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Indian airline cracks the code to halving disembark times

<p dir="ltr">A low-cost Indian airline has come up with a game-changing solution to get passengers off planes quicker during disembarking. </p> <p dir="ltr">A lot of planes rely on one door at the front of the plane to get travellers off the aircraft when they arrive at their destination.</p> <p dir="ltr">This often means passengers at the back of the plane have to let hundreds of others off the plane before they get the chance to disembark in an orderly fashion. </p> <p dir="ltr">To combat the wait, some airlines, including Virgin Australia and Qantas-owned Jetstar, regularly allow passengers to disembark from a set of stairs at the rear of the plane. </p> <p dir="ltr">But India’s largest carrier IndiGo has gone one step further and has introduced a third door for passengers to exit through.</p> <p dir="ltr">They have utilised the door in the middle of the plane, which is only ever used in an emergency, as another exit for passengers. </p> <p dir="ltr">The carrier reckons it could almost halve the time it takes to get passengers off the plane from up to 13 minutes to a mere seven minutes.</p> <p dir="ltr">“The new Three-Point Disembarkation process will be carried out from two forward and one rear exit ramp, making IndiGo the first airline to use this process,” an IndiGo spokesman told India’s <a href="https://www.hindustantimes.com/india-news/indigo-introduces-process-for-faster-de-boarding-of-passengers-101659598634339.html">Hindustan Times</a>. </p> <p dir="ltr">A video uploaded by Indian business journalist Sumit Chaturvedi shows the new process with passengers leaving an IndiGo Airbus A320 aircraft via the various ramps.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Indian carrier Indigo today introduced a new Three Point Disembarkation <br />which it claims will enable its customers to exit the aircraft faster than before. The new process <br />will be carried out from two forward and one rear exit ramp. <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/IndiGo?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#IndiGo</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/ChhaviLeekha?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ChhaviLeekha</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/IndiGo6E?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@IndiGo6E</a> <a href="https://t.co/n7Xajg8dk0">pic.twitter.com/n7Xajg8dk0</a></p> <p>— Sumit Chaturvedi (@joinsumit) <a href="https://twitter.com/joinsumit/status/1555098794609455104?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">August 4, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“An A320 aircraft usually takes around 13 minutes for its passengers to de-board the aircraft. However, the new process will make the drill faster and will reduce the disembarkation time from 13 minutes to seven minutes,” an IndiGo spokesman said.</p> <p dir="ltr">As well as being a major bonus for anxious passengers who are eager to make a swift exit from the plane, the changes could also greatly help the airline. </p> <p dir="ltr">The quicker passengers can leave the plane, the shorter the turnaround time to get it back in the air with more fare-paying passengers on board.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the revolutionary change exciting many, others are sceptical at the airline’s claims. </p> <p dir="ltr">Ben Schlappig of US aviation blog<a href="https://onemileatatime.com/news/indigo-deplaning-a320-three-doors/"> One Mile At A Time </a>questioned if all the claimed time savings would occur in real-life settings. </p> <p dir="ltr">“The process of actually getting out the door is one bottleneck, but I’d think that getting down the aisle is another thing that takes time, and that’s still an issue, even with a second door in the front.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em><span id="docs-internal-guid-9300df50-7fff-1f10-f327-9cda09fc8532"></span></p>

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Five ways to make your holidays more sustainable

<p>COVID-19 has resulted in the most severe disruption to the global tourism industry in <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/09669582.2020.1758708">modern times</a>. And although many countries have now reopened to visitors from overseas, the economic impact is likely to be felt for many years. </p> <p>Prior to the pandemic, awareness had <a href="https://globalnews.booking.com/bookingcom-reveals-key-findings-from-its-2019-sustainable-travel-report/">been growing</a> regarding the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2019/jul/18/environmental-damage-of-tourism-comes-under-mps-spotlight">environmental sustainability of tourism</a>. From over-consumption of <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/nov/20/national-parks-america-overcrowding-crisis-tourism-visitation-solutions">precious resources</a> to the destructive impact on <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/jun/22/the-world-needs-wildlife-tourism-but-that-wont-work-without-wildlife">natural habitats</a>, tourism can put enormous strains on <a href="https://theconversation.com/tourists-not-welcome-how-to-tackle-the-issue-of-overtourism-101766">destination communities</a>. </p> <p><a href="https://www.responsibletravel.com/copy/what-is-overtourism">Overtourism</a> has also been highlighted as an issue in many places. The Galapagos Islands, Machu Picchu, Mount Everest, Majorca, Barcelona and Venice have all <a href="https://theconversation.com/overtourism-a-growing-global-problem-100029">felt the affects</a>. </p> <p>Meanwhile, <a href="https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/article-canadian-airlines-feel-the-pressure-of-flight-shaming-and-the-greta-2/">Greta Thunberg’s</a> climate-change activism has added the term “flight shame” to our vocabulary. Her work has encouraged airlines to engage in tree planting or invest in wind farms to offset their carbon emissions, and travellers to think before they fly. </p> <p>As global restrictions begin to ease, now is a good time to think radically about the purpose of tourism and the way we all travel. This is a chance to <a href="https://unlearn.travel/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Unlearn-Bruce-Poon-Tip.pdf">reset everything</a>we know – and not simply return to business as usual.</p> <p>Obviously, one of the difficulties is that many of us are used to going wherever we want, whenever we want – which is not sustainable. But a few changes to our travel plans can play a key role in shaping the future of the travel industry. </p> <p>Below are five suggestions to help you travel in a more purposeful way.</p> <h2>1. Choose carefully</h2> <p>Carefully consider your desired destination and avoid places impacted by overtourism. Visiting during off-peak seasons will likely save you money and enhance your overall experience - and let you skip the queues.</p> <p>It’s also worth thinking about a different type of “holiday” or travel experience. You could volunteer for a <a href="https://sustainabletourism.net/case-studies/companies-and-organizations/ngos/">local NGO</a> or consider travel opportunities that support <a href="https://planeterra.org/what-we-do/our-projects/sisterhood-of-survivors/">marginalised groups</a>, for example.</p> <h2>2. Travel slowly</h2> <p>Travel like Greta to minimise your environmental impact. Travel less for longer, swapping the quantity of experiences for quality. Instead of taking three separate long weekends, why not take just one two-week holiday. </p> <p><a href="https://www.smartertravel.com/art-slow-travel/#:%7E:text=What%20Is%20Slow%20Travel%3F,and%20traditional%20food%20preparation%20methods.">Slow travel</a> is a mindset. Rather than pursuing Instagram-worthy photos and trying to squeeze as many attractions into your trip as possible, leave your phone at home and explore each destination at your own pace.</p> <p>Keeping sustainability in mind, it’s also worth considering opportunities that allow you to slowly experience a certain city, country or region while supporting local projects. Try a walking tour that supports previously <a href="https://sockmobevents.wordpress.com/author/sockmobevents/">marginalised locals</a> or rent a <a href="https://planeterra.org/what-we-do/our-projects/belize-bike-with-purpose/">bike with purpose</a> and help to fund educational programmes for local students.</p> <h2>3. Plan how you spend</h2> <p>Wherever you go, make sure you seek out local initiatives including local guides and local accommodation providers. This will make sure your money goes directly to people who will benefit from your support.</p> <p>Sites such as <a href="http://good-travel.org/">Good Travel</a> list businesses that prioritise environmental action and support local communities. You can also find out about locally made products sold at local businesses employing local people. This helps to ensure positive impacts remain in the community. </p> <p>And if you’re thinking of heading to Africa, <a href="http://www.fairtrade.travel/Home/">Fair trade tourism</a> is also a great resource to find out about businesses recognised for promoting responsible practices. Certified businesses range from eco-lodges, resorts, safaris, educational centres, township tours, golf clubs and cruises – so there are a lot of different options to choose from.</p> <h2>4. Eat like a local</h2> <p>Food accounts for over a quarter of global <a href="https://ourworldindata.org/environmental-impacts-of-food">greenhouse gas emissions</a>, so it lies at the heart of tackling climate change, reducing water stress, pollution and restoring land. </p> <p>There are many ways to minimise your food miles when you travel. For a start, avoid eating at restaurant chains and instead, try to eat like a local. Visit markets, local neighbourhoods or local vendors for your foodie needs.</p> <p>You could even check out a food tour or meal-sharing host. <a href="https://www.travelingspoon.com/">Traveling Spoon</a> has a whole host of online and in-person cooking classes with locals from around the world. Eating locally supports local jobs and can also teach you about new cuisines.</p> <h2>5. Immerse yourself</h2> <p>An immersive type of travel prioritises people over places and avoids overcrowded spaces. This allows you to make real connections and can also help you gain insights about local traditions, cultures and history. For example, you could go trekking with a <a href="https://www.adventurealternative.com/experiences/">local guide</a>, enrol in a language course or attend a local festival or event. </p> <p>Ultimately, the pandemic has presented an opportunity to rethink and act radically and really consider the actual purpose of tourism. This is not only important from an environmental perspective, but travelling in a more purposeful way is more likely to help support local people in destination communities. And it also helps to contribute to a future where tourism is less harmful to people, places and the planet.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/five-ways-to-make-your-holidays-more-sustainable-143379" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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13 travel secrets only hotel managers know

