch their mouth, nose or eyes. The more symptomatic somebody is, the more easy it is to get the infection but people with very mild symptoms can still pass it on. More is being learnt about the virus and this knowledge may change.</p> <p>That is why handwashing and cough or sneeze etiquette is so important.</p> <p>COVID-19 is currently thought to be mostly spread by people who have symptoms and have been in close contact with others. Those more at risk of it are those who have had contact with someone who has been diagnosed with it or have recently returned from overseas.</p> <p>However, that is changing as it moves more in the general community in Australia.</p> <p>That basic understanding of how it moves can help people make decisions of who to see, how to see them, how to behave in public places and at home.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> How do the risks of a certain activity weigh up against the benefits?</strong></li> </ol> <p>Whenever you are considering doing some activity with somebody, you need to weigh up the risks of harm with the potential benefits.</p> <p>First, make sure you are abiding by the public health orders. Also remember that this is not just a decision about your personal risk. We are all reducing the chain of transmission by reducing our contact with others as much as we can.</p> <p>Sometimes, we will still want or need contact with others.</p> <p>First of all, we need to accept that we take a risk whenever we have contact with another person and we need to weigh that risk against the potential benefits.</p> <p>There might be really important social benefits, for example, for seeing a person for whom contact with others is extremely important.</p> <p>There might be benefits in helping someone who has less access to resources than we do – for example, helping a neighbour in need.</p> <p>In these instances, if you decide to take the risk, it is important to follow guidance on doing everything you possibly can do to minimise the spread of COVID-19 within that encounter.</p> <p>That means proper hand hygeine; washing hands when arriving and leaving. Try to stay 1.5 metres or more apart. Never go out and meet with others if you have respiratory symptoms such as a cough, or a fever. And it means trying to avoid contact with people at greater risk of severe disease, such as those with existing chronic disease, an older person, or person who is Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.</p> <p>If the COVID-19 risk is really high to that person, then maybe the benefits don’t outweigh the potential harm. You may be forced to make a really hard decision.</p> <p><strong>Hard decisions ahead</strong></p> <p>There’s no magic cut off where you stop all risk. We have got to accept it is about degrees of risk and what we collectively do to minimise it.</p> <p>If we choose to have contact with another person, while staying within the boundaries of what is permissible based on the government requirements, then it’s important you have a set of evidence-based principles that helps guide your decision-making.</p> <p><em>Written by Julie Leask. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-distancing-measures-are-confusing-here-are-3-things-to-ask-yourself-before-you-see-someone-134394">The Conversation.</a></em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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“Patience, confidence, courage, solidarity”: Prince Albert of Monaco's health update and personal message

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Prince Albert II of Monaco recently tested positive for COVID-19 last week, and has finally given a health update to the curious public.</p> <p>The reigning monarch is the second royal to contract the deadly virus, and over the weekend, People Magazine was able to give a look into the Prince’s condition.</p> <p>The 62-year-old is improving his health slowly and steadily as he continues to work from the confines of his home, under his doctor’s orders.</p> <p>“A little news. Condition unchanged. Little fever, little cough,” Prince Rainier III, who is the son of Princess Grace of Monaco told <em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://people.com/royals/prince-albert-health-update-after-coronavirus-diagnosis/" target="_blank" title="People Magazine. ">People Magazine.</a></em></p> <p>“Vital signs all good. The doctors are satisfied for now.”</p> <p>Prince Albert, who falls into the category of high-risk coronavirus patients, is undergoing regular temperature checks, and is consistently receiving news on his blood oxygen levels.</p> <p>An insider to the family has said the king messages, emails and calls ranging from celebrities and politicians to regular everyday people has been touching.</p> <p>Issuing a statement on his behalf, the Palace said Prince Albert was grateful and “touched by the many expressions of sympathy that have come to him from around the world.”</p> <p>“His Serene Highness wishes to thank all those who have shown him their support.”</p> <p>The prince tested anonymously last week in a bid to avoid being treated differently in the healthcare system.</p> <p>The royal exhibited mild flu-like symptoms and was later confirmed to have the virus by the labs of the hospital named after his late mother, Princess Grace of Monaco.</p> <p>It is understood Prince Albert is still unsure of where he could've come in contact with the virus.</p> <p>The royal signed off his official palace statement with a handwritten message of “patience, confidence, courage, solidarity” in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic.</p> <p>There are concerns for 71-year-old Prince Charles, who Prince Albert was with just days prior to his diagnosis as both royals attended the WaterAid Summit on March 10.</p> <p>Thankfully, it is believed Prince Charles did not come into contact with Albert during the event, and he has gone so far as to avoid handshakes during engagements and events since the beginning of March.</p> </div> </div> </div> <div class="post-action-bar-component-wrapper"> <div class="post-actions-component"> <div class="upper-row"><span class="like-bar-component"></span> <div class="watched-bookmark-container"></div> </div> </div> </div>

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Why coronavirus curve could flatten in “couple of weeks”

<p>The new measures introduced by the federal and state governments would help flatten the curve in the next couple of weeks, a Nobel prize-winning Australian scientist said.</p> <p>Immunologist Peter Doherty wrote the book <em>Pandemics: What Everyone Needs to Know </em>in 2013 and won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1996 for uncovering how human immune systems fight viruses.</p> <p>Speaking to <em><a href="https://www.msn.com/en-au/news/coronavirus/nobel-prize-winner-says-virus-curve-will-flatten-in-couple-of-weeks/ar-BB11Dl1x?li=AAgfYrC">The Sydney Morning Herald</a></em>, Doherty said the new measures will not instantly slow down the rise in the number of reported cases.</p> <p>“We may see an upward trajectory for another week – a lot of the people on Bondi may have been infected,” he said.</p> <p>The short-term surge is expected as “the average time to [display] symptoms is five to six days and maybe longer”, and only people showing symptoms have been allowed tests.</p> <p>“I think the steps announced by the Prime Minister and the premiers will dampen this down. I would expect to see the curve flatten in the next couple of weeks, see it start to come down,” he said.</p> <p>The Doherty Institute, the first lab out of China to decode the COVID-19’s structure and share the data to labs around the world, has received funding for research from federal and state governments as well as private donors and philanthropists, he said.</p> <p>“We are moving faster on this than on anything in human history,” Doherty said.</p> <p>“One vaccine in the US is already on trial, it’s already gone into people's arms, and the University of Queensland vaccine is being progressed here and with CSIRO.”</p> <p>He also called for more urgent clinical work, including antibody test on people who have had the virus and recovered.</p> <p>He said the people who may not have displayed any symptoms and not know that they have been infected “won’t spread the disease”, “are perfectly okay to go out and work and live and do anything” and therefore could help alleviate the pressure on the economy.</p> <p>Doherty previously told the <em><a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2020-03-22/doubt-over-contracting-coronavirus-covid-19-twice/12075878">ABC</a> </em>that people are unlikely to contract COVID-19 twice. “I would think even if it was a reinfection, that your prior infection would give you very rapid immunity and you would recover very quickly,” he said.</p> <p>He estimated a vaccine to the new coronavirus would be available within 12 to 18 months.</p>

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Dolly Parton and others post heartfelt tributes to Kenny Rogers

