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ALDI announces huge Black Friday sale

<p>ALDI has announced a major sales event to kick-start Black Friday celebrations.</p> <p>The supermarket giant has announced a huge range of bargain buys as part of its Black Wednesday sale on November 25.</p> <p>The ALDI event begins two days before official Black Friday sales on November 27.</p> <p>Shoppers can expect some incredible savings on tech and home appliance items, including a gaming chair for $149 and a Bauhn 65” UHD Smart TV for $599.</p> <p>“With Christmas just around the corner, ALDI is releasing some early and extra-special Black Friday deals as part of our Special Buys,” said <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.aldi.com.au/" target="_blank">ALDI</a> shopping expert Nicole Higgins.</p> <p>“Some of our incredible Special Buys include a Bauhn 65” UHD Smart TV for only $599 and Philips soundbar with Bluetooth at $99.99, sure to satisfy any movie buff.</p> <p>“There are also returning favourites such as our Waeco Portable Fridge Freezer, priced at an unbelievable $599.</p> <p>“So whether you’re planning a camping trip or just to camp out in your lounge room catching up on the latest movie releases, you’re sure to find a bargain at ALDI with our early Black Friday sales, on Wednesday 25 November.”</p> <p><span><strong>ALDI Black Friday sale:</strong></span></p> <ul> <li>Some of the standout buys include:</li> <li>Gaming Chair - $149</li> <li>Bauhn 65” UHD Smart TV, $599</li> <li>Philips soundbar with Bluetooth, $99.99</li> <li>WAECO Portable Fridge Freezer, $599</li> <li>Vivitar Activity Tracker, $12.99</li> <li>De’Longhi Espresso Machine, $99.99</li> <li>Nokia C3 Unlocked Smartphone 16GG, $129</li> </ul>

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Mum shares “life-saving” iPhone feature

<p>A woman has taken to Facebook to share a simple iPhone feature that could save lives.</p> <p>The mother based on the Sunshine Coast in Queensland said she was shopping at a local Kmart when a woman became unresponsive and was in dire need of medical attention.</p> <p>“I was looking through her purse and then when I found her phone, it’s locked and needs the pin number she was unresponsive so we could not access the contacts,” she wrote on Facebook.</p> <p>While searching through the woman’s phone in the hope to find out more information, she remembered a feature she could access without needing the pin code or face time to unlock.</p> <p>“Lucky she was ok but if I could of called her nearest and dearest we could of been told of any possible illnesses and maybe they have an epipen or something,” the woman added.</p> <p>She was referencing Apple’s emergency contact feature which is on every iPhone, even if the handset is locked.</p> <p>“In your settings add a medical ID, it will have all medical knowledge and emergency contact numbers that an ambulance or member of the public can use without unlocking your phone,” the woman explained.</p> <p>The emergency contact features is available for all iPhone users to nominate an emergency contact phone number as well as list any allergies or medical requirements that can be identified without having to unlock the device or risk any other private information being shared.</p> <p>To make an emergency call the Apple website instructs users to go to the lock screen and then tap the red “emergency” button.</p> <p>The person can then call the emergency number the iPhone user has nominated.</p> <p>Medical information such as allergies and conditions can be listed in this screen as well,</p> <p>“If someone needs help and is unresponsive, you can check their iPhone for Medical ID. </p> <p>“Medical ID provides information about a person that may be important in an emergency, like allergies, medical conditions and who to contact,” the Apple website states.</p>

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Woolies customer finds "disgusting" item on shelves

<p>A man from Sydney has posted on Facebook about a "disgusting" find on a shelf in Woolworths.</p> <p>He shared a photo of a Continental cup of soup on Tuesday on Facebook.</p> <p>“Fresh food?” he wrote.</p> <p>“How about months out of date? How can you try to charge me for this? Disgusting.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height:281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838128/body-woolworths.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/9d01db29df89453ea1d627495a989d81" /></p> <div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text "> <p>Woolworths said it was "concerned" by the soup.</p> <p>“Our store teams continually check our shelves to rotate the stock and make sure only the best products are on display,” it wrote. </p> <p>“Unfortunately, it seems like these were missed in our regular checks. Thanks for bringing this to our attention and we'd like to look into this further.”</p> <p>Foods past the use-by date can not legally be sold.</p> <p>CSIRO applied food microbiology team leader Sandra Olivier said that it's "pretty black and white" when it comes to eating food past the use-by date.</p> <p>“Don’t use a product past its use-by date,” she said.</p> <p><em>Photo credits: </em><em><a rel="noopener" href="https://au.news.yahoo.com/woolworths-customer-spots-disgusting-find-on-shelves-233812208.html" target="_blank" class="editor-rtflink">Yahoo! News</a></em></p> </div> </div> </div>

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How a smartwatch saved this grandad's life

<p><span>A grandfather-of-nine is counting his blessings after his life was miraculously saved by a simple smart watch.</span><br /><br /><span>Jason Potts says he was spring-cleaning his gutters when he fell backward, over his neighbour’s fence and onto a solid concrete path.</span><br /><br /><span>“I climbed the ladder, pulled the trigger and it immediately pushed me away from the house. So I reached out and grabbed onto the timber and it broke in my hand, it just crumbled,” he explained to 7NEWS.</span><br /><br /><span>After the 54-year-old fell to the ground, a familiar voice sounded - “Hello, is anyone there? Can you hear me?”</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838091/smart-watch-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/71bb38a7408646bea370e0b7f8eedebd" /><br /><br /><span>“Your Apple Watch has detected a hard fall and called 000. Do you require an ambulance?” the person said.</span><br /><br /><span>The watch had alerted emergency services, as well as his wife as she was listed as an emergency contact.</span><br /><br /><span>“I’m 107kg so I had 107kg of weight land on my head and my shoulder,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“I received four messages saying that Jay had had a hard fall and it (included) his last location,” his wife said.</span><br /><br /><span>The call proved to be life-saving as Potts suffered a dislocated collarbone, fractures to his spine and ribs, and a serious head injury.</span><br /><br /><span>Thankfully, the happy-go-lucky grandad says his near-death experience has not fazed him in the slightest - admitting he will be back up the ladder to finish the job as soon as he can.</span></p>