<p>There are all kinds of suggestions for finding the best hotel deals and getting upgrades, but we wanted to know the insider secrets so we went straight to the source: Hotel managers. Find out the 13 incredible hotel amenities that will make you want to book a room ASAP.</p> <p><strong>Just show up</strong></p> <p>Hotels pay a significant commission to booking agents, so if you simply walk in without a reservation (and the hotel has rooms available), you may be able to negotiate a better price, says Flavio Serreti, manager at Soprano Villas in Italy. “Even if we undercut our website’s listed prices a little, we would still make more revenue than if we had to pay commission,” Serreti says.</p> <p><strong>Be nice</strong></p> <p>Simply being nice and cordial to the front desk agents –since these are typically the people who assign the rooms –will give you a better chance at an upgrade, says Michael Nenner, area general manager for Gurney’s Resorts with properties in New York and Rhode Island. Tipping the housekeeping staff won’t hurt, either.</p> <p><strong>Tweet</strong></p> <p>Most hotels are more connected real-time to their guests through social media services like Twitter and Instagram, and review sites like Yelp, says Patrick Cook, hotel regional director. Chances are good that they will quickly respond to any comments posted from the moment you arrive.</p> <p>“Hotels want nothing more than to surprise and delight you during your stay, so if you are celebrating a special occasion, let the front desk know; if you had a great meal in the restaurant, spread the word,” Cook says. “It’s very possible the hotel will show its gratitude with a special treat in your room.”</p> <p><strong>Don't ask about the best restaurants</strong></p> <p>Instead, ask, “‘Is there a local food or drink specialty that I should experience while I’m here?’” says Ric Tanner, hotel general manager. That way, you’ll be directed to the spots that you really must try.</p> <p><strong>Request a late check-out early</strong></p> <p>The chances of receiving your late check-out will improve if you request it early in the day rather than at the last minute, Tanner says. Since they can only let a few rooms have late check-outs, it’s typically first-come, first served.</p> <p><strong>Bring binder clips</strong></p> <p>Black-out drapes sometimes gap in the middle, Tanner says. If you like a dark room, travel with a few binder clips to keep them snug. “A skirt hanger from the closet will also work in a pinch,” he says.</p> <p><strong>Bring liquor</strong></p> <p>When Michael Wilson, hotel director of sales and marketing, dines at the hotel restaurant, he always takes a 6-pack of local beer or a bottle of bourbon for the kitchen staff to enjoy later. “I give it to our server as he or she takes our first drink order,” Wilson says.</p> <p>“The response from the server and staff is always very appreciative, and they usually send extra bites, apps, shooters –and the chef will usually pop out and say ‘hello’ as well.” Try it with the front desk staff and you may get a free hotel room upgrade.</p> <p><strong>Book well in advance - or at the last minute</strong></p> <p>There are often deals to be found when planning well in advance or waiting until the day before to make your reservation, says Megan Walters, guesthouse manager. “Hotels want to fill spaces and get heads in beds,” she says.</p> <p><strong>Check social media</strong></p> <p>Follow your hotel’s social media pages, as that’s where deals, promotions and sales are often posted, says James Adamson, hotel general manager at Kimpton Hotel Philadelphia, which has a “social password” which can be used at check-in for a surprise like free parking or a bottle of wine.</p> <p>The catch: the only way to find it is on Facebook and Instagram. Plus, when people book through the link in the bio of the hotel’s Instagram page, they’re automatically upgraded to the next room type based on availability.</p> <p><strong>Trust your concierge</strong></p> <p>Your concierge is 1,000 times more valuable and reliable than the online reviews, says Anderson Foote, hotel general manager. Foote suggests looking for the Les Clefs d’Or distinction of wearing gold crossed keys. This is a globally recognised professional organisation of hotel lobby concierges. “Know you’ll be guided well,” Foote says.</p> <p><strong>Join the loyalty program</strong></p> <p>In addition to some great hidden perks like free Internet and discounted food and beverages, you are much more likely to be granted upgrades during low occupancy dates, says Robert Hannigan, hotel general manager. “Singing up during check-in will often get you an immediate upgrade or amenity from the front desk agents who are tracked on signups,” Hannigan says.</p> <p><strong>Book the right hotel at the wrong time</strong></p> <p>Depending on the type of area you’re visiting, look at the shoulder seasons for a particular city, Hannigan says. “If it’s a short term stay, book a weekend visit at a business hotel, and a midweek stay at a resort,” he says. “In addition to a better rate due to lower occupancy, you won’t have to deal with the crowds.”</p> <p><strong>Use the bellman</strong></p> <p>They’re here to assist you, to orient you to the building and are often your best resource for immediate help and recommendations, Hannigan says. “Bellstaff are experts in what the locals are doing,” he says. “They’re a perfect resource for finding out about that hole-in-the-wall bar, or small family restaurant that everyone in the city loves, but is reluctant to share with someone from outside the area.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/travel-hints-tips/13-travel-secrets-only-hotel-managers-know?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

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Mum shares “life-changing” advice for travelling with kids

<p dir="ltr">When it comes to travelling with kids, it's no secret that airports and planes are notoriously difficult environments. </p> <p dir="ltr">Luckily, one seasoned traveller and mother of two has cracked the code to make the journey much smoother. </p> <p dir="ltr">TV host Samantha Brown recently took to Instagram to share her ultimate travel hack to ensure a seamless flying experience with children, and it has gone viral with over 3.5 million views.</p> <p dir="ltr">"My twins are now 9, I've been putting them on planes since they were 2 months. I learned the hard way so you don't have to," Brown captions a video sharing the tip, which she claims "saved her marriage".</p> <p dir="ltr">For the hack to work, you will need at least two adults to utilise the chaotic pre-boarding call for families. </p> <p dir="ltr">Instead of heading on to the plane with the whole family in one go, Brown suggests doing it in two stages instead.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Partner number one uses the pre-board to load all the stuff onto the plane, the bags, the strollers etc," she explains.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Partner number two waits in the gate area with the kids, keeps them worn out, walks them around and does not board until the very last zone is called. You then walk your children on board, get them settled, and the plane will hopefully leave 10-15 minutes later."</p> <p dir="ltr">By doing this, parents can avoid being stuck in their seats with restless kids while they wait for everyone else to board. </p> <p dir="ltr">"If you use the pre-board, your child is sitting in the plane for a good 45 minutes more than the flight time," Brown continues. "This is a really stressful time for kids, they have bags going over their heads, people are really stressed and they can feel it.”</p> <p dir="ltr">"What happens is once they get to a cruising altitude for 30,000ft, that's when the child releases that stress they've just felt."</p> <p dir="ltr">Brown's post was flooded with comments from grateful parents thanking her for the "genius" advice.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I think I'm going to nominate you for a Nobel Peace Prize for this," one person commented.</p> <p> </p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.8666666666666667; margin-top: 12pt; margin-bottom: 15pt;"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Five spiritual tourism destinations and how to experience them