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Dolly Parton has posted a heartfelt video tribute to her longtime friend, Kenny Rogers, who passed away on Friday.</p> <p>Rogers, 81, passed away “peacefully at home from natural causes under the care of hospice and surrounded by his family” at his home in Georgia, according to the<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://twitter.com/_KennyRogers/status/1241244740957413376" target="_blank">Rogers family</a>.</p> <p>Parton posted the video on her Instagram account, explaining how she heard the news about her friend.</p> <p>“Well, I couldn’t believe it this morning when I got up and turned on the TV,” said Parton, “and they told me that my friend and singing partner Kenny Rogers had passed away.”</p> <p>“We all know that Kenny is in a better place than we are today, but I’m pretty sure he’s going to be talking to God sometime today…He’s going to be asking Him to spread some light on a bunch of this darkness that’s going on here.”</p> <p>“I loved Kenny with all my heart,” she continued. “My heart’s broken, and a big old chunk of it has gone with him today, and I think I can speak for all his family, his friends and fans, when I say, that ‘I will always love you,'” quoting one of her most beloved lyrics.</p> <p>“God bless you, Kenny,” said Parton, her voice cracking as she cradled a photo of her and Rogers. “Fly high, straight to the arms of God. And to the rest of you, keep the faith.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9_9UgElH-y/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9_9UgElH-y/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">You never know how much you love somebody until they’re gone. I’ve had so many wonderful years and wonderful times with my friend Kenny, but above all the music and the success I loved him as a wonderful man and a true friend. So you be safe with God and just know that I will always love you, dolly.</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/dollyparton/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Dolly Parton</a> (@dollyparton) on Mar 21, 2020 at 7:39am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Other celebrities, such as Carrie Underwood, Keith Urban and Billy Ray Cyrus have expressed their sympathies to the Rogers family.</p> <p>"No one bridged the gap between country and pop more often and better than Kenny Rogers. He will be missed, but his music and diverse style of story telling will live on forever,” said Billy Ray Cyrus on his Twitter account.</p> <p>“THANK YOU KENNY ROGERS- for decades of genre bending music and collaborations - for making music that travelled the globe .. and songs that became common threads for people from all walks of life !! GO REST HIGH BROTHER. With love and deep appreciation . KU,” country singer Keith Urban said on his<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://twitter.com/KeithUrban/status/1241453704416550914" target="_blank">Twitter</a>.</p> <p>"Country music has lost one of its pillars...sing with the angels and talk to God, Kenny. Bless you for being a part of so many lives..." expressed Carrie Underwood.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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“We’ve dealt with serious s**t before”: Russell Crowe sends encouraging message to Aussies amid coronavirus crisis

<p>Russell Crowe has sent an encouraging message to his fellow Australians amid the coronavirus pandemic.</p> <p>The 55-year-old posted a series of bushfire-themed photos to Instagram, reminding Aussies of all the obstacles they have faced in recent months.</p> <p>“Australia, just a reminder, we’ve dealt with serious s**t before, and we will deal with what confronts us now. Together (minimum 1.5 metres apart),” he captioned the post.</p> <p>The first photo was a snap of a eucalyptus tree with fire embers burning through it.</p> <p>He referenced social distancing when he spoke about staying “1.5 metres apart”, which can help reduce the spread of COVID-19.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9410KShgq0/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9410KShgq0/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Hey Australia, Just a reminder, we’ve dealt with serious shit before, and we will deal with what confronts us now. Together (minimum 1.5 metres apart).</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/russellcrowe/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Russell Crowe</a> (@russellcrowe) on Mar 18, 2020 at 1:19pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Russell also co-owns the South Sydney Rabbitohs NRL team, but the season could be shut down due to COVID-19.</p> <p>The NSWRL and QRL have already suspended their seasons, which isn’t reassuring for the NRL.</p> <p>“If we are going to continue our season, some revolutionary thought is going to be required,” Russell told the<span> </span><em>Daily Telegraph</em>.</p> <p>“Based on the information that this particular strain seems to be less potent in warmer climates, (the idea should be) to move all teams and coaching squads to northern regional centres.</p> <p>“The big cost to the game is not going to be lack of crowds in urban stadiums. The big cost, financially and culturally, is if the game is forced to halt and broadcast revenue dries up.”</p> <p>Due to the coronavirus, NRL games are currently being played without crowds as the government has banned gatherings of 500 people or more.</p>

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Prince Harry and Meghan Markle share emotional message in wake of coronavirus

<p>Prince Harry and Meghan Markle have issued an emotional statement during the coronavirus outbreak to call for “empathy” and “kindness”.</p> <p>The couple took to Instagram in light of the pandemic causing panic across the globe, saying these “uncertain times” means people need each other “more than ever”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9tY59rHH4k/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9tY59rHH4k/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Meghan (fan page) (@_duchess_of_sussex)</a> on Mar 14, 2020 at 2:34am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>We need each other for truth, for support, and to feel less alone during a time that can honestly feel quite scary,” the couple wrote.</p> <p>“There are so many around the world who need support right now, who are working tirelessly to respond to this crisis behind the scenes, on the frontline, or at home,” they continued. “Our willingness, as a people, to step up in the face of what we are all experiencing with COVID-19 is awe-inspiring.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B931VgInJPI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B931VgInJPI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Meghan (fan page) (@_duchess_of_sussex)</a> on Mar 18, 2020 at 3:55am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“This moment is as true a testament there is to the human spirit. We often speak of compassion. All of our lives are in some way affected by this, uniting each of us globally.”</p> <p>The 35-year-old and his wife, 38,<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://o60.me/IKf11h" target="_blank">who are currently bunkering down in their Vancouver home</a><span> </span>went on to say: “How we approach each other and our communities with empathy and kindness is indisputably important right now.”</p> <p>The couple told their followers to continue doing their part by sharing accurate news and information to the public about safe and healthy practices.</p> <p>“We will be sharing information and resources to help all of us navigate the uncertainty: from posting accurate information and facts from trusted experts, to learning about measures we can take to keep ourselves and our families healthy, to working with organisations that can support our mental and emotional well-being,” they went on to say.</p> <p>“In addition, we will focus on the inspiring stories of how so many of you around the world are connecting in ways big and small to lift all of us up.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9luym7nBt1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9luym7nBt1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Meghan (fan page) (@_duchess_of_sussex)</a> on Mar 11, 2020 at 3:12am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The Duke and Duchess of Sussex wrapped up their farewell tour in the UK last week, where afterwards they rushed back to Canada to be with their son Archie, who turns one in May.</p>

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Government ignores vital family violence reducing solutions

<p>Hannah Clarke and her three children were doused in petrol and burnt to death by her ex-partner in a Brisbane suburb on 19 February. She is one of nine women who’ve been violently killed so far this year, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/notes/destroy-the-joint/counting-dead-women-australia-2020-we-count-every-known-death-due-to-violence-ag/2815333238514402/">according to</a> the Counting Dead Women Australia researchers of <a href="https://www.facebook.com/DestroyTheJoint/">Destroy The Joint</a>.</p> <p>Outrage over the brutal multiple murder led to a special “<a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/outrage-as-morrison-continues-inaction-on-violence-towards-women/">nothing off the table</a>” meeting of state and territory women’s safety ministers convened on 6 March, with a subsequent scheduled COAG forum of the same ministers being held a week later, <a href="https://www.womenssafetynsw.org.au/impact/article/coag-opts-for-more-talk-but-no-new-measures-to-tackle-domestic-violence-crisis/">with neither gatherings</a> resulting in any proposals.</p> <p>This lack of new measures has led women’s safety advocates to question the government’s decision to simply increase prevention campaigns, without making much-needed changes to both the civil and criminal justice systems that could significantly reduce domestic and family violence.</p> <p>Indeed, the <a href="https://awava.org.au/">Australian Women Against Violence Alliance (AWAVA)</a> had already presented the ministers with <a href="https://awava.org.au/2020/03/05/in-focus/womens-safety-ministers-urgent-actions-for-womens-safety">five key recommendations</a>, which included fully funding specialist organisations, a national risk assessment and referral process, as well as ensuring access to assistance for all.</p> <p><strong>AVO standards</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.womenssafetynsw.org.au/">Women’s Safety NSW</a> chief executive Hayley Foster told Sydney Criminal Lawyers that of the five AWAVA recommendations there are two solutions that she draws attention to as being of particular significance.</p> <p>“Most importantly, we need apprehended violence orders to be enforced,” Ms Foster emphasised. “Right now, across the nation, when offenders are brought before their local or magistrates court for breaching those orders, they are regularly let off with non-custodial alternatives.”</p> <p>The women’s advocate stressed that the AWAVA isn’t suggesting mandatory sentencing. Rather, it would like to see specialist domestic violence (DV) prosecutors and magistrates established, as at present, the risk to a woman’s safety can be heightened depending on the <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/queensland-barrister-who-was-found-guilty-of-tax-offences-tipped-to-become-magistrate/">magistrate</a> they see.</p> <p>Foster also outlined that she’s been involved in surveying DV advocacy workers at 117 local courts across NSW and found that there are substantial variations in the way magistrates deal with such matters, which includes differences in penalties being imposed and protections afforded to victims.</p> <p><strong>Parental responsibility</strong></p> <p>The other recommendation that Foster highlights is that the presumption of equal shared parental responsibility contained in part 7 division 2 of the Family Law Act 1975 (Cth) (the Act) should be removed all together, so as to ensure the safety of children.</p> <p><a href="http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/fla1975114/s61b.html">Section 61B</a> of the Act defines parental responsibility as “duties, powers, responsibilities and authority” that a parent has in relation to a child, while <a href="http://classic.austlii.edu.au/au/legis/cth/consol_act/fla1975114/s61da.html">section 61DA</a> stipulates that there’s to be a presumption of equal shared parental responsibility when the court makes an order.</p> <p>According to Foster, when entering the family law system, most women are told that “no matter how violent and abusive their ex-partner is, he’s going to get supervised, overnight access to the children if he wants to, and she is warned against making too many allegations or fighting this”.</p> <p>This claim was backed up by Foster with figures that show that although <a href="https://aifs.gov.au/publications/evaluation-2012-family-violence-amendments">70 to 85 percent</a> of family cases deal with violence, only 3 percent of matters result in no face-to-face time given to fathers. And this set of circumstances leads some women to decide not to take action in violent situations.</p> <p>These are “two really important changes that – yes – if implemented right away would dramatically increase women and children’s safety within weeks,” Ms Foster said, adding in conclusion that she has no idea why the government won’t even consider these vital recommendations.</p> <p><em>Written by Paul Gregoire. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/government-ignores-vital-family-violence-reducing-solutions/">Sydney Criminal Lawyers. </a></em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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Morrison government bans indoor gatherings of 100 people, and tells Australians “don’t go overseas”

