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How Frozen II helps children weather risk and accept change

<p>Disney’s <em>Frozen</em> has been a staple in my house since before it won an <a href="https://www.huffpost.com/entry/frozen-oscars_n_4887295">Academy Award for best animated feature in 2014</a>. Before my girls could even talk, they were humming along to the famous “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V-zXT5bIBM0">Do You Want to Build a Snowman</a>?” song.</p> <p><a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2294629/plotsummary"><em>Frozen</em></a> is about a fearless princess named Anna who journeys to find her sister, Elsa, whose icy powers have trapped their kingdom in eternal winter. Anna’s quest to save the kingdom comes to an abrupt halt when she is frozen in a heroic act to save Elsa from being killed by Hans, who wants to take over the kingdom.</p> <p>Now, <em>Frozen II</em> has broken box office records <a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/frozen-2-box-office-all-records-broken-1257703">for an animated film global opening</a> — and I’m not surprised. As a mom, I love that Anna and Elsa’s love for one another teaches my daughters to love each other and to take care of one another. And as an early childhood professional, I appreciate how the film <a href="https://www.tor.com/2016/06/23/fairy-tale-subversion-hans-christian-andersens-the-snow-queen/">reinterprets</a> and <a href="https://www.bustle.com/articles/38101-how-is-frozen-different-from-the-snow-queen-by-hans-christian-andersen-theyre-an-icy-world">retells</a> <a href="http://hdl.handle.net/2027/spo.act2080.0047.311">fairy tales</a> and myths to share powerful lessons about coping with change and taking risks.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eIw-dKqTtY0?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="caption">‘Frozen II’ trailer.</span></p> <h2>Lesson 1: Life is full of change</h2> <p><em>Frozen II</em> begins with Elsa and Anna’s quest to discover the truth about their kingdom’s past, and Elsa’s gradual discovery that her charged and sometimes dangerous magical powers have deep origins. Anna, meanwhile, seeks to hold onto the sisters’ powerful bond while finding her own identity.</p> <p>Olaf the snowman returns in this movie after being brought to life by Elsa in <em>Frozen</em>. No longer trapped in a perpetual ice world, the characters celebrate autumn. Olaf tells Anna about the difficulties he’s having. He observes changes in the season and anticipates change in the family with Anna and Kristoff’s engagement. He worries that “nothing is permanent.”</p> <p>Life is full of change. Children are constantly learning and growing, and are therefore experiencing large amounts of <a href="https://www.early-education.org.uk/sites/default/files/Helping%20children%20cope%20with%20change.pdf">change and transition each day</a>.</p> <p>Change can include simple things like a change in season, or an unfamiliar food served at lunch. But changes like moving schools, parents divorcing or a death in the family can have <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/jftr.12243">profound effects on children</a>. Some children <a href="https://books.google.ca/books?id=30dIGIyRGf0C&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=how+children+adjust+to+change&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=0ahUKEwi0npXpj4bmAhUCnOAKHYz3AzIQ6AEIMDAB#v=onepage&amp;q&amp;f=false">can adjust</a> easily to changes, but for many children, change is scary.</p> <p>Children who have a <a href="https://www.easternflorida.edu/community-resources/child-development-centers/parent-resource-library/documents/parenting-the-slow-to-warm-temperament.pdf">slow-to-warm-up temperament</a> may struggle with change more than easygoing children. Children who have difficulty with trust may experience change as traumatic. For children <a href="https://raisingchildren.net.au/autism/behaviour/understanding-behaviour/changing-routines-asd">on the autism spectrum</a>, change, especially if it alters their predetermined structure, can be especially difficult.</p> <h2>How to assure children</h2> <p>Through Olaf’s discussion with Anna, he comes to understand that “growing up means adapting, puzzling at your world and your place.”</p> <p>In the face of Olaf’s sadness and unease about the unknown, Anna assures Olaf that it’s important to rely on the certainties: “Yes, the wind blows a little bit colder, and we’re all getting older,” but “some things stay the same.”</p> <p>She reassures him that as things change, there will always be people in your life who will support you.</p> <p><a href="https://link.springer.com/book/10.1007%2F978-1-4614-3661-4">Resilience is important for learning</a>, relationships and being able to handle difficult situations. Coping with change is a part of <a href="https://eric.ed.gov/?id=ED386327">building resilience</a> and an essential skill for future success.</p> <p>You can help children adapt to change by talking about it. Have discussions about what’s changing and why. If the change is unexpected, share with them only what you know about the change. It’s OK to tell children: “I don’t know.”</p> <p>Have <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/02739615.2012.657040">routines</a> and consider transitions. When children know what comes first, then next and can predict some of what will happen, they are learning to think through situations and solve problems. Both these skills are important when managing the emotions that come with change.</p> <p>Accept <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/07481187.2012.718037">children’s grief</a> through change, especially during significant situations like the death of a loved one or a divorce. It’s important to listen to their feelings and respond to their questions and worries.</p> <p>Give them choices and let them be a part of the change — this allows them to feel like they have control. With control comes acceptance. For example, if you’re moving to a new home, let your child help pick out the paint colours.</p> <h2>Lesson 2: Taking risks</h2> <p>Elsa and Anna’s comfort zone was their kingdom, Arendelle. As they embark on their journey into the enchanted forest to discover their family’s history, Olaf reminds us <a href="https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/203434/the-uses-of-enchantment-by-bruno-bettelheim/">that the enchanted forest</a> — where we step outside of our comfort zones while looking to trusted guides or companions — is a place of transformation.</p> <p>It’s important to take risks throughout life, but the uncertainty of taking risks can be scary. There is a feeling of unease associated with not knowing the outcome, as well as fear of potential failure.</p> <p>Elsa depicts this fear in her musical response to the enchanted forests’ calling for her. She sings:</p> <blockquote> <p>“I can hear you, but I won’t … There’s a thousand reasons I should go about my day and ignore your whispers, which I wish would go away.”</p> </blockquote> <p>Elsa takes a leap of faith, plunges into the unknown and finally embarks on an adventure to discover hidden truths. She finds a place where she can be herself, without fear of harming anything with her powers.</p> <p>Anna, meanwhile, becomes queen of Arendelle, a place where she no longer lives in her sister’s shadow — where she can shine.</p> <h2>How to support children’s risk taking</h2> <p>It’s important to allow children to participate in <a href="https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/12/6/6423/htm">risky play</a>. Risky play teaches children to regulate <a href="https://eric.ed.gov/?id=EJ985542">fear and anger</a>. They learn to manage and overcome obstacles.</p> <p>Sometimes the outcome of risk-taking in both childhood and adulthood is failure. <a href="https://thriveglobal.com/stories/why-it-s-important-to-let-your-kid-fail/">Failure</a>, as difficult as it is, is an important part of life and necessary for children to learn for future success. We should help our children to see failure as a stepping stone to discovering who they are.</p> <p>The forest howls and it’s scary. But with love and friendship, and having the courage to step into the unknown, in time princesses become queens, dangerous powers can become gifts — and snowmen can cope with autumn.<!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Elena Merenda, Assistant Program Head of Early Childhood Studies, University of Guelph-Humber</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/frozen-ii-helps-children-weather-risk-and-accept-change-127845" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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What is Scarlett Johansson’s best movie performance?

<p>As one of the biggest names in Hollywood today, Scarlett Johansson isn’t one to be missed. She is the world’s top-paid actress with <span><a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2019/02/22/the-worlds-highest-paid-actors-and-actresses.html">US$40.5 million in earnings</a></span>, and – despite the controversy surrounding <span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/mar/24/scarlett-johansson-ghost-in-the-shell-director-whitewashing">her casting in <em>Ghost in the Shell</em></a></span> and her support for <span><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/sep/04/scarlett-johansson-defends-woody-allen">accused sexual abuser Woody Allen</a></span> – she is set to get her first Oscar nomination next year for her work in <em>Marriage Story </em>and <em>Jojo Rabbit</em>.</p> <p>In recognition of Johansson’s successful year, <em>Vulture </em>has listed some of the 35-year-old’s best performances.</p> <p>The number one spot went to the 2013 science fiction flick <em>Under the Skin</em>, where Johansson played an extraterrestrial disguised as a human woman. While the movie did not perform well in the box office, it received critical acclaim and was named as one of the BBC’s 100 Greatest Films of the 21st Century.</p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/7S1yhSp5jaI"></iframe></div> <p>“Earlier in her career, she was magnetic or sarcastic or the simple object of a man’s affection,” wrote Tim Grierson and Will Leitch. “In <em>Under the Skin</em>, she sheds all need to connect to an audience, giving us a menacing figure who’s brutally efficient but emotionally vacant.”</p> <p>Other movies making the top five include Sofia Coppola’s <em>Lost in Translation </em>(2003), Spike Jonze’s <em>Her </em>(2013) and Terry Zwigoff’s <em>Ghost World </em>(2001).</p> <p>“What’s abundantly clear is that, at the age of 35, Johansson already boasts a sizable treasure trove of standout performances,” wrote Grierson and Leitch.</p> <p>See the full list <a href="https://www.vulture.com/article/best-scarlett-johansson-movies-ranked.html">here</a>.</p>

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What is there to love about black and white films? Everything!