<p>The pandemic has led some people to take a greater interest in <a href="https://www.pewforum.org/2021/01/27/more-americans-than-people-in-other-advanced-economies-say-covid-19-has-strengthened-religious-faith/">religion</a> and <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-us-canada-55419894">spirituality</a>. One of the many definitions of the “spirit” is that it is our inner, <a href="https://www.dictionary.com/browse/spirit">nonphysical world</a>, including both our conscious and subconscious minds. Our spiritual self <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S105381001830521X">interprets sensory inputs from our outer world</a> and <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2018/10/hallucinations-hearing-voices-reality-debate/571819/">creates our experience of reality</a>. </p> <p>We usually associate spirituality with practices such as worship, meditation and yoga. But for many, travelling can be highly spiritual, as it involves being immersed in an experience different from our normal existence. It is also a <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14616688.2020.1725618">“liminal experience”</a> – we are suspended in an unknown setting which opens us to new possibilities.</p> <p><a href="https://www.mdpi.com/2077-1444/11/4/177">Spiritual tourism</a>, including <a href="https://medium.com/tourism-geographic/three-ways-to-ensure-wellness-tourism-provides-a-post-pandemic-opportunity-for-the-travel-c997d7b842f7">wellness tourism</a>, was a rising global trend before the pandemic. The book and Hollywood film <a href="http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,2011931,00.html">Eat Pray Love</a>, for example, drew tourists to India and Bali in Indonesia, seeking spiritual solutions to the challenges of modern life.</p> <p>As the pandemic eases and the world gradually returns to international travel, we expect places known for their spiritual energy and significance will become popular destinations. Spiritual tourism is <a href="https://medium.com/new-earth-consciousness/explore-your-world-explore-your-mind-b955665b17f8?sk=ae0b2423a08c57279f8391d7baaa90a4">as much about inner, self-reflexive experiences</a> as outer destination experiences. Here are five places you can visit with great spiritual significance.</p> <h2>1. The Old City of Jerusalem, Israel</h2> <p>The <a href="https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/148">Old City of Jerusalem</a> is often listed among the top spiritual places in the world. It contains some of the holiest sites for the Abrahamic religions, including the Western Wall for Judaism, the Church of the Holy Sepulchre for Christianity, and the Dome of the Rock for Islam. </p> <p>But even if you’re not a follower of these religions, the sounds, smells, narrow cobblestone footpaths, ancient architecture, and multicultural people, shops and foods open your mind. Some even succumb to <a href="https://www.jewishvirtuallibrary.org/the-jerusalem-syndrome">Jerusalem syndrome</a>, perhaps remembering a spiritual connection to the city from a past life.</p> <p>But while we can go to the most religious places in the world, they will not be spiritual until we turn inward. For tourists, there are several non-intrusive ways to turn inwards while maintaining respect for the destination. These include setting aside time for contemplation, maintaining a sense of <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/epub/10.1080/14616688.2021.2021978?needAccess=true">mindfulness</a> and openness to new experiences, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/what-is-walking-meditation-175989">silent walking</a> and <a href="https://medium.com/new-earth-consciousness/meditation-explainer-the-what-why-how-of-meditating-6bf6e934a982?sk=888fb69504e401a14495fe8717b5bb87">other forms of quiet meditation</a> and prayer. </p> <h2>2. The Ghats of Varanasi, India</h2> <p>Varanasi is the oldest and holiest city in India. It was already over 1,400 years old when the Buddha gave his first sermon near here in <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gautama_Buddha#cite_note-dating-12">around 400BC</a>. The city has more than 3,000 Hindu and over 1,300 Muslim holy sites, along with Buddhist, Jain, Sikh and Christian spiritual places.</p> <p>But Varanasi is most famous for <a href="https://whc.unesco.org/en/tentativelists/6526/">the “ghats” along the Ganges River</a>. Ghats are the over 80 sets of steps leading into the river from Hindu temples, shrines, and palaces. Bathing ghats are where devotees cleanse themselves of karma to be free of the cycle of incarnations. There are also cremation ghats. Spirituality permeates the narrow streets of temples, bazaars and artisans.</p> <h2>3. Luang Prabang, Laos</h2> <p><a href="https://d.docs.live.net/2f918da4f5876012/Desktop/A%20Trip%20to%20Laos%20for%20Spiritual%20Healing%20and%20Food%20Like%20No%20Other%20Place%20-%20Bloomberg">Luang Prabang</a> is the peaceful, laid-back, former capital of the historic kingdom of the same name. With <a href="https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/479/multiple=1&amp;unique_number=1954">33 Buddhist temples and shrines</a>, it embodies the Buddha’s teaching that our true essence is the silence within. </p> <p>The city is quiet, relaxing, and surrounded by the Mekong River with mountains and waterfalls nearby. Spirituality is everywhere, from exploring and contemplating temples and appreciating the daily rituals of monks and nuns, to taking long walks along the river and in the surrounding hills, and interacting with the people and culture. </p> <h2>4. The Hopi Mesas, Arizona, USA</h2> <p><a href="https://www.legendsofamerica.com/na-hopi/">The Hopi Native Americans</a> are among the most traditional cultures in the US today, with Old Oraibi village being the country’s oldest continuously occupied settlement. They are “settled agriculturalists”, living in villages atop mesas (flat-topped hills) and farming the lands below. <a href="https://hopitribeblog.weebly.com/religion--tradition.html">Their religion is secret</a>, but they announce <a href="https://www.kachinahouse.com/hopi-calendar">traditional social and spiritual dances</a> to the public about a week before they are held.</p> <p>Visitors are always welcome to watch the dances or wander the villages to see and buy from artisans. Photography or sketching are not allowed for spiritual reasons. The Hopi believe their religion maintains the spiritual stability of the entire planet. You get a sense of this as you step back into an infinite time of quiet solitude and meditate on the open vistas of the Hopi Mesas. Many are so taken that they become “<a href="https://leowbanks.com/journalism/bahana-humor-on-the-hopi-reservation/">wannabe Hopis</a>”, though outsiders are discouraged as permanent residents.</p> <h2>5. The Camino de Santiago, Spain</h2> <p><a href="https://whc.unesco.org/en/list/669">The Camino de Santiago</a> is an ancient pilgrimage route to the cathedral in Santiago, to worship the remains of St James, who brought Christianity to Spain. The journey can be long (several weeks) or short (several days) and can start in Spain, Portugal, or France. The most popular path is 780km long, starting from Saint Jean Pied de Port, France, to Santiago de Compostela, Spain.</p> <p>Although a religious tradition within Spain, the pilgrimage route attracts many spiritual tourists from elsewhere. As with most <a href="https://medium.com/tourism-geographic/why-you-might-want-to-consider-a-pilgrimage-for-your-next-holiday-or-day-trip-73911715222d">pilgrimage treks</a>, the journey is more important than the destination. </p> <p>For some it is meditative, bringing psychological <a href="https://brill.com/view/book/edcoll/9789004381223/BP000009.xml">wellbeing</a>. For others, it offers space to reflect on <a href="https://arrow.tudublin.ie/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1388&amp;context=ijrtp">personal challenges</a> (such as a relationship breakup or job loss). You can enjoy walking alone, but there is also a strong sense of community among like-minded pilgrims from around the world sharing hostel accommodations and meals.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/five-spiritual-tourism-destinations-and-how-to-experience-them-178372" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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A list of what you can and can’t take in your carry-on luggage

<p dir="ltr">When it comes to travelling, there are a lot of grey areas when it comes to what you can and can’t take in your carry-on luggage. </p> <p dir="ltr">You often run into inconsistencies with travelling internationally and domestically with the do’s and don’ts of packing, making it difficult to know what you should be taking. </p> <p dir="ltr">When it comes to travelling within Australia on a domestic flight, the rules are slightly more relaxed than on international journeys.</p> <p dir="ltr">According to the <a href="https://www.abf.gov.au/entering-and-leaving-australia/can-you-bring-it-in/bring-on-a-plane">Australian Border Force</a>, there are no restrictions on how much powders, liquids, aerosols and gels you can carry onboard.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, the rules are very different for flights overseas. </p> <p dir="ltr">All liquids, aerosols and gel items must be in containers of 100 millilitres or 100 grams or less. Containers must fit into one transparent and re-sealable plastic bag, like a snap-lock bag, with only one ziplock bag allowed per passenger. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, there is one detail on travelling with liquids that can often catch people off guard at the last minute. </p> <p dir="ltr">Australian Traveller's Quentin Long said, "But the problem that gets us all ... is that it's not based on the actual quantity of liquid, it's based on the container size. So if you have a 120ml size container with liquid in it, that's going to be taken off you."</p> <p dir="ltr">"That has cost me, and a lot of other people, some very expensive fragrances."</p> <p dir="ltr">While you are allowed to take most laptops, tablets and phones in your hand luggage without any worries, you'll need to remove them when going through security.</p> <p dir="ltr">Airport x-ray machine operator Michael Sørensen explained why in a <a href="https://www.quora.com/Why-do-I-need-to-take-my-electronics-out-of-my-bag-at-airport-security/answer/Michael-S%C3%B8rensen">Quora</a> thread, writing, "The main reason that you need to remove laptops especially and tablets sometimes is because the batteries and some electronics are so dense metallic material that they obscure what's beneath.”</p> <p dir="ltr">"So that's why we ask for electronics with large batteries to be next to your bag or in a tray on its own."</p> <p dir="ltr">All batteries must be packed in your carry-on luggage, which includes lithium ion batteries, non-spill batteries like dry cell batteries, and nickel, alkaline, or nickel cadmium batteries.</p> <p dir="ltr">E-cigarettes and personal vaping devices also must be tucked into your carry-on baggage.</p> <p dir="ltr">When it comes to miscellaneous items such as umbrellas, razors and alcohol, Long says, "There's different rules for international and domestic, but the general rule for both is don't take anything sharp."</p> <p dir="ltr">So things like scissors, metal nail files and Swiss army knives are a big no-no. Razor blades are also not allowed, but the <a href="https://www.homeaffairs.gov.au/travelsecure-subsite/Pages/Items-you-cannot-take-on-plane.aspx">Department of Home Affairs</a> clarifies that household and personal items such as safety razors are permitted.</p> <p dir="ltr">Umbrellas with metal points are also on the permitted list, along with knitting and crochet needles, perfume, lighter fluid and alcohol.</p> <p dir="ltr">If in doubt about whether an item can be carried onboard, check with your airline prior to arriving at the airport. In some cases, you may be able to pack the item in your checked baggage at the last minute.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Tips on Avoiding Crowds

<p>Don’t let the frustration of dealing with pushy travellers ruin your trip.</p> <p><strong>Book Tickets In Advance </strong></p> <p>Purchase tickets online before you leave home, and skip the crowds and endless lines at your destination. Smart travellers can avoid the queue when visiting abroad – the London Eye, Britain’s Houses of Parliament, Italy’s Vatican Museums, and the Louvre in Paris all help you keep your cool with online ticket sales.</p> <div id="firstFloatAd"> <div data-fuse="21928626849"> </div> <div data-fuse="21699960946"> </div> </div> <p><strong>Talk To People </strong></p> <p>Your hotel’s concierge or the assistant at the tourist office know their city’s attractions inside and out. Have a chat and get their take on the best times to visit popular sites.</p> <p><strong>Sign Up For Special Tours Often </strong></p> <p>Special organisations get after-hours or behind-the-scenes access to famous places. You’ll get a guided tour and beat the rush. A note of caution – these tours can be costly, but if large crowds routinely ruin your experience, splashing a little extra cash will save your sanity.</p> <div id="lastFloatAd"> <div data-fuse="21928512968"> </div> <div data-fuse="22652288252"> </div> </div> <p><strong>Visit During the Week</strong></p> <p> For shorter lines, fewer people, and better opportunities to interact and enjoy the attraction, stop by during the week. In many cases, you’ll have the place to yourself. Take it one step further, and head to museums, galleries or tourism hot spots after 2pm when visiting school groups will have returned to class.</p> <p><strong>Watch The Weather </strong></p> <p>Spooked travellers often cancel their plans when there are reports of a storm on the approach. While some travel advisories are the real deal, sometimes they’re not as bad as they sound. By keeping an eye on weather broadcasts, brave souls can often score great last-minute deals or empty attractions.</p> <p>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/tips/tips-on-avoiding-crowds" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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The must-know Google Translate hack for your next holiday