<p>The federal government’s new sweeping measures in the coronavirus crisis include a ban on non-essential indoor gatherings of 100 people or more, advice that no Australian should travel abroad, and strict restrictions on visitor access to aged care facilities.</p> <p>The measures, announced by Prime Minister Scott Morrison early Wednesday, take the battle to contain the spread of the virus to a new level but do not include the closure of the nation’s schools, or foreshadow a general community shutdown.</p> <p>Morrison said the second stage economic package the government is now working on would be to “cushion” the impact of the measures put in place - it would focus on strengthening the “safety net” for individuals and small businesses.</p> <p>He said there had been a big “gear change” at the weekend “when we were moving to far more widespread social distancing and bans on gatherings”.</p> <p>Morrison berated hoarders in the strongest language. “Stop doing it. It’s ridiculous. It’s un-Australian[…]also, do not abuse staff. We’re all in this together. People are doing their jobs.”</p> <p>“They are doing their best, whether they are at a testing clinic this morning, whether they are at a shopping centre.”</p> <p>The new measures, which were approved late Tuesday night by the federal-state “national cabinet”, also include the cancellation of ANZAC Day events, which was mostly an endorsement of action already taken by the RSL. There will be a national service, but without a crowd. Small streamed ceremonies involving officials at state level may be held</p> <p>“Life is changing in Australia, as it is changing all around the world,” Morrison told a Canberra news conference in which he and Chief Medical Officer Brendan Murphy stood the required social distance apart.</p> <p>“Life is going to continue to change,” he said, but he also stressed the need to keep the country operating.</p> <p>Morrison emphasised that measures had to be for the long term because the crisis was set to last at least six months.</p> <p>Murphy said “a short-term two to four week shut down of society is not recommended by any of our experts. It does not achieve anything.”</p> <p>On the sensitive issue of the schools, on which there’s been a lot of pressure for closure, Morrison highlighted his own family.</p> <p>“I am telling you that, as a father, I’m happy for my kids to go to school. There is only one reason your kids shouldn’t be going to school and that is if they are unwell.”</p> <p>The advice from health experts, and the view of the premiers and chief ministers has been that schools should be kept open. Morrison said that closure would mean a “30% impact on the availability of health workers.”</p> <p>The government has also decided that 20,000 international student nurses who are in Australia will be able to stay to help with the local crisis.</p> <p>Aged cared facilities will not ban visits but will put in place restrictions to protect residents, who form the most high risk portion of the population. Morrison, who recently lost his own father, said he knew these would be difficult for families.</p> <p>Visits will be restricted to a maximum of two people at any one time a day and no large group visits or social activities will be allowed</p> <p>There will be special arrangements for the families of end-of-life patients.</p> <p>The human biosecurity emergency provision of the Biosecurity Act was put into force early Wednesday. This gives draconian powers to the federal government, and the action matches the state governments’ emergency declarations.</p> <p>Morrison said the advice was that plane travel within the country did not present a high risk - the risk was where people had come from and were going to. People are told not to visit remote communities, to protect vulnerable indigenous citizens.</p> <p>The ban on non-essential indoor gatherings of more than 100 excludes a range of places such as shopping centres; public transport; medical and healthcare facilities; office buildings; factories; construction sites, and mining sites.</p> <p>States and territories are looking at rules for non-essential indoor gatherings of fewer than 100 people, such as cinemas, restaurants, clubs, weddings, and funerals. This will be considered when the national cabinet meets on Friday. There may be significant changes to the operation of these facilities, such as decreasing maximum capacity, or increasing space available.</p> <p>The beleaguered aviation industry is being promised relief, with a waiver of fees and charges.</p> <p>Both Morrison and Murphy strongly reinforced the need for “social distancing”</p> <p>Murphy said “it is every individual Australian’s responsibility to practice good social distancing. Keep away from each other where possible. Practice really good hand hygiene.”</p> <p>“No more handshaking. No more hugging - except in your family.”</p> <p>So far, 80,000 tests have been conducted, and the government is sourcing further testing kits.</p> <p><strong>Full press release from The Prime Minister’s office can be read below</strong></p> <p><em>The focus for the Commonwealth, State and Territory Governments is the health and wellbeing of Australians and their livelihoods, ensuring that Australia is positioned to emerge strong and resilient from this global pandemic crisis.</em></p> <p><em>Leaders met last night for the second National Cabinet meeting and agreed to further actions to protect the Australian community from the spread of coronavirus (COVID-19).</em></p> <p><strong><em>General Population - Indoor Gatherings</em></strong></p> <p><em>As part of our efforts to slow the spread of COVID-19 in Australia, the National Cabinet has accepted further restrictions on gatherings.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet has accepted the Australian Health Protection Principal Committee (AHPPC) advice that non-essential indoor gatherings of greater than 100 people (including staff) will no longer be permitted from Wednesday 18 March 2020.</em></p> <p><em>An indoor gathering refers to a gathering within a single enclosed area (i.e. an area, room or premises that is or are substantially enclosed by a roof and walls, regardless of whether the roof or walls or any part of them are permanent, temporary, open or closed).</em></p> <p><em>This does not apply to essential activities such as public transportation facilities, medical and health care facilities, pharmacies, emergency service facilities, correctional facilities, youth justice centres or other places of custody, courts or tribunals, Parliaments, food markets, supermarkets and grocery stores, shopping centres, office buildings, factories, construction sites, and mining sites, where it is necessary for their normal operation (although other social distancing and hygiene practices may be required in these settings). The states and territories will give further consideration to practical guidance and rules for non-essential indoor gatherings of fewer than 100 people (including staff) such as cinemas, theatres, restaurants/cafes, pubs, clubs, weddings and funerals. This will be considered at the next National Cabinet meeting on Friday 20 March 2020. In the meantime these venues should continue to apply social distancing and hygiene practices.</em></p> <p><em>This includes being able to maintain a distance of 1.5 metres between patrons. Hand hygiene products and suitable waste receptacles need to be available, with frequent cleaning and waste disposal.</em></p> <p><em>This may require significant changes to the operation of some venues, such as reducing the maximum capacity or increasing the space available.</em></p> <p><em>Settings like gyms, indoor fitness centres and swimming pools are not required to close at this time providing they meet these requirements for social distancing and hand hygiene. Such venues should take actions to ensure regular high standards of environmental cleaning take place.</em></p> <p><strong><em>General Population - Outdoor Gatherings</em></strong></p> <p><em>Outdoor events of fewer than 500 attendees may proceed. There are general measures that all events should follow, including:</em></p> <p><em>In a given occupied space, there must be no more than one person per four square metres of ground space.</em></p> <p><em>Availability of hand hygiene products and suitable waste receptacles, with frequent cleaning and waste disposal.</em></p> <p><em>Food markets are exempt from the 500 person limit, however must undertake additional measures, such as control of patronage level numbers or stall density reduction to decrease the risk of COVID-19 transmission.</em></p> <p><em>There may be other gatherings that are considered essential and it is at the discretion of the individual state and territory Chief Medical Officers or equivalent to assess each on their merits, and determine whether they can continue if mitigated by social distancing measures.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Domestic Transport</em></strong></p> <p><em>National Cabinet agreed that all Australians should only consider travelling when it is essential. If unwell, people must stay at home, unless seeking medical care.</em></p> <p><em>National Cabinet agreed that public transport is essential and that AHPPC advice should apply in relation to public transport (trains, trams, buses, ferries), taxi and ride share vehicles and transport of vulnerable populations, with particular attention given to cleaning and hygiene.</em></p> <p><em>National Cabinet agreed that domestic air travel is low risk. The issue of where people are travelling to and sensitive locations where travel should be restricted, will be developed with advice of states and territories.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet will further consider social distancing arrangements for domestic transport at its next meeting on Friday 20 March 2020.</em></p> <p><em>In all cases, appropriate social distancing and hygiene practices should be applied.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Anzac Day</em></strong></p> <p><em>Anzac Day is an important commemoration where we demonstrate our respect and admiration for Anzacs past and present. But the way we commemorate Anzac Day this year will need to change.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet has agreed that Anzac Day ceremonies and events should be cancelled due to the high proportion of older Australians who attend such events and the increased risk posed to such individuals. A small streamed/filmed ceremony involving officials at a state level may be acceptable. There should be no marches.</em></p> <p><em>All Australian-led international Anzac Day Services will be cancelled for 2020 given international travel restrictions and restrictions on public gatherings.</em></p> <p><em>The Australian War Memorial will aim to conduct a national televised Dawn Service with no general public attendance.</em></p> <p><em>State and Territory Governments and the RSLs will work together on local community arrangements to commemorate Anzac Day.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Recommendation on bulk purchase of supplies</em></strong></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet has strongly endorsed the AHPPC advice against the bulk purchase of foods, medicines and other goods.</em></p> <p><em>We strongly discourage the panic purchase of food and other supplies. While some advice has been provided to have a small addition of long shelf life products in the case of illness there are a range of mechanisms in place to support people in self-isolation, including food and other deliveries. AHPPC notes that the risk of individual Australians being asked to quarantine in coming weeks is low, and encourages individuals to plan with friends and family in the event of the need to isolate. We recognise the importance of supply lines to remote communities.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Aged Care and Older Australians</em></strong></p> <p><em>As the transmission of COVID-19 increases rapidly, it is our priority to protect and support elderly and vulnerable Australians. Aged care is a critical sector that faces staffing challenges as existing staff are either subject to self-isolation requirements due to COVID-19 or are unable to attend work.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet has agreed to the recommendations by the AHPPC to enhanced arrangements to protect older Australians in Residential Aged Care Facilities and in the community</em></p> <p><strong><em>Restrictions on entry into aged care facilities</em></strong></p> <p><em>The following visitors and staff (including visiting workers) should not be permitted to enter the facility:</em></p> <p><em>Those who have returned from overseas in the last 14 days; Those who have been in contact with a confirmed case of COVID-19 in the last 14 days; Those with fever or symptoms of acute respiratory infection (e.g. cough, sore throat, runny nose, shortness of breath); and Those who have not been vaccinated against influenza (after 1 May) Visitors</em></p> <p><em>Aged care facilities should implement the following measures for restricting visits and visitors to reduce the risk of transmission to residents, including:</em></p> <p><em>Limiting visits to a short duration; Limiting visits to a maximum of two immediate social supports (family members, close friends) or professional service or advocacy at one time, per day; Visits should be conducted in a resident’s room, outdoors, or in a specific area designated by the aged care facility, rather than communal areas where the risk of transmission to residents is greater; No large group visits or gatherings, including social activities or entertainment, should be permitted at this time; No school groups of any size should be allowed to visit aged care facilities. Visitors should also be encouraged to practise social distancing practices where possible, including maintaining a distance of 1.5 metres. Children aged 16 years or less must be permitted only by exception, as they are generally unable to comply with hygiene measures. Exemptions can be assessed on a case-by-case basis, for example, where the resident is in a palliative care scenario. Measures such as phone or video calls must be accessible to all residents to enable more regular communication with family members. Family and friends should be encouraged to maintain contact with residents by phone and other social communication apps, as appropriate. Managing illness in visitors and staff</em></p> <p><em>Aged care facilities should advise all regular visitors and staff to be vigilant for illness and use hygiene measures including social distancing, and to monitor for symptoms of COVID-19, specifically fever and acute respiratory illness. They should be instructed to stay away when unwell, for their own and residents’ protection.