<p>Any photography app worth its hashtags features a black and white mode. It’s as much a part of the tech shebang as filters. In this hypersaturated mega mega-pixeled era, it seems we just can’t get away from the eternal beauty that is black, white and the grayscale between. It is simultaneously austere and flattering. Totes arty as the millennials might say.</p> <p>Many of us, of course, can remember when black and white wasn’t a choice. Like national service, short back and sides and the poetry of John Laws, it was pretty much mandatory. Especially if you wanted to catch the latest goings on at <em>Number 96</em>.</p> <p>But where the format really shone was film. Every few years, some hip director who is inordinately fond of the word “zeitgeist” rediscovers the sheer monochromatic magnificence of the medium. And we get titles such as <em>The Artist</em> and <em>Nebraska</em> as a result.</p> <p>But you know what? The rest of them can keep their CGI and digital cameras that can pick up every pore on Angelina Jolie’s nose.</p> <p>Black and white gave generations of screen goddesses the ethereal allure necessary for the title. It flattered and cajoled like a teenage boy working up to ask the prettiest girl in school to the prom.</p> <p>Twelve-feet tall and in a flickering beam, Ava, Marilyn, Joan and Bette didn’t look like people you saw on the streets of Adelaide or Melbourne. And that was precisely the point. Call me a misty-eyed nostalgic but I prefer my Katharine as a Hepburn not a Heigl and Bacall over Beyonce.</p> <p>Lest you write this reminiscence off as a priapic stroll down mammary lane, let’s get to the likes of Cary and Cagney. Black and white was ideal for portraying men who saw the world in precisely these terms. Enigmas in dinner jackets with flinty faces, and hearts that would never be broken again. Even if it meant a lifetime of last drinks and loneliness.</p> <p>If this all sounds rather romantic, no apologies are made. That was the point. Because when you stepped out into the Technicolour sunshine of Australian daylight, you blinked to not only accustomise your eyes to the light but the fact that you were no longer beside Charles Foster Kane’s bed as he breathed his enigmatic last.</p> <p>Of course, the technology exists to colourise pretty much any film you care to mention but this Pantone migration has not taken place. Want to know why? No one wants to see the hues of Rick’s Café Americain, let alone its proprietor. It’s better than fine as is.</p> <p>From a craft perspective, the filmmakers simply did not have the luxury of a rainbow to create a sense of foreboding or fantasy. What they had at their disposal was light and shadow, perspective and dimension. Not to mention the European expressionist grounding that gave rise to an American artform as idiosyncratic as jazz: film noir.</p> <p>Aesthetics aside, black and white films also throw down a visual challenge to the viewer; they make you recalibrate the image and subliminally add the colour yourself.</p> <p>Or not. You have the option.</p> <p>It is as much a cinema of inference as exposition. Take the shower scene in <em>Psycho</em> as an example. Do you think the infamous shot of Janet Leigh’s blood gurgling into the shower drain would be any more chilling if it was red instead of grey? We say no.</p> <p>What director Alfred Hitchcock asks viewers to bring to party is the finishing touches, the custom viridian spoutings of their nightmares. The original plasma screen if you will.</p> <p>So roll on black and white, roll on. Down in front and pass the Jaffas.</p> <p><em>Written by David Smiedt. Republished with permission of <a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/in-praise-of/in-praise-of-black-and-white-films.aspx">Wyza.com.au.</a></em></p>

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How to stream all the latest tv and movies at home

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">An entertainment revolution is quietly taking place in living rooms all across Australia. Where once we were limited to four TV channels, and forced to trudge to the DVD shop to rent a movie, now we can watch what we want, when we want, wherever we want to watch it. It’s called “streaming” and it’s really easy to do, even if you’re a technological novice.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Streaming is different from Pay TV such as Foxtel or Fetch TV in that it doesn’t require a special set-top box, and won’t tie you into an expensive long-term contract. Streaming can be done on a laptop, iPad, phone, or even a gaming console. All you have to do is log on to the streaming service’s website (see below) and sign up for a subscription.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you prefer to watch on a large screen, you can link your laptop, phone or tablet to your television using a cable adaptor, or even splash out on one of the new Smart TVs, which come with built-in streaming compatibility. There are so many choices available, there really is something to suit everyone.</span></p> <p><strong>What you’ll need</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">You’ll ideally want broadband speeds of at least 2 megabits per second. You’ll also need to make sure that you have a generous, or preferably unlimited, download allowance. Check with your internet provider to see what your limit is, and shop around to see if you can find a better deal – try comparison website www.youcompare.com.au which lists the different packages and prices. Some telcos, including Telstra and Optus, offer movie streaming as options in their monthly packages.</span></p> <p><strong>Choosing your hardware</strong></p> <p><strong>Laptop</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you’re using a laptop, you can either watch movies on the computer screen, or use an HDMI cable to connect the computer to your TV. You can buy HDMI cables at places like Harvey Norman, Officeworks or JB Hi-Fi for around $20. Once you’ve plugged it in, you need to change the display settings on your computer. On PCs, go to Control Panel, then Display, then select Change Display Settings. On a Mac, go to System Preferences, then Display, then Arrangement. When you have followed these steps, you can drag the browser window across using the mouse. Thankfully it isn’t as complicated as it sounds. YouTube has a number of helpful videos to guide you through these steps. Click here to view.</span></p> <p><strong>Phone or tablet</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Streaming on a tablet or phone allows you to watch your favourite shows anywhere – even on the bus. Most streaming providers have an app that can be downloaded from their websites to make viewing even easier. Phones and tablets can also be linked to a TV screen for viewing at home: for iPhones and iPads, you need a Composite AV Cable, available from Apple stores for $59. For Android phones and tablets, you’ll need an HDMI cable with the appropriate port for your phone (the same as your charger). You can get these from most electrical retailers. Again, if you’re using a phone, don’t forget to make sure you have a high data limit, so you don’t get slapped with hefty charges.</span></p> <p><strong>Games console</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">If you have an Xbox or Playstation, it should already be able to connect to the internet, and you can use it in the same way to access online streaming.</span></p> <p><strong>Apple tv</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Mac owners might want to consider buying this little box, which gives you access to Apple’s library of movies, TV shows, live sports and news (RRP $109).</span></p> <p><strong>Google chromecast</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This little “dongle” has a USB port that plugs directly into the HDMI port on your TV and allows you to connect your computer or Android phone to the screen wirelessly (RRP $49).</span></p> <p><strong>Smart tv</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A new generation of televisions by Sony, Samsung, LG and others, come with internet browsing built in – although not all makes and models will be compatible with all streaming services available in Australia. If you are considering buying one, check the information on the streaming service’s website to make sure you choose a TV that’s compatible.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">So now you’ve got the kit, the next step is to decide which streaming service you want to sign up for – we’ve listed them below. They all offer free trials (of up to 30 days) and there are no contracts to tie you in. Plus, they’re much cheaper than a Foxtel subscription, so why stop at one?</span></p> <p><strong>Quickflix</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Launched in 2003 as a postal DVD-rental service, Quickflix began streaming movies in 2011. It has a vast selection of new releases and classic television series available to stream.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Quickflix Subscription: from $9.99 per month. </span></p> <p><strong>Netflix</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The behemoth of the streaming world, this American service finally landed in to Australia in March 2015. Its TV shows include many popular “Netflix Original” series such as House of Cards, Orange is the New Black, and its latest offering, Bloodline starring Aussie actor Ben Mendelsohn.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Netflix subscription: from $8.99 per month.</span></p> <p><strong>Presto</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Foxtel is behind this venture, in partnership with Seven West Media. Both companies provide the content, so expect home-grown Australian series like Packed to the Rafters and films from Foxtel’s movie library. There are a few HBO shows, including Entourage and The Sopranos, but no Game of Thrones. This one is more expensive than its rivals.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Presto subscription: Movies only $9.99 per month; TV and movies $14.99 per month.</span></p> <p><strong>Stan</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Jointly owned by Nine Entertainment and Fairfax, Stan was launched on Australia Day 2015. It has an extensive catalogue of shows, and is also commissioning original Australian drama for exclusive viewing on its service.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stan subscription: $10 per month.</span></p> <p><strong>ABC iView</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A chance to catch up on free-to-air TV. Programs are usually available to view for 30 days after broadcast. There’s no subscription and you don’t need to sign up. All you need is an internet browser to log on to the ABC’s website, click on iVew and start watching.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">ABC iView: Free service.</span></p> <p><strong>SBS on demand</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Like the ABC, this service has a library of recently broadcast programs and complete series available to view for a limited time, without subscription. It also has 600 movies, with an emphasis on international, art house and cult classics. Watch via an internet browser.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">SBS on demand: Free service.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">There are so many benefits to streaming that once you start you’ll wonder what took you so long. Forget fighting over the remote. Now everyone can watch their favourite shows, whenever suits them. What’s more, you can wave goodbye to annoying ad breaks and, even better, you won’t have to wait a week to watch the next episode of a show and find out what happens.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Ali Wright. Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/how-to-stream-all-the-best-tv-and-movies-at-home.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