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Warning issued over dangerous video on TikTok

<p>Parents have been issued a warning about a sick video circulating on multiple social media platforms, including TikTok, that is luring children through puppy videos.</p> <p>While it seems innocuous at first, towards the end the video shows graphic footage of a man taking his own life.</p> <p>Dozens of Australian schools have emailed parents warning them of the video, which was live-streamed on Facebook and is now making the rounds on TikTok and Instagram.</p> <p>The video was reportedly made by a man from Mississippi last week, and was first discovered on TikTok on Sunday.</p> <p>Speaking to Buzzfeed News, a spokesperson for the app said they were investigating the matter.</p> <p>“We are banning accounts that repeatedly try to upload clips,” spokeswoman Hilary McQuaide told the publication.</p> <p>“Our systems have been automatically detecting and flagging these clips for violating our policies against content that displays, praises, glorifies, or promotes suicide.”</p> <p>CEO of Safe on Social Kirra Pendergast told ABC News that these types of videos on the internet was not uncommon.</p> <p>“It’s like what we called Elsagate — which was when Elsa from Frozen got some full-on treatment with people posting two minutes into a video some obscene things happening to Elsa,” Ms Pendergast said.</p> <p>“It’s a kind of trolling. They’re luring kids in with videos of kittens and puppies, then it goes to this very, very graphic video.”</p> <p><strong>Advice for parents and grandparents*:</strong></p> <p>1. Secure household devices by setting passcodes and restrictions on all devices</p> <p>2. Supervise children online and monitor the material they are accessing</p> <p>3. Sit down and have an open conversation with your child about the material they may see online</p> <p><em>*Courtesy of Act for Kids</em></p>

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Four easy ways to tell if you’ve been blocked on Facebook

<p>Facebook can sometimes feel like the world’s best reunion party. You run into people you haven’t seen in a long time, share favourite throwback photos, and heart one another’s most uplifting memes.</p> <p>Other times it can feel like a battlefield. Conflicts of interest can send tensions high, with arguments about to erupt at every turn.</p> <p>You’ve probably blocked (or at least “snoozed for 30 days”) someone you disagree with, so it’s equally likely that at least one “friend” has you blocked.</p> <p>Here’s how to tell if someone has blocked you on Facebook.</p> <p><strong>Method 1: Scroll through your friend list</strong></p> <p>You can tell if someone blocked you on Facebook by scrolling your friend list. Social media professional Chad R. MacDonald manages Facebook pages with tens of thousands of followers and is highly experienced with handling Facebook privacy. MacDonald tells us that deactivated accounts’ profiles and profile photos “will still be visible on your friends list, although you can’t click on them anymore. Someone who has blocked you won’t show up at all.”</p> <p><strong>Method 2: Search for their Facebook profile</strong></p> <p>If you’ve recently gotten into a Facebook kerfuffle with your great-aunt Nora, you might want to check if things are still okay between the two of you. Do a general search for her name in the Facebook search results bar at the top of the page. If Auntie Nora shows up as a friend, you’re still on good terms, and there’s no need to worry.</p> <p>However, if the widget on her search result reads “Add friend,” this means that she has unfriended or blocked you. A simple unfriend is less worrisome than a block, and you can take it as a sign that there’s room for the two of you to rebuild your relationship. If you’re still able to see her public posts, you have not been blocked.</p> <p><strong>If they don’t show up in search results…</strong></p> <p>If the person doesn’t show up in search results at all, the user has either deleted their profile or has blocked you. And let’s be frank, if the two of you were arguing it’s more likely to be the latter. To double-check, ask a mutual friend to search the person’s name in their Facebook search bar. If the person shows up in their results but not yours, you have some relationship mending to do.</p> <p>“If the search yields a result with an active page, it’s clear that you’ve gotten the chop,” says Krystin Dunbar, Senior Campaign Strategist at digital agency Union. But Dunbar cautions this could also mean the person has just changed their privacy settings. “Privacy settings can be changed so that accounts don’t show up in a [Facebook] member search – so this isn’t a foolproof method.”</p> <p><strong>Method 3: Check your Facebook memories</strong></p> <p>The “Memories” feature, which shows you old posts, “including everyone who has commented on or liked them,” says MacDonald, is another place to check.</p> <p>“People who have blocked you can still show up on your posts in Memories,” he explains. “Their profiles will show their names in black font that you can’t click on, as opposed to the normal blue font for profiles that you can click through.”</p> <p>A very long scroll through your news feed may serve the same purpose. Or a much faster way would be to simply <a href="http://www.deleted.io/">use this app</a> to see who unfollowed you on Facebook.</p> <p><strong>Method 4: Check your Facebook groups</strong></p> <p>A final method is to check your mutual groups. If you are an administrator on a Facebook group, such as a town or school community page, “you can see all profiles that interact there, whether they’ve blocked you or not,” says MacDonald.</p> <p>In these groups, you will be able to view the posts of all users, even if you are not friends on Facebook, and here again any profiles with their names in bold, black font indicate that “the user has blocked you (or you have blocked them) and you won’t be able to view those profiles.”</p> <p><strong>How to tell if someone blocked you on Facebook Messenger</strong></p> <p>It is possible for someone to block you from messaging them on Facebook Messenger even if they haven’t blocked your profile on Facebook, and this would indicate they are unwilling to be more than just a social media acquaintance.</p> <p>To check if someone has blocked you on Facebook Messenger, try sending a message to their profile. If you get an error message that reads “This person isn’t available at the moment,” then the person has either blocked you or deactivated their account.</p> <p><em>Written by Dani Walpole. This article first appeared on </em><em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/science-technology/how-to-tell-if-someone-blocked-you-on-facebook">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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Heartwarming footage of Princess Anne's fumbly Zoom call with the Queen