<p dir="ltr">When travelling overseas, one thing we can often run into is an issue with the language barrier. </p> <p dir="ltr">Whether it's chatting to someone in a store or trying to decipher street signs and menus, when exploring international locations, it's important to be prepared to communicate. </p> <p dir="ltr">One savvy traveller has shared a must-know tip for your next trip abroad, which will get you out of sticky situations. </p> <p dir="ltr">When Nguyen was travelling in Turkey, she found herself stumped when trying to order off a menu written in a language she didn’t speak. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, she discovered that if you open the Google Translate app and point the camera at the foreign text, it will instantly translate it to English. </p> <p dir="ltr">"Literally, it translates everything within seconds. How sick is that?" she said. </p> <p dir="ltr">The feature automatically detects the language shown on camera and immediately translates it to the user's preferred language. </p> <p dir="ltr">The camera can currently interpret over 85 language scripts and can translate into any of the languages supported on Google Translate, which can be downloaded on both iPhone and Android devices.</p> <p dir="ltr">"You guys need to get onto this and thank me later," said Nguyen.</p> <p dir="ltr">While Nguyen found the tech an illuminating discovery, her TikTok video was flooded by users saying they had been using the app for their international travels for years, with the camera feature being available to the public since at least 2018.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I'm 71 and feel good today, been using this for years," said one.</p> <p dir="ltr">Another commented, "Welcome to 2022 you're years late!"</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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Annual leave: here’s the evidence for why you should use it up – and how to make the most of it

<p>We are currently at the peak of the holiday season, but instead of drinking cocktails on the beach, hiking the mountains and enjoying what life has to offer, a surprising number of people are reluctant to take time out from work. Recent research shows one in five people in Ireland do not take their full <a href="https://www.cso.ie/en/releasesandpublications/ep/p-pwlbmr/personalandwork-lifebalance2021-mainresults/leaveintheworkplace/">annual leave entitlement</a>. And in the UK, <a href="https://www.peoplemanagement.co.uk/article/1747255/four-in-10-workers-taken-less-holiday-during-pandemic-survey-finds">two in five</a> workers have taken less leave in recent years as a result of the pandemic.</p> <p>It is important to take time out from work in order to fully live our lives, but there are several issues that can discourage us from taking annual leave. Some people have doubts about whether taking time out will allow for full <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32406700/">psychological detachment</a> from work, for example. The fear that thoughts of work will invade our minds encourages many people to just keep working. A common trend among those who are obsessively <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/260832037_Vallerand_R_J_Houlfort_N_Forest_J_2014_Passion_for_work_Determinants_and_outcomes_In_M_Gagne_Ed_The_Oxford_Handbook_of_Work_Engagement_Motivation_and_Self-Determination_Theory_pp_85-105_Oxford_Oxford_">passionate</a> about their work, these feelings can become overbearing, controlling their thoughts and making them unable to temporarily forget about work. </p> <p>Another reason people do not take time off is because they do not expect to <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32406700/">feel relaxed</a> while on holidays. This may be due to their circumstances or choices made about how to spend time off. In particular, family holidays may generate a lot of conflict, sometimes becoming even <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/15022250510014255?casa_token=6cmhqIg0WPsAAAAA%3AViEAGpjmW3PjZc6UzCaijcXlDqzlE1sF8emH8kuG6yU9nf8HR-3uFwcdPJGzGsE0zHUThyxrR64knQ">more stressful than work</a>. It’s unsurprising then that staying on at work instead of taking time out may be tempting for many.</p> <p>Alternatively, some people fear the <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32406700/">financial consequences</a> of annual leave. Holidays are expensive, especially for large families, leading many to forgo their leave entitlement to save money. </p> <div data-id="17"> </div> <h2>Benefits of annual leave</h2> <p>These are just some examples of why people may avoid holidays, but regardless of the reason, taking time off – especially from demanding jobs – has immediate benefits in terms of decreasing stress and <a href="https://d-nb.info/1097755169/34">burnout</a>. These benefits are only temporary, with stress often climbing again shortly after returning to work. As such, regular respites throughout the year can help achieve the accumulative benefits of annual leave on health. </p> <p>The good news is that taking time out for a week to two weeks is <a href="https://www.researchgate.net/publication/255708351_How_Do_We_Feel_on_Vacation_A_Closer_Look_at_How_Emotions_Change_over_the_Course_of_a_Trip">enough</a> to recover and experience a boost of positive emotions. This will begin to decline as the time off comes to an end, but still offers the break needed to recharge your batteries.</p> <p>Annual leave is also <a href="https://www.hrlocker.com/features/time-management/time-management-software/profuductivity-increases-annual-leave/">beneficial for employers</a>, as it improves employee productivity by up to 40%, reduces the likelihood of sick leave by 28%, and boosts creativity and mental health. Taking time out is also essential for <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2661484/">parents</a>, as their children gain immense benefits from spending more time together.</p> <h2>Getting the best from annual leave</h2> <p>While these figures may have you reaching for your phone to search for package deals, the spike in <a href="https://inews.co.uk/inews-lifestyle/travel/flight-cancellations-airports-routes-cancelled-flights-avoid-how-1724492">travel disruption</a> this summer may put you off from searching for the farthest-flung destination. But you don’t need expensive foreign holidays to enjoy annual leave. Here are three vacation <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Positive-Health-100-Research-based-Positive-Psychology-and-Lifestyle-Medicine/Burke-Dunne-Meehan-OBoyle-Nieuwerburgh/p/book/9781032246383">activities</a> that can improve wellbeing, whether you are away or on a staycation:</p> <p><strong>1. Practice relaxation</strong></p> <p>Relaxation can involve simple <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/ppc.12184?casa_token=YgyHqZvOXj0AAAAA%3ApeIFfCofPsvwVJkZ9RX6S24jLLOw-rQ0sZYYFhWyIMfFOZx4eG00FPz066hV0RJsZjI7Q02Fr2NnWi4">breathing practice</a> that can help reduce anxiety. An alternative that can have similar benefits is to use meditation techniques such as <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/1359432X.2017.1308924?casa_token=jP_gVWSNsL8AAAAA:1TYdaHq2Ua9lgg4vr7bdaXMkozyrUJdHcEx9HCMKSabC2x8ftYft9WQTv7070bsUVFJT4j0SYK8G">mindfulness</a>.</p> <p><strong>2. Spend time in nature</strong></p> <p>When on annual leave, try to spend as much time as you can in nature because it is associated an improvement in both <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0272494419301185">emotional and psychological</a> health. It doesn’t matter what you do when enjoying nature; you can be active, for example walking, running, gardening, or simply sitting on a park bench or spending time sky-gazing.</p> <p><strong>3. Engage your brain</strong></p> <p>Take time off as an opportunity to develop your interests. If you love reading, plan to read a few books over the holiday. Research shows these activities <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1948550618775410">support our minds</a> and our moods, <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0740818818300537?casa_token=4CPDmuirRlcAAAAA:-7008IJWIawAD85BjnNIyJhqScOhD7Ov0Ju4bCqTvBy8WIB2Q0D-htnHoEHBiC2ZhO2_9Logtg">regardless of age</a>. There are additional benefits if you help your <a href="https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/284286/reading_for_pleasure.pdf">children enjoy books</a> over the summer. </p> <p>Alternatively, if you enjoy listening to music, take this time to dust off your CDs or rearrange your digital music library. Share music, play an instrument, write lyrics, dance or even just <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8455907/">listen to</a> as much music as you can to improve your physcial and mental health.</p> <p>These are just a few ideas. What’s most important is to do something that engages your mind, helps you forget about your job and allows for a respite before you return to work feeling happier and more energised than before.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/annual-leave-heres-the-evidence-for-why-you-should-use-it-up-and-how-to-make-the-most-of-it-185503" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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The real reason you want your ears to pop on a plane

<p dir="ltr">An airline pilot has revealed one of the most common questions she gets asked and it has to do with ear popping. </p> <p dir="ltr">It is a commonly known fact that there is nothing more annoying than having to deal with painful ears on a flight. Blocked ears occur when the plane takes off or starts to descend as the air pressure changes rapidly.</p> <p dir="ltr">It may not be as bad for some but others will find their Eustachian tube – the narrow passage connected to the middle ear - often can’t react fast enough, which causes the symptoms of aeroplane ear. </p> <p dir="ltr">US-based Boeing 737 co-pilot Morgan, who is known for her flight-related content on TikTok, shared a clip explaining why you want your ears to pop on a plane. *embed tweet</p> <p dir="ltr">“Trust me when I say you want your ears to pop,” she began the clip.</p> <p dir="ltr">The aviation TikTok star who has over 12 million likes on her videos, said if the pressure is building up and you’re getting one big painful pop, there are a couple of things you can do to pop your ears a little bit sooner.</p> <blockquote class="tiktok-embed" style="max-width: 605px; min-width: 325px;" cite="https://www.tiktok.com/@almostcaptainmorgan/video/7111430582608989482" data-video-id="7111430582608989482"> <section><a title="@almostcaptainmorgan" href="https://www.tiktok.com/@almostcaptainmorgan" target="_blank" rel="noopener">@almostcaptainmorgan</a> Reply to @ladyhawkuk Tips and tricks from an airline pilot if your ears pop when you fly! <a title="airlinepilot" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/airlinepilot" target="_blank" rel="noopener">#airlinepilot</a> <a title="traveltiktok" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/traveltiktok" target="_blank" rel="noopener">#traveltiktok</a> <a title="flyingtips" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/flyingtips" target="_blank" rel="noopener">#flyingtips</a> <a title="traveltips" href="https://www.tiktok.com/tag/traveltips" target="_blank" rel="noopener">#traveltips</a> <a title="♬ original sound - Morgan" href="https://www.tiktok.com/music/original-sound-7111430549822294830" target="_blank" rel="noopener">♬ original sound - Morgan</a></section> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“Yawning, talking, eating, chewing gum, swallowing, really anything that’s going to move your jaw is going to help activate your Eustachian tube and pop your ears,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“If none of those work, you can do something called a Valsalva manoeuvre, which is where you pinch your nose and blow.”</p> <p dir="ltr">She said don’t blow harder if your ears don’t clear as “this can lead to bigger issues”.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-0683e841-7fff-ce3f-3c0f-3ea7a02e8418"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Morgan shares if you’re ever in a situation where the pressure is really building up and your ears just aren’t popping, “always travel with some Afrin nasal spray”. The alternative in Australia is Drixine, although she wants passengers to use it sparingly and only as a last resort.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: TikTok</em></p>