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What drives the appeal of 'Passion of the Christ' and other films on the life of Jesus

<p>Church isn’t the only place people go to learn about Jesus.</p> <p>At the beginning of Lent, 15 years ago, devout evangelical Christians did not go to church to have ashes marked on their foreheads. Rather, they thronged to theaters to <a href="https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2004/march/100.100.html">watch</a> a decidedly Catholic film to begin the Lenten season.</p> <p>That film was Mel Gibson’s “The Passion of the Christ,” which would go on to gross over US$600 million globally. It brought to screen a vivid portrayal of the last few hours of the life of Jesus and even today many can readily recall the brutality of those depictions. The film also stirred up a number of <a href="https://www.firstthings.com/article/2004/06/the-passions-passionate-despisers">cultural clashes</a> and raised questions about Christian anti-Semitism and what seemed to be a <a href="https://www.chron.com/g00/entertainment/movies/article/Will-a-recut-Passion-still-stir-debate-1568750.php?i10c.ua=1&amp;i10c.encReferrer=aHR0cHM6Ly93d3cuZ29vZ2xlLmNvbS8%3d&amp;i10c.dv=22">glorification</a> of violence.</p> <p>This wasn’t the only film to bring Jesus to cinema in such a powerful way. There have, in fact, been hundreds of films about Jesus produced around the world for over 100 years.</p> <p>These films have prompted devotion and missionary outreach, just as they have challenged viewers’ assumptions of who the figure of Jesus really was.</p> <h2>From still images to moving images</h2> <p>For the last two decades, I have researched the <a href="https://cup.columbia.edu/book/religion-and-film/9780231176750">portrayal of religious figures on screen</a>. I have also looked at the ways in which <a href="http://theconversation.com/when-do-moviegoers-become-pilgrims-81016">audiences</a> make their own spiritual meanings through the images of film.</p> <p><a href="https://www.ucpress.edu/book/9780520286955/the-forge-of-vision">Images of Jesus</a>, or the Virgin Mary, have long been part of the <a href="https://books.google.com/books/about/Image_as_Insight.html?id=lrpLAwAAQBAJ">Christian tradition</a>. From amulets to icons, paintings to sculptures, Christianity incorporates a rich visual history, so perhaps it is not surprising that cinema has become a vital medium to display the life of Jesus.</p> <p>Inventors of cinematic technologies, such as <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0151913/">Thomas Edison</a> and the <a href="http://www.acinemahistory.com/2016/04/la-passion-1898-passion.html">Lumière brothers</a>, were among the first to bring Jesus’s life to the big screen at the end of the 19th century. Hollywood continued to cash in on Christian audiences all through the 20th century.</p> <p>In 1912, Sidney Olcott’s <a href="http://www.bfi.org.uk/films-tv-people/4ce2b6aaafe24">“From the Manger to the Cross”</a> became the first feature length film to offer a full account of the life of Christ.</p> <p>Fifteen years later, crowds flocked to see Cecil B. DeMille’s <a href="https://catalog.afi.com/Catalog/moviedetails/10078">“The King of Kings”</a>, demonstrating the power of a big budget and a well-known director. Writing about DeMille’s film some years later, film historian Charles Musser <a href="https://www.criterion.com/current/posts/900-the-king-of-kings">commented</a> how the film evoked “Christ’s charisma” through “a mesmerizing repertoire of special effects, lighting and editing.”</p> <p>In Hollywood’s portrayal, Jesus was a white, European man. In Nicholas Ray’s 1961 film, <a href="https://catalog.afi.com/Film/20301-KING-OF-KINGS?sid=b96a394a-6a48-4f41-b7a4-6d05b5042fc3&amp;sr=3.1776974&amp;cp=1&amp;pos=0">“King of Kings”</a> Jeffrey Hunter made a deep impression on his audience in the role of Jesus with his piercing blue eyes. Four years later, George Stevens’s <a href="https://catalog.afi.com/Catalog/moviedetails/22336">“The Greatest Story Ever Told”</a>, cast the white Swedish actor Max von Sydow in the lead role.</p> <p>In all these films, evidence of Jesus’s <a href="https://digitalcommons.unomaha.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1853&amp;context=jrf">Jewish identity</a> was toned down. Social or political messages found in the gospels – such as the political charge of a “kingdom of God” – were smoothed over. Jesus was portrayed as a spiritual savior figure while avoiding many of the socio-political controversies.</p> <p>This was, as Biblical studies scholar Adele Reinhartz <a href="http://www.oxfordscholarship.com/view/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195146967.001.0001/acprof-9780195146967">put it</a>, not Jesus of Nazareth, but the creation of a “Jesus of Hollywood.”</p> <h2>Global moral instruction</h2> <p>Many of these films were useful for Christian <a href="https://brill.com/view/journals/exch/33/4/article-p310_2.xml">missionary work</a>.</p> <p>An <a href="https://books.google.com/books?id=k-KOCMRN1yYC&amp;pg=PA116&amp;lpg=PA116&amp;dq=%22destined+to+be+more+far-reaching+than+the+Bible+in+telling+the+story+of+the+Saviour%22&amp;source=bl&amp;ots=qfNYKdafRF&amp;sig=ACfU3U1thBDr3oVzabJSRUbpLHjMhCtMZA&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwiZ">advertisement for Olcott’s film</a>, for example, stated how it was “destined to be more far-reaching than the Bible in telling the story of the Savior.” Indeed, as media scholars <a href="https://www.vwu.edu/academics/majors/communication/meet-the-faculty.php?person=tlindvall">Terry Lindvall</a> and <a href="https://www.regent.edu/faculty/m-a-andrew-c-quicke/">Andrew Quicke</a> have <a href="https://nyupress.org/books/9780814753248/">noted</a>, many Christian leaders throughout the 20th century utilized the power of film for moral instruction and conversion.</p> <p>A 1979 film, known as <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/cros.12121">“The Jesus Film”</a>, went on to become the most <a href="https://religionnews.com/2017/12/20/jesus-film-project-premieres-1500th-translation-of-jesus/">watched</a> film in history. The film was a relatively straightforward depiction of the life of Jesus, taken mainly from the gospel of Luke.</p> <p>The film was translated into 1,500 languages and shown in cities and remote villages around the world.</p> <h2>The global Jesus</h2> <p>But, as <a href="https://www.firstthings.com/article/2006/12/believing-in-the-global-south">majority Christian population shifted</a> from Europe and North America to Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, and South Asia, so did portrayals of Jesus: they came to reflect local cultures and ethnicities.</p> <p>In the 2006 South African film <a href="https://www.sheffieldphoenix.com/showbook.asp?bkid=232">“Son of Man”</a>, for example, Jesus, his mother and disciples are all black, and the setting is a contemporary, though fictionalized, South Africa. The film employed traditional art forms of dance and music that retold the Jesus story in ways that would appeal to a South African audience.</p> <p>It was the same with a Telugu film, <a href="https://brill.com/view/journals/exch/36/1/article-p41_3.xml">“Karunamayudu” (Ocean of Mercy)</a>, released in 1978. The style resembles a long tradition of Hindu devotional and mythological films and Jesus could easily be seen as part of the pantheon of Hindu deities.</p> <p>For the past four decades in southern India and beyond, villagers have gathered in front of makeshift outdoor theaters to watch this film. With over 100 million viewers, it has become a <a href="https://brill.com/view/journals/exch/41/2/article-p120_3.xml">tool for Christian evangelism</a>.</p> <p>Other films have responded to and reflected local conditions in Latin America. The Cuban film “<a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/1212065?seq=1#metadata_info_tab_contents">The Last Supper</a>,” from 1976, offered a vision of a Jesus that is on the side of the enslaved and oppressed, mirroring Latin American movements in <a href="https://library.brown.edu/create/modernlatinamerica/chapters/chapter-15-culture-and-society/essays-on-culture-and-society/liberation-theology-in-latin-america/">Liberation Theology</a>. Growing out of the Cold War, and led by radical Latin American priests, Liberation Theology worked in local communities to promote socio-economic justice.</p> <p>Meanwhile, the appeal of some of these films can also be gauged from how they continue to be watched year after year. The 1986 Mexican film, “La vida de nuestro señor Jesucristo,” for example, is broadcast on the Spanish-language television station Univision during Easter week every year.</p> <h2>The power of film</h2> <p>Throughout history, Jesus has taken on the appearance and behavior of one cultural group after another, some claiming him as their own, others rejecting certain versions of him.</p> <p>As the scholar of religion <a href="https://dornsife.usc.edu/cf/faculty-and-staff/faculty.cfm?pid=1003260">Richard Wightman Fox</a> puts it in his <a href="https://www.harpercollins.com/9780060628741/jesus-in-america/">book “Jesus in America: Personal Savior, Cultural Hero, National Obsession:”</a> “His incarnation guaranteed that each later culture would grasp him anew for each would have a different view of what it means to be human.”</p> <p>Cinema allows people in new places and times to grasp Jesus “anew,” and create what I have <a href="https://books.google.com/books/about/Representing_Religion_in_World_Cinema.html?id=tQGc8oHH5fkC">called</a> a “georeligious aesthetic.” Films, especially those about Jesus, in their movement across the globe, can alter the religious practices and beliefs of people they come into contact with.</p> <p>While the church and the Bible provide particular versions of Jesus, films provide even more – new images that can prompt controversy, but also devotion.</p> <p><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><em>Written by <span>S. Brent Rodriguez-Plate, Associate Professor of Religious Studies and Cinema and Media Studies, by special appointment, Hamilton College</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/what-drives-the-appeal-of-passion-of-the-christ-and-other-films-on-the-life-of-jesus-110691" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/110691/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /></p>