<p>It appears that everyone is having trouble adapting to our new normal, including the Queen herself.</p> <p>As the coronavirus pandemic has forced many to isolate, many have used Zoom to communicate with their loved ones.</p> <p>However, it can be tricky to use, which the Queen quickly found out and her daughter Princess Anne had to guide her through it.</p> <p>In a preview for a new ITV documentary about Princess Anne, which is airing in celebration of her 70th birthday, footage of a video conference is included with the Queen and Princess Anne herself.</p> <p>"Can you see everybody? You should have six people on your screen," the Princess royal tells her mother.</p> <p>The Queen, who was tuning in from Windsor Castle tells her: "Yes, well, I can see four anyway."</p> <p>"Ok fair enough. Actually, you don't need me," Anne then jovially adds.</p> <p>"You know what I look like."</p> <p>The sweet clip was shared by ITV royal correspondent Chris Ship.</p> <p>"Watch how Princess Anne tried to teach her elderly mother about @zoom_us. But her elderly mother is, err, the Queen," he joked.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">NEW: A first look behind the scenes of those royal video calls 💻 <br />Watch how Princess Anne tried to teach her elderly mother about <a href="https://twitter.com/zoom_us?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@zoom_us</a>. <br />But her elderly mother is, err, the Queen.<br />🎥 A great clip from tomorrow’s documentary ‘Anne: The Princess Royal at 70’ on <a href="https://twitter.com/ITV?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@itv</a> 9pm 👇 <a href="https://t.co/duHzozH2x5">pic.twitter.com/duHzozH2x5</a></p> — Chris Ship (@chrisshipitv) <a href="https://twitter.com/chrisshipitv/status/1288164903111602176?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 28, 2020</a></blockquote> <p>Royal fans loved the new clip.</p> <p> "I want to see the Queen with an accidental tropical island backdrop," one joked.</p> <p>Another fan wrote: "I love it! The whole world deals with zoom in the same way: 'Can you see me?' 'Can you hear me?' 'Am I on?' 'Is my background neat &amp; tidy?' Love their humanity, their humility, and their graciousness."</p>

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“Hey Siri, I’m getting pulled over”: The iPhone shortcut that lets you record police encounters

<p>Amid worldwide protests against police brutality, an iPhone shortcut that allows people to record their encounters with authorities has gained traction.</p> <p>The shortcut, which must first be <a href="https://www.icloud.com/shortcuts/cc95be30b285469ea22b7cff11ce0737">installed on the device</a>, is activated by saying: “Hey Siri, I’m getting pulled over”. It will then pause any music, dim the brightness of the phone, turn on the Do Not Disturb mode, open the device’s front camera to start a video recording, and send your location in a message to a predesignated contact.</p> <p>Once the recording stops, it will send a copy of the video to the predesignated contact and give you the option to upload the clip to iCloud Drive or Dropbox.</p> <p>The “I’m getting pulled over” shortcut was created by Robert Petersen in 2018.</p> <p>Petersen said the feature could be “a very huge help” for those experiencing “improper police interaction”.</p> <p>“I just wanted a way for anyone to have proof of their version of events in the unlikely scenario that something unexpected happens during a police interaction,” he told <em><a href="https://www.cbsnews.com/news/apple-siri-shortcut-ios12-lets-you-secretly-record-interactions-with-police/">CBS News</a> </em>in October 2018.</p> <p>“And if one in 10,000 people find my shortcut useful at all I’d be glad.”</p> <p>Petersen recommended <a href="https://www.reddit.com/r/shortcuts/comments/9huqiw/getting_pulled_over_by_police/">putting the phone on a dashboard mount</a> when using the function.</p> <p>The feature has been brought back into the spotlight on social media amid protests sparked by the death of George Floyd, a black man who died after a police officer knelt on his neck for nearly nine minutes.</p> <p>Taking pictures or videos of police carrying out duties in any public place is legal in <a href="https://www.lifehacker.com.au/2019/12/is-it-legal-to-film-police-officers-in-australia/">Australia</a> and <a href="https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/109993747/police-apologise-after-officer-threatens-to-ticket-filming-teenager#:~:text=Filming%20police%20carrying%20out%20duties,complaint%20was%20passed%20to%20police.">New Zealand</a>.</p> <p>Here’s how to install the shortcut on your iPhone device:</p> <ol> <li>Download the Shortcuts app.</li> <li>Open <a href="https://www.icloud.com/shortcuts/cc95be30b285469ea22b7cff11ce0737">this link</a> in the Safari web browser.</li> <li>Once it opens, scroll down and select “Add Untrusted Shortcut”.</li> <li>Select a contact whom you would like to send your location and video recording to.</li> </ol>

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Aussie mum’s game-changing ALDI Special Buys hack

<p>ALDI’s weekly Special Buys usually causes a frenzy amongst shoppers, with people travelling to multiple stores to grab a bargain.</p> <p>But one woman has shared a “secret” tip to help you locate the deal you’re after.</p> <p>The mum revealed you just need to type two words “Get started” into a chat box on the ALDI Australia Facebook page, answer a few prompts, and it will tell you which stores within a 20km radius to you have the item you’re after in stock.</p> <p>“Not sure if any of you know but if you message ALDI on Facebook and type ‘Get Started’ it’ll bring up a few weeks of special buy catalogue dates,” she wrote on the ALDI Mums Facebook page.</p> <p>“Just click what you want and type your postcode, it’ll see if any stores within 20km have stock.</p> <p>“Managed to get some goodies I couldn’t find a few weeks back!”</p> <p>The nifty hack left many people gobsmacked, saying they had “no idea” of the online feature.</p> <p>“Love it, I checked with this function and got something I wanted today,” one said.</p> <p>“Soooooooooo awesome!!,” another wrote.</p> <p>“That’s a great idea, I used it and went to the store where stock was available …” someone else added.</p> <p>While the helpful feature is not widely known, it is clearly listed on the German Supermarket’s website under the tab “Check Stock Availability”.</p> <p>“We want to save you time. That’s why we’ve created a chatbot that checks Special Buys stock availability,” the description reads, adding it made it “easier than ever to find your dream Special Buy”.</p> <p>Speaking to news.com.au, ALDI Australia said the recent addition had received “positive feedback”.</p> <p>“We recently expanded our customer service offering with a chatbot function for Messenger, to make it easier and quicker for our customers to check Special Buys stock availability in their area,” the spokesperson said.</p> <p>“We hope the chatbot experience continues to make it even easier for people to shop with us and locate their favourite Special Buys products.”</p> <p>As one mum said, it’s a game-changer.</p>