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How to beat jet lag and get the most out of your holiday

<p dir="ltr">There’s nothing more frustrating than not being able to explore somewhere new because you’re just too tired. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, a few travel experts have revealed their best tips for avoiding jet lag so you can acclimatise to your new destination as quickly as possible.</p> <p dir="ltr">The main advice from the experts is to adjust to the local time when you board the plane. They suggest eating and sleeping as if it’s the time at your destination from the moment you get onboard the plane. </p> <p dir="ltr">Another tip is having your meals at the times you will be eating once you arrive, as this will help your body adjust, making it easier for you to get in sync.</p> <p dir="ltr">They even suggest eating before you get on your plane if you can, if it fits better with your new schedule.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sleep is an important part of acclimatising too. If you’re arriving at your destination in the morning, maximising the amount of sleep on the plane is the priority to make sure you are fresh when you arrive.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, if you are landing in the evening, it’s best to sleep when you arrive at the same time as the locals.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-7a79dafb-7fff-9290-98a1-019d582cbf29"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Sometimes that might mean pushing through to evening if you’re tired, but the benefits for the rest of the trip will make it worthwhile. Try to push yourself to power through in order to get the most  out of your holiday.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

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What to do if your luggage goes missing

<p dir="ltr">If there’s one thing every traveller fears is arriving at their holiday destination without their luggage. </p> <p dir="ltr">As international airport chaos continues, many are facing the reality of not having their luggage and having to deal with airport lost and found services before their holiday even begins. </p> <p dir="ltr">Even before the pandemic, lost luggage was already the second most common travel mishap Aussies had to deal with, according to a survey by Finder.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Lost luggage is the last thing you want to happen when you're on holiday," James Martin, <a href="https://urldefense.com/v3/__https://www.finder.com.au/travel-insurance__;!!LBk0ZmAmG_H4m2o!p3qtXTKGX6cpzRIS1Wd6r_1aRVhQ0pXAZiVMdczaZRAuQe_AALAw0tK1NEeuan-2-NPNHVDTqO34yLxbSC6GUytct910wIYG$">Finder</a> travel insurance expert, told <a href="https://travel.nine.com.au/latest/travel-advice-what-to-do-if-your-luggage-goes-missing-at-airport-expert-tips/d9427010-46cc-453f-b7fe-b15645e5882c">9Honey</a>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Luckily, there are some pre-departure precautions you can take to ensure your luggage arrives safely. </p> <p dir="ltr">According to James Martin, preparing for the worst is a must. </p> <p dir="ltr">He said, "Rest assured, there are things you can do to increase your chances of finding your belongings, or receiving compensation for a complete loss.”</p> <p dir="ltr">"If you can, keep laptops/tablets or other valuables like jewellery in your carry on."</p> <p dir="ltr">Expedia Travel Expert, Lisa Perkovic, also has some packing advice.</p> <p dir="ltr">"The best thing you can do to safeguard your luggage is make sure your bag is labelled with your details in case it goes missing, and for extra peace of mind," Perkovic said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"One savvy tip is to invest in a digital tracking device to help you monitor where your luggage is. If you have room in your carry-on, it's also a smart idea to pack valuable items and a change of clothes, in case your checked baggage is delayed."</p> <p dir="ltr">Sometimes, despite these precautions, luggage can go missing with no rhyme or reason. </p> <p dir="ltr">It’s important to take these next steps to ensure you get your valuables back, or at the very least receive compensation for your lost luggage.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>File a report</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">As soon as you realise your luggage is not turning up, the first step is to file a Property Irregularity Report (PIR) directly with the airline you flew in on, Martin explains.</p> <p dir="ltr">"If you had flights on multiple airlines, you'll need to lodge the PIR with the airline that you last flew on," he says.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Be sure to include as much information about your luggage as possible. Noting the approximate size, brand, colour, and any identifying marks such as baggage tags or ribbons will help to improve your chances of getting it back.”</p> <p dir="ltr">"Your PIR report will have a reference number that you can use to track the status of your luggage once it's been located.”</p> <p dir="ltr">"It is the airline's responsibility to compensate you for buying necessities until you are reunited with your belongings, such as a toothbrush, underwear and socks."</p> <p dir="ltr">Lodging a report before you leave the airport is vital, as it increases the chances of a timely solution. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Lost vs delayed </strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Once you’ve left the airport, all you can do is hope your luggage turns up and keep checking in with the airline.  </p> <p dir="ltr">Best case scenario, you'll find out your luggage has been held up and your airline should make arrangements to get your belongings back to you as soon as possible. Most airlines will organise a courier to deliver your luggage to your accommodation.</p> <p dir="ltr">"If you're travelling internationally, it's a good idea to leave your accommodation details in case your mobile phone provider does not offer coverage overseas," Perkovic says.</p> <p dir="ltr">Officially, you need to wait three weeks for the status of your baggage from “delayed” to “lost” before you can take further action with your airline. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Claim compensation from your airline</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">If your baggage was lost for less than a three week period and is eventually delivered back to you, you can lodge a compensation claim with your airline to reimburse for necessities you had to replace. </p> <p dir="ltr">These forms can be done online through your chosen airline.</p> <p dir="ltr">If your luggage has been lost for good, you may be eligible for a much higher compensation payment to replace your belongings. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Lodge a travel insurance claim</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">While you may be eligible for a payout to replace lost items, sometimes these amounts from the airlines can be less than the total of the items lost.            </p> <p dir="ltr">If there's a shortfall between what the airline pays you and that value, that's when you can lodge a claim for the difference with your travel insurance.</p> <p dir="ltr">"If you're bringing things of high value, make sure to take out a travel insurance policy that will cover the value of your item. You can usually pay a bit extra to cover those valuables" Martin points out.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>What happens to lost luggage at airports?</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Airlines usually give themselves a maximum of 90 days to find the owner of lost luggage before auctioning it off to the highest bidder or donating the contents to charity.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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The best time to travel revealed

<p dir="ltr">With the demand for travel high after almost two years of borders being closed, more passengers are asking when are the best times and routes to travel. </p> <p dir="ltr">Planning is more essential now more than ever for smooth air travel given the past month’s hiccups.</p> <p dir="ltr">A tidal wave of delays and cancellations arrived at airports across Britain, the US and EU over June, including luggage handling glitches at Heathrow and labour shortages across American airports. </p> <p dir="ltr">Last week there were 14,500 cancellations and 34,000 delays across the international airspace according to air traffic monitor FlightAware.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, this disruption has only affected passengers travelling at a specific time. You can escape some of the chaos, if you pick the right airline, route and time to travel.</p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 18pt;"><span style="font-size: 13pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: bold; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">The best times to travel</span></p> <p dir="ltr">According to the data from FlightRadar24 and OAG cargo of cancellations across the last month, the best times to fly are late mornings between 10am and 1pm. </p> <p dir="ltr">Only 0.75% of flights were cancelled in the hour before midday, making this off-peak period the safest time to fly.</p> <p dir="ltr">The risk of cancellation rises for later flights, as an average of 138 flights between 6pm and 7pm were cancelled. </p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 18pt;"><span style="font-size: 13pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: bold; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">The best day to fly</span></p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 18pt;">Saturday is the best time to fly, according to the data. With only 157 departures scrapped, it’s a far better bet than Sunday.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sunday was no day of rest for those arranging travel with 256 flights cancelled out of the UK. 2% of all flights were grounded, making it a day to avoid.</p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 18pt;"><span style="font-size: 13pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: bold; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">The best and worst airlines to fly with</span></p> <p dir="ltr">Looking at delays and cancellations in the data from Flightaware, some international airlines were less affected by disruption than others, according to on-time arrivals from the past week.</p> <p dir="ltr">Japan’s All Nippon Airlines was the most reliable, with fewer than 10 planes cancelled a day. This is on top of an impressive 97% on-time record.</p> <p dir="ltr">Turkish Airlines also fared well, cancelling fewer than one in every 380 flights, albeit seeing 735 late running services.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ryanair and easyJet all managed an impressive less than 1% cancellation rate, however they were beset by major delays.</p> <p dir="ltr">These two budget airlines also saw between 20 and 40% of flights delayed by over 30 minutes. So an average of around 600 flights running late a day.</p> <p dir="ltr">China Eastern and Tianjin Airlines saw 16% and 28% of flights knocked off the board, or around 500 flights a day.</p> <p dir="ltr">However, it was Spring Airlines which saw one of the worst performance records.</p> <p dir="ltr">Over the past three days, almost 50% of its international flights were cancelled.</p> <p dir="ltr">June was a bad month for KLM. </p> <p dir="ltr">The Dutch carrier saw a whopping 5% cancellation rate over June. Disruption was so bad the carrier stopped selling flights into Amsterdam Schiphol at the beginning of the month to ease overcrowding.</p> <p dir="ltr">On this side of the world, New Zealand had a 14% disruption rate over the last week, versus 21% for Jetstar and 15 per cent for Qantas.</p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 0pt; margin-bottom: 18pt;"><span style="font-size: 13pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: bold; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Best and worst airports for disruption</span></p> <p dir="ltr">Disruptions at New York’s Airports saw La Guardia facing highs of 17% of daily flights cancelled and Newark Liberty suffering around 14%  of international flights scrubbed. JFK, however, managed to cruise along with 96% of daily flights taking off.</p> <p dir="ltr">London’s disruption was felt worse at some airports than others, according to FlightRadar24 data. London Stansted in the north east saw the least cancellations with only 1 in 720 services scrapped.</p> <p dir="ltr">London City Airport was worst affected, the central city airstrip in London’s docklands saw an abysmal one in 33 – or 3% – of flights axed.</p> <p> </p> <p dir="ltr">Even in the worst affected cities, some travel hubs were moving quicker than others.</p> <p><em><span style="font-size: 13pt; font-family: Arial; color: #000000; background-color: transparent; font-weight: 400; font-variant: normal; text-decoration: none; vertical-align: baseline; white-space: pre-wrap;">Image: Getty</span></em></p>

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Should I still go on holiday if I have COVID?