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5 facts about Elizbeth Taylor

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Here are five facts about hollywood heavyweight Elizabeth Taylor. </span></p> <p><strong>1. A beautiful soul, with an illustrious career</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This Hollywood legend was married 8 times (twice to Richard Burton), starred in 50 movies and won 2 Oscars. With the fifth anniversary of her death coming up on 23rd March, here are 18 reasons we still love Liz. In her last interview in Harper’s Bazaar Taylor said, “I never planned to acquire a lot of jewels or a lot of husbands. I have been supremely lucky in my life in that I have known great love, and of course, I am the temporary custodian of some incredible and beautiful things.”</span></p> <p><strong>2. Royal favour</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With dual citizen status to America and England, Taylor was named a Dame Commander of the British Empire (DBE) during a visit to the UK in 2000. She joined a short, but illustrious, list of entertainers to be given damehoods, including Julie Andrews, Judi Dench, Maggie Smith and Vanessa Redgrave.</span></p> <p><strong>3. A child star</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Discovered by talents scouts at the tender age of 10, Elizabeth Taylor first wowed audiences in the 1942 film, There’s One Born Every Minute. Her performance was so captivating that directors scrambled to secure her in their latest projects. In 1943 she played Priscilla in Lassie, Come Home, and the following year she completed two films, Jane Eyre and National Velvet. Life With Father (1947), A Date with Judy (1948) and Little Women (1949) were the final three big-screen performances Elizabeth would make as a ‘child’.</span></p> <p><strong>4. Movies and men</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Appearing in 50 films, Taylor enjoyed working with co-stars of the highest calibre. Her leading mean included Rock Hudson and James Dean (Giant, 1956), Montgomery Clift (A Place in the Sun, 1951, Raintree Country, 1957 and Suddenly, Last Summer, 1959), Paul Newman (Cat On A Hot Tin Roof, 1958) and on-again-off-again husband Richard Burton she met on the set of Cleopatra in 1963. She and Burton shared the screen in 14 feature-length films.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Tabloid film </strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Taylor once told the gossip columnist Liz Smith, "My fame has been ridiculous. I often wondered why it persisted. But once I became involved with AIDS, I blessed every lousy photograph, all the fat jokes, every untrue rumour, every true rumour. Les scandales! My crazy fame allowed me to do this work. It all finally made sense."</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/elizabeth-taylor-19-classic-must-see-images/page/18"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

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The Golden age of Hollywood

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Golden Age of Hollywood was the boom in movie productions from Hollywood after silent films. The actresses that graced our screens with their timeless glamour and style is something that we still aspire to today. Here we take a moment to salute these ladies who are forever immortalised on our screens.</span></p> <p><strong>Marilyn Monroe </strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B452SF0nGIy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B452SF0nGIy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Marilyn Monroe (@somelikeitmonroe)</a> on Nov 15, 2019 at 3:05pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Marilyn Monroe was a classic Hollywood sex symbol of the 1950s. Monroe was usually typecast to play the "dumb blonde" roles but she was incredibly smart, strong and sophisticated, growing up from a tough, dysfunctional childhood. Her sex symbol status is forever immortalised by the scene in the 'The Seven Year Itch' (1955) where she stands over a subway grate that blows up her white dress. It is one of the most iconic scenes of classic Hollywood.</span></p> <p><strong>Judy Garland</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-3cAHFaVA/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-3cAHFaVA/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Movies (@archie_movies_and_more_1)</a> on Nov 17, 2019 at 1:51pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Judy Garland's breakthrough role was Dorothy in 'The Wizard of Oz' (1939) and she continued to light up screens with her amazing voice, starring in a number of musical films such as 'Me in St Louis' (1944) and 'A Star is Born' (1954). Her life was marked by tragedy but we will forever remember her voice and presence on screen.</span></p> <p><strong>Grace Kelly</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4xNYy2Dj5U/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4xNYy2Dj5U/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by life (@life)</a> on Nov 12, 2019 at 6:34am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Grace Kelly shot to Hollywood fame through her role in Alfred Hitchcock’s 'Rear Window' (1954) as Lisa Fremont. Kelly wedded the Prince of Monaco, Rainier III and famously wore her engagement ring in her last film, 'High Society' (1956). Her wedding too was dubbed by the press as “the wedding of the century” due to her high profile within Hollywood at the time.</span></p> <p><strong>Vivien Leigh</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B45ozMllTI_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B45ozMllTI_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Period Fashion (@periodfashion)</a> on Nov 15, 2019 at 1:07pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Vivien Leigh, was British born actress that shot to stardom in Hollywood by winning two Academy Awards for her “southern belle” performance of Scarlett O’Hara in 'Gone with the Wind' (1939). Leigh also had a love for theatre where she met and fell in love with Laurence Olivier and had a very public love affair.</span></p> <p><strong>Elizabeth Taylor</strong></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-TYhyn0Ki/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4-TYhyn0Ki/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Elizabeth Taylor Archives (@elizabethtaylorarchives)</a> on Nov 17, 2019 at 8:36am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Elizabeth Taylor is one of the world’s most famous film stars and one of the last to debut from the classic Hollywood studio system. You may remember her from films such as 'A Place in the Sun' (1951), 'Cat on a Hot TIn Roof' (1958) and 'Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf' (1966). She was not only recognised for her acting, but she was always featured for her glamorous lifestyle, beauty and her alluring blue/violet eyes.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/the-gold-age-of-hollywood-the-female-starlets/page/1"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

Movies

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How Scorsese cinema boycott will shape the future of movies

