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How art museums are helping to heal their audiences

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The COVID-19 pandemic saw a worldwide increase in depression, anxiety and other mental health issues. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As a response to the global mental health problems, art galleries and museums are responding to the collective trauma with specialised art installations and programmes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The last 18 months has seen a drastic increase of museum-based healing initiatives, that are available online and in person. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Queens Museum in New York has launched La Ventanita/The Little Window, an online art therapy program for recent immigrants and students at local elementary schools. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In Florida, the Tampa Museum of Art is expanding both in-person and virtual offerings in connections, a community art engagement program geared toward people with depression, memory loss, and PTSD.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the country of Doha, a medical research centre has teamed up with the National Museum of Qatar to design an art therapy program to help alleviate depression and anxiety in children. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Another New York museum has developed an online “care package” with an option to meditate amid chanting monks in a virtual version of its shrine room.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The programmes are not the first time art has been used to heal individuals of traumatic experiences. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Some have previously been influenced by social change, such as the Black Lives Matter movement, to help those in mourning and those dealing with mental turmoil. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Art has long been used to help people heal from trauma, as a means to discuss the relationship between art and health. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In 2017, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts hired a full-time art therapist and permitted physicians to formally “prescribe” free access to their galleries, which drew in a lot of global attention. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Art therapy originally arose in the 1940s and ’50s, as specialised exhibitions helped researchers in the mental health field study the brain’s response to art. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Shutterstock</span></em></p>

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Picasso’s daughter exchanges famous artworks for a tax bill settlement

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The French Government has negotiated a unique deal with Pablo Picasso’s daughter, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Maya Ruiz-Picasso, to settle an inheritance tax bill. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">France is set to receive six paintings, two sculptures and a sketchbook by the world-famous artist, as French finance minister Bruno Le Maire announced during a press conference at the PIcasso Museum. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It is an honour for our country to welcome these new artworks by Picasso. They will enrich and deepen our cultural heritage,” Le Maire wrote on Twitter.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Le Maire presented one of the artworks at the press conference: the 1938 painting called </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Child with a Lollipop Sitting Under a Chair</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to Picasso’s grandson Olivier Widmaier-Picasso, the painting depicts his mother Maya as a child. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">French citizens have been permitted to settle debts similar to Maya’s with a payment of profitable art, books, and collectibles of national importance since 1968. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The collective total of the nine objects given by Picasso's daughter was not publicly disclosed. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to France’s culture minister Roselyne Bachelot, the artworks will enter the national collections at Paris’s Musée Picasso in 2022, and will be exhibited as a whole to the public in the spring of 2022.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It is with deep emotion that I come to celebrate the entry into the national collections of the works,” said Bachelot, who called the donation an “exceptional event.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: French Ministry of Culture</span></em></p>

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Art meets science

<div class="copy"> <p>Science and art have always had a close relationship – both seek to observe and explain the world.</p> <p>Leonardo da Vinci’s drawings, for instance, did much to unravel the anatomy of the human body, while his imagination and draughtsmanship took us to new technological realms.</p> <p>But in the 20th and 21st centuries, the nexus between art and science has been strained, and sometimes lost.</p> <p>C.P. Snow’s 1959 lecture, <em>The Two Cultures</em>, bemoaned the way Western intellectual life had been split into the two camps – the sciences and the humanities.</p> <p>This, he said, was holding us back from solving some of the world’s most intractable problems.</p> <p>But it was not always this way, as this selection of images celebrating how art has aided science and vice versa – taken from an exhibition at London’s Science Museum – shows.</p> <p><a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="http://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/visitmuseum/Plan_your_visit/exhibitions/revelations.aspx" target="_self"><em>Revelations: Experiments in Photography</em></a> investigates the influence of early scientific photography on modern and contemporary art and includes some of the rarest images from the pioneers of photography.</p> <p>“From the 1840s, scientists were using photography as a device to record and measure phenomena which lay beyond human vision,” the catalogue tells us.</p> <p>“The aesthetic beauty of this early photography and the revolutionary techniques developed for scientific study shaped the history of photography and heavily influenced modern and contemporary art photographers.”</p> <p>The exhibition gathers some of the earliest photographic images by figures such as William Henry Fox Talbot and Eadweard Muybridge alongside works by modern and contemporary artists including Harold Edgerton and Hiroshi Sugimoto.</p> <p>It includes the earliest recorded images of the Moon and 19th century photographs capturing electrical discharges.</p> <p>The art of photography to help scientists understand the world around them is far from dead, as we showed in <a rel="noopener noreferrer" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/physical-sciences/making-waves" target="_self">our recent gallery <em>Making Waves</em></a>.</p> <p>In that, high-speed photography specialist Phred Petersen at RMIT University shows the beautiful patterns waves make as they pass through gases.</p> <p>Petersen’s work helps aerospace engineers understand the airflow around their designs.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/people/society/art-meets-science-experiments-in-photography/" target="_blank">cosmosmagazine.com</a> by Bill Condie</em></p> </div>

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Never-before-seen Van Gogh drawing goes on display