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Online calculator reveals how likely you are to die from coronavirus

<p>A team of scientists in the UK have built a calculator that can predict a person’s risk of dying from COVID-19.</p> <p>The <a href="http://covid19-phenomics.org/PrototypeOurRiskCoV.html">online tool</a>, developed by researchers at University College London, predicts a one-year mortality rate based on factors such as sex, age, and underlying conditions as well as the levels of coronavirus infection in the population and strain on the health service.</p> <p>The calculator is a part of <a href="https://www.thelancet.com/pdfs/journals/lancet/PIIS0140-6736(20)30854-0.pdf">a study</a> involving 3.8 million health records from England, which concluded that “stringent” restrictions must be sustained to prevent excess deaths.</p> <p>Lead author Dr Amitava Banerjee said older people, particularly those with underlying conditions, were asking what easing coronavirus restrictions could mean for their health.</p> <p>“For example, we show how a 66-year-old man with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has 6 per cent risk of dying over the next year and there are 25,000 ‘patients like me’ [men of the same age with the same condition] in England,” he said.</p> <p>“The calculator estimates 164 excess COVID-19-related deaths on top of the expected 1,639 deaths over a year in patients in a similar situation.</p> <p>“Our findings show the mortality risk for these vulnerable groups increases significantly and could lead to thousands of avoidable deaths.”</p> <p>The calculator works using a given age, sex, and underlying health condition along with the level of suppression measures in the area using a mortality impact of 1.5 per cent.</p> <p>The tool then calculates the one-year mortality rate, or the number of people with similar characteristics in England who would have died pre-coronavirus from other causes.</p> <p>It also forecasts the excess mortality under the COVID-19 emergency – that is, the number of additional deaths among the group of people due to coronavirus.</p> <p>The study’s co-author Professor Harry Hemingway told <em><a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/news/health/coronavirus-death-risk-calculator-uk-university-college-london-study-a9511591.html">Independent.co.uk</a></em>: “Our findings emphasise the importance of delivering consistent preventive interventions to people with a wide range of diseases, who are cared for by a wide range of clinical specialties.”</p>

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"Absolute idiot": Grand slam birthday stitch-up puts Nick Kyrgios on the back foot

<p>It may not have been the 25th birthday Nick Kyrgios had in mind, but it went from bad to worse on Monday night when a fellow tennis star posted a particular photo.</p> <p>As countless people wished the talented Aussie a happy birthday, Greek tennis champ Stefanos Tsitsipas decided to go down a different path with his Instagram upload.</p> <p>Tsitsipas’ post was an image of himself holding up a cardboard sign which he captioned: “Lift others up”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_eouG8DHie/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B_eouG8DHie/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">‎Lift others up 🙌🏼 . . . . . . . . 💭: @dudewithsign | #dudewithsign</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/stefanostsitsipas98/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Stefanos Tsitsipas</a> (@stefanostsitsipas98) on Apr 27, 2020 at 2:07am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The only problem was, the sign contained a mobile number, which fans quickly realised belonged to the one and only Nick Kyrgios. Kyrgios commented on the post: “You are an absolute idiot, everyone stop calling me!!!!!”</p> <p>The number was quickly disconnected after what most likely was a never ending hoard of phone calls and text messages.</p> <p>Of course, not all of the birthday wishes directed towards him caused a headache, as many took to social media to say happy birthday in a much more conventional way.</p>

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Tennis fans shred Rafael Nadal over blunder in Roger Federer chat

<p>Throughout his incredible career, it has taken a pretty special opponent to make Rafael Nadal worry, but the Spanish great met his match in the form of Instagram Live on Monday.</p> <p>The 33-year-old can make any of his rivals break into a sweat. Whether that’s with his wickedly spinning forehand or backhand, everyone in the tennis world fears his name.</p> <p>But fans on his social media witnessed a completely different side of the Mallorcan as they eagerly awaited his live chat with Swiss legend Roger Federer.</p> <p>He may have 19 Grand Slam titles, one shy of Federer’s all-time men’s record, but when it comes to IT skills, he resembled a Sunday morning park hacker crumbling under pressure.</p> <p>With 40,000 viewers tuning in, a confused Nadal blankly stared into cyberspace, as he tried to work out why Federer, who is currently isolating at home in Switzerland, refused to appear.</p> <p>Eventually to Nadal’s obvious relief, the tennis champion popped up to speak briefly about how he’s dealing with the shutdown amidst the pandemic.</p> <p>“Finally!” said Nadal.</p> <p>Federer revealed he had been practising against a wall, when not spending time with his four children. But Nadal admitted that he hadn’t been training at all. “Perfect! You won’t be able to play tennis any more when you come back,” said a laughing Federer.</p> <p>Federer said the extended lay-off has meant he has had time to rehab his right knee after surgery in February.</p> <p>“I’ve got plenty of time, there is no stress, no rush, if there is a positive that’s it,” he said.</p>

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Oscar winner plays bingo with nursing home residents