</em></p> <p><em>Given the high vulnerability of this particular group, aged care facilities should request that staff and visitors provide details on their current health status, particularly presentation of symptoms consistent with COVID-19. Screening for fever could also be considered upon entry.</em></p> <p><em>These additional measures should be implemented in order to better protect residents and prompt individuals entering the aged care facility to consider their current state of health prior to entry. Both individuals and management need to take responsibility for the health of visitors and staff at facilities to protect our most vulnerable community members.</em></p> <p><em>These are the recommendations of the AHPPC, individual facilities may choose to implement additional measures as they see fit for their circumstances.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Symptomatic staff</em></strong></p> <p><em>Staff should be made aware of early signs and symptoms of COVID-19. Any staff with fever or symptoms of acute respiratory infection (e.g. cough, sore throat, runny nose, shortness of breath) should be excluded from the workplace and tested for COVID-19. Staff must report their symptoms to the aged care facility.</em></p> <p><em>Further information is available at: https://www.health.gov.au/committees-and-groups/australian-health-protection-principal-committee-ahppc</em></p> <p><strong><em>Schools</em></strong></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet has accepted the advice of the AHPPC that schools should remain open at this time.</em></p> <p><em>Specifically the National Cabinet has agreed that “pre-emptive closures are not proportionate or effective as a public health intervention to prevent community transmission of COVID-19 at this time.”</em></p> <p><em>National Cabinet also noted AHPPC advice that “More than 70 countries around the world have implemented either nationwide or localised school closures, at different times in the evolution of the local COVID-19 epidemic, however it should be noted the majority of these have not been successful in controlling the outbreak. Some of these countries are now considering their position in relation to re-opening schools.”</em></p> <p><strong><em>Boarding schools</em></strong></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet noted that boarding schools are “at high risk of transmission” and encouraged boarding schools and parents to “consider the risks versus the benefits of a student remaining in boarding school”.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Universities and other higher education centres</em></strong></p> <p>_The National Cabinet accepted the advice that university and higher education “should continue at this time” with risk mitigation measures, including working from home arrangements where effective. As with boarding schools, group student accommodation “presents a higher risk” that warrants consideration of “closing or reducing accommodation densities” if risk mitigation is not possible. _</p> <p><strong><em>Community Sport</em></strong></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet accepted advice from the AHPPC that community sporting activities could continue with involvement from essential participants (players, coaches, match officials, staff and volunteers involved in operations, and parents and guardians of participants).</em></p> <p><em>This advice follows ongoing consultation with sporting organisations which has resulted in guidelines being prepared for community sporting organisations. The guidelines provide relevant advice on change room access, physical contact, travel, and social distancing and hygiene practices.</em></p> <p><em>Furthermore, it has been acknowledged that contact sports have a greater risk of transmission than other sports, and as such, should be considered on a case-by-case basis.</em></p> <p><em>All sporting codes should seek public health advice applicable to their codes, and take into account outdoor mass gathering issues.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Further work on Indigenous and NDIS Australia</em></strong></p> <p><em>Further work will be progressed by Friday 20 March 2020 and will include additional support for vulnerable Australians including indigenous communities and NDIS participants.</em></p> <p><em>The Department of Social Services (DSS), National Disability Insurance Agency (NDIA) and NDIS Quality and Safeguards Commission (NDIS Commission) are working together in preparation to respond to COVID-19 and its impact on the NDIS.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Additional measures</em></strong></p> <p><strong><em>Commonwealth emergency powers</em></strong></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet noted that Commonwealth, States and Territories were implementing emergency powers under respective legislation in order to be able to deal with the spread of COVID-19 as quickly and flexibly as possible.</em></p> <p><em>The Governor-General has accepted the Commonwealth Government’s recommendation that he declare a “human biosecurity emergency” under the Biosecurity Act 2015 given the risks COVID-19 poses to human health and the need to control its spread in Australia.</em></p> <p><em>That declaration would allow the Health Minister to issue targeted, legally enforceable directions and requirements to combat the virus.</em></p> <p><em>The declaration was recommended by the Chief Medical Officer in his capacity as the Director of Human Biosecurity.</em></p> <p><em>The first emergency requirement that will be made under the declaration is to formally prohibit international cruise ships from entering Australian ports for an initial 30 days, which provides additional legal support for the decision announced on Sunday 15 March 2020.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Additional Support for International Student Nurses</em></strong></p> <p><em>The Commonwealth Government will relax international student nurse visa work conditions to provide workforce continuity for aged care facilities, home care providers and other health care workers. This will allow international student nurses and other aged care workers to work more than the 40 hours a fortnight that they are currently. This measure will be examined on an ongoing basis. There are currently around 900 approved providers of residential aged care employers and around 1,000 approved providers of Home Care Packages. There are currently around 20,000 international student nurses studying in Australia.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Level 4 Travel restrictions - Do Not Travel</em></strong></p> <p><em>The National Security Committee of Cabinet has decided to raise the advice for all overseas travel to the highest level. Our advice to all Australians - regardless of your destination, age or health - is do not travel overseas at this time.</em></p> <p><em>This our highest travel advice setting – Level 4 of 4.</em></p> <p><em>The decision reflects the gravity of the international situation arising from the COVID-19 outbreak, the risks to health and the high likelihood of major travel disruptions.</em></p> <p><em>We also now advise Australians who are overseas who wish to return to Australia, to do so as soon as possible by commercial means. Commercial options may quickly become limited.</em></p> <p><em>Anyone arriving in Australia from overseas, including Australians citizens and permanent residents, will be required to self-isolate for 14 days from the date of arrival.</em></p> <p><em>We have issued this advice for several reasons:</em></p> <p><em>There may be a higher risk of contracting COVID-19 overseas. Health care systems in some countries may come under strain and may not be as well-equipped as Australia’s or have the capacity to support foreigners. Overseas travel has become complex and unpredictable. Many countries are introducing entry or movement restrictions. These are changing often and quickly, and your travel plans could be disrupted. The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade will do what it can to provide consular advice and assistance, but DFAT’s capacity to do so may be limited by local restrictions on movement, and the scale of the challenges posed by COVID-19. These challenges vary and the situation is changing rapidly.</em></p> <p><em>Australians who cannot, or do not want to, return home should follow the advice of local authorities and minimise their risk of COVID-19 exposure by self-isolating.</em></p> <p><strong><em>Aviation Industry Support</em></strong></p> <p><em>The Commonwealth Government has announced an aviation package for the refunding and ongoing waiving of a range Government charges on the industry including aviation fuel excise, Airservices charges on domestic airline operations and domestic and regional aviation security charges.</em></p> <p><em>These measures are in response to unprecedented and likely sustained period of falling international and domestic aviation demand related to the impact of COVID-19.</em></p> <p><em>The total cost of the measures are estimated to be $715 million, with an upfront estimated benefit of $159 million to our airlines for reimbursement of applicable charges paid by domestic airlines since 1 February 2020.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet expressed their thanks to Australia’s world-class health professionals for their continued efforts in restricting the spread of the virus and saving lives.</em></p> <p><em>Leaders also thanked all Australians for playing their part in following the health guidance and complying with the strong measures in place to respond to COVID-19.</em></p> <p><em>Leaders called on the community to remain calm. While there have been some temporary, localised food and grocery distribution delays, there are sufficient stocks in Australia. Violent or anti-social behaviour would not be tolerated.</em></p> <p><em>As a National Cabinet, we will continue to come together as a united team to ensure our collective response remains proactive and targeted, but we all have a responsibility to each other in protecting our community.</em></p> <p><em>All Australians must continue to be vigilant and play their part to slow the spread of COVID-19 and protect vulnerable members of our community, including the elderly.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet urged Australians to continue to adhere to the health guidance on hygiene and personal social distancing, including avoiding any non-essential travel. Leaders also acknowledged the many businesses that have stepped up and allowed staff to work from home where practical. These early actions are critical in delaying the peak of the outbreak and ensuring our health system response remains strong.</em></p> <p><em>The Commonwealth Chief Medical Officer, Professor Brendan Murphy, provided the National Cabinet with an overview of the current situation in Australia and overseas. The National Cabinet noted the continued development of international responses. Australia, like many other nations, is seeing an increase in community transmission. We are one of the best prepared nations and we remain united, focussed and ready to respond to any sustained escalation.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet also considered the Chief Medical Officer’s advice on rates of community testing. More than 80,000 tests have already been undertaken in Australia. Further testing stocks have been secured and the Doherty Institute in Melbourne has developed an alternative testing process. This ensures Australia has a diverse range of tests and can protect supply of testing in the event there is a shortage in materials or components of some testing kits.</em></p> <p><em>All Australians should continue to closely follow the expert medical advice – and ensure testing is only sought for COVID-19 where it meets the relevant clinical criteria. As we enter the colder months there may be a number of other viruses that enter our community, so there is a need to prioritise testing of people.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet noted that in order to protect older Australians and vulnerable communities in the weeks and months ahead, Australia may see even more restrictions put on social movements. We need all Australians to please look out for each other and to follow the medical advice.</em></p> <p><em>The National Cabinet will be meeting again on Friday 20 March 2020 to discuss implementation arrangements for indoor gatherings and domestic transport.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Michelle Grattan. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/morrison-government-bans-indoor-gatherings-of-100-people-and-tells-australians-dont-go-overseas-134018">The Conversation.</a></em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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From the doctor's mouth: How to stay healthy during coronavirus