<p>A newly discovered Vincent Van Gogh drawing has made its debut in in Amsterdam.</p> <p>The Van Gogh Museum revealed that the never-before-seen piece was drawn in 1882, marking the early days of the famous artist's extraordinary career.</p> <p>The artwork had been sitting in a Dutch family's private collection for over 100 years, and was loaned to the Amsterdam Museum for viewing for the first time.</p> <p>The unique piece will be visible to the public until January 2nd 2022, before returning to the private collection.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">🎉We have discovered a new work by Vincent van Gogh! Study for ‘Worn Out’ from 1882 is added to Van Gogh's oeuvre. What do you think of this study? On display in the museum from tomorrow on. Find out more: <a href="https://t.co/LyjgpLkRtv">https://t.co/LyjgpLkRtv</a> <a href="https://t.co/86fu9XRbeY">pic.twitter.com/86fu9XRbeY</a></p> — Van Gogh Museum (@vangoghmuseum) <a href="https://twitter.com/vangoghmuseum/status/1438498921169391623?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 16, 2021</a></blockquote> <p>The drawing depicts an exhausted old man and has been titled <em>Study for Worn Out</em>.</p> <p>Signed <em>“</em><em>Vincent”</em>, the drawing shows an elderly labourer dressed in boots, trousers and a waistcoat bending over with his head in his hands.</p> <p>Teio Meedendorp, a senior researcher at the Van Gogh Museum, told the BBC that it was "absolutely impossible" to predict how much the piece was worth.</p> <p>The artwork seems to be an earlier version of a more well-known Van Gogh piece titled <em>Worn Out</em>, which has been on display at the museum for many years.</p> <p>This first draft of an artwork gives researchers an exclusive insight into Van Gogh's working process as an early artist.</p> <p>As expected, the team at The Van Gogh Museum, were “delighted with this discovery” and felt like they had contributed to their specialty.</p> <p>The owner of the artwork, who wishes to remain anonymous, was conversing with the museum about the likelihood of the piece being attributed to Vincent Van Gogh.</p> <p>Teio Meedendorp stated, "In stylistic terms, it fits perfectly with the many figures we know from Van Goghs time in the Hague and the connect with <em>Worn Out</em> is obvious”.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty Images</em></p>

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7 Mysteries of the Mona Lisa

<p>As the most famous painting in the world, the Mona Lisa draws more than six million admirers to the Louvre each year. Just what is her peculiar power?</p> <p><strong>Monda Lisa mystery #1: Who was Mona Lisa?</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/96ac8753d46042ba935d8ca973208772" />Over the past century, it has been proposed that Mona Lisa was a noblewoman – Isabella d’Este, Marquise of Mantua, or Costanza d’Avalos, Duchess of Francavilla. Others have stared at that unsettling visage and seen the face of a man – Leonardo da Vinci himself, or the man who was for 20 years his assistant (and perhaps his lover), Gian Giacomo Caprotti. There is even a theory that the picture may have started out as a portrait from life but, over the years that Leonardo worked on it, evolved into an abstract vision of the feminine ideal.</p> <p>These days, most experts agree that the Mona Lisa is a portrait of Lisa Gherardini del Giocondo, wife of a Florentine silk merchant named Francesco del Giocondo (hence the name by which she is known in Italy and France, La Gioconda, or La Joconde). When she sat for Leonardo da Vinci, in around 1503, she was about 24 years old. Her <em>contrapposto</em> pose – with the body angled away from the viewer, head turned forward – was widely admired and copied by Leonardo’s contemporaries. And his<em> sfumato</em> technique, where sharp edges are blurred to create an uncannily lifelike effect, was seen as a brilliant technical innovation, very unlike the slightly frozen human figures of earlier, lesser painters.</p> <p><strong>Mona Lisa mystery #2: The hidden initials</strong></p> <p>In 2010, Silvano Vinceti, chairman of Italy’s National Committee for Cultural Heritage, claimed to have discerned letters minutely painted on Mona Lisa’s eyes: L and V (Leonardo da Vinci’s initials) in the right eye, and perhaps C, E or B in the left. The Louvre responded that Vinceti’s letters were simply microscopic cracks in the paint.</p> <p><strong>Mona Lisa mystery #3: The broken backdrop</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d24b5d5c75c44f5aa5f5219632097fab" /><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.5442561205273px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844236/mona-lisa-backdrop-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/d24b5d5c75c44f5aa5f5219632097fab" /></p> <p>The distant, dreamlike vista behind Mona Lisa’s head seems to be higher on the right-hand side than on the left. It is hard to see how the landscape would join up. This is subliminally unsettling: Mona Lisa appears taller, more erect, when one’s gaze drifts to the left than when it is on the right.</p> <p><strong>Mona Lisa mystery #4: The bewitching smile</strong></p> <p>In 2000, scientists at Harvard University suggested a neurological explanation for Mona Lisa’s elusive smile. When a viewer looks at her eyes, the mouth is in peripheral vision, which sees in black and white. This accentuates the shadows at the corners of her mouth, making the smile seem broader. But the smile diminishes when you look straight at it. It is the variability of her smile, the fact that it changes when you look away from it, that makes her seem so alive, so mysterious.</p> <p><strong>Mona Lisa mystery #5: The unknown bridge</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="/nothing.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2138f0c4b92d42fd8502466377e2c2b8" /><img style="width: 500px; height: 280.97982708933716px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7844234/mona-lisa-3-bridge-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/2138f0c4b92d42fd8502466377e2c2b8" /></p> <p>The Mona Lisa’s background landscape seems unreal, but the bridge might be one that Leonardo knew. It is usually said to be Ponte Buriano in Tuscany, but in 2011, a researcher claimed it depicts the Bobbio Bridge over the Trebbia, which was washed away in a flood in 1472.</p> <p><strong>Mona Lisa mystery #6: Da Vinci’s obsession</strong></p> <p>Leonardo da Vinci worked on the painting for four years, and possibly at intervals after that. He always took it with him when he travelled, and he never signed or dated it. The picture went with him when, towards the end of his life, he moved to France.</p> <p>It was sold to his last patron, King François I, and remained out of sight in the royal collection for almost 200 years. In 1799 Napoleon came across the painting and commandeered it for his bedroom. Only in 1804 did the Mona Lisa go on public display – in the newly founded Louvre Museum.</p> <p>At that time, it was not seen as particularly interesting, but in the middle of the 19th century Leonardo’s stock as an artist slowly rose. He came to be seen as the equal of the two acknowledged Renaissance greats, Michelangelo and Raphael. This new interest in Leonardo as a painter drew attention to his few known works.</p> <p><strong>Mona Lisa mystery #7: Was Mona Lisa unwell?</strong></p> <p>Mona Lisa has often been scrutinised by medical experts. In 2010, an Italian doctor looked at the swelling around her eyes and diagnosed excess cholesterol in her diet. Other conditions ascribed to her include facial paralysis, deafness, even syphilis.</p> <p>More happily, it has been suggested that the look of contentment on her face indicates she is pregnant. Dentists have also posited bruxism, compulsive grinding of the teeth; or that the line of her top lip suggests that her front teeth are missing – which, along with the faintest hint of a scar on her lip, raises the possibility that she was a victim of domestic violence.</p> <p>Jungians have seen her as an accomplished representation of the anima, the female archetype that resides in each one of us. It seems that almost any condition can be read into that puzzling face.</p> <p><em><sub>From Great Secrets of History © 2012. The Reader’s Digest Association, inc.</sub></em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on </em><em><a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/true-stories-lifestyle/entertainment/mysterious-mona-lisa">Reader’s Digest</a></em></p> <p><em>Images: Reader’s Digest</em></p> <p><em> </em></p>