<p>Your flights are booked, your bags are packed, and in your mind you’re already sunning yourself by the beach with a cocktail.</p> <p>With summer in full swing in the northern hemisphere, and most <a href="https://www.gov.uk/coronavirus?gclid=CjwKCAjw_ISWBhBkEiwAdqxb9u_dVdg0T_EbAlN8bWRd2HBUnc0oogiIZwtoZBjIZgzx2W30V6WgZBoCHE8QAvD_BwE">COVID-related restrictions</a> behind us, travel is back on the agenda for many people. But at the same time, <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/articles/coronaviruscovid19/latestinsights">COVID cases</a> in the UK are rising.</p> <p>So what if you’re unlucky enough to catch COVID just before your long-awaited getaway? Given most countries have stopped requiring negative tests to enter, can you just go anyway?</p> <p>“Obviously not – you don’t want to go and infect another country”, my 13-year-old responded when I asked him this question. But is the answer as obvious as my teenage son seems to think?</p> <p>The first thing to note is that other countries may still have COVID restrictions in place, so entry might be restricted altogether, or you may be prevented from travelling with COVID due to <a href="https://theconversation.com/are-covid-19-vaccine-passports-fair-163838">testing, vaccination or quarantine rules</a>. You can check the requirements in different countries using <a href="https://apply.joinsherpa.com/map?affiliateId=sherpa&amp;language=en-US">this map</a>.</p> <p>But assuming you’ve checked the rules for the country you’re visiting, and you’re legally allowed to travel even with COVID, what should you do? This is clearly an ethical question, and what seems like an obvious answer to one person might not be so obvious to others.</p> <p>First, let’s look at the facts. The combination of vaccination and effective treatments for severe COVID has changed the situation compared with 2020 or 2021. The ratio of deaths to infections <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/healthandsocialcare/conditionsanddiseases/articles/coronaviruscovid19latestinsights/deaths">continues to become more favourable</a>, and while the potential for a new, more harmful variant is an ongoing concern, the risks from COVID are becoming increasingly similar to risks faced from many other infectious diseases.</p> <p>Given this, and the fact that it’s becoming harder to find a COVID test (or certainly a free one), it may be more pertinent to consider the question in relation to infectious diseases more generally. </p> <h2>Weighing up the risks</h2> <p>If you’re planning to travel while knowingly ill, there would seem to be risks both to you and others. For instance, people generally don’t like the idea of being sick far from home, and buy travel insurance in the hope it will ensure they’re cared for should they become unwell (or get worse) while abroad. But while taking out insurance shows one level of concern for health risks, these concerns are by definition quite self-centred.</p> <p>Considering risks to other people, travelling with an infectious disease clearly carries the potential of passing the disease on to others. With all diseases, certain sections of the population will be more vulnerable. So where a virus like COVID might result in only mild cold-like symptoms for you, it could be fatal for someone else.</p> <p>But working out who may be vulnerable so that you can then avoid them if you’re sick is very difficult. There are also plenty of people who care for vulnerable people, and could easily pass an infection on. Being careful and wearing a mask <a href="https://theconversation.com/does-your-face-mask-protect-you-or-other-people-142612">will help to a certain extent</a>, but the obvious solution for protecting vulnerable people and their carers is to avoid mixing in large groups altogether.</p> <p>A second health risk is the possibility of being the cause of a new, geographically distinct outbreak. This is especially worth considering in countries with less developed healthcare systems or poorer availability of vaccines. A mild variant of a disease like COVID in the UK (which has a high vaccination rate) may well be significantly more lethal in a country where a lower proportion of the population is vaccinated.</p> <p>A final thing to consider is that no one has a “right” to go on holiday. Broadly speaking, “rights” are socially or legally determined, and while certainly many of us are very tired of COVID and the restrictions we’ve had to endure over the past couple of years, it’s difficult to argue that this frustration means we have a “right” to travel. Just because something is legal does not mean it is a right.</p> <h2>Changing attitudes</h2> <p>It’s interesting to note that the experience of the last couple of years – the first true pandemic in most people’s lifetime – has changed general attitudes towards infection and health risks, so that behaviour that was socially acceptable before COVID is now no longer considered appropriate.</p> <p>In particular, the pandemic has increased the <a href="https://theconversation.com/coronavirus-wearing-a-cloth-face-mask-is-less-about-science-and-more-about-solidarity-138461">public’s awareness</a> of infection control. While previously many people would have perhaps drawn a moral distinction between passing on clearly severe infectious diseases like tuberculosis or Ebola, they were often more relaxed about spreading milder diseases like influenza or the common cold. The experience of COVID has changed this as more people have <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-020-76763-2">come to realise</a> infections that are mild in most people can be highly risky for some.</p> <p>So should you go on holiday if you have COVID? I would argue that the answer to this question is similar to considering what you should do more generally if you have COVID at home, or indeed any other infection: stay away from others and <a href="https://theconversation.com/caught-covid-heres-what-you-should-and-shouldnt-do-when-self-isolation-isnt-mandatory-179441">treat the illness with respect</a>.</p> <p>Maybe you can achieve this if your holiday involves driving on your own, or with a small number of people you’ve previously had close contact with. Perhaps you (or your group) may also be able to stay away from others until you have recovered. But if your intention is to fly, stay in a hotel, or visit tourist hot spots, I refer you to the comment from my 13-year-old son: “Obviously not – you don’t want to go and infect another country”.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/should-i-still-go-on-holiday-if-i-have-covid-186185" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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Here are the most effective things you can do to fight climate change