<p>Most people are feeling the current worldwide viral pandemic which is unlike anything anyone has ever lived through. Right now, people are preparing for a major community outbreak of the virus.</p> <p>The next few weeks to months will be intense, with people working long hours, and children having to go to and from school. But there are things you can do to ensure your mental and physical health, as well as those around you, are in optimal condition. </p> <p>Speaking to the Sydney Morning Herald, Dr Kate Gregorevic provided her top tips to say healthy during this difficult period.</p> <p><strong>1. Prioritising sleep: "</strong>People who have only slept four hours, compared to those who have slept eight hours, have a reduced response to vaccination," says Dr Kate. "While this may or may not translate to a better immune response to coronavirus, sleep is also valuable in its own right, and optimises memory and cognitive function. Adequate sleep is also important for managing anxiety, so it really is worth prioritising."</p> <p><strong>2. Regularly exercising:</strong> "This is one of my go-tos for stress management. Regular exercise does appear to decrease the number of days someone reports illness symptoms, although these studies are observational, so they show correlation not causation. Right now, most gyms are still operating, but if this changes I will continue to go for walks and do my home exercise program, as long as I am well."</p> <p><strong>3. Eating well: "</strong>While I have stocked up on a few essentials, I am also conscious that I can't store enough food for months. I can't help but notice at the supermarket, there are still plenty of fresh fruit and vegetables available. Even in Italy and Wuhan, the grocery stores remained open during the most stringent social restrictions, and I am going to continue to enjoy making myself healthy meals with fresh ingredients."</p> <p><strong>4. Cocooning people at risk:<span> </span></strong>"For most people who are young and healthy, particularly children, COVID-19 seems to present itself as a mild illness. But for people who are older it is far more dangerous. While it is heartbreaking to think that my children might not see their grandparents for a few weeks or months, the reality is that my father-in-law is in his eighties and we need to protect him. My youngest child is two and incapable of social distancing. My husband will still visit his parents to drop groceries off while maintaining a distance of about 1.5 metres."</p> <p><strong>5. Checking in on my neighbours:<span> </span></strong>"One of my neighbours is currently having chemotherapy. Since this knocks out the immune system, she is at risk of developing more serious symptoms from coronavirus, and so she and her family will be in self-quarantine. When I go to the shops, I'll check in whether she needs anything and leave it on her porch to avoid her or her family facing crowds."</p> <p><strong>6. Openly communicating with my children:</strong> "A few nights ago, my eight-year-old started crying. She knows that she can't see some people she loves for a while, and the school warned her that they might close soon. The kids are fully aware of what is going on, and that their parents are worried. The scientists who host children's YouTube show <em><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQJDFI9j8UeNoqra37p5OkA" target="_blank">Operation Ouch</a> </em>made <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m2rQV34fr-M" target="_blank">a video </a>to give kids accurate and age appropriate information to help with this."</p> <p><strong>7. Putting the phone away:</strong> "While it is tempting to constantly read updates on news websites and Twitter, I also know that I need to mentally take a break. Since I find myself consumed by all the articles on coronavirus if my phone is nearby, in the evenings I am putting my phone away and taking some time to relax by reading a good book or watching something light on a streaming service."</p> <p><strong>8. Washing my hands:</strong> "This one I cannot emphasise enough. We all touch our faces all the time. It is something we do so absent-mindedly that we are almost powerless to stop it. Washing our hands with soap and water can remove microbes from our skin and disrupts the outer membrane of most viruses and bacteria. Alcohol-based hand sanitisers are a good substitute if you can't wash your hands."</p>

