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Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster reunite after 30 years

<div class="post_body_wrapper"> <div class="post_body"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in"> <p>Movie legends Anthony Hopkins and Jodie Foster reunited via Zoom to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the release of<span> </span><em>The Silence of the Lambs</em>.</p> <p>The pair were happy to see each other and reminisced about their experiences during and after filming.</p> <p>"It's a life-changing adventure, that movie, for both of us," Foster said during a one-hour remote conversation for<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://variety.com/2021/film/news/jodie-foster-anthony-hopkins-silence-of-the-lambs-30th-anniversary-1234887496/" target="_blank">Variety's Actors on Actors</a>.</p> <p>"I'm sure you still get people who come up to you and say, 'Would you like a nice Chianti?'" she joked to Hopkins.</p> <p>"Oh yeah, they do!" he agreed.</p> <p>Hopkins also revealed the real-life inspiration behind his iconic character, the manipulative killer known as Dr. Hannibal Lector.</p> <p>"He's like a machine. He's like HAL, the computer in 2001: 'Good evening, Dave.' He just comes in like a silent shark," Hopkins explained.</p> <p>"I remember there was a teacher at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, and his name was Christopher Fettes. He was a movement teacher. He had a cutting voice, and he would slice you to pieces. His analysis of what you were doing was so precise; it's a method that stayed with me for all my life.</p> <p>"When I was doing it, I thought, 'This is Chris Fettes. This is the voice. This man is merciless.' I remember the cage scene, when I said, 'No!' Wrong, try it again. That, to anyone, to the observer, the recipient of that, is lethal and charismatic."</p> <p>He also recalled one of his favourite scenes involving Foster, which is where her character FBI cadet Clarice Starling gets into a Quantico elevator with her much taller male colleagues.</p> <p>"I'm like, 'This is brilliant, because you are a smaller person in this big, macho male world, coming in as the hero,'" Hopkins noted.</p> <p>Foster then shared the most important part of her character was nailing her rural West Virginia accent.</p> <p>"She had this quietness. There was almost a shame that she wasn't bigger, that she wasn't stronger, this person trying to overcome the failure of the body they were born in,' she explained.</p> <p>"I understood that was her strength. In some ways, she was just like the victims - another girl in another town. The fact that she could relate to those victims made her the hero."</p> <p>The classic film went on to win the five big Academy Awards, which are best picture, best director (Jonathan Demme, best actor (Hopkins), best actress (Foster) and best adapted screenplay (Ted Tally).</p> </div> </div> </div>

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Guide to the classics: My Brilliant Career and its uncompromising message for girls today

<p>Growing up in Australia in the 1970s, I much preferred the hijinks of Han Solo and Chewie to Princess Leia’s sexualised damsel in distress. My sister and I spent an entire summer pigging out on Choc Wedges and Barney Bananas so we could collect the men’s cricket team on specially marked sticks. Feminism seemed a world “far, far away”. Yet what Australian girls could and couldn’t do was being explored through a glut of screen adaptations of classic novels.</p> <p>These included Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975), The Getting of Wisdom (1977), Seven Little Australians (1973) and My Brilliant Career (1979). Many revealed a depressing picture of what happened if you were different, clever or outspoken. You could be: left behind while other girls are led through a mysterious rock portal, the subject of school bullying, or crushed more literally by a falling tree in an act of sacrificial redemption.</p> <p>My Brilliant Career offered an alternative. Sybylla Melvyn, its “little bush commoner,” remains untamed and unapologetic. She would be modelled on author Miles Franklin herself, who mailed the manuscript to her literary idol, Henry Lawson. He subsequently provided a rousing endorsement and saw through its publication.</p> <p>My Brilliant Career emerged in 1901, the same year as Federation, and aligned women’s independence with national independence through a symbolic coming-of-age narrative.</p> <p>While Australian women received the right to vote the following year, My Brilliant Career voiced an irrepressible desire to be heard. Addressed to “My dear fellow Australians,” Melvyn (or Franklin) argues the story seeks to improve on other autobiographies by telling a collective truth: “This is not a romance … neither is it a novel, but simply a yarn — a real yarn”.</p> <p>As such, My Brilliant Career blends the intimacy of life writing with the broader scope of a story being retold. My Brilliant Career is everywoman’s career as much as it is the career of Australia.</p> <p><strong>A hoydenish tomboy</strong><br />Sybylla is a highly likeable but flawed heroine, kicking around a crowded home and lamenting the “agonizing monotony, narrowness, and absolute uncongeniality” of teenage life.</p> <p>The family has fallen on hard times, shifting from three stations and 200,000 acres to the small and “stagnant” Possum Gully. Dick Melvyn, once his daughter’s “hero, confidant, encyclopedia, mate, and even religion”, reneges all paternal responsibility by turning to drink after a series of failed speculations.</p> <p>Franklin captures the resulting strain between Sybylla’s hardworking mother and her eldest daughter. As Sybylla knocks about as a hoydenish tomboy and dreams of joining the ranks of poets like Gordon, Lawson and Paterson, her mother sees only domestic uselessness and self-centredness.</p> <p>Sent with her siblings to the local school, mingling with the Italian migrants at nearby diggings, and absorbing pub slang when retrieving her father, Sybylla has a democratic outlook:</p> <p><em>To me the Prince of Wales will be no more than a shearer, unless when I meet him he displays some personality apart from his princeship — otherwise he can go hang.</em></p> <p>Such colourful vernacular underscores how Franklin mobilises a living language, as much as a bush landscape, to generate national distinctiveness.</p> <p>Packed off to her grandmother’s to be transformed into more marriageable material, Sybylla soon navigates a class-bound squattocracy with limited options. Besides her mother’s descent into drudgery, her Aunt Helen has been forced to return to the family home after her husband’s desertion. Sybylla realises with</p> <p><em>a great blow that it was only men who could take the world by its ears and conquer their fate, while women, metaphorically speaking, were forced to sit with tied hands and patiently suffer as the waves of fate tossed them hither and thither.</em></p> <p>She is critical of women’s value being reduced to an index of their beauty but also internalises it to think herself plain and unappealing. In this, she is proved wrong, for her unpretentious liveliness attracts a number of possible suitors, including neighbouring hunk, Harry Beecham.</p> <p>For the 1979 film, Gillian Armstrong perfectly cast then little-known Judy Davis as the pimply, unkempt Sybylla, a far cry from the Chiko Roll or Big M girls then gracing Australian billboards and TV.</p> <p>My mother, now in her 80s, still raves about Sam Neill’s blue eyes as the dashing Beecham. Both Franklin and Armstrong build the chemistry in Sybylla and Harry’s courtship, emphasising an equality of energy and wit.</p> <p><strong>A higher love</strong><br />Distinguishing between sexual passion and friendship love, Aunt Helen advises Sybylla she might receive and find real love in the latter. Yet Sybylla seeks a higher love.</p> <p>Having “learnt them by heart”, the “men I loved” are the poets and she continues her “hope that one day I would clasp hands with them, and feel and know the unspeakable comfort and heart rest of congenial companionship”.</p> <p>Sybylla holds to a Romantic view of the poet as both bard of the people and transcendent. The poet must be “Alone because his soul is as far above common mortals as common mortals are above monkeys.” This drives her sense there is something more than her appointed lot in life.</p> <p>While Harry is prepared to “give” Sybylla “a study” and “truckload of writing gear” so she can pursue her career, Sybylla refuses his marriage proposal. She reflects, “He offered me everything — but control.”</p> <p>Realising she needs an unfettered life, she knows she would ultimately destroy Harry’s “honest heart”. At the same time, there is little possibility of finding an ideal mate, who would be someone who has similarly “suffered” for their dreams.</p> <p>My Brilliant Career not only captured the frustration of women at the turn of the century; it refused to end happily. Whereas the novel ends with Sybylla stuck and wearisome at Possum Gully, the film has her hopeful at the fence-line sending off her finished manuscript. Even in the 1970s, a choice between career and love seemed harsh.</p> <p>Whereas Franklin suggests that women’s path to success requires lonely self-determination, second-wave feminism emphasised collective consciousness-raising, even if that forum of voices remained faultily selective in its whiteness.</p> <p><strong>A social divide</strong><br />While representing the “rope of class distinction” drawing “tighter” around Australian working men and women, My Brilliant Career revealed a social divide marked as much by race as class and gender. The Irish M’Swats, for whom Sybylla is forced to become a governess to repay her father’s debt, are depicted as uncivilised in their dirtiness.</p> <p>The Aborigines exist as unnamed servants, their culture similarly dismissed. Servant girl Jane Haizelip tells Sybylla of her disdain for the men at Possum Gully: “They let the women work too hard. It puts me in mind er the time wen the black fellows made the gins do all the work.”</p> <p>While Franklin occasionally employs a slave rhetoric to emphasise female oppression, one is struck by the novel’s racial inequities.</p> <p>Many of the problems in My Brilliant Career remain prescient: drought, bushfire, economic depression and social precarity. Whereas second-wave feminists advocated having it all, too often the message today is that women can’t expect to have love, family and career simultaneously.</p> <p>Franklin achieved fame and showed women as central to Australian literature. I hope my daughter’s generation keep her spirit but that the yarn becomes one of shared, all-round fulfilment.</p> <p><em>An adaptation of My Brilliant Career is at Sydney’s Belvoir St Theatre until January 31.</em></p> <p><em>Written by Ann Vickery. This article first appeared on The Conversation.</em></p>