<p>Limiting global warming to 1.5℃ above pre-industrial levels requires reaching <a href="https://theconversation.com/net-zero-carbon-neutral-carbon-negative-confused-by-all-the-carbon-jargon-then-read-this-151382">net zero</a> emissions by the middle of this century. This means that, in less than three decades, we need to reverse more than a century of rising emissions and bring annual emissions down to near zero, while balancing out all remaining <a href="https://www.cdp.net/en/articles/climate/how-can-companies-handle-so-called-residual-emissions">unavoidable emissions</a> by actively removing carbon from the atmosphere.</p> <p>To help speed this process as individuals, we’ve got to do everything we can to cut down our use of fossil fuels. But many people <a href="https://www.ipsos.com/en/ipsos-perils-perception-climate-change">aren’t aware</a> of the most effective ways to do this. Thankfully, the <a href="https://theconversation.com/five-key-points-in-the-ipcc-report-on-climate-change-impacts-and-adaptation-178195">latest report</a> by the UN climate change panel <a href="https://www.ipcc.ch/">IPCC</a> devotes a chapter to all the ways in which changes in people’s behaviour can accelerate the transition to net zero.</p> <p>The chapter includes an analysis of 60 individual actions which can help fight climate change, building on <a href="https://environment.leeds.ac.uk/faculty/news/article/5471/global-study-uncovers-best-ways-to-change-consumption-to-cut-carbon-footprint">research</a> led by Diana Ivanova at the University of Leeds – and to which I contributed. We grouped these actions into three areas: avoiding consumption, shifting consumption and improving consumption (making it more efficient). </p> <h2>What to avoid</h2> <p>By far the most effective things to avoid involve transport. Living <a href="https://theconversation.com/car-ownership-is-likely-to-become-a-thing-of-the-past-and-so-could-public-transport-110550">without a car</a>reduces greenhouse gas emissions by an average of 2 tonnes of CO₂ emissions per person per year, while avoiding a single long distance return flight cuts emissions by an average of 1.9 tonnes. That’s equivalent to driving a <a href="https://www.eea.europa.eu/ims/co2-performance-of-new-passenger">typical EU car</a> more than 16,000km from <a href="https://www.google.com/maps/dir/Hamburg/Ulaanbaatar,+Mongolia/@50.3406451,40.6332697,4z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m14!4m13!1m5!1m1!1s0x47b161837e1813b9:0x4263df27bd63aa0!2m2!1d9.9936819!2d53.5510846!1m5!1m1!1s0x5d96925be2b18aab:0xe606927864a1847f!2m2!1d106.9057439!2d47.8863988!3e0">Hamburg, Germany to Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia</a> and back.</p> <p>Since the vast majority of the world’s population do not fly at all – and of those who do, only a <a href="https://www.businesstraveller.com/business-travel/2021/03/31/majority-of-flights-taken-by-a-small-percentage-of-flyers/">small percentage</a> fly frequently – fliers can make very substantial reductions to their carbon footprints with each flight they avoid.</p> <h2>What to shift</h2> <p>But living sustainably is not just about giving things up. Large reductions in emissions can be achieved by shifting to a different way of doing things. Because driving is so polluting, for example, shifting to <a href="https://theconversation.com/12-best-ways-to-get-cars-out-of-cities-ranked-by-new-research-180642">public transport</a>, walking or cycling can make an enormous change, with <a href="https://theconversation.com/we-transformed-a-london-borough-into-a-game-to-get-fewer-people-travelling-by-car-heres-what-happened-171035">added benefits</a> for your personal health and local air pollution levels.</p> <p>Likewise, because of the high emissions associated with <a href="https://theconversation.com/meat-eating-is-a-big-climate-issue-but-isnt-getting-the-attention-it-deserves-170855">meat and dairy</a> – particularly those produced by farming sheep and cows – shifting towards more sustainable diets can substantially reduce your carbon footprint. A <a href="https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/veganism-environmental-impact-planet-reduced-plant-based-diet-humans-study-a8378631.html">totally vegan diet</a> is the most effective way to do this, but sizeable savings can be made simply by <a href="https://theconversation.com/five-ways-the-meat-on-your-plate-is-killing-the-planet-76128">switching</a> from beef and lamb to pork and chicken. </p> <h2>What to improve</h2> <p>Finally, the things we do already could be made more efficient by improving <a href="https://theconversation.com/oceans-and-their-largest-inhabitants-could-be-the-key-to-storing-our-carbon-emissions-180901">carbon</a> efficiency at home: for example by using insulation and <a href="https://theconversation.com/no-space-for-a-heat-pump-heres-how-your-whole-street-could-get-off-gas-heating-180005">heat pumps</a>, or producing your own renewable energy by installing <a href="https://theconversation.com/solar-panels-on-half-the-worlds-roofs-could-meet-its-entire-electricity-demand-new-research-169302">solar panels</a>. Switching from a combustion car to an electric one – ideally a battery EV, which generates <a href="https://www.energy.gov/sites/default/files/2014/03/f9/thomas_fcev_vs_battery_evs.pdf">much larger reductions</a> in emissions than hybrid or fuel cell EVs – will make your car journeys more efficient. Plus, its effect on emissions will increase as time goes by and the amount of electricity generated by renewables grows.</p> <p>In the race to net zero, <a href="https://theconversation.com/climate-breakdown-even-if-we-miss-the-1-5-c-target-we-must-still-fight-to-prevent-every-single-increment-of-warming-178581">every tonne of CO₂</a> really does count. If more of us take even a few of these suggestions into account, we’re collectively more likely to be able to achieve the ambitious goals set out in the <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-paris-agreement-is-working-as-intended-but-weve-still-got-a-long-way-to-go-173478">Paris climate agreement</a>. Of course, these changes will need to be backed by major political action on sustainability at the same time. </p> <p>If we’re to use less fossil fuel energy, the use of fossil fuels needs to be either restricted or made more expensive. The social consequences of this need to be carefully managed so that <a href="https://carbonpricingdashboard.worldbank.org/what-carbon-pricing">carbon pricing schemes</a> can benefit people on lower incomes: which can happen if <a href="https://www.mcc-berlin.net/en/research/policy-briefs/taxreform.html">revenues are redistributed</a> to take the financial burden off poorer households. </p> <p>But there’s a whole lot more that governments could do to help people to live more sustainably, such as providing better, safer public transport and “<a href="https://theconversation.com/from-walking-to-cycling-how-we-get-around-a-city-is-a-gender-equality-issue-new-research-175014">active travel</a>” infrastructure (such as bike lanes and pedestrian zones) so that people have alternatives to driving and flying. </p> <p>There’s no avoiding the fact that if political solutions are to address climate change with the urgency our global situation requires, these solutions will limit the extent to which we can indulge in carbon-intensive behaviours. More than anything, we must vote into power those prepared to make such tough decisions for the sake of our planet’s future.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/here-are-the-most-effective-things-you-can-do-to-fight-climate-change-183555" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

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Air New Zealand set to offer the ‘best sleep in the sky’

<p dir="ltr">One of the most annoying things about catching long flights is not being able to sleep and for Aussies travelling to Europe or anywhere overseas the journey could be up to 24 hours.</p> <p dir="ltr">Once you have watched multiple movies, the only option left is sleep, which is a struggle for many. </p> <p dir="ltr">However, Air New Zealand has completely shaken things up with the introduction of its new Dreamliners, due to arrive in 2024. It will give customers more choice than any other airline in the world, providing, as they say, “the best sleep in the sky” regardless of the cabin customers choose to fly in.</p> <p dir="ltr">This includes a new Business Premier Luxe seat, designed for customers looking for more space and privacy, and Skynest, the world’s first sleep pods in the sky for economy travellers.</p> <p dir="ltr">Chief Customer and Sales Officer Leanne Geraghty says the idea has come after feedback from customers over the past five years basically highlighting the importance for a good night’s sleep, more comfort and privacy.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Skynest was an idea born out of looking at how we could offer a lie-flat option for Economy and Premium Economy travellers, and it’s going to be a real game-changer, adding more flexibility to the economy travel experience,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">It allows passengers to stretch out in one of six pods for part of the journey and catch some shut eye. And to top it off, each pod will include a full-size pillow, sheets and blanket.</p> <p dir="ltr">Of course there’s the option of ear plugs along with lighting designed for rest.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Research shows us the first night away from home is the hardest to get a good night’s sleep so everything we do on-board is to help create a sense of calm – from the lighting and sleep ritual including sleepy teas and balms, to the healthier food choices and breathable fabrics,” Ms Geraghty said.</p> <p dir="ltr"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Air NZ Cabin options</span></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Business Premier Luxe</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">For customers looking for the ultimate space and privacy. A luxury experience with all the features of Business Premier, but with a fully closing door and space for two to dine</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Business Premier</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">A private nest for a blissful journey and tranquil sleep. And if traveling with a companion, the middle row allows customers to open their nest and share their experience.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Premium Economy</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">For the treat-seekers looking for a little luxury to unwind and enjoy a taste of Aotearoa. The new seat offers more privacy and protected space where you can recline at leisure without interrupting the person behind.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Economy Skynest</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">It’s time to swap the headrest for some bedrest. Say hello to the world’s first sleep pods in the sky, Skynest. Stretch out in one of six pods for part of your journey and catch some shut eye. A game changer for economy travellers.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Economy Skycouch</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Use the Skycouch the way you want. Sit, spread out, or lie down and snooze. Share the space or keep it all to yourself.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Economy Stretch</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">It’s all in the name. This seat is for those who want to rest and stretch their legs further than the regular Economy seat.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Economy seat</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">An enhanced economy seat designed with more storage, comfort and space and a 50% bigger screen for entertainment. Connect to Bluetooth audio and pair your device to act as a remote control or second screen</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Now, for the million dollar question. How much does the Skynest cost?</strong></p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-0786b6f9-7fff-34d8-b6d3-65936aaef46d"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“We have yet to determine the costs and will be able to share more information on pricing closer to the delivery of our new aircraft in 2024,” Ms Geraghty said.</p>

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The benefits of a night-long stopover on a long haul flight

<p dir="ltr">When it comes to long-haul flights, there is nothing easy about being stuck in a plane for hours on end. </p> <p dir="ltr">Flying is exhausting, and can impact us in many physical and mental ways.</p> <p dir="ltr">While boarding a plane is undoubtedly exciting as you jet off to begin your holiday, looking at a long flight ahead can also make you dread the air travel. </p> <p dir="ltr">One solution to these long, sleepless hours on a plane is to break up your travel with a night stopover along the way to your destination. </p> <p dir="ltr">Say you’re flying from Australia or New Zealand to somewhere in Europe, taking 24 hours to recharge in Asia can make all the difference. </p> <p dir="ltr">Here are just a few reasons that taking a night stopover on a long haul flight is something you should consider on your next overseas journey. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Adjusting to jet lag</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Flying from one side of the world to the other often means travelling through multiple time zones that can mess up your body clock. </p> <p dir="ltr">Stopping along the way can often help you ease into a new time zone a lot easier, even if the time in your stopover destination is different to your final stop. </p> <p dir="ltr">Taking a few hours off the plane and living in a new time zone often helps beat the jet lag when you arrive at your final destination, making the first days of your holiday a breeze.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Giving your body a break</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Air travel physically affects your body in many different ways. </p> <p dir="ltr">From dehydration, stress on your ears, swelling limbs, and exposing you to germs in the recycled air, the physical toll of flying is no joke. </p> <p dir="ltr">Taking a much needed break from these harsh elements can limit how long these effects hang around for. </p> <p dir="ltr">You are able to rewind these physical effects much quicker with a break in your air travel, meaning you are able to bounce back from the second leg of your trip easier to enjoy your time away. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Being able to rest and recharge</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">It's no secret that being able to get good quality sleep on a plane is near impossible. </p> <p dir="ltr">Having a night stopover along your journey means you can get a shower and good nights rest to make the rest of your journey feel like a walk in the park. </p> <p dir="ltr">Breaking up two long-haul flights with a sleep, refresh and good quality meal is sometimes all it takes to make air travel feel much easier. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Exploring somewhere new</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Stopping somewhere along the way to your final destination means you get to explore a new place that you might not have thought of visiting. </p> <p dir="ltr">Experiencing a new culture along the way to your holiday spot is a great way to discover new destinations, even if it’s only for a short while. </p> <p dir="ltr">You could easily fall in love with your stop-over destination and all it has to offer, giving you a reason to start booking your next holiday. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