<p>Hollywood actor Matthew McConaughey has hosted a game of virtual bingo for residents living in a senior nursing home in Texas, U.S on Sunday.</p> <p>The A-lister was joined by his wife, Camila Alves and mother, Kay as they led a game of bingo for seniors currently residing at The Enclave at Round Rock senior Living in Round Rock, Texas.</p> <p>A clip of the event was shared to social media, where the 50-year-old star was recording saying: “We got I-24!</p> <p>“Richard is waving a hammer up high, we got Charles with the iPad up high. We got two winners!”</p> <p><iframe src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2FTheEnclaveatRoundRockSeniorLiving%2Fvideos%2F652315845592481%2F&amp;show_text=1&amp;width=560" width="560" height="508" style="border: none; overflow: hidden;" scrolling="no" frameborder="0" allowtransparency="true" allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="true"></iframe></p> <p>The clip also showed Camila taking pictures of the bingo participants who were all turning in through Zoom, along with two of their three children peeking in behind McConaughey’s shoulder.</p> <p>The caption of the clip which was posted by the facility’s Facebook page read: “Ever play virtual bingo with #MatthewMcConaughey? You'd be a whole lot cooler if you did! The residents at The Enclave at Round Rock Senior Living got to play virtual bingo with #MatthewMcConaughey and his family!</p> <p>“Thank you to Matthew, his wife Camila, and his mom Kay for hosting our residents for a few rounds of virtual bingo! Our residents had a great time playing, and they loved talking with Matthew about his family heritage and his favourite drink.”</p> <p>A second piece of footage from the virtual bingo game was also shared onto Facebook, with one of the facility’s employees thanking the award-winning actor for his support.</p> <p>“I wanted to say, from all of us, we want to continue to turn a red light into a green light.”</p>

Technology

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How to seek medical advice from the comfort of your own home

<p>Australians can now seek medical advice from their GP or mental health professional from the comfort of their living room without being left out of pocket. </p> <p>They can phone or video call their medical professional and bulk bill as part of new Government measures to try and contain the coronavirus, a move very much needed, that will also change the way many view telehealth.</p> <p>The list of medical professionals people can now access for bulk-billed telehealth consultations includes - GP’s, midwives, psychologists, nurses, psychiatrists, paediatricians, speech pathologists, physiotherapists and occupational therapists for services for children with developmental delays. Also Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practitioners as well as social workers and dieticians for eating disorders.</p> <p>You may be surprised to know telehealth has been in existence for over a decade yet the uptake has been slow and fragmented in this country. </p> <p>This is despite its success to date  - it improves access to health care for those in rural and regional areas, it’s more affordable, reduces the risk of infection spreading and there’s less strain on hospital emergency departments.</p> <p>People think of telehealth as simply enabling people to seek medical help and advice via phone or online using video technology such as FaceTime and Skype, but it has gone beyond just this. </p> <p>New technologies such as Artificial Intelligence can help clinicians vastly increase their patient risk assessments by helping to automatically assess data providing key indications that may flag issues missed in traditional testing methods.</p> <p>As Australians start using telehealth, and we expect unprecedented numbers will, and they witness first hand how effective it is we will see it start to become the norm. </p> <p>This is not the first time telehealth has been used in disaster situations before - Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the 2011 earthquake in Japan as well as the Boston Blizzard in 2014. In the 2003 SARS outbreak, one-fifth of reported infections were in health-care workers. Healthcare systems are easily stretched beyond their limits and it’s critical the health-care workers are kept well, so they can attend to the surge in required services. </p> <p>As patients get access to expert medical advice while maintaining social distancing ..this shift will start to change the mindset of both the clinical and patient community, helping normalise the remote delivery of gold class clinical care.</p> <p>Our work at <a href="https://maxwellplus.com/">Maxwell Plus </a>in the diagnosis of prostate cancer is fully remote for the vast majority of our patients. We centralise the clinical expertise and use telehealth and other technologies to make that widely available. </p> <p>At the same time, we utilise the excellent existing infrastructure through partnering with pathology and radiology services all over the country. </p> <p>I think patients everywhere are starting to understand that top quality care can be delivered in many different ways.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7835444/headshot-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c83ceb8eea9140dcb99123a18c388fee" /></p> <p><em>Written by Dr Elliott Smith.</em></p>

Technology

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High tech shortages in the future as coronavirus shuts down manufacturers