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“You’re f***ing gone”: Furious Tom Cruise lashes out on set of Mission Impossible

<p>Furious Tom Cruise has ripped into workers who broke COVID rules on the set of Mission: Impossible, screaming: “If I see you doing it again, you’re f***ing gone.”</p> <p>The Hollywood superstar has gone the extra mile to make sure tight social-distancing rules were being implemented during the filming, which is taking place in Britain.</p> <p>And after coming across two of the crew members standing within two metres of each other, he quickly flew into a rage.</p> <p>The Sun published the audio recording, which heard Cruise shouting: “If I see you do it again, you’re f***ing gone. And if anyone in this crew does it, that’s it — and you too and you too. And you, don’t you ever f***ing do it again.”</p> <p>50 staff members at Warner Bros. Studios in Leavesden, Herts, were left shocked by the angry outburst.</p> <p>The 58-year-old was furious that his efforts to keep filming going during a pandemic could be at risk.</p> <p>He went on: “They’re back there in Hollywood making movies right now because of us. “We are creating thousands of jobs, you motherf***ers.</p> <p>“That’s it. No apologies. You can tell it to the people that are losing their f***ing homes because our industry is shut down. “</p> <p>“We are not shutting this f***ing movie down. Is it understood? If I see it again, you’re f***ing gone.”</p> <p>A source said: “Tom has taken it upon himself, along with the health and safety department, to try to force the safety precautions, with a view to keeping the film running.</p> <p>“He does daily rounds to make sure that everything is set up appropriately, that people are behaving and working as safely as they can. He is very proactive when it comes to safety.”</p> <p>They added: “Everyone was wearing masks. It was purely that these people were standing under a metre away from each other.</p> <p>“It isn’t known whether he saw those guys breaking the rules before or whether this was the straw that broke the camel’s back.</p> <p>“People make mistakes and they slip up, but Tom is just on it.”</p> <p><strong>Tom’s rant, in full:</strong></p> <p>“We want the gold standard. They’re back there in Hollywood making movies right now because of us! Because they believe in us and what we’re doing!</p> <p>I’m on the phone with every f***ing studio at night, insurance companies, producers, and they’re looking at us and using us to make their movies. We are creating thousands of jobs you motherf***ers.</p> <p>I don’t ever want to see it again, ever! And if you don’t do it you’re fired, if I see you do it again you’re f***ing gone. And if anyone in this crew does it – that’s it, and you too and you too. And you, don’t you ever f***ing do it again.</p> <p>That’s it! No apologies. You can tell it to the people that are losing their f***ing homes because our industry is shut down. It’s not going to put food on their table or pay for their college education.</p> <p>That’s what I sleep with every night. The future of this f***ing industry! So I’m sorry I am beyond your apologies. I have told you and now I want it and if you don’t do it you’re out. We are not shutting this f***ing movie down! Is it understood?</p> <p>If I see it again you’re f***ing gone — and you are — so you’re going to cost him his job, if I see it on the set you’re gone and you’re gone.</p> <p>That’s it. Am I clear?</p> <p>Do you understand what I want? Do you understand the responsibility that you have? Because I will deal with your reason. And if you can’t be reasonable and I can’t deal with your logic, you’re fired. That’s it. That is it.</p> <p>I trust you guys to be here. That’s it. That’s it guys. Have a little think about it …[inaudible].</p> <p>That’s what I think of Universal and Paramount. Warner Brothers. Movies are going because of us. If we shut down it’s going to cost people f***ing jobs, their home, their family. That’s what’s happening.</p> <p>All the way down the line. And I care about you guys, but if you’re not going to help me you’re gone. OK? Do you see that stick? How many metres is that?</p> <p>When people are standing around a f***ing computer and hanging out around here, what are you doing? And if they don’t comply then send their names to Matt Spooner. That’s it.”</p>

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“Awful”: Steve Price slams upcoming Port Arthur movie

<p>The film about the 1996 Port Arthur massacre has proven to be a massive controversy, with many saying it should not be made.</p> <p>On Wednesday night’s episode of The Project, Lisa Wilkinson asked Steve Price his opinion on the upcoming film.</p> <p>“A controversial new film about the 1996 Port Arthur massacre has been widely condemned. It is due for release next year. Survivors have branded it ‘tasteless and inappropriate,’” Lisa stated.</p> <p>“The film focuses on the gunman who killed 32 people and injured 23 others in what became one of Australia’s worst mass shootings.”</p> <p>“Steve Price was at the scene after that horrific event unfolded in 1996.</p> <p>“There are films made about 9/11, World War II and here in Australia about Snowtown. What is different about this one?” Lisa asks.</p> <p>“Well, Lisa, I think it is probably too soon and too close to home. I mean, the 35 people who were killed there, their relatives today I would think would be having flashbacks,” Price said.</p> <p>“The 21 people injured by that gunman would be feeling uncomfortable. I saw an interview back with Walter who did it from the ABC, where he was talking about how he lost his wife and his two children and he described how the gunman had left the cafe and was driving back down the road. He saw his wife. He jumped out of the car. He killed her. He then shot one of the daughters. The other was hiding behind a tree. He turned around the side of that tree and gunned her down as well. I stood in front of that tree the day after that happened and I can tell you, and I wasn’t there on the day but I was there the next day, it still haunts me. It was an awful feeling and awful place and it would be an awful movie.”</p> <p>“Is it fair to protest a film – we don’t know what is in the film. Is it fair to protest a film which has not been made yet?” asked co-host Joel Creasey.</p> <p>“We all know how it ends and the end is grim and awful. I don’t know what sort of job this filmmaker will make of this movie. I won’t see it. I am sure anyone there on the day will avoid it at all costs. I agree it should not be made,” he said.</p> <p>“I don’t see the point in making something which was an awful stain on our history.”</p> <p>Waleed Aly asked him whether the film could be seen as a crucial way to learn lessons from the tragedy, as there was no trial.</p> <p>“It sounds like an important story to tell. Isn’t this a way to do that?” Waleed asked.</p> <p>But Price didn’t think so.</p> <p>“The big lesson we learn is there’s no place in Australian homes for automatic and semiautomatic weapons. We learnt that John Howard took guns off people after that. A lot of people turned weapons in and we’ve not had as may a mass shooting as that ever since. That is the lesson we learnt. What did we learn about the gunman? What we have learnt today is we’re not using his name. That is a good lesson. I don’t though how a movie can be made without using the person it is about and saying their name.”</p> <p>The movie based around the events leading up to the horrible tragedy will make its cinematic debut in 2021.</p>

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Sean Connery: his five best Bond movies rated