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“It broke my heart”: Native Americans outbid to buy back their own sacred site

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Over 290 prehistoric Native American </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">glyphs that depict people, animals, and mythological figures adorn the walls of Picture Cave in eastern Missouri. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The cave has been deemed an “ultimate sacred site” by the Osage Nation, who were pushed out of the land as a consequence of the Indian Removal Act of 1830.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since the 1950s, the land has been owned by the extremely wealthy Busch family, who mostly used it as a hunting ground. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When the Busch family announced last year that they would be selling the cave, and the 43 acres of land surrounding it, the Osage Nation began a campaign to procure their land back. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They teamed up with the Conservation Fund, as well as Fish and Wildlife Services, on the account of endangered bats living in the cave. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Despite their mammoth efforts, the Osage Nation could not gather enough money to buy their sacred land back. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“[Picture Cave] is our ultimate sacred site,” says Andrea Hunter, a member of the Osage Nation and director of its Historic Preservation Office.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It was our land to begin with and we then had to resort to trying to buy it back. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“And we’ve got landowners who don’t understand the history of the place they live in and whose significance doesn’t amount to more than monetary value [for them].”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Busch family sold the land to an anonymous buyer for $2,200,000USD, just $200,000 more than the Osage Nation offered. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Watching it get to $2 million stopped my heart,” said Hunter. “It broke my heart.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hunter and her team are currently trying to contact the anonymous bidder from Nashville to explain the historical and cultural significance of the land. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So far, they have not been successful in their communications. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Youtube - Selkirk Auctioneers &amp; Appraisers</span></em></p>

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Art inspires the magic Rubik’s cube

<div> <div class="copy"> <p>The joy puzzle lovers derive from solving a good puzzle is matched only by the frustration felt by those of us who are not good solvers.</p> <p>2015 marked the 40th anniversary of the patenting of perhaps the greatest – and most difficult – puzzle of the 20th century, the Rubik’s Cube.</p> <p>In 1974, Ernő Rubik was living in Budapest and teaching design courses at the Academy of Applied Arts and Crafts.</p> <p>The cube’s beginnings are unclear, but some reports state a project given to his students inspired Rubik’s prototype which was then refined over about six weeks.</p> <p>He created a plastic cube with six different colours, one for each face, with each face divided into a 3×3 grid.</p> <p>The beauty of it was that each face could turn independently thanks to an internal mechanism of 21 parts moving on curved tracks.</p> <p>He had considered the cube to be primarily a work of art, until he scrambled the colours.</p> <p>Realising how difficult it was to restore each face to a single colour, Rubik discovered he’d created a puzzle.</p> <p>It took him more than a month to work out how to solve it.</p> <p>Initially, Rubik wasn’t even sure a solution was possible.</p> <p>Eventually he hit upon the idea all modern solutions are based upon – certain moves exist that will exchange pairs or triplets of edge or corner pieces without disturbing the remainder of the cube.</p> <p>This convinced him to go ahead with his marketing plans. In 1977 production began within Hungary.</p> <p>Puzzle crazes have periodically captivated the world since the early 1800s. The “Chinese Tangram” puzzle was wildly popular from about 1815 until the 1820s, with plastic sets still available.</p> <p>In 1880 the “15 Puzzle” was all the rage in Boston and eventually spread to Europe before fizzling out after about six months.</p> <p>Rubik played with the 15 puzzle as a child and says he was possibly inspired by it.</p> <p>More recently, Sudoku went from an obscure game to a multi-million dollar industry.</p> <p>But none of these puzzles captured the world’s attention like the Rubik’s Cube.</p> <p>Rubik’s original cube is at once elegant and fiendish.</p> <p>Rubik called it the “Magic Cube”.</p> <p>The first run of 5000 sold out in a few months.</p> <p>In 1978 the cube was a hit at the International Congress of Mathematicians and over the next several years won awards at European toy fairs.</p> <p>By 1980, the Ideal Toy company in the US was marketing the puzzle as “Rubik’s Cube”.</p> <p>It sold about 4.5 million by the year’s end.</p> <p>In 1981 numbers were approaching 80 million units worldwide.</p> <p>By the mid-1980s the craze had passed.</p> <p>The cube inspired follow-up puzzles such as the 4×4 “Rubik’s Revenge” and the 5×5 “Professor’s Cube”.</p> <p>These days, models of 6×6, 7×7 and even higher-order cubes can be found in puzzle stores.</p> <p>Computer simulations of cubes up to 100×100 are available online.</p> <p>Rubik’s original cube is at once elegant and fiendish.</p> <p>Puzzle expert Jerry Slocum says rotational cube puzzles are among the most difficult of all manipulative puzzles.</p> <p>On the standard 3×3 cube there are 43,252,003,274,489,856,000 possible arrangements.</p> <p>In 1978, while the cube was still an underground success, physicist Roger Penrose and mathematician John Conway were demonstrating solutions.</p> <p>Conway was said to be able to solve the cube in around four minutes without consulting notes.</p> <p>In 1979 David Singmaster offered a guide to the perplexed with his <em>Notes on the Magic Cube</em>.</p> <p>It led to a popular standardised notation for solving the cube which survives today.</p> <p>Up, Down, Front, Back, Left and Right faces are represented by U, D, F, B, L and R.</p> <p>A sequence to manoeuvre a corner piece into position might be written out as: R U R`.</p> <p>This corresponds to a clockwise twist of the right face, followed by a clockwise twist of the up face, and finally a counter-clockwise twist of the right face.</p> <p>The accent mark denotes a counter-clockwise twist.</p> <p>Although these solutions appear daunting, with a cube and instructions in hand most readers will be able to solve the puzzle in half an hour or so.</p> <p>Practice will soon get your times down to five to 10 minutes.</p> <p>Using such algorithms, competitors have reduced the solution time to under a minute.</p> <p>The world record is 5.55 seconds held by Mats Valk of the Netherlands.</p> <p>There are also blindfold and one-hand categories.</p> <p>Blindfold solving has the competitor examine the cube and memorise the solution before putting on the blindfold.</p> <p>The final time includes the examination period and the hands-on time.</p> <p>If you’re feeling like a challenge, the record is just over 23 seconds.</p> <p>Good luck.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article was originally published on <a rel="noopener" href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/science/mathematics/art-inspires-the-magic-rubiks-cube/" target="_blank">cosmosmagazine.com</a> and was written by Jason England. </em></p> </div> </div>