<p>There are now <a href="https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200212-sitrep-23-ncov.pdf?sfvrsn=41e9fb78_2">more than 45,000</a> confirmed cases of the coronavirus dubbed COVID-19 by the World Health Organization, and the disease has caused at least 1,115 deaths. The impact of the virus is now reaching way beyond public health: China is at the heart of global manufacturing, and as supply chains suffer, <a href="https://www.logisticsmgmt.com/article/coronavirus_and_the_global_supply_chain_rising_panic_part">panic</a> is beginning to set in.</p> <p>In many provinces across China the government has urged hundreds of millions of workers to <a href="https://www.afr.com/world/asia/virus-death-toll-above-900-as-workers-told-to-stay-home-20200210-p53zbr">stay home</a> to help reduce the spread of the virus. As a result, many factories have stayed closed since the Lunar New Year holiday in late January, halting the production of products and parts destined for countries around the world, including Australia.</p> <p>Apple is one of the most high-profile companies affected, with its <a href="https://www.wsj.com/amp/articles/rapid-spread-of-coronavirus-tests-apples-china-dependency-11580910743">manufacturing partner Foxconn hitting a lengthy production delay</a>, but they are far from alone.</p> <p><strong>Global supply chains, global problems</strong></p> <p>The sectors hit hardest <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/stevebanker/2020/02/10/global-high-tech-supply-chains-disrupted-by-the-coronavirus/amp/">appear to be</a> high-tech electronics, pharmaceuticals and the automotive industry.</p> <p>Globalised supply chains and just-in-time manufacturing mean many seemingly unrelated products are vulnerable to pauses in the flow of goods from China.</p> <p>It only takes one small missing part to bring entire supply chains to a standstill. If a tyre manufacturer in the United States doesn’t receive valves from a supplier in China, a car plant in Germany won’t receive any tyres, and therefore can’t ship finished cars to its customers.</p> <p>Something similar happened to automotive giant Hyundai, which had to <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/02/04/business/hyundai-south-korea-coronavirus.html">suspend all operations</a> at its manufacturing plant in South Korea due to a lack of parts from China.</p> <p>Even tech companies such as Samsung, Google and Sony, which have moved their factories out of China in recent years, are <a href="https://qz.com/1800540/how-coronavirus-is-upending-the-tech-industrys-supply-chain/">being affected</a>. They still rely on China for many components such as sensors or smartphone screens.</p> <p>It is not just large businesses that will feel these effects. Many small businesses around the world also source products and parts from China.</p> <p>The supply of these is now uncertain, with no sign yet as to when normal service may resume. For products and parts that are still being manufactured in China, new enhanced screening measures at all Chinese border crossings are likely to cause further delays.</p> <p><strong>How will Australia be affected?</strong></p> <p>The effects of the coronavirus are also being felt in Australia. China is our largest trading partner for both imports and exports. According to the United Nations Comtrade database, <a href="https://tradingeconomics.com/australia/imports/china">Australian imports from China</a> were valued at A$85.9 billion in 2018. The biggest product categories were electronics and electrical equipment, making up A$19.8 billion, and machinery, which accounts for another A$15.7 billion.</p> <p>Moreover, <a href="https://www.aph.gov.au/About_Parliament/Parliamentary_Departments/Parliamentary_Library/pubs/BriefingBook44p/China">90% of all Australia’s merchandise imports</a> are from China, and half of those are engineering products such as office and telecommunications equipment.</p> <p>Besides the well-publicised impact on airlines, universities and tourism, Australian construction companies are warning clients of upcoming project delays as a result of forecast disruptions in materials sourced from China. Aurizon, Australia’s largest rail operator, has said the coronavirus will delay the arrival of <a href="https://www.afr.com/companies/retail/coronavirus-fallout-hits-australian-companies-20200210-p53zfc">66 new rail wagons</a> being made in Wuhan, the city at the epicentre of the outbreak.</p> <p><strong>Expect shortages of high-tech goods</strong></p> <p>Product shortages could also soon be visible on retailers’ shelves, with electronics stores such as JB Hi-Fi and Harvey Norman expected to experience <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/feb/12/coronavirus-fallout-could-leave-australian-tourism-and-retail-sector-in-the-doldrums">significant disruption</a> to their supply of computers, televisions and smartphones.</p> <p>When shortages like this occur, customers will struggle to buy the products they want, when they want them. The only channels available might be third-party resellers offering highly inflated prices. In extreme cases, supply shortages like these can also lead to <a href="http://personal.cb.cityu.edu.hk/biyishou/Consumer_panic_buying.pdf">panic buying</a> and stockpiling.</p> <p><strong>More uncertainty ahead</strong></p> <p>It is commonly said that “when China sneezes, the world catches a cold”. So what is the long-term diagnosis for the coronavirus breakout, and what will the economic symptoms be?</p> <p>As so much is still unknown about COVID-19, with no vaccine or formal means of preventing it spreading having emerged yet, it’s too early to predict what the full impact will be.</p> <p>For many industries the next few months will bring high levels of uncertainty, with disruptions certain to continue, before recovery programs can start to gain traction.</p> <p>This is obviously a worry for many organisations, but could also be a period of new opportunity for others, as the world comes to terms with this latest global health crisis. Supply chains that are agile enough to react quicker than their competitors’, or those with more robust risk management plans, might find themselves gaining greater market share as a result of this crisis.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/131646/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/john-l-hopkins-255434">John L Hopkins</a>, Theme Leader (Future Urban Mobility), Smart Cities Research Institute, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/swinburne-university-of-technology-767">Swinburne University of Technology</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/high-tech-shortages-loom-as-coronavirus-shutdowns-hit-manufacturers-131646">original article</a>.</em></p>

Technology

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Charging your phone using a public port is dangerous