<p>Obituaries for <a href="https://theconversation.com/sean-connery-bond-james-bond-but-so-much-more-149238">Sean Connery</a> all over the world remind us of what a versatile actor he was, starring in films as diverse as Alfred Hitchcock’s 1964 <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058329/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Marnie</a> and Brian de Palma’s 1987 <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0094226/">The Untouchables</a>. But it is the character of James Bond, <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/films/news/sean-connery-death-cause-james-bond-007-michael-caine-hated-b1478316.html">which he allegedly came to hate</a>, that film fans will inevitably associate with the rugged features of the Scottish actor who first played the role in Dr. No in 1962.</p> <p>Connery’s Bond embodied the postwar ideal of masculinity, a complex mix of old-fashioned charm and tough virility, loyalty to “Queen and Country”, and relaxed sexual mores. <a href="http://jamesbondmemes.blogspot.com/2012/04/women-want-to-be-with-him-men-want-to.html">Raymond Mortimer</a> wrote at the time, in his review of Fleming’s On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1963): “James Bond is what every man would like to be, and what every woman would like between her sheets.”</p> <p>Like his literary incarnation, the cinematic Bond launched by Connery caused disdain and thrilled audiences of both sexes in equal measures. Reviewing Goldfinger, film critic <a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=oXxZAAAAMAAJ&amp;q=%E2%80%98The+constantly+lurking+viciousness,+and+the+glamorisation+of+violence+%E2%80%A6+the+carefully+timed+peaks+of+titillation+and+the+skilfully+contrived+sensationalism%E2%80%99&amp;dq=%E2%80%98The+constantly+lurking+viciousness,+and+the+glamorisation+of+violence+%E2%80%A6+the+carefully+timed+peaks+of+titillation+and+the+skilfully+contrived+sensationalism%E2%80%99&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwieiu6wjOHsAhUlQUEAHey1C34Q6AEwAHoECAAQAg">Nina Hibbin</a> remained unimpressed by the Bond formula of “constantly lurking viciousness, and the glamorisation of violence … the carefully timed peaks of titillation and the skilfully contrived sensationalism”. Meantime, the late <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/apr/06/honor-blackman-obituary">Honor Blackman</a>, who played alongside him in <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0058150/">Goldfinger</a>, described working with Connery as “<a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=dbijDwAAQBAJ&amp;pg=PT13&amp;dq=romping+about+on+international+locations+with+the+sexiest+man+ever+seen+on+screen&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwiBn_zsiuHsAhVVilwKHe6NAYQQ6AEwAHoECAYQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=romping%20about%20on%20international%20locations%20with%20the%20sexiest%20man%20ever%20seen%20on%20screen&amp;f=false">romping about on international locations with the sexiest man ever seen on screen</a>”.</p> <p>Connery’s Bond may get his Savile Row suit dirty, but he never loses his cool. Ruthless with his enemies, he’s not afraid of hurting many a female villain who threatens the success of his missions. He’s also, of course, an irresistible lover, able to seduce even those, like Pussy Galore, who claim “immunity” to his charms.</p> <p>But is there more to Connery’s Bond than backward machismo and dubious race politics? Here are my top five Connery Bond films, and why you may want to watch them again:</p> <p><strong>1. Goldfinger (Guy Hamilton, 1964)</strong></p> <p>A beautiful woman whose spectacular death, and gold-painted lifeless body – remains, for better or worse, one of the most iconic images in the history of the franchise. A squad of female pilots is led by the talented Pussy Galore, whose name is an ironic reference to her sexuality. <em>Goldfinger</em> is a criminal genius, whose plan to make the US gold reserves radioactive in order to increase the value of his own is nothing short of brilliant, and whose laser beam poses a literal threat to <a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books/about/The_James_Bond_Phenomenon.html?id=x9-1QY5boUsC&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;source=kp_read_button&amp;redir_esc=y#v=onepage&amp;q=laser&amp;f=false">Bond’s virility</a>.</p> <p>A Korean henchman in a lethal bowler hat is a parody of the quintessential Englishness, which trilby-wearing Connery – a proud Scotsman – also “performs”. These manifestations of ambivalent gender and race politics, more recently picked up in Anthony Horowitz’s sequel Bond novel, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/books/2015/may/28/new-james-bond-novel-trigger-mortis-pussy-galore-anthony-horowitz">Trigger Mortis</a>, make it, if anything, even more relevant to watch today.</p> <p><strong>2. Dr No (Terence Young, 1962)</strong></p> <p>Set in Ian Fleming’s beloved Jamaica, hints of Sinophobia lurk in the figure of Dr. No, whose Chinese ethnicity is conveyed through the Asian style of the clothes he wears. The first cinematic “Bond Girl” makes a memorable entrance wearing an equally memorable <a href="https://www.tatler.com/article/ursula-andress-dr-no-honey-ryder-bikini-auction-los-angeles">white bikini</a>. But the fact that Honey Ryder also wears a knife around her waist suggests that she’s more than eye-candy.</p> <p>We’re also told she has used a black widow spider to kill an abusive landlord in the past. Just like Dr. No threatens the authority of white British Bond, so Honey represents a challenge to the patriarchal order he represents. She is a new kind of woman, as <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2hC8Frhicg&amp;list=PLGiXHXUUO-jMHt4O8nAslNZ5UBHd_cZZ7&amp;index=10">Andress claims</a>, physically strong and ready to take part in the action.</p> <p><strong>3. From Russia with Love (Terence Young, 1963)</strong></p> <p>The romantic settings – Istanbul, the Orient Express train journey – and the beautiful co-star, Daniela Bianchi, who plays defecting Soviet spy Tania Romanova, may fool us into thinking that this may be a Cold War “Romeo and Juliet” love story. Tania is, however, less interested in Bond and more attracted to the other tempting luxuries of the West that he may help her achieve.</p> <p>The poisoned blade concealed in the toe of villain Rosa Klebb’s shoe, provides another unforgettable moment in the film franchise, and one that insinuates further doubts about Bond’s invulnerable masculinity. And while at the end of Fleming’s novel, Bond is left for dead, in the film, it is Tania’s quick thinking and good aim that saves his life.</p> <p><strong>4. Thunderball (Terence Young, 1965)</strong></p> <p>Still, according to <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/travisbean/2020/04/18/all-26-james-bond-films-ranked-at-the-box-office/">Forbes</a>, the highest grossing film of the franchise, <em>Thunderball</em> sees Bond in action in the Bahamas, a place which would remain close to Connery’s heart until his death in Nassau on October 31 2020.</p> <p>As the action unfolds around the beautiful island setting, and its treacherous coastline, Bond’s life is threatened by SPECTRE operative Emilio Largo (Adolfo Celi), and especially Fiona Volpe (Luciana Paluzzi), one of the many phenomenal female drivers in the film franchise – and a woman who is confident enough to ridicule his alleged sexual prowess. But it is the leading Bond Girl, Domino Derval (Claudine Auger), who, again, saves Bond’s life by shooting a harpoon at Largo.</p> <p><strong>5. You Only Live Twice (Lewis Gilbert, 1967)</strong></p> <p>We may raise an eyebrow at Bond’s dubious transformation into a Japanese man, the patriarchal attitudes towards women presented as traditional of Japan, not helped by the lukewarm performance by Mie Hama, who plays what has been described as “<a href="https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=auaECgAAQBAJ&amp;printsec=frontcover&amp;dq=lisa+funnel+lotus+blossom&amp;hl=en&amp;sa=X&amp;ved=2ahUKEwjHgOmKkOHsAhUJZcAKHf8ZAowQ6AEwAXoECAYQAg#v=onepage&amp;q=lotus&amp;f=false">servile Lotus Blossom</a>” Kissy Suzuki, but there is enough charisma between the other female roles in the film, Aki (Akiko Wakabayashi) and Helga Brandt (Karin Dor), to make up for Kissy’s submissiveness.</p> <p>Both die, the latter in a spectacularly sadistic execution in a piranha pool. But Helga also very nearly mutilates Bond with a surgical scalpel and chucks a lipstick bomb at him before parachuting herself out of the plane she has been flying. A “bombshell” she may be, but not on the terms set by the men who try to control her.</p> <p>Most of us will cringe, today, at the bottom-slapping, the “man-talk” and the colonial attitudes that we see in the early Bond movies. But Connery’s Bond is more nuanced than we think and his white British masculinity is rarely left unchallenged. He was a Bond for his time.</p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/monica-germana-415866">Monica Germanà</a>, University of Westminster. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/sean-connery-his-five-best-bond-movies-rated-149240">The Conversation.</a></em></p>

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“Things were different”: Olivia Newton-John hits back at Grease sexism claims

<p>Olivia Newton-John had addressed backlash surrounding her classic 1979 movie Grease.</p> <p>In the smash hit musical, the Aussie actress plays goody-two-shoes Sandy Olsson who changes who she is at the end of the movie to impress her bad-boy boyfriend, Danny Zuko (played by John Travolta).</p> <p>Despite the final scene being hailed as one of the most iconic movie screen moments, in recent times it’s been classified as sexist.</p> <p>Speaking to The Guardian, Newton-John said critics need to take into account that the movie was filmed during a very different time period.</p> <p>"It's a movie," the 72-year-old told the publication. "It's a story from the Fifties where things were different. Everyone forgets that, at the end, he changes for her, too. There's nothing deep in there about the #MeToo movement.</p> <p>"It's just a girl who loves a guy, and she thinks if she does that, he'll like her. And he thinks if he does that, she'll like him. I think that's pretty real. People do that for each other. It was a fun love story."</p> <p>Back in 2018, when the film celebrated its 40th birthday, Travolta also said he was proud of the film and how it remains a fan favourite with audiences both new and old.</p> <p>"This is a film that's so timeless that keeps on giving to each new generation," he told <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.etonline.com/john-travolta-shares-his-most-vivid-memories-from-filming-grease-exclusive-104277" target="_blank">ET</a> at the time. "When people watch this, they just get happy. They want to become the characters they're watching. They want to sing along with it, they want to dance, they want to be part of this film. When mutual enthusiasm comes together and creates an environment you can create almost anything and we created Grease."</p>

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My best worst film: Pink Flamingos – “one of the most vile, stupid and repulsive films ever made”?