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Man strikes gold 1500 years old

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One lucky man in the town of Vindelev, Denmark, has stumbled upon a once in a lifetime discovery. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Using a metal detector, the man discovered a cache of 1,500-year-old gold objects, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">according to the Vejlemuseerne, the museum consortium in Vejle, Denmark.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The treasure trove was found in a small town 240km from the capital of Copenhagen, and offered up more than two pounds of gold. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It includes coins from the Roman Empire as well as medallions known as bracteates, which would have been sewn onto clothing and worn as ornamentation</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These newly discovered objects are expected to go on view at the Vejlemuseerne in February 2022.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Among the bracteates discovered in one inscribed with unique text that translates to “the High”, which may be a reference to a ruler at the time, or to the Norse god Odin. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">That medallion, along with all the other objects found, dates back to the 6th century C.E.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">It’s suspected that these pre-Viking objects may have been buried amid the ongoing threat of ecological devastation. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In the year 536, a volcano erupted in Denmark, creating a giant ash cloud and a subsequent famine in the country. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Experts believe that, amid the chaos, the inhabitants of modern-day Denmark rejected their rulers and parted ways with gold objects bearing these leaders’ images, either as a way of hiding the medallions from enemies or as a means of placating angry gods.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Archaeologists at the Vejlemuseerne are calculating the possibility that the town of Vindelev was the epicentre of a powerful empire during the Iron Age. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Before the discovery of the artifacts, “there was nothing that could make us predict that an unprecedented warlord or great man lived here, long before the kingdom of Denmark arose in the following centuries,” said Mads Ravn, a research director at the Vejlemuseerne, in a statement.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Vejlemuseerne</span></em></p>

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Iconic shredded Banksy artwork returns to auction

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In 2018, Banksy’s iconic </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Girl With a Balloon</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> artwork was sold for just over $1million at an auction in London. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Immediately after the auctioneer's hammer dropped and the sale went through, a shredder built into the frame destroyed half of the image. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Now, three years later, the damaged artwork is returning to auction with an estimated cost of roughly $6million with a new title of </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Love is in the Bin</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The artwork has been certified by Banksy’s authentication committee called Pest Control, and confirmed that the inflated price is due to the viral moment at the auction three years prior. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The elusive street artist has long denied any claims that the auction house in London was behind the stunt, as the winning bid for the work in 2018 decided to keep the shredded artwork in its new form. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Since winning the image, the image has gone on view at two museums in Germany, both boasting massive crowds coming to view the artwork. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a press release, Sotheby’s auction house likened the daring stunt to Robert Rauschenberg’s famed 1953 work, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Erased de Kooning</span><span style="font-weight: 400;">, as part of a tradition of destroying artworks as an artistic statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Alex Branczik, Sotheby’s senior director and chairman of modern and contemporary art, said, “Today this piece is considered heir to a venerated legacy of anti-establishment art that began with Dada and Marcel Duchamp more than a century ago.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Banksy shared an image of the artwork getting destroyed at the auction with the cheeky caption reading, “Going, going, gone…”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The destruction of the artwork in such a public setting made global headlines, with many art critics saying it was a social statement to the ownership of art. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Love is in the Bin</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> will go on public display at the same auction house where it was once destroyed, before travelling around the world and returning to London for sale. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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Fake Banksy print sold on the artist’s website for over $450,000

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A hacker has been forced to return over $450,000AUD to a British art collector after he tricked him into purchasing a fake Banksy print. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The NFT (non-fungible token) print was posted on Banksy’s official website, fooling many fans of the elusive street artist. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The auction of the print ended early after the art collector offered 90% of rival bidders. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Banksy’s team spoke to the </span><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/technology-58399338"><span style="font-weight: 400;">BBC</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> and assured art fans that, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">"any Banksy NFT auctions are not affiliated with the artist in any shape or form."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">NFT’s are a relatively new phenomenon in the art world, which show artworks that can be “tokenised” to create a digital certificate of ownership that can be bought and sold. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They often don’t give the buyer the actual artwork of copyright, but are seen as more of an investment. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The man who got duped by the site believed he was buying Banksy’s first ever NFT. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The man, who wished to remain anonymous, explained over Twitter that he suspected Banksy’s official site was hacked and that he was the victim of an elaborate scam. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The hacker returned all the money, with the exception of $9,000AUD transaction fee once he was caught out. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The prominent NFT collector used the online name Pranksy, and said the whole experience was bizarre but that the hacker may have got scared.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The refund was totally unexpected, I think the press coverage of the hack plus the fact that I had found the hacker and followed him on Twitter may have pushed him into a refund. “</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I feel very lucky when a lot of others in a similar situation with less reach would not have had the same outcome," he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The NFT was called Great Distribution of the Climate Change Disaster, and is not linked to the famous street artist.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Banksy</span></em></p>

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Four artists explain how science informs and inspires their work