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"Herd immunity" response plan sparks incredulous response

<p><span>The United Kingdom’s approach to COVID-19 has sparked widespread backlash as scientists urged the government to introduce tougher measures to deal with the pandemic.</span></p> <p><span>More than 220 scientists have signed an open letter condemning the government’s chief scientific adviser Sir Patrick Vallance, who said on Friday the spread of the infection could be managed to make the population immune.</span></p> <p><span>According to Sir Patrick, about 60 per cent of the population would need to get ill to reach “herd immunity”. The idea means at-risk individuals would be protected from infection because the people around them would be resistant to the disease.</span></p> <p><span>“Our aim is to try and reduce the peak, broaden the peak, not suppress it completely,” he said.</span></p> <p><span>However, the scientists argued in the letter such option is not “viable” and will risk “many more lives than necessary”.</span></p> <p><span>Dr William Hanage, professor of the evolution and epidemiology of infectious disease at Harvard T. H. Chan School of Public Health, said he thought the policy would overwhelm the healthcare system and put high-risk population in danger.</span></p> <p><span>Herd immunity only works to protect vulnerable individuals if most people in the population are vaccinated, according to <a href="https://vk.ovg.ox.ac.uk/vk/herd-immunity">Oxford Vaccine Group</a>.</span></p> <p><span>“We talk about vaccines generating herd immunity, so why is this different? Because this is not a vaccine,” Dr Hanage wrote on <em><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/mar/15/epidemiologist-britain-herd-immunity-coronavirus-covid-19">The Guardian</a></em>. </span></p> <p><span>“This is an actual pandemic that will make a very large number of people sick, and some of them will die.</span></p> <p><span>“This virus is capable of shutting down countries. You should not want to be the next after Wuhan, Iran, Italy or Spain. In those places, the healthcare systems have broken down.”</span></p> <p><span>University of Auckland associate professor Helen Petousis-Harris said a herd immunity strategy means “throwing people under the train”.</span></p> <p><span>“When you have that proportion of the community affected, you can probably calculate how many people will be dead,” she told <em><a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120326939/nz-scientists-horrified-at-herd-immunity-strategy">Stuff.co.nz</a></em>. “When you have that overwhelming explosion of cases, your health system is overwhelmed and your mortality rate goes up.”</span></p> <p><span>Following the criticism, the country’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson on Monday advised people to avoid non-essential travel and contact with others. He also asked households where someone was displaying symptoms to self-isolate for 14 days.</span></p> <p><span>At the time of writing, the UK has not introduced mandatory self-isolation measures for international arrivals.</span></p>

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How do I tell my family I’ve been charged with a crime?

<p>Being charged with a criminal offence can be a stressful experience, and telling your family members and close friends about the accusations can be a daunting task.</p> <p>But it’s important to know that those who are closest to you can be a pillar of support through difficult times – providing much needed emotional assistance when you need it the most.</p> <p>Here are some tips about how to approach a difficult task.</p> <p><strong>Obtain legal advice</strong></p> <p>It is always in your best interest to get <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/services/free-first-appointment/">legal advice</a> before talking to anyone about what you have been charged with.</p> <p>This not only protects your legal interests, but it also means you will be better informed of the next steps in the criminal justice process.</p> <p>Your initial meeting with a lawyer will inform you about the way forward, including your options, the best way forward, what you may be facing and the court process.</p> <p>This can help you when you speak to loved ones about your situation.</p> <p><strong>Be ready for questions from your loved ones</strong></p> <p>Whilst it may seem overly formal, it is often a good idea to anticipate some of the questions your loved ones may ask and prepare some responses in your head.</p> <p>Some common questions family members may ask are:</p> <ul> <li>What are they saying you did?</li> <li>Did you do it?</li> <li>What actually happened?</li> <li>What are you going to do?</li> <li>How long is this process going to take?</li> <li>What does your lawyer think?</li> </ul> <p>There are situations where it may be against your interests to divulge too much to those close to you, especially, for example, where they may be a witness to the events in question.</p> <p>That said, your family may well be able to provide you with emotional stability and a much needed avenue to help you make decisions, which can assist you through the process.</p> <p>Know the situation can be confronting for loved ones</p> <p>It’s important to be aware that receiving information that you have been accused of a serious offence – especially one that is seen as particularly repulsive or heinous such as a sexual offence – can stir emotions in your loved ones as well.</p> <p>They may find it difficult to reconcile the allegations with the person they know, while at the same time asking themselves why you would be facing charges if you are innocent.</p> <p>Try to step into their shoes and empathise with their feelings, rather than act confrontationally or aggressively when they ask you legitimate questions, such as those listed about.</p> <p><strong>Accept help</strong></p> <p>For some loved ones, the automatic reaction may be asking how they can help you get through this.</p> <p>You should make it clear that they should not attempt to investigate your case themselves and should never attempt to contact complainants or witnesses, as doing this could land them in trouble.</p> <p>But you may wish to encourage them to attend court with you, or to get in contact with your lawyer if they have information which may be of assistance to your case.</p> <p>Be willing to accept help if you think it could assist.</p> <p>Take care of yourself, your lawyer will take care of the legal side</p> <p>It is extremely important that, throughout the process, you remain focused on taking care of yourself by continuing to attend work and your regular social activities, as well as being physically active.</p> <p>Take care of yourself and let your lawyer take care of the legal side of things.</p> <p>If you feel it’s all getting too much for you, don’t be afraid to reach out for professional help. After all, that what it’s there for.</p> <p>Some Australia-wide support services that you can reach out to for help include:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.beyondblue.org.au/get-support/get-immediate-support">BeyondBlue</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.lifeline.org.au/">LifeLine</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.sane.org/index.php">SANE Australia</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.mensline.org.au/Home.html">MensLine</a> (Men)</li> <li><a href="http://www.headspace.org.au/">Headspace</a> (Youth)</li> <li><a href="http://www.kidshelp.com.au/">Kids Help Line</a> (Youth)</li> </ul> <p>So, the bottom line is not to try to do it all alone – those who are close to you will often want to stand by you and help in any way they can, and professional help is out there if you need it.</p> <p><em>Written by Ugur Nedim and Jarryd Bartle. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/how-do-i-tell-my-family-ive-been-charged-with-a-crime/">Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</a> </em></p>