<p><em>In a new series by The Conversation, writers explore their best worst film. They’ll tell you what the critics got wrong – and why it’s time to give these movies another chance.</em></p> <p>While some may know John Waters through his family friendly <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0095270/">Hairspray</a> (1988) – adapted into a stage musical <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hairspray_(musical)">in 2002</a> and back to the screen <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0427327/">in 2007</a> – many know him as the Prince of Puke, the King of Bad Taste or the Pope of Trash.</p> <p>Perhaps his most notorious film is the exploitation comedy <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0069089/">Pink Flamingos</a> (1972), the first in his “Trash Trilogy”, which also includes <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0072979/">Female Trouble</a> (1974) and <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0075936/">Desperate Living</a> (1977).</p> <p>Pink Flamingos is emblematic of Waters’ camp aesthetic, juxtaposing grotesque subject matter against pastel colours, kitsch props and bubblegum pop music.</p> <p>Waters’ muse <a href="https://www.them.us/story/drag-herstory-divine">Divine</a> is Babs Johnson, the “filthiest person alive.” She lives with her mother Edie (Edith Massey), who dresses as a baby, sits in a crib and screams for eggs; her ghoulish lover Cotton (Mary Vivian Pearce); and her son Crackers (Danny Mills), who, in a particularly gruesome moment, has sex with a woman while a live chicken is crushed to death between their two bodies.</p> <p>But Babs’ title of “filthiest person alive” is at stake, and she must rival Raymond (David Lochary) and Connie Marble (Mink Stole), who kidnap women, imprison and forcefully impregnate them, and sell their babies to lesbian couples.</p> <p>Variety’s <a href="https://variety.com/1973/film/reviews/pink-flamingos-1200423192/amp/">first review</a> is now famous, calling it “one of the most vile, stupid and repulsive films ever made.”</p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838450/evergreen-5-movie-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/34ba8ffdcdd84d0ab84e873fdc198af3" /></p> <p><strong>Banned for indecency</strong></p> <p>It wasn’t just the critics who were unimpressed. When distributors tried to bring the film to Australia in 1976, it was <a href="https://www.refused-classification.com/censorship/films/p.html">banned</a> for “indecency”. A cut version was given an R rating and released that year theatrically.</p> <p>The film’s full version was eventually granted an X18+ rating, for pornographic, non-simulated sexual activity, restricting sale and hire of the film to the ACT and some regions of the NT.</p> <p>In 1997, for a 25th anniversary cinematic re-release, the uncut film was again refused. The classification board <a href="https://www.refused-classification.com/censorship/films/p.html">said</a> films could receive an R rating when sexual activity was “realistically simulated” – but not when it was “the real thing”.</p> <p>Films with unsimulated sexual activity, such as Catherine Breillat’s <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0194314/">Romance</a> (1999) and John Cameron Mitchell’s <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0367027/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Shortbus</a> (2006) have since been awarded R18+ classification, allowing the category to include them.</p> <p>But the full version of Pink Flamingos maintains an X18+ rating. Even the National Film and Sound Archive’s 2017 <a href="https://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-07-12/the-banned-and-the-beautiful-films-government-censored/8702692">screenings of banned films</a> showed a cut version rated R18+.</p> <p><strong>Stupid? No: it was groundbreaking</strong></p> <p>Despite this reception, Pink Flamingos is now heralded as groundbreaking. It shaped the boundaries of bad taste and gross out humour.</p> <p>There are several shocking scenes in the film. One sees Divine and Crackers break into the Marbles’ home where, after licking all the furniture, Divine fellates her son. Another sees a shot of a man flexing his prolapsed anus so it looks like it’s miming the words to “Surfin’ Bird”.</p> <p>But perhaps the most notorious is where, in the final scene, Divine eats dog faeces to the song “How Much is the Doggy in the Window?”.</p> <p>Just how much can you stomach when watching something disgusting?</p> <p>The characters in Pink Flamingos challenge normative ideas around sexuality, gender and family. Confronting perceptions of “good taste”, Pink Flamingos attacked an elitist culture that excluded many communities, such as queer folk and punks.</p> <p>Unlike the respectable queer characters palatable to a broad audience in <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5164432/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2">Love, Simon</a> (2018) or <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0157246/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Will &amp; Grace</a> (1998–2005, 2017–), Pink Flamingos allows us pleasure in others’ disgust at these mad characters.</p> <p>The film draws on a queer rage that channelled the discontent many viewers felt with assimilationist politics. Babs Johnson and her family were disgusting and broke the law – and the audience loved her for it.</p> <p>Pink Flamingos contributed to a camp aesthetic that is imbued in many popular queer films, such as <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0179116/">But I’m a Cheerleader</a> (1999) and <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0390418/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1">Raspberry Reich</a> (2004), and Waters’ rage became a key part of queer cinema, seen elsewhere in the <a href="https://www.vulture.com/article/new-queer-cinema-movies.html">New Queer Cinema</a> movement of the early 90s and beyond.</p> <p>In an era when films depicted queer folk as painfully banal, such as <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0065488/?ref_=fn_tt_tt_10">The Boys in the Band</a> (1970), or offensive, such as <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080569/?ref_=nv_sr_srsg_0">Cruising</a> (1980), Waters’ films were a funny and crude counterpoint.</p> <p>They were a promise of a brighter and queerer future.</p> <p>As I have argued <a href="http://www.sensesofcinema.com/2019/20-years-of-senses/divine-dog-shit-john-waters-and-disruptive-queer-humour-in-film-issue-80-september-2016/">elsewhere</a>, Waters’ films do not make explicit political statements. His ideology is conveyed through humour.</p> <p>Through co-opting the plastic, pink flamingo lawn ornament, Waters makes fun of middle class respectability. Before carrying out the punishment of the Marbles (for “asshole-ism”, no less), Babs Johnson proclaims:</p> <p><em>Kill everyone now! Condone first degree murder! Advocate cannibalism! Eat shit! Filth is my politics! Filth is my life!</em></p> <p>The humour lies in the absurdity of the situation.</p> <p>When Variety dubbed the film “one of the most vile, stupid and repulsive films ever made”, Waters used this on the posters promoting it. Waters wanted to offend people with Pink Flamingos – and if you can stomach to look past the offence, you will find a biting and hilarious film, as shocking and politically relevant as ever.</p> <p>But in revisiting Pink Flamingos, there is one scene that still doesn’t sit right with me. The on-screen deaths of the chicken (purely for the sake of comedy) are a cruelty and grotesquery that goes beyond my own sense of good taste. Everyone has their limits.</p> <p><em>Written by <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/stuart-richards-9983">Stuart Richards</a>, University of South Australia. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/my-best-worst-film-pink-flamingos-one-of-the-most-vile-stupid-and-repulsive-films-ever-made-147358">The Conversation.</a></em></p> <p> </p> <p> </p>

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Nicole Kidman raves about co-star Hugh Grant: “He is just very easy to be around”

<p>Nicole Kidman have been friends for years, and now fans will see them standing side by side in a new mini-series as man and wife.</p> <p>Starring alongside eachother in <em>The Undoing,</em> Nicole Kidman gushed about her special bond with the British actor, 60.</p> <p>Speaking to <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/news/nsw/nicole-kidman-on-hugh-grant-ahead-of-new-series-the-undoing/news-story/99277e70b93a68c765a72eaf9c243b89" target="_blank">The Daily Telegraph</a>, the 53-year-old said: “I have known Hugh for a long time now. He knows my sister and he is just very easy to be around.</p> <p>“We have to make it look like we’ve been married for 10 years and I think just having that same sense of humour and having that history together, we were able to bring some of that to the screen.”</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838403/nicole-kidman-hugh-grant.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b1f2e154db974ae8a7d37a4353807a51" /></p> <p><em>The Undoing</em> is based on the 2014 novel You Should Have Known by Jean Hanff Korelitz.</p> <p><em>The Undoing</em> follows Grace (Kidman) and Jonathan Fraser (Grant), whose beautiful life comes to a roaring halt when a violent death close to their family sets off a chaotic set of events.</p> <p>The six-episode limited series also stars Edgar Ramirez as Detective Joe Mendoza, Noah Jupe as Henry Fraser, Jonathan and Grace's precocious and artistic 12-year-old son and Lily Rabe as Sylvia Steinetz.</p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7838401/nicole-kidman-hugh-grant-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/aff330a3256942d9a79a8d5bb6631c2d" /></p> <p>The six-episode limited series was written by David E. Kelley and directed by Susanne Bier.</p>