<p>“The greatest scientists are artists as well,” said Albert Einstein. For as long as artistic expression has existed, it has benefited from interplay with scientific principles – be it experimentation with new materials or the discovery of techniques to render different perspectives. Likewise, art has long contributed to the work and communication of science.</p> <p>We asked four outstanding artists to comment on their work and its relationship to science. “Science is my muse,” replied Xavier Cortada, who marked the discovery of the ‘God particle’ with a set of triumphal banners. The same can be said for the other three: Suzanne Anker renders small worlds in petri dishes, Lia Halloran explores serendipity in science, and Daniel Zeller translates images from alien realms in his own artistic language.</p> <p>Credit: Raul Valverde</p> <p><strong>Suzanne Anker</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 496px; height: 496px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843784/art-suzanne-anker-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b5d9c04404f441f7a95f03be92b1a842" /></p> <p>Employed as a container for working with fungi, bacteria and even embryos, the glass dish named after bacteriologist Jules Petri is not only a fundamental of laboratory research: it has become a cultural icon.</p> <p>In my Remote Sensing series I use the Petri dish to juxtapose microscopic and macroscopic worlds. The title refers to new digital technologies that can picture places too toxic or inaccessible to visit.</p> <p>The fabrication of this piece began with 2D digital photographs, which were then converted into 3D virtual models. This petri dish with its luxuriant growth emerged from the 3D printer.</p> <p>These micro-landscapes offer the viewer a top-down topographic effect assembled by zeros and ones. Each configuration of these works takes the geometry of a circle, inspired by the Petri dish, and crosses the divide between the disciplines of art and science.</p> <p>The ‘bio art’ of Suzanne Anker explores the intersection of art and the biological sciences. Based in New York, Anker works in a variety of traditional and experimental mediums ranging from digital sculpture and installation to large-scale photography and plants grown under LED lights. Her work has been exhibited at the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, the Pera Museum in Istanbul, and the International Biennial of Contemporary Art of Cartagena de Indias, Colombia. Anker is co-author of The Molecular Gaze: Art in the Genetic Age (2004) and co-editor of Visual Culture and Bioscience (2008). </p> <p><a href="http://www.suzanneanker.com">www.suzanneanker.com</a></p> <p>Credit: Lia Halloran</p> <p><strong>Lia Halloran</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 500px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843785/art-lia-halloran-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b408465517604d788b927db09d523746" /></p> <p>The 18th-century French astronomer Charles Messier set his telescopic sights on the grand prize of finding a lonely, wandering comet. He ended up amassing an astronomical inventory filled with galaxies, clusters and nebulae. A catalogue of 110 objects is credited to his journals and drawings.</p> <p>Deep Sky Companion is a series of 110 pairs of paintings and photographs of night sky objects drawn from the Messier catalogue.</p> <p>These works are about discovery and all the things we find when we are not seeking them. It relates to my own challenging first stabs at observing the night sky. In college I was given a small Celestron telescope for Christmas. Observing the Orion Nebula and nearby galaxies seemed to create a fold in time between Messier and myself.</p> <p>I would imagine his sessions observing through his telescope and the drawings he made to classify the natural world and make sense of the unknown above him.</p> <p>Each painting in the Deep Sky Companion series was created in ink on semi-transparent paper, which was then used as a negative to create the positive photographic equivalent using standard black-and-white darkroom printing. This process connects to the historical drawings by Messier, here redrawn and then turned back into positives through a photographic process mimicking early glass-plate astrophotography.</p> <p>Lia Halloran is an artist and academic based in Los Angeles. At Chapman University, in California’s Orange County, she teaches painting as well as courses that explore the intersection of art and science. Her art often makes use of scientific concepts and explores how perception, time and scale inform the human desire to understand the world, and our emotional and psychological place within it. She has held solo exhibitions in New York, Miami, Boston, Los Angeles, London, Vienna and Florence. Her work is held in public collections that include the Guggenheim in New York. </p> <p><a href="http://www.liahalloran.com">www.liahalloran.com</a></p> <p>Credit: Courtesy NASA Art Program</p> <p><strong>Daniel Zeller</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 440px; height: 440px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843786/art-daniel-zeller-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0f926a1a4fbf4b3ba0ca9804420ba3a8" /></p> <p>I was very grateful to have the Cassini mission as a launching point for this drawing. (Cassini’s 20-year mission ended in September 2017 when it crashed into Saturn.) There are obvious reasons Titan is so appealing: Saturn’s largest moon has an atmosphere, deserts and seas – it is an alien world with some characteristics we can relate to.</p> <p>The probe generated so much fascinating source material it was difficult to choose any single viewpoint, but there was something particularly intriguing about the image of Titan I finally settled on. Greyscale imagery naturally lends itself to broad interpretation, and the radar-mapping method suited my curiosity and my process; it seems to relay its subject as somehow simultaneously familiar and completely alien. Titan’s surface became a scaffold on which I could build and explore. The relative ambiguity of the source image allowed me wide latitude to interpret the moon as a stand-in for any not-yet-discovered world or landscape, while still allowing it to be grounded in the recognisable projection of topography.</p> <p>The Cassini mission was a truly amazing foray into the unknown. We are greatly enriched by the knowledge it collected. My work is but a humble homage to our immediate neighbourhood – once so far away and now a little bit closer – and to what is yet to be discovered on many frontiers.</p> <p>Daniel Zeller is an illustrator and painter based in New York. His work, inspired by informative images and maps forged by scientific inquiry, resembles microscopic views of intricate cellular structures and macroscopic perspectives of satellite panoramas. He seeks to push the compositional boundaries of a limited range of media, working with ink, acrylic and graphite on paper. His works are part of permanent collections including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington DC, the Princeton University Art Museum and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.</p> <p><a href="http://www.danielzeller.net">www.danielzeller.net</a></p> <p>Credit: Xavier Cortada</p> <p><strong>Xavier Cortada</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843787/art-xavier-cortada-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c474b72dabb844aaa577417a1c590450" /><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.0402684563758px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843787/art-xavier-cortada-um.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/c474b72dabb844aaa577417a1c590450" /></p> <p>In 2013 I was invited to see the planet’s largest science experiment at the CERN Laboratory in Geneva. My art wound up honouring the Nobel Prize-winning discovery of the Higgs boson, the particle that imbues all the others with mass. Five banners depict the five experiments used to make the discovery.</p> <p>Identifying the Higgs required the most complex machine humans have ever built, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The particle accelerator shoots protons at almost the speed of light along a 27 km tunnel. Every second 40 million protons collide with one another. These high-energy collisions make new particles and new mass.</p> <p>The LHC’s detectors did not directly measure the Higgs.</p> <p>They measured the paths taken by the photons, quarks and electrons created in the collisions. The curvature of the paths  revealed the charge and momentum of the particles, and the size of the signal their energy. The data told scientists there was another particle – the Higgs boson – produced in the collisions.</p> <p>Let me tell you why these experiments were so important. When physicists first came up with the Standard Model of physics, a theory to describe the forces and particles of nature, they couldn’t figure out how to give those particles mass.</p> <p>This was quite a problem, because particles with no mass would move at the speed of light and be unable to slow down enough to form atoms. Without atoms the universe would be very different.</p> <p>In the 1960s British physicist Peter Higgs and others independently came up with a theory to solve that problem. Just as marine creatures move in water, all particles in the universe move in a fundamental energy field – now commonly known as the Higgs field. As particles travel through the field, their intrinsic properties generate more or less mass – much as the properties of an animal create different degrees of drag as it moves through water.  Think of a barracuda and a manatee. The sleeker barracuda is going to move faster.</p> <p>Mathematically, the theory required the existence of a particle representing the ‘excited state’ of the field. This new particle – dubbed the Higgs boson – would be to the Higgs field what photons are to the electromagnetic field. Finding the particle involved scientists from 182 universities and institutes in 42 countries. On 4 July 2012, half a century after it was first postulated, CERN scientists announced its discovery.</p> <p>The detection itself was intricate and multilayered, and so were the artworks I created. Stained glass references the LHC as a modern-day cathedral that helps us understand the universe and shape our new world view. The oil painting technique honours those who came before us, the repetition of motifs across the five works celebrates internationalism, and rendering the work as ‘banners’ marks this as a monumental event.</p> <p>Most importantly, the background for the banners honours the scientific collaboration. It is composed of words from the pages of 383 joint publications and the names of more than 4,000 scientists, engineers and technicians. With this piece I wanted to create art from the very words, charts, graphs and ideas of this coalition of thinkers.</p> <p>It was a supremely important moment for humanity. I wanted the art to mark that event at the exact location where the experiment took place. These five banners hang at the exact location of the LHC, where the Higgs boson was discovered. That is where a scientific theory crystallised into a proven truth.</p> <p>It is my hope these banners will inspire future generations of physicists to continue to move humanity forward.</p> <p>Xavier Cortada is a painter based in Miami, Florida. His art regularly involves collaboration with scientists. As well as his art installation for CERN, he has worked with a population geneticist on a project exploring our ancestral journey out of Africa 60,000 years ago, with a molecular biologist to synthesise DNA from participants visiting his museum exhibit, and with botanists on eco-art projects. He estimates his installation at the South Pole using a moving ice sheet as an instrument to mark time will be completed in 150,000 years.</p> <p><a href="http://www.cortada.com">www.cortada.com</a></p> <p><strong>Related reading:</strong></p> <ul> <li><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/society/when-arts-and-science-collide/">When arts and science collide</a></li> <li><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/biology/how-eye-disorders-may-have-influenced-the-work-of-famous-painters/">Eye disorders influence famous painters</a></li> <li><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/sciences-war-on-art-fraud/?hilite=%27artist%27">Science’s war on art fraud</a></li> </ul> <p><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/people/society/four-artists-influenced-by-science/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/cosmos-editors">Cosmos</a>. </p> <p> </p>