<p>Have you ever used a public charging station to charge your mobile phone when it runs out of battery? If so, watch out for “juice jacking”.</p> <p>Cybercriminals are on the prowl to infect your mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet computers and access your personal data, or install malware while you charge them.</p> <p>Specifically, <a href="https://dl.acm.org/doi/pdf/10.1145/2732198.2732205">juice jacking</a> is a cyber attack in which criminals <a href="https://securelist.com/wired-mobile-charging-is-it-safe/74804/">use publicly accessible USB charging ports or cables</a> to install malicious software on your mobile device and/or steal personal data from it.</p> <p>Even a <a href="https://media.blackhat.com/us-13/US-13-Lau-Mactans-Injecting-Malware-into-iOS-Devices-via-Malicious-Chargers-WP.pdf">60-second power-up</a> can be enough to compromise your phone’s data. This is because USB cables allow the transmission of both power and data streams simultaneously. Victims can be left vulnerable to identity theft, financial fraud, and significant stress.</p> <p>USB charging stations are a common sight in shopping centres, airports, hotels, fast-food restaurants, and even on public transport. While juice jacking is neither <a href="https://securelist.com/wi-fi-security-and-fake-acdc-charges-threaten-your-data-at-the-2014-world-cup/63759/">new</a> nor particularly widespread so far, it was recently highlighted by <a href="http://da.lacounty.gov/about/inside-LADA/juice-jacking-criminals-use-public-usb-chargers-steal-data-ff">Los Angeles County District Attorney’s Office</a> as a significant threat, especially to travellers who can easily find themselves caught short and in need of a battery boost.</p> <p><strong>How does it work?</strong></p> <p>First, the attackers tamper with the charging stations or cables in public areas, and install malicious software on them. This software then infects the phones of unsuspecting users who subsequently plug into the tampered charger.</p> <p>The software can invade, damage or even disable your phone. It can also steal or delete data from your phone and possibly spy on your usage activity, to the extent of transmitting your personal information such as account numbers, usernames, passwords, photos, and emails to the perpetrator.</p> <p><strong>How can I tell if I’ve been juice jacked?</strong></p> <p>Hacked mobile devices will often go undetected. But there are a few telltale signs that your device may have been hacked. These include:</p> <ul> <li> <p>a sudden surge in battery consumption or rapid loss of charge, indicating a malicious app may be running in the background</p> </li> <li> <p>the device operating slower than usual, or restarting without notice</p> </li> <li> <p>apps taking a long time to load or frequently crashing</p> </li> <li> <p>excessive heating</p> </li> <li> <p>changes to device settings that you did not make</p> </li> <li> <p>increased or abnormal data usage.</p> </li> </ul> <p><strong>How do I protect myself?</strong></p> <p>The tampering of USB charging stations or USB cables is almost impossible to identify. But there are some simple ways to guard against juice jacking:</p> <ul> <li> <p>avoid USB power charging stations</p> </li> <li> <p>use AC power outlets rather than USB ports</p> </li> <li> <p>use a portable battery power bank (your own, not a borrowed one!)</p> </li> <li> <p>carry your own charging cable and adaptor</p> </li> <li> <p>use a data-blocker device such as <a href="http://syncstop.com/">SyncStop</a> or <a href="https://www.amazon.com.au/Juice-Jack-Defender-Security-purchased-employees/dp/B00XYTQ4Q8">Juice-Jack Defender</a>. These devices physically prevent data transfer and only allow power to go through while charging</p> </li> <li> <p>use power-only USB cables such as <a href="https://www.4cabling.com.au/portapow-fast-charge-micro-usb-cable-300cm.html">PortaPow</a>, which don’t pass any data.</p> </li> </ul> <p>And finally, if you must use a charging station, keep your phone locked while doing so. USB ports typically don’t sync data from a phone that is locked. Most mobile phones will ask your permission to give the USB port access to your phone’s data when you plug in. If you’re using an unknown or untrustworthy port, make sure you decline.</p> <p><strong>I think I might have been juice jacked – what can I do?</strong></p> <p>If you suspect you have fallen prey, there are several things you can do to protect your device’s integrity:</p> <ul> <li> <p>monitor your device for unusual activity</p> </li> <li> <p>delete suspicious apps you don’t recall installing</p> </li> <li> <p>restore your device to its factory settings</p> </li> <li> <p>install anti-virus software, such as <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.avast.android.mobilesecurity&amp;hl=en_AU">Avast Antivirus</a> or <a href="https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.antivirus&amp;hl=en_AU%22">AVG AntiVirus</a></p> </li> <li> <p>keep your mobile device’s system software up to date. Developers continually release patches against common types of malware.</p> </li> </ul> <p>A lot of data is stored on our mobile devices these days, and protecting our privacy is crucial. While juice jacking may not be a widespread threat, it is important to ensure the safety of our mobile devices. So, the next time you consider using a public USB charging station or cable, ask yourself if it is worth it, particularly as your personal information is at stake.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/130947/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ritesh-chugh-162770">Ritesh Chugh</a>, Senior Lecturer/Discipline Lead – Information Systems and Analysis, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/cquniversity-australia-2140">CQUniversity Australia</a></em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="http://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/charging-your-phone-using-a-public-usb-port-beware-of-juice-jacking-130947">original article</a>.</em></p>

Technology

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Posting about politicians? The NSW Police Force may have you in their sights

