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Alice Springs plunged into curfew after wave of violence

<p>The city of Alice Springs has been plunged into a three-night curfew after a wave of violence that saw four police officers allegedly attacked. </p> <p>Northern Territory Police Commissioner Michael Murphy declared the curfew on Monday, which will prevent people of all ages going into the city centre between 10pm and 6am over the next three nights without good reason.</p> <p>"Some of those reasons are if you're fleeing from domestic violence, if you're visiting family, if you have to care for someone, if you're here for employment purposes, if you go into a fast food restaurant or some lawful purpose," Murphy said.</p> <p>He said the curfew area would cover "Anzac Hill, Schwarz Crescent, down to the hospital, from the Stuart Highway across to Leichhardt and Stott Terrace".</p> <p>The curfew is a result of a crime-ridden weekend, where several incidents of violent crime allegedly took place. </p> <p>In the early hours of Sunday morning, a group of four off-duty police officers were allegedly assaulted by a group of 20 young men, while another officer was allegedly run over by a drunk driver outside a bottle shop.</p> <p>"The offending in Alice Springs over the last few days has been unacceptable," NT Chief Minister Eva Lawler said.</p> <p>"The curfew will provide police extra powers to get on top of the situation on the ground in Alice Springs."</p> <p>Commissioner Murphy said he will consider requesting an extension of the curfew if required.</p> <p>"If there is a continuation of harmful conduct, which I hope there is not, we apply some measures now and use the community to help us we should see a turnaround," he said.</p> <p>Lawler said she believed the curfew would be an effective "circuit breaker", but Swinburne University criminology expert Dr Joel McGregor said longer-term measures were required for broader change in the region.</p> <p>"To address any crime problem, interventions that lead to long-term behaviour change are required," he said.</p> <div>"While the Northern Territory curfew may be stopping crimes being perpetuated during the evening, it should not be thought of as a solution to the problems the state is facing."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> </div>

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Paris in spring, Bali in winter. How ‘bucket lists’ help cancer patients handle life and death