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Five Australian flag designs kick off hot debate

<p>A TikTok user has reignited the passionate debate over the design of the Australian flag. </p> <p>Jack Toohey, who shares videos as @fleetwood_jack, posted a clip that showcased five alternate designs that have been offered up in recent years as an alternative to the current flag. </p> <p>He shares images of each flag's design, as well as details on what they represent and who came up with them originally. </p> <p>The current Australian flag features <span>the Union Jack, the Commonwealth Star and the Southern Cross.</span></p> <p>However, there have been many calls over the years to include First Nation Australians and Indigenous elements to the country's flag. </p> <p>The five designs Jack shares in his video are <span>The Reconciliation Flag, the Down Under Flag, the Sunburnt Flag, the Golden Wattle flag and John Joseph’s Untitled Flag.</span></p> <p>The Reconciliation Flag was designed in 2013 by John Blaxland and incorporates the Southern Cross and a seven-point Commonwealth <span>Star with dots representing 150 Indigenous and migrant languages spoken in Australia.</span></p> <p>This design is the closest to the current flag, but also acknowledges Indigenous Australians, with a red boomerang being pictured in a fragment of the Union Jack. </p> <p>The Down Under Flag was designed in 1986 by <span>Friedensrich Hundertwasser and features a red semi-circle on top of a blue background with the seven-point Commonwealth star. </span></p> <p><span>It is meant to represent Uluru upside down - a play of the notion of a “land down under.”</span></p> <p><span>The Untitled Flag was created in 2006 by John Jospeh, and replaces the Union Jack with a circular Indigenous painting. </span></p> <p><span>The Sunburnt Flag was designed in 1988 by Stephen Berry and takes inspiration from the famous Dorothea McKellar poem “My Country,” which contains the phrase, “I love a sunburnt country, a land of sweeping plains ...”</span></p> <p><span>The design features a red base and yellow sunrise, as seen on the current Aboriginal flag, as well as a blue sky and the Southern Cross. </span></p> <p><span>The Golden Wattle flag was designed in 2015 by Jeremy Matthews, and draws inspiration from the country's native flower. </span></p> <p><span>The seven points of the Commonwealth Star in the middle of the wattle point refer to the individual states and territories that make up Australia.</span></p> <p><span>While some of Jack Toohey's TikTok followers thought our current flag was just fine, most commenters agreed it was time for a change that included representation for </span>Indigenous Australians. </p> <p><span>Many felt that a modern Australian flag should reference both Indigenous history and culture, and reference to Australia’s colonial history.</span></p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock/TikTok @fleetwood_jack</em></p>

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6 colours you shouldn’t have in your bedroom