<p>Cinema has always been a medium in crisis. After the so-called golden age of Hollywood came television: why go to the movies when you can sit in the comfort of your home, watching recycled movies in letterbox format? Yet cinemas adapted and survived.</p> <p>This week, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/nov/07/why-martin-scorseses-the-irishman-wont-be-coming-to-a-cinema-near-you">major cinema chains</a> said they would not run Martin Scorsese’s upcoming film <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1302006/">The Irishman</a> because Netflix - who partially funded production and own distribution rights - were restricting its theatre run to four weeks before it hit small screens.</p> <p>The news signals a looming threat to cinema as we know it.</p> <h2>Big screen blues</h2> <p>Television made movies a commodity audiences could consume on their own terms. Yet cinema survived. In fact, it became a global mass cultural medium in the late 1970s and in the <a href="https://blog.scienceandmediamuseum.org.uk/very-short-history-of-cinema/">multiplexes</a> of the 1980s.</p> <p>Even the turbulent digital turn that brought cinema to a second crisis point in the early 2000s was navigated by the major Hollywood studios with the rebirth of the blockbuster in pristine form: <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0499549/?ref_=nv_sr_2?ref_=nv_sr_2">Avatar</a> (2009) in stereoscopic 3-D, the high-tech Marvel <a href="https://hbr.org/2019/07/marvels-blockbuster-machine">cinematic universe</a>.</p> <p>This is all to say that cinema, for the time being, is alive and well.</p> <p>But shrinking diversity in cinema offerings - Scorsese is <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/nov/05/martin-scorsese-superhero-marvel-movies-debate-sadness">no Marvel fan</a> - has forced even big name directors to seek funding from alternative sources. This is especially necessary when their movie <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/21/business/media/netflix-scorsese-the-irishman.html">costs US$159 million</a> (A$230 million) to make. Enter television streaming giant Netflix.</p> <h2>Are you talking to me?</h2> <p>The Irishman, Scorsese’s eagerly anticipated gangster epic, opened this week in a number of independent <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com.au/the-irishman-australian-cinemas-2019-11">Australian cinemas</a>.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/WHXxVmeGQUc?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="caption">The Irishman tells the story of war veteran Frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro) who worked as a hitman alongside Jimmy Hoffa (Al Pacino).</span></p> <p>Scorsese is perhaps America’s greatest living auteur, the director of films including <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075314/?ref_=nv_sr_1?ref_=nv_sr_1">Taxi Driver</a> (1976), <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0081398/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Raging Bull</a> (1980), <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0099685/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Goodfellas</a> (1990), and <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0112641/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Casino</a> (1995).</p> <p>But what makes The Irishman unlike any other Scorsese film is that it is being distributed by Netflix. After its short theatre run it will be distributed to our homes, where it will do its major business.</p> <p>In February, the tension between Netflix and theatrical distributors escalated with the nomination of Alfonso Cuarón’s Netflix-distributed <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt6155172/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2">Roma</a> for a Best Picture Oscar. Director Steven Spielberg subsequently <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2018/03/steven-spielbergs-netflix-fears/556550/">declared</a> a Netflix film might “deserve an Emmy, but not an Oscar”.</p> <p>A Netflix production – whether David Fincher’s monumental longform series, <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5290382/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Mindhunter</a>, or Scorsese’s The Irishman – was television and therefore not cinema.</p> <h2>Goodfellas or bad guys?</h2> <p>Netflix represents a very real threat to theatrically screened cinema and its distribution apparatus, which is why several large cinema chains in the US (and, indeed, Australia) are boycotting The Irishman.</p> <p>While Netflix has consistently produced high quality content either through internal production or by acquiring and distributing titles, its assimilation of an auteur picture – a Scorsese gangster epic, no less - signals an aggressive move into the once sacrosanct domain of cinema entertainment.</p> <p>One wonders: if Scorsese capitulates to the economic strictures of the contemporary studio system, what will independent filmmakers do? How will low budget features be funded in an era in which Netflix colonises the large and small-scale productions alike?</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SshqfhmmtSE?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe> <span class="caption">Scorsese has directed many of the greatest characters of modern cinema.</span></p> <p>Netflix is not cinema, but neither is it television. Directors such as Spielberg struggle to understand that the new media entertainment regime is far removed from the projection (theatre) or broadcast (television) media environment of a predigital era.</p> <p>Instead of declaring a Netflix production unworthy of an Oscar, we could invert this measure: perhaps it is the Oscar that is increasingly outmoded as an artistic and cultural mark of value.</p> <h2>‘The End’, roll credits</h2> <p>The digital economic currents that carry Netflix intuitively seek expansion into proximate markets, and cinema is a natural fit. Netflix’s move into cinema distribution – with Scorsese at the helm – is therefore a smart negotiation. Even if Scorsese is an unwilling participant, it sets a clear precedent.</p> <p>It seems unlikely that cinema will end in any formal sense, at least within the next few decades.</p> <p>But a Netflix-distributed Scorsese film gives us cause to lament the ailing cinema experience. Christopher Nolan’s <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5013056/?ref_=nv_sr_1?ref_=nv_sr_1">Dunkirk</a> (2017) exemplified cinema’s ability to assault us with big screen images and jolt our bodies with a powerful soundscape. Only a grand technological scale can provide this kind of visceral experience.</p> <p>And yet, like Scorsese, I’m tired of Marvel. I’m tired of the rigidity of formulaic narrative and image structures intrinsic to the contemporary studio system. I’m disappointed at Hollywood’s capitulation to an instrumental economic model. Could a studio have produced The Irishman? They had a chance, and they <a href="https://variety.com/2019/film/news/theater-chief-blasts-netflix-over-handling-of-martin-scorseses-irishman-its-a-disgrace-1203390726/">turned it down</a>.</p> <p>Hollywood - and media entertainment structures more generally - will need to find a way for the big and small screen distributors to get along in order to keep the dynasty alive.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/126598/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Bruce Isaacs, Senior Lecturer in Film Studies, University of Sydney</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/pass-the-popcorn-scorsese-cinema-boycott-will-shape-the-future-of-movies-126598" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>. </em></p>

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Gene Kelly’s wife reveals another side to the Hollywood icon

<p><span>When she first met him in 1985, she had no idea who he was – but Patricia Ward Kelly was soon to develop a special insight into Hollywood legend Gene Kelly both as an artist and a person.</span></p> <p><span>Patricia, then 26, was working on a documentary about the Smithsonian museum when she was introduced to the then-73-year-old Gene, who was tapped as the television special’s host. After she was made aware of his fame, Patricia took out videos from the store and carried out a marathon viewing. What she watched – from <em>Singin’ in the Rain </em>to <em>Brigadoon </em>– left her mouth “agape”.</span></p> <p><span>The two soon became closer and bonded over the poetry of William Butler Yeats. Before long, Gene invited her to California to become his biographer, and their working relationship turned into a romance.</span></p> <p><span>Gene and Patricia tied the knot in 1990. Throughout the decade they spent together, Patricia documented her partner’s words – be it in writing or tape recording – nearly every day, and in the process, grew a greater appreciation of the seemingly “two-dimensional” man that the audience knew and loved.</span></p> <p><span>“People have no idea of the magnitude of him,” she told <em>Over60</em>. “He looks great up on-screen dancing, [but] many people don’t realise he created what you’re seeing, that he directed and choreographed it, and that’s really what he wanted to be known for … for being behind the camera, and for changing the look of dance on film.”</span></p> <div class="embed-responsive embed-responsive-16by9"><iframe class="embed-responsive-item" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/x7CIgWZTdgw"></iframe></div> <p><span>Gene, she said, had some personal favourites from his impressive filmography. The first and most widely known was the 1949 musical <em>On the Town</em>, which Gene took part in co-directing and choreographing. </span></p> <p><span>“He would often say that because it broke new ground by shooting the opening number on location,” she said. “That just had not been done in that way, and that really influenced the French New Wave filmmakers like François Truffaut.”</span></p> <p><span>However, Gene also had a lesser-known pick – a work that grew out of his childhood interests. According to Patricia, Gene revealed in private that he really enjoyed <em>The Three Musketeers</em> because swordplay and acrobatics were some of “what he loved as a little boy growing up”.</span></p> <p><span>Gene died in 1996 at the age of 83 following a series of strokes – but Patricia has been determined to keep his legacy and memory alive. In 2012, Patricia launched <em>Gene Kelly: The Legacy</em> and has since toured with it around the world. </span></p> <p><span>Patricia said a “show” is not quite the right word to describe the program. “I often refer to it as a kind of an experience. It begins the minute the door is open,” she said.</span></p> <p><span>In the “one-woman presentation”, set to tour Australia next year, Patricia is set to share some stories, film clips, previously unreleased recordings, personal memorabilia, and insights culled from hours of interviews and conversations with her husband.</span></p> <p>“It’s like we’re sitting in the living room having a chat, and I’m bringing these things out,” she said. “Even though it’s a very large venue, people [will] just feel like we’re in this very intimate setting.”</p> <p><em>Gene Kelly: The Legacy is coming to Australia in February 2020.</em></p>

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Kyle and Jackie O’s disastrous interview with Russell Crowe