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James Bond is more than a (sexist) secret agent. He is a fertility god, a Dionysus of the modern era

<p>James Bond is more than a (sexist) secret agent. He is a fertility god, a Dionysus of the modern era</p> <p>“History isn’t kind to people who play God,” quips James Bond to supervillain Safin in the trailer for No Time to Die.</p> <p>The film’s release has been delayed yet again, to April 2021. It will mark Daniel Craig’s swansong as 007 and speculation continues as to who will be the next Bond. Will it be Idris Elba, Tom Hardy or perhaps a woman?</p> <p>Bond has long been criticised for his sexist attitudes, with even Judi Dench’s M in GoldenEye (1995) dubbing him a “sexist, misogynist dinosaur” . But what if we view him through the prism of Greek mythology? Is Bond, in fact, a contemporary incarnation of Dionysus, the god of wine, pleasure and fertility?</p> <p>In Greek mythology, the gods punish mortals for the sin of hubris. In our pop-culture pantheon, Bond is a deity.</p> <p>Dionysus travelled throughout the ancient world, sometimes by boat in the Aegean islands, sometimes in a winged chariot. Bond also circumnavigates the globe, equally at home on yachts or in helicopters. But his chariot of choice is an Aston Martin.</p> <p>Its logo? A pair of wings.</p> <p><strong>Secrets of wine – and martinis</strong><br />Wherever Dionysus went he initiated his followers in the secrets of wine-making. Wherever Bond goes he initiates the mixologist in the secrets of making the perfect Vesper martini.</p> <p>In Ian Fleming’s Diamonds are Forever (1956), Bond tells the bartender to combine three measures of Gordon’s gin, one of vodka and half a measure of Kina Lillet with a thick slice of lemon peel and poured into a deep champagne goblet. In Casino Royale (2006), he adds the martini must be shaken “until it’s ice cold.”</p> <p>Unlike mortals, Bond’s prodigious consumption of alcohol does him no harm, indeed he is hailed as “the best shot in the Secret Service.”</p> <p>In a study of the novels published in the British Medical Journal in 2013, researchers estimated Bond consumed an average of 92 units of alcohol per week with a maximum daily intake peaking at 49.8 units.</p> <p>There were days when Bond abstained – 12.5 out of a total 87.5 days – but mostly because he was being held prisoner.</p> <p><strong>Weapons of disguise</strong><br />Dionysus carries a thyrsus: a sacred pinecone-tipped staff wreathed in vines. The thyrus is a phallic symbol, sometimes displayed with a kantharos wine cup, denoting female sexuality.</p> <p>The union of the two created a powerful representation of fertility and rebirth. Dionysus also turned his thyrsus into a dangerous weapon by secreting an iron tip in its point.</p> <p>As a secret agent, Bond conceals his Walther PPK pistol in a hidden holster, but one of his most lethal weapons is disguised as a cigarette – a potent symbol of sexual union in cinema, where smoking a cigarette signifies the completion of copulation.</p> <p>In You Only Live Twice (1967) the villain makes the fatal mistake of allowing Bond “one last fag.” It turns out to be tipped with a rocket-propelled bullet, proving that cigarettes aren’t just lethal for smokers.</p> <p><strong>Gods of possession</strong><br />Dionysus was deeply attractive to his female followers, Maenads, who would drink themselves into a frenzy to be possessed by the god. Likewise, Bond is pursued by a bevy of beautiful women – Pussy Galore, Plenty O’Toole and Honey Rider – panting to be possessed.</p> <p>As with the Maenads, devotion to Bond comes with its perils. In Live and Let Die (1973), Bond girl, Solitaire loses her psychic powers after a close encounter of the passionate kind with Bond and becomes a target for heroin baron, Dr Kananga.</p> <p>In Goldfinger (1964), Jill Masterton is punished by the eponymous villain for betraying him to Bond, dying of skin suffocation when he covers her in gold paint.</p> <p>This puts a new spin on the Midas myth in which Dionysus granted the king’s wish to be blessed with the golden touch, only to discover that it is a curse making it impossible to eat or even embrace his daughter without turning her into metal.</p> <p><strong>Ecstasy and death</strong><br />In ancient Greece, the number seven was sacred and composed of the number three (the heavenly male) and the number four (the heavenly female). Bond’s number in the secret service – Agent 007 – is thus the perfect number to represent a modern-day fertility god.</p> <p>Like Dionysus who is depicted in a number of forms which range from an older, bearded god to a long-haired youth, Bond has appeared in a variety of guises from the debonair David Niven to the strapping Daniel Craig.</p> <p>Yet regardless of his age and physique, Bond’s dual Dionysian nature brings either divine ecstasy in bed, or brutal death to his foes.</p> <p>Dionysus almost dies before he is born but his father Zeus saves him. Later he returns from the dead after he is dismembered by the Titans.</p> <p>Bond says, “You only live twice: once when you are born and once when you look death in the face.”</p> <p>Like Dionysus, Bond is resurrected in Skyfall (2012) after he is accidentally shot by Moneypenny. The bullet penetrates his body causing him to fall off a train and into a waterfall where he sinks to the bottom. But Bond is immortal. He returns to save another day.</p> <p>When it finally reaches cinemas, No Time to Die will be the last hurrah for Craig, but gods do not die. Bond will live on.</p> <p><em>Written by Nicole Lenoir-Jourdan. This article first appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/james-bond-is-more-than-a-sexist-secret-agent-he-is-a-fertility-god-a-dionysus-of-the-modern-era-131040">The Conversation</a>.</em></p>

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Chris Hemsworth lands new role in prequel to Aussie cult classic

<p>Chris Hemsworth has said he is “pretty damn fired up” after confirming he will star in a Mad Max prequel alongside Anya Taylor-Joy.</p> <p>The Aussie actor said it will be an “honour” to appear in George Miller’s eagerly awaited follow-up to acclaimed 2015 blockbuster Mad Max: Fury Road.</p> <p>The movie, called Furiosa, will see Taylor-Joy in the lead role and will also feature 34-year-old American actor Yahya Abdul-Mateen II.</p> <p>It will explore the story of a character played by Charlize Theron in Fury Road, which garnered praise for its portrayal of the strong female lead.</p> <p>The Thor actor took to Instagram to say: "Pretty damn fired up to be a part of a franchise that meant the world to me as a kid growing up in Australia.</p> <p>"Mad Max was the pinnacle and a huge reason why I got into the business of telling stories.</p> <p>"The fact that I'll have the honour of not only being directed by its original visionary in George Miller but also take part in Furiosa's origin story is incredibly exciting."</p> <p>The Hollywood star said he has “huge respect” for Miller, Theron and her Fury Road co-star Tom Hardy, and added: "I'll do my best to continue the tradition of cinematic badassery."</p> <p>Australian filmmaker said he originally thought of recasting 45-year-old Theron as Furiosa and with the use of de-aging technology, she could discover the character’s origins.</p> <p>But he then decided to cast 24-year-old Taylor-Joy, an American-born Argentine-British actress.</p> <p>Fury Road was a huge critical and commercial success and scored 10 Oscar nominations, including for best picture and best director. It won six, including for costume design and production design.</p>

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Nicole Kidman’s rare admission on marriage with Tom Cruise: “We were happy”

<p>Nicole Kidman has made a rare statement about her marriage to Tom Cruise.</p> <p>The star opened up in an interview with the<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/10/05/magazine/nicole-kidman-interview.html" target="_blank">New York Times</a><span> </span>where the Australian actress said that she and 58-year-old Cruise were “happily married” while filming the 1999 film Eyes Wide Shut.</p> <p>In the film they played a married couple who dealt with infidelity.</p> <p>When Kidman was asked if working on the film gave her any "negative feelings" towards her relationship with Cruise, she simply responded, "That fits the narrative that people came up with, but I definitely didn't see it like that."</p> <p>"We were happily married through that," she said.</p> <p>"We would go go-kart racing after those scenes. We'd rent out a place and go racing at three in the morning. I don't know what else to say. Maybe I don't have the ability to look back and dissect it. Or I'm not willing to."</p> <p>Before the couple officially split in 2001, Kidman and Cruise adopted two kids.</p> <p>They share their daughter Isabella, now 27, and son Connor, now 25.</p> <p>The Big Little Lies star also revealed her experience on working with director Stanley Kubrick, who sadly died at age 70, not long after the film was completed.</p> <p>"We loved working with him. We shot that for two years," she revealed.</p> <p>"We had two kids and were living in a trailer on the lot primarily, making spaghetti because Stanley liked to eat with us sometimes. We were working with the greatest filmmaker and learning about our lives and enjoying our lives on set.</p> <p>"We would say, 'When is it going to end?' We went over there thinking it was going to be three months. It turned into a year, a year and a half. But you go, 'As long as I surrender to what this is, I'm going to have an incredible time'."</p> <p>Five years after the pair ended their marriage, the Mission: Impossible star married Katie Holmes, 41.</p> <p>The pair share daughter Suri, 14, and were married for six years before Holmes filed for divorce.</p> <p>Kidman tied the knot with musician Keith Urban in June 2006 and have welcomed two daughters together: Sunday, 12, and Faith, nine.</p>