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A bedroom is a sanctuary where we can be our most authentic selves. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Most people want the colours of their bedroom to feel intimate and to reflect who they truly are, but at the same time, a bedroom should feel cosy and provide the best night’s sleep. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Believe it or not, colour choices in your bedroom can largely affect how calm you feel and how well you rest in the evenings. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to experts, keep these colours out of the bedroom.</span></p> <p><strong>Black</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Besides just darkening a room, a colour such as black will create an illusion that a room looks smaller than it actually is. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">While the darkness may aid in falling asleep at night, it will consequently inhibit your ability to get up in the morning, as well as psychologically decreasing your energy. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I suggest avoiding painting all four walls top to bottom and instead getting creative with paint placement and choosing a feature wall or leaving the trims out etc,” said Home Décor Designer, Shani Moran.</span></p> <p><strong>Neon</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“You should always avoid using neon colours such as electric lime and magenta as they bring excitement and energy into the bedroom,” explained property developer Shad Elia. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The vibrance will create a space that makes it more challenging to wind down, which is the whole purpose of a bedroom. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instead, Elia recommends using lighter shades of grey and beige, as “these colours are warm and help the body relax when it comes time to sleeping.”</span></p> <p><strong>Yellow</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Yellow is a highly stimulating colour as we mostly associate the brightness with the sun and mornings, a time when we are most alert. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“While the cheerful tone may be great for daytime, those who opt for a lemon-hued room are more likely to experience difficulty falling asleep at night,” claimed Kimberly Smith, a property marketing manager.</span></p> <p><strong>Red</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Like yellow, red is a striking colour.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"> While bold colours, particularly warm-toned reds and bright pinks, can look stylish, they can also evoke feelings of unrest or agitation. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“These colours are often used in marketing as they stimulate the senses, and this is not something you want when trying to fall asleep,” explained Karin Sun, founder of a luxury bedding brand. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These colours are better suited for places that encourage activity, like a gym, or a warmth, like a family room.</span></p> <p><strong>Orange</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“In the early days of our marriage, my wife and I thought it would be a good idea to paint our bedroom orange,” said Daniel Carter, founder of an online business. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Not the bright, saturated shade you’d normally see on the fruit of the same name, but a lighter hue. We then added green and purple accents. It looked cool and eclectic.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“We loved how it turned out until we actually had to go to sleep. The room still looked bright even when we only had a night lamp on, so we had to pull the shades down and have all the lights switched off come bedtime, not always an ideal situation.” </span></p> <p><strong>Dark brown</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The darkness of the colour provides a sense of heaviness and gloom, which may decrease the motivation of waking up in the morning. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“However, if your heart is set on painting your bedroom walls with a colour that is deemed not wise, you can opt for their muted counterparts instead, or use them as an accent colour, instead of the main colour,” explained realtor Tal Shelef.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">This article first appeared in </span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/home-tips/6-colours-you-shouldnt-have-in-your-bedroom" target="_blank"><em>Reader’s Digest</em></a>.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Shutterstock</span></em></p>

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Meet the British man making art out of discarded face masks

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A British man is making the most out of the pandemic by making unique art in his backyard. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nottingham native Thomas Yates, 45, was made redundant from a brewery at the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After working there for five years, he found himself with an abundance of extra time. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Tom decided to take to the streets and use his working hours to clean the streets of discarded litter. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">On his travels in his local area, he noticed he was collecting a lot of abandoned face masks and decided to make art out of them in his own backyard. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After he creates his artworks, he collects all of the rubbish and sends it off to be properly recycled. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His images of unusual art have attracted hundreds of followers on social media, as his artworks only continue to grow. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I have questioned myself. Why am I making art out of litter? And then when you see the end results, I think they're quite good," he said to the BBC.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A spokesperson for his local council area applauded his efforts of cleaning the streets. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The council spokesperson said, </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">"We would like to thank Thomas for his excellent work and all the many volunteers who already litter pick in their local communities regularly and help keep our streets, parks and open spaces even tidier."</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Instagram @averagegradient</span></em></p>

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Banksy goes on a mural-making spree in England

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The elusive street artist Banksy has been producing works in secret along the east coast of England.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His latest project, the Great British Spraycation, has seen a series of his murals pop up throughout the country displaying his signature style.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The anonymous artist took to his Instagram to share news of his project, focusing on his travels in a campervan.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CShWMUwFKkI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CShWMUwFKkI/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Banksy (@banksy)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The first of the murals, featuring a couple dancing on top of a bus shelter and a man playing an accordion, was spotted in Norfolk by eagle-eyed fans.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The second artwork shows an arcade toy-grabber crane that appeared in a small town just 10 minutes away from the first mural. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">More artworks, one depicting a child building a sandcastle with a crowbar, the other featuring three children in a boat, soon arrived in the neighbouring county of Suffolk. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In an unusual move for the artist, Banksy also left a miniature thatched stable bearing his signature at the Merrivale Model Village.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">His short film posted to Instagram brought attention to his more wholesome artworks, such as an ice cream cone and tongue added to a statue of Frederick Savage, a 19th century mayor of King’s Lynn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One critical passerby is captured in the video, calling one of his mural’s “mindless vandalism”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of his artworks from the Great British Spraycation, which depicted two children on an inflatable dinghy, has already been removed by local authorities, claiming it was distasteful.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Council members in the town of Great Yarmouth told the BBC that the artwork was covered up amid “sensitivity” to a young girl who died after being flung from an inflatable trampoline on a nearby beach in 2018. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Getty Images</span></em></p>

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Unveiling the world’s first underwater art sculpture park