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White Island volcano tour guide's miraculous recovery after surviving eruption

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>19-year-old Jake Milbank, a White Island tour guide, has been seen for the first time since the volcano erupted on December 9.</p> <p>He was leading a group of tourists around the volcano when it erupted, with the blast claiming the lives of 21 people.</p> <p>Milbank suffered burns to 80 percent of his body, but is now enjoying spending time with his family and his beloved family pet.</p> <p>He was allowed to leave the hospital for the first time on March 1 and it was the first time he had been outside in three months.</p> <p>“After more than three long months in hospital things are finally starting to look up as my medical team have cleared me for day leave,” he wrote in an Instagram update.</p> <p>“The first thing on my list was to go and see this little cutie who hasn't seen me in a whopping 1.8 dog years.</p> <p>“Such an awesome feeling to be back out in the real world breathing in some fresh air.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9lZPh6hJID/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B9lZPh6hJID/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">After more than three long months in hospital things are finally starting to look up as my medical team have cleared me for day leave! The first thing on my list was to go and see this little cutie who hasn’t seen me in a whopping 1.8 dog years 😅 Such an awesome feeling to be back out in the real world breathing in some fresh air. I’d like to say a huge thank you to everyone who has helped me get to this point, I couldn’t have done it without you all ❤️</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/jake_milbank/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Jake Milbank</a> (@jake_milbank) on Mar 11, 2020 at 12:03am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Milbank also updated his<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://givealittle.co.nz/cause/help-support-jakes-recovery" target="_blank"><em>Give a Little</em></a><span> </span>page, explaining that he had been able to spend the day celebrating his aunt’s birthday.</p> <p>“I am now fully grafted which means my physio regime has been getting more and more intense as my skin grafts heal,” the Give A Little update said. </p> <p>“From walking on the treadmill to pumping iron we are seeing improvements every day.</p> <p>“I am finally beginning to gain weight and have put on three kilograms in the last three weeks.”</p> <p>Friends and family of Milbank have been making the eight-hour round trip to the hospital to visit, including colleagues from White Island tours.</p> <p>“Words can't even express how amazing my family have been, they have been so supportive, keeping me company and bringing me home cooked meals, I can't thank them enough,” he said.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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What you didn’t know: Why can some organs regenerate while others can’t?

<p><strong>What are cells?</strong></p> <p>As you may know, the body is made of cells. We sometimes call these cells “the building blocks of life”. Nature builds all the parts of our bodies with cells.</p> <p>In other words, you might have played with Lego before. Cells are like pieces of Lego! Just like Lego blocks do, cells come in lots of shapes and colours. Cells can also do lots of different things.</p> <p>Your skin is made of different cells. Some of them make your hair, and some make your scars when you get a cut, for example.</p> <p>Even your blood is made of many different cells. The red blood cells give your blood its red colour.</p> <p>So going back to your question, some cells in our body are very special because they can multiply. Not only that, these special cells can turn into other cells as well. The name of these special cells is “stem cells”, and they are the key to our organs regenerating.</p> <p>Imagine if your Lego blocks could do that!</p> <p><strong>Which organs can regenerate themselves?</strong></p> <p>Maggie, you’re very clever at nine to know what “regeneration” means, but in case some other young readers don’t, regeneration is when our organs fix themselves after they’ve been damaged. Our organs might have been damaged if we get injured or we’re very sick.</p> <p>Organs like our skin (yes, the skin is the biggest organ of the body!) need to regenerate often. The skin’s stem cells produce new cells when the old ones are lost, like when we get a paper cut.</p> <p>Our livers are very good at regenerating themselves because they too can make new cells. The cells of the liver are called “hepatocytes”. Hepatocytes start to multiply when the liver is damaged. So hepatocytes work like stem cells.</p> <p>Intestines are another good example of an organ which regenerates itself. Our intestines regenerate all the time, even when we’re healthy. They lose cells when we digest food, but the stem cells in the intestines multiply to keep this important organ working well.</p> <p><strong>Which organs aren’t very good at regenerating?</strong></p> <p>The brain actually can’t regenerate itself well because when the brain is damaged its cells find it harder to make new ones. This is because the brain has very few of the special cells, or stem cells.</p> <p>In recent years, we’ve found some areas of the brain can regenerate. But we still need to do more research to better understand how this works.</p> <p>We do know the brain is better at regenerating itself when we are young than when we are old.</p> <p><em>Written by Jose Polo. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-can-some-organs-regenerate-while-others-cant-128217"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

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COVID-19 has now reached New Zealand – how prepared is it to deal with a pandemic?