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Hugh Jackman surprises fan with beautiful gesture

<p><span>Hugh Jackman is famously known as the nicest guy in Hollywood, and we’re not surprised after he surprised a young fan on Tuesday with a beautiful birthday video via Instagram.</span><br /><br /><span>“Hi Julia. I’m so proud of you. Keep concentrating! I love @elmo too. Happy birthday! Love Hugh,” the 51-year-old captioned the clip shared on his social media account.</span><br /><br /><span>Hugh’s video was to a young girl named Julia.</span><br /><br /><span>She had previously recorded a message to the Aussie actor in which she said she learnt to say the word “concentrate” after watching him teach viewers how to say it on ‘Sesame Street’ in 2010.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFcIC4gj_O_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CFcIC4gj_O_/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Hugh Jackman (@thehughjackman)</a> on Sep 22, 2020 at 5:51am PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>In his sweet birthday message, the movie star told Julia, “You’re doing so well. I’m going to practice hard today as well”.</span><br /><br /><span>He then quoted P. T. Barnum, who Hugh portrayed in ‘The Greatest Showman’ in 2017.</span><br /><br /><span>“Like P. T. Barnum said, ‘no one made a difference by being like anyone else’. Happy birthday,” the actor said.</span><br /><br /><span>Monday he might have missed out on an Emmy award but his gracious reaction overshadowed his loss to Mark Ruffalo.</span><br /><br /><span>He applauded and cheered on Mark when he was announced as the winner in the Outstanding Lead Actor in a Limited Series or Movie Category for his performance in ‘I Know This Much Is True’.</span></p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr">can we talk about how happy hugh jackman was when he saw that mark had won 🥺 this is why i love this man 💓 congratulations to mark ruffalo <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Emmys?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Emmys</a> <a href="https://t.co/HqZdmIUdLt">pic.twitter.com/HqZdmIUdLt</a></p> — han (@hughguessedit) <a href="https://twitter.com/hughguessedit/status/1307859603057672193?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">September 21, 2020</a></blockquote> <p><br /><span>Hugh had been nominated for his role in ‘Bad Education’, was seen fist pumping the air with his wife Deborra-Lee Furness by his side in a live stream that was filmed from the comfort of their home.</span></p>

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Where are the films starring successful women entrepreneurs?

<p><a href="https://www.hbo.com/documentaries/the-inventor-out-for-blood-in-silicon-valley">The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley</a>, now streaming in Australia on Binge, depicts Theranos founder and former CEO Elizabeth Holmes as a bewitching sociopath.</p> <p>Holmes wanted to revolutionise health care by providing a simple and cheap way to perform blood tests using only a finger prick. In 2003, she founded Theranos, with a vision of the company’s machines in every home in America.</p> <p>But, as the Wall Street Journal’s John Carreyrou <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/theranos-has-struggled-with-blood-tests-1444881901">revealed</a> in 2015, Holmes created an intricate web of deception. Even as machines found their way into chemists and were being used by medical insurance companies, they never actually worked.</p> <p>Holmes put patients’ lives at risk and cost investors millions of dollars.</p> <p>The documentary is compelling viewing, but as it enters a very slim field of movies about female entrepreneurs it is worth questioning the impact of the stories we choose to tell.</p> <p><strong>Fall from grace</strong></p> <p>The journey Holmes took from young idol to spectacular failure is a story about systemic issues and the <a href="https://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/silicon-valley-work-culture/">sometimes toxic</a> culture of the world of start-ups.</p> <p>Prior to the scandal breaking, Holmes was <a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/12/15/blood-simpler">celebrated in the media</a>. She was portrayed as a Stanford University dropout with a vision for changing the world. She raised hundreds of millions of dollars from powerful men in a start-up landscape known for its <a href="https://hbr.org/2020/01/how-the-vc-pitch-process-is-failing-female-entrepreneurs">discriminating funding practices</a>.</p> <p>She made the <a href="https://www.forbes.com/profile/elizabeth-holmes/#338f337c47a7">cover</a> of Forbes magazine in 2014 as the world’s youngest self-made female billionaire. Holmes represented a heady mix of tech, science and business. She was the golden girl of the start-up world.</p> <p>This made her fall from grace even more spectacular.</p> <p>But compare Holmes’ portrayal with another well known example of a deceitful male entrepreneur: <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/feb/28/wolf-of-wall-street-jordan-belfort-sex-drugs">Jordan Belfort</a>, the “wolf of Wall Street”.</p> <p>Belfort ran an elaborate crime scheme linked to manipulating the stock market and was jailed for 22 months for securities fraud. Nonetheless, his <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/522776.The_Wolf_of_Wall_Street">autobiography</a> and Martin Scorsese’s 2013 <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0993846/">film adaptation</a> depict Belfort’s story as celebration of wealth and power, rather than a critical review of his fraudulent behaviour.</p> <p><strong>Where are all the good stories?</strong></p> <p>Feature films about female entrepreneurs are few and far between.</p> <p><a href="https://journals.aom.org/doi/abs/10.5465/AMBPP.2020.21276abstract">Research</a> from one of the authors examined English-language films from 1986 to 2016 with female entrepreneurs as the central character. Over the 30-year period, only 11 films about women entrepreneurs were identified – fewer than the number of <a href="https://www.macworld.co.uk/news/apple/steve-jobs-movies-documentaries-to-watch-3786148/">films about Apple co-founder Steve Jobs</a> alone.</p> <p>From <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0092605/">Baby Boom</a> (1987), where Diane Keaton’s character starts a baby food business, to Melissa McCarthy’s brownie empire in <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2702724">The Boss</a> (2016), these films overwhelmingly depicted female entrepreneurs as running small-scale kitchen table businesses in female-dominated industries.</p> <p>These movies told stories of cleaning, as in <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2446980/">Joy</a> (2015) and <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0862846/">Sunshine Cleaning</a> (2008); fashion, as in <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt2361509/">The Intern</a> (2015); and not-for-profit work, as in the <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0116313/">First Wives Club</a> (1996).</p> <p>Businesses depicted typically had low numbers of paid employees. The entrepreneurs were resource-poor, and most often it was a supporting male character who helped the female entrepreneur succeed.</p> <p>Additionally, the study found a woman starting her own business is seemingly not enough to hold audience attention: all films included a parallel romantic storyline.</p> <p><strong>The female entrepreneur as role model</strong></p> <p>Celebrating successful female role models <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0167487011000353">encourages women</a> to dream big and succeed in male dominated arenas.</p> <p>Role models provide a source of inspiration and contribute to self-belief. As the quantity of entrepreneurship related media increases, so does the amount of <a href="https://link.springer.com/content/pdf/10.1007/s11365-006-0018-8.pdf">entrepreneurial activity</a>.</p> <p>However, negative portrayals of careers may <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1997-04591-001">prevent</a> people from considering a profession.</p> <p>The case of Holmes and Theranos is damaging for the <a href="https://www.bloomberg.com/opinion/articles/2018-03-14/theranos-misled-investors-and-consumers-who-used-its-blood-test">betrayed</a> customers and investors, but also for the field of entrepreneurship, which only in recent decades has seen its reputation overhauled.</p> <p>Entrepreneurship was once the <a href="http://cup.columbia.edu/book/a-brief-history-of-entrepreneurship/9780231173049">domain of racketeers</a>. Over time, it has evolved to be the domain of tech celebrities, socially conscious founders and a vehicle for upward social mobility – but still, too often, a domain of men.</p> <p><a href="https://www.taylorfrancis.com/books/e/9780429279836/chapters/10.4324/9780429279836-26">One study</a> investigated how female entrepreneurs are featured on the cover of Entrepreneur magazine. Women were vastly outnumbered by men on the cover, and were often portrayed in a stereotypical female fashion.</p> <p>Words surrounding images of women tended to be about nurturing, health, beauty and fashion. Wording accompanying images of male entrepreneurs talked of power, innovation and risk taking.</p> <p>Women were “glamified” in full make-up and focus given to their face, while men were more likely to be standing and set against a corporate colour palette.</p> <p>How we tell stories of female entrepreneurs matters.</p> <p>In order to achieve equity in entrepreneurship, we need to acknowledge the role of the media in filling the entrepreneurship pipeline.</p> <p>Positive depictions of innovative women act as a mirror, showing girls and women what they can achieve. We need more, and better, stories about female entrepreneurs so stories about female innovation aren’t limited to failure and fraud.</p> <p><em>Written by Bronwyn Eager and Louise Grimmer. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-inventor-tells-a-story-of-a-fraudulent-female-billionaire-where-are-the-films-starring-successful-women-entrepreneurs-145922">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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10 iconic movie cars – and how much they cost in real life