<p>Kyle and Jackie O have opened up about their disastrous radio interview with Russell Crowe.</p> <p>Revealing the details on air yesterday, the KIIS FM hosts took a trip back in time and reminisced about what happened when they met Crowe face-to-face for the first time when they were hosting the<span> </span><em>Hot30<span> </span></em>in the early 2000s.</p> <p>“We went to his hotel to interview him,” said Jackie O. “We were pretty young and impressionable. We thought, ‘What can we do to get Russell on side and have a great interview with him?’”</p> <p>Crowe had just won an Oscar for his role in<span> </span><em>Gladiator</em><span> </span>and was known to be stand-offish during interviews, so Kyle came up with a plan to get on his good side.</p> <p>“You said, ‘We’ll take him a carton of beer and a carton of cigarettes and give it to him as a gift’,” said Jackie O.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/B4wYEN4DP2R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/B4wYEN4DP2R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">#KJShow</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/kyleandjackieo/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Kyle and Jackie O</a> (@kyleandjackieo) on Nov 11, 2019 at 10:50pm PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>But unfortunately, the gift didn’t go down too well.</p> <p>“It was a disaster,” Kyle recalled.</p> <p>“He was offended! He said, ‘Is this what you think I’m like, is it? Is this all there is to me?’” said Jackie O.</p> <p>The radio hosts were left bewildered as things only started to get worse from there.</p> <p>“We started the interview … and he goes, ‘Have we started yet?’” said Jackie O. “And we’re like, ‘Yeah’, and we kept going on and again he said, ‘Sorry, have we started? This is the interview, is it?’”</p> <p>“It was so bad,” Kyle exclaimed.</p> <p>But despite the interview starting off disastrous, it gradually took a positive turn as the actor loosened up, and even invited Kyle and Jackie O to stick around afterwards.</p> <p>“By the end of the interview, he goes, ‘Let’s crack open the beers and all hang out together’,” said Jackie.</p> <p>“We stayed there so late, chain-smoking and skolling beer, and I don’t even drink,” Kyle said. “I was legless. Then we had to get a cab back to the radio show and we went on air live blind drunk. I was rat-a**ed.”</p> <p>The radio hosts now consider Crowe a good friend, with Kyle saying, “He’s the greatest bloke.”</p>

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James Dean to star in new movie 64 years after his death

<p><span>James Dean is set to star in an upcoming Vietnam War film, 64 years after his death.</span></p> <p><span>Last week, Magic City Films announced that they will be casting the late Hollywood icon for their upcoming movie <em>Finding Jack </em>through computer-generated imagery (CGI).</span></p> <p><span>Directors Anton Ernst and Tati Golykh told <em><a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/afm-james-dean-reborn-cgi-vietnam-war-action-drama-1252703">The Hollywood Reporter</a></em> they obtained the rights to use Dean’s image from the actor’s family. Dean will play a secondary lead character named Rogan.</span></p> <p><span>The announcement sparked backlash from fans and industry figures.</span></p> <p><span>Actor Chris Evans called the decision “awful”, saying, “Maybe we can get a computer to paint us a new Picasso. Or write a couple new John Lennon tunes. The complete lack of understanding here is shameful.”</span></p> <p><span>Actress Zelda Williams, whose late Robin Williams restricted exploitation of his image for 25 years following his death, expressed her concern on Twitter. “I have talked to friends about this for YEARS and no one ever believed me that the industry would stoop this low once tech got better,” she wrote.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr">I have talked to friends about this for YEARS and no one ever believed me that the industry would stoop this low once tech got better. Publicity stunt or not, this is puppeteering the dead for their ‘clout’ alone and it sets such an awful precedent for the future of performance. <a href="https://t.co/elS1BrbDGv">https://t.co/elS1BrbDGv</a></p> — Zelda Williams (@zeldawilliams) <a href="https://twitter.com/zeldawilliams/status/1192141551171854338?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">November 6, 2019</a></blockquote> <p><span>“Publicity stunt or not, this is puppeteering the dead for their ‘clout’ alone and it sets such an awful precedent for the future of performance.”</span></p> <p><span>Ernst said Dean’s estate has been “supportive” of the film. “I think they would have wanted their family member’s legacy to live on,” Ernst told <em><a href="https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/director-new-james-dean-movie-speaks-backlash-stars-casting-1253232">The Hollywood Reporter</a></em>. “That’s what we’ve done here as well. We’ve brought a whole new generation of filmgoers to be aware of James Dean.”</span></p> <p><span>Ernst said he was “saddened” and “confused” by the negative reaction to the news. “We never intended for this to be a marketing gimmick.”</span></p> <p><span>Visual effects companies Imagine Engine and MOI Worldwide will be working on a full-body CGI of Dean based on archival footage and photographs, while another actor will voice Dean’s character.</span></p> <p><span>The movie is expected to be released in November 2020.</span></p>

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The most chilling psychopaths in history

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">These killers performed murders you’d think could only happen in horror movies.</span></p> <p><strong>Ed Gein </strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Norman Bates (from Psycho), Leatherface (from The Texas Chainsaw Massacre), and Buffalo Bill (from Silence of the Lambs) are three of the most iconic fictional horror characters of all time – and they’re all loosely based on one man: Ed Gein. Also known as the Butcher of Plainfield, Gein collected women’s bodies through grave-robbing and murder from around 1945 to 1957, when he was finally caught. He used the women’s remains to decorate his isolated Wisconsin farm and to make various items of clothing. Gein passed away in 1984 in a mental institution.</span></p> <p><strong>Charles Manson</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">One of the most infamous ringleaders in history, Charles Manson used psychopathic manipulation to gain his cult followers in the 1960s. Not only did he murder people on his own, but he convinced his deepest admirers to commit the same brutal acts he did, resulting in some of the most notorious murders of celebrities and entertainment industry heads, including director Roman Polanski’s wife, Sharon Tate, as well as coffee heiress Abigail Folger. Manson and his cronies were sentenced to death, but California abolished the death penalty afterward; they’ve spent their lives in prison instead.</span></p> <p><strong>Ted Bundy</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Ted Bundy is one of those names that is practically synonymous with “serial killer” and “psychopath.” He was known to be very sly and charming, which was the shiny veneer he used to lure his many victims. He killed at least 30 people across the United States, but it took years for the authorities to catch him, because no one was able to believe such an “upstanding” young man could do such horrible things. He is most famous for his necrophiliac tendencies, and his own lawyer described him as a “heartless evil.”</span></p> <p><strong>Ivan Milat, AKA the backpack killer</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Known as one of Australia’s most cold-blooded killers, on 27 July 1996, Ivan Milat was convicted of the ‘backpacker murders’, the serial killings of seven young people that took place in New South Wales between 1989 and 1993. The bodies of the victims – five of whom were foreign backpackers, the other two Australian travellers from Melbourne – were discovered partially buried in the Belanglo State Forest, 15 kilometres south-west of the New South Wales town of Berrima. Police believe Milat may have been involved in more attacks or murders than those for which he was convicted. Now terminally ill with pancreatic cancer, Milat is expected to soon die in prison where he is currently serving seven consecutive life sentences.</span></p> <p><strong>Richard Ramirez</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">According to thoughtcatalog.com, Ramirez’s victims ranged in age from nine to eighty-three, and he did not have a particular preference for gender. He ravaged Los Angeles in the ’80s with his brutal, Satanic killings, simply because he was fascinated by it. That’s not to say it had nothing to do with his upbringing, however. When he was just 11-years-old, he witnessed his cousin murder his wife – and was asked to participate in the clean-up afterward.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by Taylor Markarian and Zoe Meunier. Republished with permission of</span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/lifestyle/the-most-chilling-psychopaths-in-history.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;"> Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

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Angelina Jolie opens up in bold new interview about Brad Pitt

<p>Actress Angelina Jolie has given a revealing interview about her third husband Brad Pitt in a new interview for<span> </span>Harper’s Bazaar.</p> <p>The actress appears on the cover sporting a veil and talks about regaining her footing after splitting from husband Brad Pitt in 2016.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4fJKm8JSs1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4fJKm8JSs1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">#AngelinaJolie on our December 2019/ January 2020 subscriber cover. See the full cover story at our link in bio. Photography by @solvesundsbostudio Styling by @patrickmackieinsta Hair by #malcomedwards Makeup by @thevalgarland Manicure by @chisatochee</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/harpersbazaarus/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> Harper's BAZAAR</a> (@harpersbazaarus) on Nov 5, 2019 at 6:10am PST</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Jolie is clever during the interview, as she technically never utters Pitt’s name once and refers to him as her children’s “father”.</p> <p>She also made a dig about how she would love to travel but is currently unable to do so due to their custody agreement.</p> <p>“I would love to live abroad and will do so as soon as my children are 18,” Jolie said. “Right now I’m having to base where their father chooses to live.”</p> <p>Jolie also speaks about the “visible and invisible scars” that the last four years have left on her body.</p> <p>"My body has been through a lot over the past decade, particularly the past four years, and I have both the visible and invisible scars to show for it," she explained.</p> <p>She continued: "The invisible ones are harder to wrestle with. Life takes many turns. Sometimes you get hurt, you see those you love in pain, and you can’t be as free and open as your spirit desires."</p> <p>However, Jolie credits her children as they know her “true self”.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0_oK14gcEQ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="margin: 8px 0 0 0; padding: 0 4px;"><a style="color: #000; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none; word-wrap: break-word;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B0_oK14gcEQ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">Family ♡ Can we talk about Zahara’s glow 🌙✨✨ - - [#ZaharaJoliePitt #AngelinaJolie #BradPitt #BlackgirlMagic]</a></p> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;">A post shared by <a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/zaharajp/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank"> ⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀ Zahara Marley Jolie-Pitt</a> (@zaharajp) on Aug 10, 2019 at 11:51am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>"My children know my true self, and they have helped me to find it again and to embrace it," she said. "They have been through a lot. I learn from their strength."</p>