<p>New Zealand joined 48 other countries affected by the novel coronavirus last week when health authorities <a href="https://www.health.govt.nz/news-media/media-releases/single-case-covid-19-confirmed-new-zealand">confirmed the first COVID-19 case</a>. The news prompted panic buying of supplies in some places, but it had <a href="https://blogs.otago.ac.nz/pubhealthexpert/2020/01/26/what-does-the-novel-coronavirus-epidemic-mean-for-new-zealand/">long been expected</a>.</p> <p>The management of the case seemed exemplary. Shortly after arriving in New Zealand from Iran, the person became unwell, rang the national health information service (Healthline) and was directed to a hospital where they were placed in isolation. Family members and fellow passengers on the flight were tracked and placed into home quarantine.</p> <p>As yet, there is no evidence of transmission to others and New Zealand remains at the “<a href="https://www.health.govt.nz/your-health/healthy-living/emergency-management/pandemic-planning-and-response/influenza-pandemic-plan">keep it out</a>” stage of its pandemic plan.</p> <p><strong>Preventing a pandemic</strong></p> <p>Like many countries, New Zealand has two broad phases in responding to an emerging pandemic: the containment phase followed by the management phase.</p> <p>The containment phase aims to prevent, or more likely delay, the arrival of a pandemic. New Zealand is managing this by <a href="https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-health-advice-general-public/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-countries-and-areas-concern">excluding some travellers entirely</a>(currently from China and Iran, except New Zealand residents and their families). It also requires those arriving from a growing list of countries to <a href="https://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/diseases-and-conditions/covid-19-novel-coronavirus/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-health-advice-general-public/covid-19-novel-coronavirus-countries-and-areas-concern">“self-isolate” for 14 days</a> to reduce the risk of infecting others if they develop disease. Such quarantine is unsupervised, but travellers are encouraged to register with <a href="https://www.health.govt.nz/your-health/services-and-support/health-care-services/healthline">Healthline</a>.</p> <p>Border controls make intuitive sense for limiting the movement of infectious diseases between countries. There is evidence they <a href="https://www.who.int/bulletin/volumes/92/12/14-135590/en/">delay the entry of pandemic diseases</a>, and they have sometimes prevented the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2570822/">spread of pandemics to islands</a>. Travel restrictions are <a href="https://www.who.int/ith/2019-nCoV_advice_for_international_traffic-rev/en/">not generally supported</a> by the World Health Organization, but it offers no advice specific to islands or for extremely severe pandemics.</p> <p>If a case of COVID-19 is detected during this containment phase, efforts are made to “stamp it out” by isolating the person and placing their contacts under quarantine. Such measures were effective in ending the SARS epidemic, but are probably unlikely to do more than delay the more infectious COVID-19.</p> <p>A COVID-19 pandemic could potentially become one of the greatest public health disaster threats in New Zealand since the <a href="https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/alumni/our-alumni/alumni-authors/books/black-flu-1918-the-story-of-new-zealands-worst-public-health-disaster.html">1918 influenza pandemic</a> when 9,000 New Zealanders died.</p> <p><strong>Managing a pandemic</strong></p> <p>The detection of cases that have no known connection to travel typically marks the beginning of community transmission and a shift in focus from eliminating an infection to managing it.</p> <p>With COVID-19, this stage may arrive quite suddenly. Because most cases are mild, the virus may be transmitted through several generations before being detected, perhaps only when someone develops more severe symptoms and is admitted to hospital. This pattern is called silent transmission. It has been reported in a number of locations for COVID-19, <a href="http://www.cidrap.umn.edu/news-perspective/2020/03/four-states-report-more-covid-19-cases-silent-washington-spread-suspected">including in the US</a>.</p> <p>In the management phase, interventions focus on dampening down transmission by <a href="https://www.nzma.org.nz/journal-articles/hand-hygiene-practices-at-a-hospital-entrance-after-the-2009-influenza-pandemic-observational-study-over-1-year">encouraging hand washing</a> and cough etiquette, which can be <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19761739">poor even during pandemics</a>. <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5907354/">Social distancing</a> (working from home, closing schools etc) is also effective at slowing transmission, at least for influenza pandemics.</p> <p>During this phase, the focus is also on ensuring health-care services are organised to manage increased demand, particularly for scarce resources such as intensive care, and health-care workers are protected from infection.</p> <p>Health services are critical for reducing the risk of death during a pandemic. Unfortunately, COVID-19 has a relatively high case fatality risk. Nearly <a href="https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200301-sitrep-41-covid-19.pdf?sfvrsn=6768306d_2">1% of the infected people</a> on board the Diamond Princess cruise ship have died.</p> <p><strong>What New Zealand needs to do</strong></p> <p>New Zealand has many natural and institutional advantages in managing the health and economic threats of a pandemic. Like Australia, New Zealand’s island status and ability to control its borders may buy time to continue pandemic planning. Given the seasonality of other known coronaviruses, the <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29427907">summer timing may provide further protection</a>.</p> <p>But the pandemic has hit New Zealand at a challenging time for public health. Capacity has been <a href="https://blogs.otago.ac.nz/pubhealthexpert/2017/12/20/the-havelock-north-drinking-water-inquiry-a-wake-up-call-to-rebuild-public-health-in-new-zealand/">reduced by erosion and fragmentation of responsibilities across several agencies</a> over the past decade or more. New Zealand is emerging from a severe national measles epidemic that had its roots in <a href="https://blogs.otago.ac.nz/pubhealthexpert/2020/02/05/a-preventable-measles-epidemic-lessons-for-reforming-public-health-in-nz/">neglected public health infrastructure</a> that failed to raise immunisation coverage sufficiently to prevent it.</p> <p>New Zealand has a <a href="https://blogs.otago.ac.nz/pubhealthexpert/2019/11/11/new-zealands-poor-pandemic-preparedness-according-to-the-global-health-security-index/">relatively low score</a>, coming in far behind Australia, on the <a href="https://blogs.otago.ac.nz/pubhealthexpert/2019/11/11/new-zealands-poor-pandemic-preparedness-according-to-the-global-health-security-index/">Global Health Security Index</a>, which assesses pandemic capacity. We hope that an upcoming review of the health and disability sector will propose a major upgrade of public health in New Zealand.</p> <p>New Zealand’s response to COVID-19 is driven by the 2017 edition of the <a href="https://www.health.govt.nz/your-health/healthy-living/emergency-management/pandemic-planning-and-response/influenza-pandemic-plan">influenza pandemic plan</a>. But we should also learn from the experience of other countries.</p> <p>COVID-19 disease risk is highest for older people and those living with chronic health conditions such as diabetes, chronic respiratory disease and heart disorders. Unfortunately, a pandemic is likely to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3310086/">magnify social and ethnic inequalities</a> through multiple pathways linked to poverty, poorer access to health care and a higher prevalence of chronic health problems.</p> <p>We should learn from China’s apparent <a href="https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/who-china-joint-mission-on-covid-19-final-report.pdf">success in containing the pandemic</a>, while at the same time <a href="https://blogs.otago.ac.nz/pubhealthexpert/2020/02/14/getting-through-together-ethical-values-for-a-pandemic/">balancing all interventions</a> with a strong focus on human rights.</p> <p><strong>Here are other measures New Zealand could consider to prepare for this pandemic:</strong></p> <ul> <li>Start talking about a pandemic, rather than using euphemisms, to make it more real.</li> <li>Form a parliamentary group to ensure multi-party engagement with the response. During an election year, it would be distracting for the response to become politicised.</li> <li>Follow <a href="https://www.health.gov.au/resources/publications/australian-health-sector-emergency-response-plan-for-novel-coronavirus-covid-19">Australia’s lead</a> and other developed countries and rapidly develop a specific COVID-19 emergency plan.</li> <li>Consider measures to protect the most vulnerable populations. One option is “protective sequestration” to <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17326953">prevent spread to certain islands or regions</a> as was achieved in the 1918 flu pandemic. This approach is being rolled out at a country level by Pacific nations, notably Samoa which now has some of the tightest border controls in the world.</li> <li>Also consider a “safe haven” policy to protect vulnerable groups such as older people with chronic conditions by temporarily moving them to carefully managed locations (such as high quality aged care facilities or even protected islands) for the duration of the pandemic.</li> </ul> <p><em>Written by Michael Baker and Nick Wilson. Republished with permission of </em><a href="https://theconversation.com/covid-19-has-now-reached-new-zealand-how-prepared-is-it-to-deal-with-a-pandemic-132857"><em>The Conversation.</em></a></p>

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“Wholly untrue”: UNICEF slams weird and dangerous coronavirus advice

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>As coronavirus panic levels continue to heighten, fake tips on how to avoid catching the disease are circulating wildly on social media.</p> <p>Social media platforms are full of advice on how to avoid catching coronavirus, but many of them are untrue.</p> <p>Humanitarian organisation UNICEF was forced to issue a statement after the organisation was linked to advice urging people to stop eating ice cream.</p> <p>“A recent erroneous online message circulating in several languages around the world and purporting to be a UNICEF communication appears to indicate, among other things, that avoiding ice cream and other cold foods can help prevent the onset of the disease. This is, of course, wholly untrue,” the organisation slammed in a<span> </span><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.unicef.org/press-releases/statement-charlotte-petri-gornitzka-unicef-deputy-executive-director-partnerships" target="_blank">statement</a>.</p> <p>“To the creators of such falsehoods, we offer a simple message: STOP. Sharing inaccurate information and attempting to imbue it with authority by misappropriating the names of those in a position of trust is dangerous and wrong.</p> <p>“To members of the public, we ask that you seek accurate information about how to keep yourself and your family safe from verified sources, such as UNICEF or WHO, government health officials and trusted healthcare professionals; and that you refrain from sharing information from untrustworthy or unverified sources.”</p> <p>The organisation also urged people to avoid sharing information from untrustworthy sources.</p> <p>“It can be difficult in today’s information-rich society to know exactly where to go for knowledge about how to keep yourself and your loved ones safe,” UNICEF partnerships deputy executive director Charlotte Petri Gornitzka said.</p> <p>“But it is critical that we remain as diligent about the accuracy of the information we share as we are about every other precaution we take to keep ourselves and our loved ones safe.”</p> <p>Other odd tips that have gone viral include advising people to keep their mouth and throat moist so that “even if the virus gets into your mouth, drinking water and other liquids will wash them down your oesophagus and into the stomach” as well as keeping your indoor temperature above 20c so that coronavirus doesn’t spread any further.</p> </div> </div> </div>

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