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The world’s first underwater sculpture park has been unveiled off the coast of Cyprus. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The sunken forest by the Museum of Underwater Sculpture in Cyprus (MUSAN) was created by Jason deCaires Taylor, and cost roughly $1.6million to bring to life.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The incredible park is made up of 93 sculptures: some of which weigh up to 13 tonnes. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With his newest installation, Jason aims to put the spotlight on "rewilding our natural spaces" and "reforesting areas of barren habitat" through the complicated relationship between people and nature. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jason spoke with CNN Travel, and said the installation was inspired by issues the world is currently facing. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"I tried to incorporate as many references to climate change and habitat loss and pollution as I could, because those are really the defining issues of our era."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He said, "I'm kind of hoping that it leaves the visitor with a sense of hope along with a sense that the human impact isn't always negative. That we can reverse some of the things we've done.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Each of the sculptures was lowered below the surface by cranes, and were placed at such a depth so that the areas may be “enriched” over time by their presence. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">MUSAN is accessible to divers and snorkellers, and Jason hopes that it will bring more visitors to the marine protected area of Cyprus, which he describes as having "some of the best visibility I've ever been in."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jason is currently working on new installations for Australia's Museum of Underwater Art in Townsville, and northern Queensland on the Great Barrier Reef, which has lost half of its corals over the past two decades.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Instagram @jasondecairestaylor</span></em></p>

Art

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Why a gazebo railing in Naples has gone viral

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A photo of an unsuspecting hand railing in Naples, Italy, has gone viral for a very unexpected reason. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The railing sits on top of a hill that is connected to the popular tourist destination St Elmo’s castle. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Each year, thousands of people trek up the stairs to observe the picturesque view from the top that overlooks the Tyrrhenian sea and Italy’s Mount Vesuvius. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">However, instead of the view catching a Twitter user's attention, it was the detailed hand railing. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 92-foot-long piece of steel is etched with braille, describing the stunning view for the blind. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The unique railing was installed in 2015 by artist Paolo Puddu and is titled “Follow the Shape”, which has been a permanent fixture of the castle ever since. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Blind visitors are encouraged to run their hands along the railing to read verses from The Land and The Man: a poetry series from Italian author Giuseppe de Lorenzo. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The inscription is carved in both Italian and English, as tourists are prompted to imagine the stunning view in front of them. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Twitter user, Rob N Roll, shared the image online, which welcomed a flood of messages praising the unique art installation. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">He captioned his image, “This railing on a gazebo in Naples has braille describing the view for blind people. More of this please.”</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Twitter - Rob N Roll</span></em></p>

Art

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How Dubai is building an art collection without buying any art

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In recent years, Dubai has established a vibrant and unique local arts scene due to their position between Africa, Asia and Europe. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These global cultural influences have seen a boom in the local artists showcasing their works in private galleries all through the capital of the UAE. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Due to this increase of the art scene, the </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dubai government is building its first institutional art collection from scratch with a very unique twist. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Instead of purchasing art for the collections, Dubai will be borrowing pieces to showcase.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The initiative was </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">developed by Dubai Culture &amp; Arts Authority and Art Dubai and will boast a unique digital museum that can be enjoyed by all, as well as annual physical exhibitions of carefully curated works. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">National art collections and museums were made popular during the 19th century in Europe and are typically built over a long period of time, but Dubai’s initiative aims to fast-track the process. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The idea behind the initiative is to promote a collective culture and create a canon of art history that has not been available in the Middle East.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A spokesperson for Art Dubai said this idea is the first of its kind, and is happy to rely on government funding to boost the arts industry. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Contributors are invited to lend their works to the Dubai Collection for a period of 10 years, while remaining legal owners of their pieces."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So far, 87 works have been commissioned during the first curation process: most of them by Emirati artists or artists from the wider Arabic world.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Part of the Dubai Collection initiative is a digital museum, which will allow more people to see the art, and will include educational materials.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This easily accessible digital museum will encourage art lovers to engage with a collection of international pieces, with the aim of highlighting emerging artists and their important stories. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Shutterstock</span></em></p>

Art

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Nine-year-old competition winner will have her art displayed in the White House

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A talented nine-year-old girl has won a coveted prize with her original drawing that holds an aspirational message. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gabrielle Faisal from Detroit </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">entered a White House student art competition with a drawing inspired by African-American history, and won against over 500 competitors. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The artwork, titled Enslaved African Americans Built the White House, features two Black hands bound in shackles holding up the White House with an American flag in the background. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The young artist explained the meaning behind her artwork to Fox 2 News Detroit, explaining its historical significance. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The white stripes represent the purity of the struggle,” Gabrielle said. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The blue means justice and the white stars represent the unity for all people.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The organisers of the White House History Association’s National Student Art Competition were on the lookout for creativity, depth and historical relevance from the hundred of entrants. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rashid, Gabrielle’s father, said his daughter’s choice of art came naturally as she was inspired by things she had learned about African-American culture and history.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I have a home library which is filled with books on African-American history, Blacks who were part of building the White House.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“So for her, when it came to time to do art, it was just organic for her,” he said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As well as winning first place in her age bracket, Gabrielle also won a $1,000 cash prize and a trip to Washington, D.C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Her painting will be displayed in the White House visitor centre until September 22nd. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credits: Shutterstock/Instagram</span></em></p>

Art

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An Italian museum’s innovative way of tracking viewer interactions

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Art researchers in Italy have discovered a new way to help more accurately curate popular museum exhibitions. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Working with the Italian national agency for new technologies, the Istituzione Bologna Musei in Bologna has installed 14 small cameras that use artificial intelligence (AI) to study the reactions of viewers. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The cameras pick up facial expressions, posture and positioning of those who pass through the gallery on a daily basis. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The data collected by these cameras is then used to draw broader conclusions about future exhibits and specific artworks. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Researcher Riccardo Scipinotti came up with the initiative, referred to as ShareArt, to record how long visitors look at art, the paths they take through galleries, where their eyes are drawn to on particular canvases.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">All of these factors make up each piece of art’s “attraction value”, as well as analysing which exhibits are the most popular. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The ShareArt technology has the potential to revolutionise the museum and art world, as the data shared from the AI could determine placement of certain works in a gallery, how works are lit or hung, or how works are displayed in relation to one another.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The team of researchers began to roll out ShareArt in early July as COVID-19 restrictions were lifted in Italy, and has already started to yield interesting results. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The technology is also fitted to detect if museum-goers are flouting making-wearing rules.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The AI device is programmed to flash red if a visitor is wearing their mask incorrectly, or not wearing one at all. </span></p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em><br /><br /></p>

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