<p><strong>1963 Aston Martin DB5</strong></p> <p>If you were either wise or lucky enough to purchase a ’63 Aston Martin DB5 just as the luxury car made its first appearance in a James Bond 007 movie (1964’s <em>Goldfinger</em>) you would not only go on to see it featured in four more Bond films – <em>Thunderball</em> (1965), <em>GoldenEye</em> (1995), <em>Tomorrow Never Dies</em> (1997) and <em>Casino Royale</em> (2006) – you’d also have seen a staggering 11,000-per cent increase in your car’s value! The original sale price was just over US$5,500 (US$45,000 in today’s money) and modern-day sales of Aston Martin DB5s have fetched upwards of $620k! The actual DB5 used in the filming of <em>GoldenEye</em> was recently sold to Spyscape, a New York City spy museum, for a whopping US$2.6 million, reports <em>Hemmings Daily</em>.</p> <p><strong>1967 Shelby Mustang GT500</strong></p> <p>Owners of this iconic 1967 Mustang will never bemoan a movie remake again after seeing the value of their ride rise by over 4,000-per cent because their Shelby Mustang GT500 was used in the year-2000 version of Gone in 60 Seconds. In the original cult classic flick from ’73, a Mustang Mach 1 from the same year was featured as Eleanor, but the remake’s Eleanor II sent automotive resale figures skyward as moviegoers flocked to see the new film at the turn of the millennium. The ’67 Shelby, originally worth US$4,195, is now being sold for a cool US$178,200, per CompareTheMarket.com’s research.</p> <p><strong>1970 Dodge Charger</strong></p> <p>No recent film has increased interest in and prices of cars quite like The Fast and the Furious movies. When the first film in the franchise debuted in 2001, the 1970 Dodge Charger quickly became the it car when Dominic Toretto claimed he could race a quarter-mile in nine seconds. With an original value of just US$3,711 and a 1,120 per cent increase in less than 20 years, this model year Dodge Charger has recently sold for around over US$82k.</p> <p><strong>1963 Model 117 Volkswagen Type 1</strong></p> <p>First featured in The Love Bug, the famous little Herbie VW beetle with that legendary racing stripe and number down the centre of its bulbous hood had a lucrative Hollywood career with five sequels over a sprawling 31-year span. Not only did that first movie help to make this cute car an iconic vehicle that would stay super popular with young people for over a half-century, it may have also contributed to the Type 1’s 931 per cent price increase since 1963, going from an original sticker price of US$1,595.00 to around US$16,493.40 in automotive resale markets today.</p> <p><strong>1966 Ford Thunderbird</strong></p> <p>Providing they didn’t drive it off a cliff in a dramatically cinematic moment of their own, owners of a ’66 Thunderbird made famous in the movie Thelma &amp; Louise would’ve seen their car’s value increase 630 per cent in the nearly three decades since the Geena Davis and Susan Sarandon film was released. The actual car from the film sold in 2008 at auction for US$71,500. The only way your decades-old car will be able to grow in value is with some serious TLC.</p> <p><strong>1977 Chevrolet Camaro</strong></p> <p>There’s nothing like a blockbuster summer action flick to give rise to car prices! One of the stars of the 2007 Transformers reboot is the ’77 Camaro with bright yellow paint and evocative black stripes running the length of its body. The car will forever be known as “Bumblebee.” With an original price tag of US$4,233.00 and an average recent sale price of US$12,012, there has been just a modest 183 per cent increase, although to be fair the film is less than 20 years old. One would expect the value to only be going in one direction from here! Fun fact: the more recent movie Bumblebee, starring Hailee Steinfield, features not a muscle car Camaro but a yellow VW Beetle. And as we’ve learned above, that is an adorable ride rich in cinematic history and price increases!</p> <p><strong>1981 DeLorean DMC-12</strong></p> <p>For people of a certain generation, it can be argued that there isn’t a more iconic movie car than the 1981 DeLorean. The funky ride played a pivotal role in getting Michael J. Fox Back To The Future but you might be surprised to learn that on-screen success has done practically nothing to help lightning strike and electrify the price of the DeLorean. Maybe this is because the car originally cost an inflated US$25,000 (US$69,000 in today’s dollar adjusted for inflation) or maybe because it simply wasn’t a good enough or practical enough vehicle in the first place. Christopher Lloyd’s little speedster is fetching only US$32,378 in recent sales according to CompareTheMarket.com. It is worth noting that special editions of the DeLorean DMC-12 either used in the movie or modified to look like the famous time machine can fetch a lot more on the open market today.</p> <p><strong>1968 Ford Mustang GT 390 Fastback</strong></p> <p>The Highland Green sports car driven around San Francisco by Steve McQueen’s determined cop, Frank Bullitt, in the eponymous thriller has seen a 1,200 per cent price growth since its 1968 launch. Originally sold for US$3,500 (a hair under US$26,000 today), the Mustang GT390 now gets over US$80k on the open market some 50 years later. Thanks to being a beloved Mustang model, Ford paid homage to the original Bullitt by introducing a new Mustang GT package featuring the Bullitt nameplate in 2001 and re-fired the Bullitt again in 2008-2009, reports CJ Pony Parts.</p> <p><strong>1961 Ferrari 250 GT California Spyder</strong></p> <p>According to The Drive, “the best cast member [in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off] never said a word, had four wheels and met an untimely demise at the bottom of a ravine. That’s the rosso corsa 1961 Ferrari 250GT SWB California Spider “borrowed” from Cameron’s dad.” There were 56 made in total, and only 37 of which featured those famous headlights, so how much is the car worth if you could throw it in reverse to wind down the mileage? Per AutoBlog.com, “a real deal, not replica, 1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB California Spider – just like the one we fell in love with watching Ferris Bueller’s Day Off – was offered for sale to the public for the first time in its 55-year history in March of 2016, and fetched US$17.16 million.”</p> <p><strong>1977 Pontiac Trans Am Special Edition</strong></p> <p>Surely its star turn in Smokey and the Bandit, and not the underground instrumental post-rock from the 90s called Trans Am, is the reason this vehicle’s price has risen over the past 40 years. Originally costing car buyers US$5,456, some ’77 Pontiac Trans Ams evoking memories of that classic film are going for nearly US$22,000 today. If only that price tag came with even an ounce of Burt Reynolds’ timeless cool factor! For the film’s sequel, again a Pontiac Trans Am was employed but this time a 1980 Turbo model was featured.</p> <p><em>Written by <span>Jeff Bogle</span>. This article first appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/culture/10-iconic-movie-cars-and-how-much-they-cost-in-real-life">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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Close up: World War Z frames the terror of ‘loss of self’ and the threat of a mass pandemic

<p>How do filmmakers communicate big ideas on screen? In this video series, film scholar Bruce Isaacs analyses pivotal film scenes in detail. (Warning: this video contains violence and may be upsetting for some viewers.)</p> <p><iframe width="560" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/rTkFBg2gSRQ" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>There is perhaps no better time than now to appreciate the unique and subversive genre of <a href="https://theconversation.com/were-obsessed-with-zombies-which-says-a-lot-about-today-37552">zombie movies</a>. These films have always been great socio-cultural lenses. Night of the Living Dead and Dawn of the Dead were two classics of the genre.</p> <p><a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0816711/?ref_=ttfc_fc_tt">World War Z</a> (2013), an adaptation of Max Brook’s 2006 <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/8908.World_War_Z">apocalyptic zombie novel</a> continues this tradition. In a pivotal scene set in Jerusalem, director <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0286975/?ref_=tt_ov_dr">Marc Foster</a> encapsulates the greatest threat posed by zombies: the end of our individuality and loss of uniqueness. The casting of Hollywood star <a href="https://www.imdb.com/name/nm0000093/?ref_=tt_ov_st_sm">Brad Pitt</a> is crucial, as are the cuts between him as a figure and the invading mass.</p> <p><em>Written by Bruce Isaacs. Republished with permission of <a href="https://theconversation.com/close-up-world-war-z-frames-the-terror-of-loss-of-self-and-the-threat-of-a-mass-pandemic-145090">The Conversation.</a> </em></p>