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Richard Gere expecting second baby with wife Alejandra Silva at the age of 70

<p>Richard Gere is expecting his second child with wife Alejandra Silva.</p> <p>The 70-year-old actor and the 36-year-old publicist recently welcomed their first firstborn Alexander in February.</p> <p>According to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.hellomagazine.com/healthandbeauty/mother-and-baby/2019110480098/richard-gere-wife-alejandra-second-baby/" target="_blank"><em>HOLA!</em></a>, Silva is currently three months into her pregnancy, with the baby expected to arrive next spring.</p> <p>The couple has yet to comment on the report.</p> <p>The actor is also a father to Homer James Jigme, whom he shares with former wife Carey Lowell, while Silva is a mother to Albert Friedland, whom she shares with ex-husband Govind Friedland.</p> <p>Gere and Silva tied the knot at the actor’s ranch outside New York City in April 2018.</p> <p>Silva confirmed her first pregnancy in September last year with an Instagram photo showing the Dalai Lama blessing her bump a month after reports emerged she was expecting.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/BnzfqiCl-0D/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BnzfqiCl-0D/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Despierta America (@despiertamerica)</a> on Sep 16, 2018 at 3:58pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“Getting blessings for our precious to come… We couldn’t announce it before telling HH Dalai Lama,” she wrote on the caption.</p>

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15 reasons we will always love Lauren Bacall

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lauren Bacall was a superstar of Hollywood’s Golden Age. Born Betty Joan Perske in New York on 16 September 1924. She is impossible to forget for her distinctive husky voice, sultry stare, and epic love affair with Humphrey Bogart. She passed away at the age of 89 on 12th August 2014 but we will always remember her style, talent and beauty.</span></p> <p><strong>To Have and Have Not, 1944</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lauren Bacall’s breakthrough performance in the 1944 Warner Bros picture, To Have and Have Not, is still acknowledged as one of the best film debuts in cinema history. The 19-year-old Bronx native was scouted by Warner bigwigs on the lookout for the next big female star. More specifically, they needed an actress who could match the magnetism – and insolence – of Humphrey Bogart. Bacall was perfect in her performance and left Bogart astounded and smitten.</span></p> <p><strong>The ‘Look’</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Seduction personified, Bacall coined ‘The Look’ during screen tests for To Have and Have Not. The alluring stare was achieved as the result of a shy tendency to press her chin to her chest. With almond-shaped eyes peeking through long lashes, she made an immediate impact.</span></p> <p><strong>Humphrey Bogart</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The romance between Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall lasted a little over a decade, yet it remains as enduring as the films they starred in together. The Hollywood love story began while the pair filmed To Have and Have Not. At the time 45-year-old Bogart was married. Within two years he was divorced and had married Bacall, who was 25 years his junior. They had two children together and remained wed until his death in 1957. “I fairly often have thought how lucky I was. I knew everybody because I was married to Bogie, and that 25-year difference was the most fantastic thing for me to have in my life,” Lauren Bacall told Vanity Fair in 2011.</span></p> <p><strong>Enduring Icon</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In 1995 Lauren Bacall was named Empire magazine’s sixth sexiest star in film history. Two years later People listed Bacall among their 50 Most Beautiful People in the World. This wasn't the first time her beauty was awarded. In 1942, she was named ‘Miss Greenwich Village’ and ‘Prettiest Usher’ of the 1942 theatre season.</span></p> <p><strong>Rat Pack Royalty</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bacall was one of the founding members of the Hollywood Rat Pack. She even coined the term ‘rat pack’ and was referred to as ‘den mother’ by fellow members Frank Sinatra, Swifty Lazar and, of course, her husband Humphrey Bogart.</span></p> <p><strong>An alluring muse</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lauren Bacall was one of four Hollywood starlets (along with Veronica Lee, Rita Hayworth and Julie London) who inspired the cartoon character Jessica Rabbit.</span></p> <p><strong>Thoughts on Ageing</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bacall opted to age gracefully, and her musings on maturing are heart-warming: "I think your whole life shows in your face and you should be proud of that.” - Lauren Bacall</span></p> <p><strong>Fearless Negotiator</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Forcing Bacall’s hand was like forcing a concrete slab across the beach. Indeed, her refusal to star in the film Storm Chase saw her suspended an astounding seven times. An article from the Reading Eagle, published in 1949, stated, "Lauren Bacall has become a storm center at Warner Brothers studio because she refuses to appear in a picture by that name.” In response to her suspension she said, “This makes the fifth or sixth time Mr. Warner has suspended me. I told him he had a fine picture (in ‘Storm Center’), but I didn’t think the part was for me. I thought he understood me at that time. I guess he didn’t.”</span></p> <p><strong>Risqué roles</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">When many actresses are cast aside or relegated to grannie roles, Bacall relaunched her career when she featured in a number of provocative roles. She starred in Lars Von Trier’s cult classic Dogville (2003), followed by the 2005 thriller Birth.</span></p> <p><strong>Self Deprecating yet Stylish</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Never afraid to laugh at herself, Bacall lent her voice to the hit animation series Family Guy. Additionally, the down-to-earth beauty played herself in a 2006 episode of The Sopranos, where she was mugged and stripped of her awards show goodie bag.</span></p> <p><strong>Stylish Dame</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Lauren Bacall knew how to wear a tailored suit. Always elegant and seductive, her ‘come-hither’ gaze was just as mesmerising as both the masculine style suits and figure-hugging gowns she favoured.</span></p> <p><strong>Key Largo, 1948</strong></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The usually seductive Bacall assumed a more demure, dutiful part in the steamy Florida thriller Key Largo. Sporting long skirts cinched at the waist with tight belts, it was the last on-screen collaboration between Bacall and Humphrey Bogart.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scroll through the gallery above to see Lauren Bacall through the ages. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Republished with permission of </span><a href="https://www.wyza.com.au/articles/entertainment/15-reasons-we-will-always-love-lauren-bacall.aspx"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Wyza.com.au.</span></a></em></p>

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Can cinema survive in a golden age of serial TV?