<p>A Blue Mountains man was arrested<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.bluemountainsgazette.com.au/story/6328433/fixated-persons-unit-investigates-winmalee-man/" target="_blank">in August last year</a>, over allegations that he’d been harassing the local mayor and a NSW Labor MLC. The 37-year-old was charged with a number of offences, including<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/domestic-and-personal-violence-act/stalking-or-intimidation/">stalking or intimidation with intent to cause fear of physical or mental harm</a><span> </span>and<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/criminal-code-act/use-carriage-service-to-menace-harass-or-cause-offence/">using a carriage service to menace, harass or cause offence</a>.</p> <p>The charges related to claims the man had been making<a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/false-sexual-assault-allegations-ruin-lives/"><span> </span>false allegations about sexual assault</a><span> </span>and child abuse. And this decade-long intimidation campaign was carried out via email, social media, text and phone messages.</p> <p>The investigation leading to the arrest was carried out by detectives from the NSW Police Force Fixated Persons Unit, which is a specialist investigation team comprised of police officers and government mental health workers that was formed in the wake of the Lindt café siege.</p> <p><strong>Identifying pre-criminals</strong></p> <p>The Fixated Persons Unit commenced operations<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.westernadvocate.com.au/story/4627585/new-police-unit-deals-with-obsessed-individuals-video/" target="_blank">on 1 May 2017</a>. NSW police commissioner Mick Fuller referred to the Martin Place shootings, when announcing its formation. And he said it would target “lone actors”, who are obsessed with public figures, as well as ideologies or beliefs.</p> <p>The state’s top cop outlined that the unit would focus on non-terrorist suspects, who threaten public officials. However, the unit also has a focus on proactively locating individuals<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-26/police-strike-force-to-target-people-who-make-violent-threats/8472280" target="_blank">vulnerable</a><span> </span>to becoming involved in this sort of behaviour before it develops.</p> <p>And that’s where the scope of these operations becomes worrying. If detectives aren’t responding to reports of threatening behaviour being carried out by fixated persons, then how are they locating those who pose a potential threat?</p> <p>At the time the unit was formed, NSW police said it had up to<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/nsw/up-to-50-wouldbe-extremists-assessed-by-new-police-fixated-persons-unit-20170426-gvsldb.html" target="_blank">50 people</a><span> </span>on its radar who could potentially be targeted, which included one man who’d fallen short of the law due to shouting anti-war slogans during the minute’s silence on Anzac Day in Martin Place.</p> <p>And by October 2017, it was reported that<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.crikey.com.au/2017/10/05/cops-and-health-professionals-can-decide-if-youre-too-obsessed-with-a-public-official/?fbclid=IwAR0MrgLNBOAoHvqutMTXWjm-aMg0qB06f5g5FJgXGsMWuVh2zAQxYDDVh1U" target="_blank">six people</a><span> </span>in this state had been charged in relation to the unit.</p> <p>A Blue Mountains man was arrested<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.bluemountainsgazette.com.au/story/6328433/fixated-persons-unit-investigates-winmalee-man/" target="_blank">in August last year</a>, over allegations that he’d been harassing the local mayor and a NSW Labor MLC. The 37-year-old was charged with a number of offences, including<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/domestic-and-personal-violence-act/stalking-or-intimidation/">stalking or intimidation with intent to cause fear of physical or mental harm</a><span> </span>and<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/criminal/legislation/criminal-code-act/use-carriage-service-to-menace-harass-or-cause-offence/">using a carriage service to menace, harass or cause offence</a>.</p> <p>The charges related to claims the man had been making<a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/false-sexual-assault-allegations-ruin-lives/"><span> </span>false allegations about sexual assault</a><span> </span>and child abuse. And this decade-long intimidation campaign was carried out via email, social media, text and phone messages.</p> <p>The investigation leading to the arrest was carried out by detectives from the NSW Police Force Fixated Persons Unit, which is a specialist investigation team comprised of police officers and government mental health workers that was formed in the wake of the Lindt café siege.</p> <p><strong>Identifying pre-criminals</strong></p> <p>The Fixated Persons Unit commenced operations<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.westernadvocate.com.au/story/4627585/new-police-unit-deals-with-obsessed-individuals-video/" target="_blank">on 1 May 2017</a>. NSW police commissioner Mick Fuller referred to the Martin Place shootings, when announcing its formation. And he said it would target “lone actors”, who are obsessed with public figures, as well as ideologies or beliefs.</p> <p>The state’s top cop outlined that the unit would focus on non-terrorist suspects, who threaten public officials. However, the unit also has a focus on proactively locating individuals<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-26/police-strike-force-to-target-people-who-make-violent-threats/8472280" target="_blank">vulnerable</a><span> </span>to becoming involved in this sort of behaviour before it develops.</p> <p>And that’s where the scope of these operations becomes worrying. If detectives aren’t responding to reports of threatening behaviour being carried out by fixated persons, then how are they locating those who pose a potential threat?</p> <p>At the time the unit was formed, NSW police said it had up to<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.theage.com.au/national/nsw/up-to-50-wouldbe-extremists-assessed-by-new-police-fixated-persons-unit-20170426-gvsldb.html" target="_blank">50 people</a><span> </span>on its radar who could potentially be targeted, which included one man who’d fallen short of the law due to shouting anti-war slogans during the minute’s silence on Anzac Day in Martin Place.</p> <p>And by October 2017, it was reported that<span> </span><a rel="nofollow noopener noreferrer" href="https://www.crikey.com.au/2017/10/05/cops-and-health-professionals-can-decide-if-youre-too-obsessed-with-a-public-official/?fbclid=IwAR0MrgLNBOAoHvqutMTXWjm-aMg0qB06f5g5FJgXGsMWuVh2zAQxYDDVh1U" target="_blank">six people</a><span> </span>in this state had been charged in relation to the unit.</p> <p><strong>The future crime regime</strong></p> <p>“The creation of this unit forms part of the reengineering process for the NSW Police Force moving forward,” commissioner Fuller told reporters. Although, he didn’t elaborate on what that actually meant.</p> <p>However, one could posit that this “reengineering” is a further step into the realm of policing future crimes, or what NSW police refers to as<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/systemic-unlawfulness-an-interview-with-dr-vicki-sentas-on-police-powers/">proactive policing</a>. This is part of a global trend towards trying to sniff out criminals before they commit any offences as its seen as being more cost effective.</p> <p>An example of this is the NSW police<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/nsw-police-future-crime-program-an-abuse-of-power/">Suspect Target Management Plan (STMP)</a>, which is a secret list of individuals subjected to intensified monitoring due to their assessed potential to commit crimes in the future. Those on the list don’t even have to have been convicted of a crime in the past.</p> <p>And while these developments are occurring,<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/predicting-and-preventing-crime-an-interview-with-ctdss-dr-roman-marchant/">there’s research being carried</a><span> </span>out with the aim of being able to predict the level of criminality present in urban areas by analysing socioeconomic factors, so as to better allocate policing resources to prevent crime before it happens.</p> <p>Of course, as yet, no one has turned up to parliament with a bill that puts thoughtcrimes on the law books. However, proactively locating individuals before they perpetrate any criminal acts certainly sounds a lot like Orwell’s dystopian vision.</p> <p>“The creation of this unit forms part of the reengineering process for the NSW Police Force moving forward,” commissioner Fuller told reporters. Although, he didn’t elaborate on what that actually meant.</p> <p>However, one could posit that this “reengineering” is a further step into the realm of policing future crimes, or what NSW police refers to as<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/systemic-unlawfulness-an-interview-with-dr-vicki-sentas-on-police-powers/">proactive policing</a>. This is part of a global trend towards trying to sniff out criminals before they commit any offences as its seen as being more cost effective.</p> <p>An example of this is the NSW police<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/nsw-police-future-crime-program-an-abuse-of-power/">Suspect Target Management Plan (STMP)</a>, which is a secret list of individuals subjected to intensified monitoring due to their assessed potential to commit crimes in the future. Those on the list don’t even have to have been convicted of a crime in the past.</p> <p>And while these developments are occurring,<span> </span><a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/predicting-and-preventing-crime-an-interview-with-ctdss-dr-roman-marchant/">there’s research being carried</a><span> </span>out with the aim of being able to predict the level of criminality present in urban areas by analysing socioeconomic factors, so as to better allocate policing resources to prevent crime before it happens.</p> <p>Of course, as yet, no one has turned up to parliament with a bill that puts thoughtcrimes on the law books. However, proactively locating individuals before they perpetrate any criminal acts certainly sounds a lot like Orwell’s dystopian vision.</p> <p><em>Written by Paul Gregoire. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.sydneycriminallawyers.com.au/blog/posting-about-politicians-the-nsw-police-force-may-have-you-in-their-sights/">Sydney Criminal Lawyers.</a></em></p>

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