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"Devastating": Jack Thompson reveals the iconic movie role that got away

<p><span>Jack Thompson is a name many would recognise.</span><br /><br /><span>He can boast a stellar acting career, however he has admitted there is one role that might have changed his whole life if he’d gotten it.</span><br /><br /><span>Appearing on Anh's Brush With Fame on Tuesday, the 80-year-old Aussie screen legend revealed he only just missed out on the lead in <em>Schindler's List</em>.</span><br /><br /><span>The Steven Spielberg-directed film was released in 1994.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 0px; height: 0px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837628/jack-thompson-2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/fdf91a1ce4d54da3aab296670b96dedf" /><br /><span>The iconic movie won seven Oscars, with Liam Neeson ultimately cast in the role.</span><br /><br /><span>The 68-year-old Irish actor also picked up a Best Actor Oscar nomination, but Jack said the role was “almost” his.</span><br /><br /><span>“I'd done camera tests, shot a couple of scenes, and then did a whole afternoon with Spielberg,” he explained to host Anh Do.</span><br /><br /><span>“At the end of it [Steven Spielberg] said, ‘Well, there's not much doubt.’”</span><br /><br /><span>Jack said Steven then told him that he had to catch a flight to New York, and they'd sign the contracts when he returned on the Monday.</span><br /><br /><span>But while he was in New York, the legendary director met up with Liam and had a change of heart.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7837629/jack-thompson-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/688a7d12ba824ab8a97d2aeecb70ee7e" /></p> <p><span><em>Liam Neeson in the Schindler's List </em></span><br /><br /><span>Jack said while the news was “a bit devastating”, he was ultimately “OK” with it, due to the complex nature of the business.</span><br /><br /><span>However he confessed that the full impact of what had occurred only struck him ”months and months and months later”.</span><br /><br /><span>“I’m on my farm, I've gone right up to the back hill, and I get off the horse… and [I'm thinking about] what had just happened with Schindler's List and I just [yelled]: ’F***’,” he admitted.</span></p>

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“Wakanda forever”: Marvel stars pay respect to lost superstar Chadwick Boseman

<p><span>Many members of the Marvel family have paid their respects following the crushing news that Chadwick Boseman, superhero actor, has died at age 43.</span><br /><br /><span>The talented performer portrayed T’Challa in the groundbreaking film Black Panther.</span><br /><br /><span>“It is with immeasurable grief that we confirm the passing of Chadwick Boseman,” the family said in a statement on Friday.</span><br /><br /><span>“Chadwick was diagnosed with stage III colon cancer in 2016 and battled with it these last four years as it progressed to stage IV. A true fighter, Chadwick persevered through it all, and brought you many of the films you have come to love so much.</span><br /><br /><span>“From Marshall to Da 5 Bloods, August Wilson’s Ma Rainey’s Black Bottom and several more, all were filmed during and between countless surgeries and chemotherapy. It was the honor of his career to bring King T’Challa to life in Black Panther.”</span><br /><br /><span>The statement finished: “He died in his home, with his wife and family by his side.”</span><br /><br /><span>Over the years, Boseman has made his mark by appearing in multiple Avengers films, making his debut as Black Panther in 2016’s Captain America: Civil War.</span><br /><br /><span>Two years later, the remarkable thespian led in his own groundbreaking film, Black Panther, before finally appearing in Avengers: Infinity War.</span><br /><br /><span>In 2019, Black Panther made a cameo in Avengers: End Game.</span><br /><br /><span>Black Panther achieved its own incredible feats just on its own however, including the SAG Award for Outstanding Performance by a Cast in a Motion Picture.</span><br /><br /><span>The 42 star took the stage to say: “I think of two questions we have received: 1.) Did we know that this movie was going to receive this kind of response? 2.) Has it changed the industry?</span><br /><br /><span>“My answer to that is to be young, gifted and Black. We all know what it’s like to be told that there’s not a place for you to be featured.</span><br /><br /><span>“We know what it’s like to be told that there’s not a screen for you to be featured on — a stage for you to be featured on.”</span><br /><br /><span>He finished by saying: “We know what it’s like to be the tail and not the head. We know what it’s like to be beneath and not above, and that is what we went to work with every day because we know that had something special that we wanted to give the world — that we could be full human beings in the roles that we were playing.</span><br /><br /><span>“That we could create a world that exemplified a world we wanted to see.”</span><br /><br /><span>Following his death, the cast of Black Panther and other Avengers cast members shared their thoughts on social media.</span><br /><br /><span>Chris Evans took to Instagram on Saturday to honour the actor.</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEdTxJWFYoD/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEdTxJWFYoD/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Chris Evans (@chrisevans)</a> on Aug 28, 2020 at 8:21pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>target="_blank"&gt;https://www.instagram.com/p/CEdTxJWFYoD/<span></span><br /><br /><span>“I’m absolutely devastated. This is beyond heartbreaking. Chadwick was special,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“A true original. He was a deeply committed and constantly curious artist. Few performers have such power and versatility. He had so much amazing work still left to create. I’m endlessly grateful for our friendship. My thoughts and prayers are with his family. Rest in power, King.”</span><br /><br /><span>Jake Gyllenhaal also took to social media to share his condolences, writing: “Chadwick’s strength and goodness and honesty burned in his eyes. We only spent a handful of hours together, but anyone that crossed paths with him on or off screen knows what I mean: he was rare. The genuine article. His bravery is a lesson to us all. Rest In Peace, Mr. Boseman. You will be deeply missed.”</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEfKmbHHHPf/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEfKmbHHHPf/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Jake Gyllenhaal (@jakegyllenhaal)</a> on Aug 29, 2020 at 1:40pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p><span>Captain Marvel’s Brie Lawson said Chadwick would “never be forgotten” in a heartfelt post.</span><br /><br /><span>“Chadwick was someone who radiated power and peace,” she began.</span><br /><br /><span>“Who stood for so much more than himself. Who took the time to really see how you were doing and gave words of encouragement when you felt unsure. I’m honored to have the memories I have. The conversations, the laughter. My heart is with you and your family. You will be missed and never forgotten. Rest in power and peace my friend.”</span><br /><br /></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEdRs2wDXFD/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="12"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CEdRs2wDXFD/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Brie (@brielarson)</a> on Aug 28, 2020 at 8:03pm PDT</p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“This hurts. Really hurts,” Boseman’s <em>Black Panther</em> costar, Letitia Wright, tweeted.</p> <div class="gallerydata update" data-aop="galleryflex_slidedata"> <div class="show"> <div class="body-text"> <div class="expand"> <div class="caption"> <div class="gallery-caption-text"> <p>Scarlett Johansson said in a statement: “Chadwick was not only a deeply soulful and powerful actor, but he was such a kind, thoughtful, funny and gentle person.”</p> <p>“He brightened everyone’s day every time he walked into our hair and makeup trailer or on set with his beautiful smile.</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p>Robert Downey Jr. shared a heartfelt Instagram post, writing: “Mr. Boseman leveled the playing field while fighting for his life… That’s heroism… I’ll remember the good times, the laughter, and the way he changed the game… #chadwickforever."</p> <p> “Today is beyond devastating to comprehend. Just shock and pain," Sebastian Stan said.</p> <div class="gallerydata update" data-aop="galleryflex_slidedata"> <div class="show"> <div class="body-text"> <div class="expand"> <div class="caption"> <div class="gallery-caption-text"> <p>"I was in awe of Chadwick, as an actor, in his commitment to the work and as a human.</p> <p>“I looked up to him. The way he carried himself, how thoughtful and mindful he was, how generous…he elevated everyone around him. None of it makes sense to me. There was so much more coming from this man. It’s such a loss. Such a shame.” </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div class="stb-flex" data-stickyviews="4" data-stickytopmargin="20"> <div id="content-actions-toolbar-vert" data-documentid="BB18ug5J" data-isrsthree="False" data-verticalkey="entertainment"> <div class="contentActionsToolbar-DS-unknown1-1 contentActionsToolbar_vertical-DS-unknown1-1"> <div data-t="{&quot;i&quot;:&quot;1|1&quot;}"> <p>Hulk actor Mark Ruffalo shared his own words about the heartbreaking loss: “All I have to say is the tragedies amassing this year have only been made more profound by the loss of #ChadwickBoseman.</p> <p>“What a man, and what an immense talent. Brother, you were one of the all time greats and your greatness was only beginning. Lord love ya. Rest in power, King.”</p> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><span>Additionally, the DC Comics Twitter account — DC is the famous Marvel rival — tweeted a powerful statement. “To a hero who transcends universes. Wakanda Forever,” the statement read. “Rest in Power Chadwick.”</span></p>

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