<p>There are many reasons you might think cinema is going the way of the dinosaurs. With the popularity of long-play TV series booming, are films “too short” now to allow the kind of plot and character development that we have become used to? In our changing world of media, does the distinction between “TV series” and “film” even make sense?</p> <p>In a recent class, when I asked my film studies students who had watched the set film for the week only a few hands went up – and my heart sank. Searching for an explanation, I asked who had watched the latest episode of the popular Netflix show <a href="https://theconversation.com/stranger-things-inventiveness-in-the-age-of-the-netflix-original-84340"><em>Stranger Things</em></a>. Nearly every hand went up.</p> <p>What does this anecdote reveal about changing viewing habits? Does the fact that even film students prefer the latest streaming series to the classic films set as coursework serve to illustrate the point that cinema is dying?</p> <p>There is no doubt of the enormous appeal of the many long-form series readily available to subscribers of streamed content providers such as Netflix, Amazon Prime, HULU, iTunes, Google Play, and NowTV. Viewers can binge-watch or pace their way through their favourite show before algorithms point them to their next favourite show, in an endless addictive cycle of entertainment and sleep deprivation.</p> <p><strong>Screen companions and virtual friends</strong></p> <p>There are many reasons for the global popularity of streamed series. For one, their characters are often more diverse and interesting than many of those in mainstream Hollywood filmic fare. This is exemplified so well by shows such as <a href="http://theconversation.com/how-orange-is-the-new-black-raised-the-bar-behind-bars-78702"><em>Orange is the New Black</em></a>, with a nearly all-female cast playing characters with diverse sexual orientations and ethnic and class backgrounds.</p> <p>Over the many hours of screen time, spanning many years in some cases, audiences become emotionally invested in characters’ stories. They become our screen companions and virtual friends. This has seen global fan bases emerge. These fans find kinship and a new kind of collective mourning when providers cancel their favourite show as seen with the devotees of the <a href="https://www.digitalspy.com/tv/ustv/a28618013/the-oa-fan-petition-season-3-axe/"><em>The OA</em></a>. The size and influence of these groups has helped the success of campaigns like that of Sense8 fans, who fought for and <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2017/jun/30/your-love-has-brought-sense8-back-to-life-cancelled-netflix-show-wins-two-hour-finale">won a finale</a> of their cancelled show. Similarly, <a href="https://themuse.jezebel.com/fans-saved-one-day-at-a-time-1835924491">the fans of <em>One Day at a Time</em></a> helped it find its new home at cable network “Pop”.</p> <p>The ultra long-play format of streamed series also allows time for extreme character development. The best known character evolution is perhaps that of Breaking Bad’s Walter White who makes a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdDfhe-0JS0">dramatic moral transformation</a> from school teacher to conflicted drug kingpin over the show’s 62-hour run-time.</p> <p><strong>Hollywood cinema refuses to die</strong></p> <p>But traditional Hollywood cinema refuses to die – as evidenced by the boom in <a href="https://theconversation.com/avengers-endgame-and-the-relentless-march-of-hollywood-franchise-movies-119130">franchise event cinema</a>. <a href="https://www.mpaa.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/03/MPAA-THEME-Report-2018.pdf">A recent report</a> from the Motion Picture Association of America reveals rising worldwide cinema ticket sales. The total takings at the box office topped US$41 billion – and the number of cinema screens worldwide increased by 7% (to 190,000 screens). The report states that “there is no question that in this ever complex world of media, theatres are vital to overall entertainment industry success”.</p> <p>But cinema still has its place. It allows a fantasy-filled retreat for family and friend entertainment – an immersive experience without the distraction of mobile phones, knocks on the door or family members talking over important bits. Cinemas, film societies, or open-air screenings become spaces where we can put our political divisions aside and cheer collectively for heroes overcoming odds to save screen worlds.</p> <p>Blockbuster films may be thriving, but poetic art cinema has a more precarious place in the market and needs nurturing by cinephiles. Film director <a href="https://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/9780719097591/">Alejandro G. Iñárritu</a> (of <em>The Revenant</em>,<em> Birdman</em>, and<em> Babel</em> fame) recently <a href="https://variety.com/2019/film/global/alejandro-g-inarritu-on-the-need-to-preserve-poetry-in-cinema-1203305924/">spoke to Variety</a> about how our worlds are being closed in by streaming services managed by “algorithms designed to keep feeding people what they like”. He added: “the problem is that the algorithms are very smart but they are not creative, and they don’t know what people don’t know they like.”</p> <p>We are in a golden age of streaming content and at-the-cinema-film. We just need to be guided by more than algorithms to see the treasures hiding away in this new era of excess and neglect.</p> <p><strong>TV or film – what’s the difference?</strong></p> <p>To complicate the arguments about the relative merits of TV series and film, distinctions between film and television are less clear than they ever have been. Many films (particularly those involving <a href="https://theconversation.com/will-the-superhero-films-ever-end-the-business-of-blockbuster-movie-franchises-78834">superheroes</a>) are no longer stand alone, but form part of a serial cinematic “Universe”.</p> <p>Many TV series now consist of feature-length episodes. With a run-time of 151 minutes, we could ask whether the Sense8 finale was actually a Netflix film, rather than a single episode. And, does it even matter to viewers what we call it?</p> <p>In a world where visual media is being increasingly viewed on tablets, mobile phones and laptops rather than in actual cinemas or on television sets perhaps the terms “cinema” and “television” no longer even make sense. This is an argument my co-editors and I <a href="https://dx.doi.org/10.1080/25785273.2019.1660067">make in a recent editorial</a> for the journal Transnational Screens.</p> <p>A key point is that streaming platforms such as Amazon and Netflix do not stand in opposition to cinema. Instead they have consumed cinema, repackaged it and made it available to global audiences. Powerful voices <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/mar/04/netflix-steven-spielberg-streaming-films-versus-cinema">rail against the power</a> of such platforms, but they do enhance screen culture and make cinema more available to global audiences.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/122234/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: http://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em>Written by <span>Deborah Shaw, Professor of Film and Screen Studies, University of Portsmouth</span>. Republished with permission of </em><a rel="noopener" href="https://theconversation.com/can-cinema-survive-in-a-golden-age-of-serial-tv-122234" target="_blank"><em>The Conversation</em></a><em>.</em></p>

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Dame Helen Mirren gets candid about filming sex scenes in her latest role

<p>While some actors and actresses have a tough time filming sex scenes in front of entire film crews, Dame Helen Mirren has admitted she isn’t bothered by it in the slightest. </p> <p>The 74-year-old Oscar winner admitted she “loved every minute of it,” to Foxtel Magazine while discussing her new show<span> </span><em>Catherine The Great. </em></p> <p>The HBO four-part series will be available for viewing on Sunday and features a particularly steamy session with not one, but two men. </p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2_a1nJjgAn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B2_a1nJjgAn/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Helen Mirren (@helenmirren)</a> on Sep 29, 2019 at 2:58am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>The show will delve into the lavish life of the famous Russian empress, who lived throughout the 18th century. </p> <p>“Catherine was a serial monogamist and one of her lines was, ‘I’m in love with love’,” Mirren explained.</p> <p>“She was a woman who always wanted to have a man, but she didn’t want to relinquish power. She loved sex and she loves a sexual relationship, but when she wanted to get rid of them after, she’d give them palaces or something.</p> <p>“She even gave one guy a country, making him King of Poland (Stanislaw August Poniatowski).</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4PKH7toTWQ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4PKH7toTWQ/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Fillm &amp; Serie TV (@filmandserietv)</a> on Oct 30, 2019 at 2:11am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>There is a particular rumour Mirren cannot stand, which alleges Catherine the Great - whose death was in 1796 - passed away while having sex with a horse.</p> <p>“I hate that in history men can sleep with anyone they want but women are punished for their sexuality. There was always the intimation that Catherine was some sort of debauched, mad, sexual creature, but those rumours absolutely weren’t true,” she said. </p> <p>German-born Catherine became ruler of Russia after deposing her husband, Emperor Peter III - a violent, drunken bully.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4PPuXCjo-R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B4PPuXCjo-R/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Sky Atlantic Italia (@skyatlanticit)</a> on Oct 30, 2019 at 3:00am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Despite having a successful ruling, Catherine’s sex life was at the forefront of public and media gossip, which historians believe was a method used to detract from her powerful and influential leadership. </p> <p>Legend says Catherine the Great’s libido was so powerful that she was enticed to sleep with a horse and died while a leather harness holding the horse above her snapped and Catherine was crushed to death. </p> <p>While it is a widely debated myth, many assume it is whispers of misogynists attempting to tarnish the extraordinary achievements of the ruler. </p> <p>“It’s appalling the way history treats successful, powerful women. It has to pull them down. Her unbelievable achievements were very successful, obfuscated by history,” Mirren told<span> </span><a href="https://www.thesun.co.uk/">The Sun.</a></p> <p>“I have feminist friends who say, ‘Oh, what are you going to do about the horse?’, which of course is a complete lie, a classic way of belittling her.”</p>

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Hugh Jackman receives hilarious 50th birthday message from actor Ryan Reynolds

<p>Ryan Reynolds has delivered a very special message to Australian actor Hugh Jackman </p> <p>The<span> </span>Deadpool<span> </span>star and the<span> </span>Wolverine<span> </span>actor have been at a playful head for years now, but for Jackman’s birthday Reynolds has pulled out all guns so the former Marvel movie star can return to his character and appear next to Reynolds for a film. </p> <p>Reynolds kept the trolling going with a 50th birthday message for Jackman during his<span> </span><em>The Man. The Music. The Show. </em>concert at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.</p> <p>In a surprise video posted to social media, Jackman shared a hilarious Reynolds wearing a birthday party hat starting off a sweet message to his friend. </p> <p>“Hello Hugh. I was just going to wish you a happy birthday,” the Deadpool star said. </p> <p>“Then I saw what you said. In a word, ‘hurtful.’ Enjoy the show, Hugh Jackman.”</p> <p>Reynolds then belted out the “Happy Birthday” song for the Aussie star — but ended it with his own expletive-filled message.</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/B3kABhRlKUS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/B3kABhRlKUS/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Man The Music The Show 🎩 (@themanthemusictheshow)</a> on Oct 13, 2019 at 7:56am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“And I’m not even f—ing professionally trained Jackman you piece of s—,” Reynolds yelled at the camera as he gave the middle finger, which was censored, at the very end of the video.</p> <p>In his tweet featuring the birthday message video, Jackman wrote, “At first I thought – Ugh, now I actually have to apologize. But then … @VancityReynolds.”</p> <p>Scroll through the gallery above to see the duo’s hilarious years together. </p>

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