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12 easy ways to save on petrol

<p>The average price of petrol skyrocketed around the world after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February 2022. The financial impact of filling up at the bowser could get worse before it gets better. So, we’re here to help you get the most for your money. The tips below will show you how to find cheap petrol, how to get better petrol mileage, and petrol apps and credit cards to use in the process. Ready for big-time savings?</p> <p><strong>1. Plan the best route</strong></p> <p>Getting from point A to point B quickly sounds like the best way to save petrol. After all, shorter distances mean less time on the road and less fuel used, right? Well, not exactly. It’s more important to take the route that helps you avoid traffic, construction and congestion. Yes, it may seem counterintuitive to drive further to save petrol money, but some longer routes may actually be more fuel efficient, says Kyle Tetz, a former Honda employee, van life and travel expert, and founder of travel website The Next Trip.</p> <p>Travelling on a highway can lower your petrol mileage by 15 to 30 per cent, while stop-and-go traffic can cut it by 10 to 40 per cent. With that in mind, here’s how to save money on petrol. Plot a route ahead of time, using a map app or Google Maps to pick roads where you can maintain a steady speed and avoid traffic or city traffic lights. You can then use the mileage to calculate petrol costs for your trip. As a bonus, you’ll also suffer less brake wear and road rage.</p> <p><strong>2. Properly inflate your tires</strong></p> <p>Proper inflation of all four tyres is the key to maximising petrol mileage, says Rick Cornilie, senior product merchandising manager and resident tyre and auto expert. He adds that while engine efficiency is essential for getting better kilometres per litre when driving, your tyres need to be properly and optimally inflated in order to maximise the engine’s potential. Under-inflated tyres will deliver poor petrol mileage and lead to more trips to the pump, which will cost you a lot of extra money throughout the year.</p> <p><strong>3. Remove excess weight from the car</strong></p> <p>The heavier your car is, the less fuel efficient it will become, says Lauren Fix of the Car Coach Reports website. If you’re looking for a super-simple solution when researching how to save petrol and get more kilometres per litre, start by removing unnecessary objects from your car. But don’t stop there. Avoid hauling bulky items on the roof as well. You’ll increase your vehicle’s aerodynamics and help keep your car as fuel-efficient as possible, Fix says.</p> <p><strong>4. Stop warming up your car</strong></p> <p>We get it: when mornings are chilly, slipping into a toasty front seat is borderline divine. But your fuel economy is going to suffer, and you’ll find yourself at the pump sooner if you keep warming up your car. Modern cars don’t need anything more than a minute to ‘wake up’. Letting your car warm up any more than that is unnecessary. With petrol prices rising, the warmth will ultimately leave you cold as you spend extra money at the pump.</p> <p><strong>5. Use ride share and public transport</strong></p> <p>In recent years, using rideshare services to get around has been a great way to save money on petrol. After all, if you aren’t paying to fill up a petrol tank, you aren’t spending any money at all at the pump. Though this perk is changing slightly, it doesn’t mean rideshares are automatically too expensive. Depending on your commute and your needs, ditching your car for a rideshare could be the answer to how to save money on petrol in 2022.</p> <p>You can certainly bike and carpool around town, but public transport continues to be an affordable, safe and reliable way to get to most destinations in cities and towns across the country. And there’s no need to learn how to save money on petrol when you don’t use the stuff. Nix your petrol needs by taking buses, trains, trams and metros to and from work and nights out. Going sans car may seem inconvenient at first, but the money you’ll save by not paying to fill up may change your attitude towards public transport.</p> <p><strong>6. Minimise AC use</strong></p> <p>If you’re driving during the summer, consider being more judicious with how and when you blast the AC. Turning off the air-conditioner while in stop-and-go traffic or moving at slower speeds can increase fuel efficiency and help save you money. So get in the habit of rolling down the windows, turning up the music, and basking in the glow of knowing how to save money on petrol while idling in city traffic.</p> <p><strong>7. Keep windows up on the highway</strong></p> <p>Putting the windows down and turning off the air-conditioner is a trick best performed in traffic. When you’re on the highway, using the AC is your best bet for cooling. The wind may feel great coursing through your hair on a summer road trip, but wind resistance can create aerodynamic drag and cause your vehicle to use more energy. And when your car uses more energy, you end up at the fuel pump paying the high petrol prices more often.</p> <p><strong>8. Maintain steady speed</strong></p> <p>Believe it or not, you’ll learn how to save petrol when you learn how to drive better. (Don’t worry, we’re not suggesting you take your driver’s test again.) You get better kilometres per litre performance when you maintain a consistent speed while driving. Over time, this will make your vehicle more fuel efficient. And you know what that means: you can spend less money on fuel.</p> <p><strong>9. Don't drive aggressively</strong></p> <p>When it comes to getting better petrol mileage, you can save money and reduce stress at the same time by driving with less aggression. Accelerating hard at green lights and braking at the last minute when a stoplight turns red isn’t just poor driver etiquette, it’s also a terrible waste of petrol. Aggressive driving habits like these make your vehicle less fuel efficient and ultimately cost you extra money at the petrol pump. Instead, drive calmly, steadily and safely. Doing so will reduce stress in you and the drivers around you, and it’ll increase your fuel economy by as much as 33 percent at highway speeds.</p> <p><strong>10. Opt for regular petrol</strong></p> <p>Unless your vehicle requires it, only fill up with regular petrol, not premium or diesel. According to car-buying site True Car, there is no reason to pay good money for something you don’t need, with experts noting that in most cases, using a higher-octane petrololine than your owner’s manual recommends offers no benefit. It won’t make your car perform better, go faster, get better mileage or run cleaner.</p> <p><strong>11. Use a credit card that rewards filling up with fuel</strong></p> <p>All but a small fraction of drivers use credit cards at the pump. That’s a good thing. Cash doesn’t offer a single reward perk. Credit cards do. But be sure you’re using a card that provides the most perks at the pump. Many of the best petrol credit cards offer valuable rewards, such as cash back, travel miles and extra points to entice you into swiping the card at the petrol station.</p> <p><strong>12. know the best days to buy petrol</strong></p> <p>You might assume Monday is an expensive day to buy petrol, what with commuters hitting the road again after the weekend. Yet in some countries it is the best day to fill up. To find out if there is a pattern for the cheapest day to fill up near where you live, put ‘best day to fill up petrol’ and your area in a search engine.</p> <p>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/travel/17-easy-ways-to-save-money-on-petrol?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>.</p> <p>Image: Getty</p>

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The gross reason you should steer clear of hotel tap water

<p dir="ltr">You might want to think twice about filling up your glass in your hotel room.</p> <p dir="ltr">The National Sanitation Foundation (NSF) – a product testing, inspection and certification organisation with headquarters in Michigan, US, has begun to urge tourists not to drink the tap water in hotel rooms. Two years of little-to-no use could have well and truly led to bugs and germs collecting in the stagnant systems. </p> <p dir="ltr">Jérôme Logie, from the Water Division at NSF, claims that water supplies now pose a real risk to travellers that may not have existed previously.</p> <p dir="ltr">While Logie was quick to remind people of the importance of staying hydrated, he has warned anyone going abroad to assure their water comes from a safe and reliable source. </p> <p dir="ltr">“After such an extended period with low to no travel, hotels and their water supplies now pose a significant risk to travellers, something many aren’t aware of,” he explained.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Water and good hydration are essential, but there is a real risk from potentially lethal bacteria that can thrive in stagnant water, such as in unused hotel pipes.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Add to that a build-up of germs and varying international standards of filtration, and you can see why travellers must be water-smart to ensure they can enjoy prettier sights than their hotel bathroom.”</p> <p dir="ltr">To help people avoid illnesses, the NSF has put together a list of top tips for staying safe when drinking water abroad when travelling.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Don’t trust the tap water in your hotel bathroom</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">No matter how desperate you are for a cool drink of water in the middle of the night, do not resort to drinking from the bathroom tap. Stock up on bottled water from a local supermarket or convenience store. </p> <p dir="ltr">Hotel plumbing is a potential breeding ground for harmful microorganisms such as E.Coli, as water in unoccupied hotel rooms can remain stagnant in pipes for days, weeks or even months.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Hot = good</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Many hotels heat their water to 55 degrees+ to kill any microorganisms that might be present which is why you will often encounter ‘Warning: hot water!’ signs.</p> <p dir="ltr">In larger resorts and hotel chains, companies have their own corporate standards for water management, and some even have water treatment facilities on-site to ensure quality, travellers are still encouraged to exercise caution. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Say no to tap water at restaurants</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">It’s not just in your hotel room you need to be wary, but also the hotel restaurant.</p> <p dir="ltr">To avoid encountering any water woes, play it safe and make simple switches such as asking for bottled drinks rather than a jug of water to accompany a meal.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>If it’s cloudy, it’s contaminated</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Detecting bacteria in clear water is impossible but never, ever drink cloudy water.</p> <p dir="ltr">If you are travelling to a remote location where bottled water is not available, certified devices and equipment can be used.</p> <p dir="ltr">E.g: light strobes can kill bacteria; portable filters can be used to remove heavy metals, as well as bacteria; chlorine pills, although not perfect, can be a convenient way to make drinking water safe.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-7827b5a5-7fff-8381-85de-bc1477777669"><br /><em>Image: Getty</em></span></p>

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