<div class="theconversation-article-body"> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/leah-williams-veazey-1223970">Leah Williams Veazey</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alex-broom-121063">Alex Broom</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/katherine-kenny-318175">Katherine Kenny</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p>In the 2007 film <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0825232/">The Bucket List</a> Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman play two main characters who respond to their terminal cancer diagnoses by rejecting experimental treatment. Instead, they go on a range of energetic, overseas escapades.</p> <p>Since then, the term “bucket list” – a list of experiences or achievements to complete before you “kick the bucket” or die – has become common.</p> <p>You can read articles listing <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2023/01/11/cities-to-visit-before-you-die-according-to-50-travel-experts-and-only-one-is-in-the-us.html">the seven cities</a> you must visit before you die or <a href="https://www.qantas.com/travelinsider/en/trending/top-100-guide/best-things-to-do-and-see-in-australia-travel-bucket-list.html">the 100</a> Australian bucket-list travel experiences.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UvdTpywTmQg?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>But there is a more serious side to the idea behind bucket lists. One of the key forms of suffering at the end of life <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pon.4821">is regret</a> for things left unsaid or undone. So bucket lists can serve as a form of insurance against this potential regret.</p> <p>The bucket-list search for adventure, memories and meaning takes on a life of its own with a diagnosis of life-limiting illness.</p> <p>In a <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/14407833241251496">study</a> published this week, we spoke to 54 people living with cancer, and 28 of their friends and family. For many, a key bucket list item was travel.</p> <h2>Why is travel so important?</h2> <p>There are lots of reasons why travel plays such a central role in our ideas about a “life well-lived”. Travel is often linked to important <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annals.2003.10.005">life transitions</a>: the youthful gap year, the journey to self-discovery in the 2010 film <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0879870/">Eat Pray Love</a>, or the popular figure of the “<a href="https://theconversation.com/grey-nomad-lifestyle-provides-a-model-for-living-remotely-106074">grey nomad</a>”.</p> <p>The significance of travel is not merely in the destination, nor even in the journey. For many people, planning the travel is just as important. A cancer diagnosis affects people’s sense of control over their future, throwing into question their ability to write their own life story or plan their travel dreams.</p> <p>Mark, the recently retired husband of a woman with cancer, told us about their stalled travel plans: "We’re just in that part of our lives where we were going to jump in the caravan and do the big trip and all this sort of thing, and now [our plans are] on blocks in the shed."</p> <p>For others, a cancer diagnosis brought an urgent need to “tick things off” their bucket list. Asha, a woman living with breast cancer, told us she’d always been driven to “get things done” but the cancer diagnosis made this worse: "So, I had to do all the travel, I had to empty my bucket list now, which has kind of driven my partner round the bend."</p> <p>People’s travel dreams ranged from whale watching in Queensland to seeing polar bears in the Arctic, and from driving a caravan across the Nullarbor Plain to skiing in Switzerland.</p> <p>Nadia, who was 38 years old when we spoke to her, said travelling with her family had made important memories and given her a sense of vitality, despite her health struggles. She told us how being diagnosed with cancer had given her the chance to live her life at a younger age, rather than waiting for retirement: "In the last three years, I think I’ve lived more than a lot of 80-year-olds."</p> <h2>But travel is expensive</h2> <p>Of course, travel is expensive. It’s not by chance Nicholson’s character in The Bucket List is a billionaire.</p> <p>Some people we spoke to had emptied their savings, assuming they would no longer need to provide for aged care or retirement. Others had used insurance payouts or charity to make their bucket-list dreams come true.</p> <p>But not everyone can do this. Jim, a 60-year-old whose wife had been diagnosed with cancer, told us: "We’ve actually bought a new car and [been] talking about getting a new caravan […] But I’ve got to work. It’d be nice if there was a little money tree out the back but never mind."</p> <p>Not everyone’s bucket list items were expensive. Some chose to spend more time with loved ones, take up a new hobby or get a pet.</p> <p>Our study showed making plans to tick items off a list can give people a sense of self-determination and hope for the future. It was a way of exerting control in the face of an illness that can leave people feeling powerless. Asha said: "This disease is not going to control me. I am not going to sit still and do nothing. I want to go travel."</p> <h2>Something we ‘ought’ to do?</h2> <p>Bucket lists are also a symptom of a broader culture that emphasises conspicuous <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JH_Pa1hOEVc">consumption</a> and <a href="https://productiveageinginstitute.org.au/">productivity</a>, even into the end of life.</p> <p>Indeed, people told us travelling could be exhausting, expensive and stressful, especially when they’re also living with the symptoms and side effects of treatment. Nevertheless, they felt travel was something they “<a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/14461242.2021.1918016">ought</a>” to do.</p> <p>Travel can be deeply meaningful, as our study found. But a life well-lived need not be extravagant or adventurous. Finding what is meaningful is a deeply personal journey.</p> <hr /> <p><em>Names of study participants mentioned in this article are pseudonyms.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/225682/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/leah-williams-veazey-1223970">Leah Williams Veazey</a>, ARC DECRA Research Fellow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alex-broom-121063">Alex Broom</a>, Professor of Sociology &amp; Director, Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/katherine-kenny-318175">Katherine Kenny</a>, ARC DECRA Senior Research Fellow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/paris-in-spring-bali-in-winter-how-bucket-lists-help-cancer-patients-handle-life-and-death-225682">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Caring

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Streets of purple haze: how the South American jacaranda became a symbol of Australian spring

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/susan-k-martin-107846">Susan K Martin</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/la-trobe-university-842">La Trobe University</a></em></p> <p>Jacaranda season is beginning across Australia as an explosion of vivid blue spreads in a wave from north to south. We think of jacarandas as a signature tree of various Australian cities. Sydney, Melbourne, Adelaide and Perth all feature avenues of them.</p> <p>Grafton in New South Wales hosts an annual <a href="https://www.jacarandafestival.com/">jacaranda festival</a>. Herberton in Queensland is noted for <a href="https://www.facebook.com/jacarandafestivalherberton/">its seasonal show</a>.</p> <p>There are significant plantings in many botanic, public and university gardens across Australia. <em>Jacaranda mimosifolia</em> (the most common species in Australia) doesn’t generally flower in Darwin, and Hobart is a little cold for it.</p> <p>So showy and ubiquitous, jacarandas can be mistaken for natives, but they originate in South America. The imperial plant-exchange networks of the 19th century introduced them to Australia.</p> <p>But how did these purple trees find their stronghold in our suburbs?</p> <h2>Propagating the trees</h2> <p>Botanist Alan Cunningham sent the first jacaranda specimens from <a href="https://mhnsw.au/stories/general/dream-tree-jacaranda-sydney-icon/">Rio to Britain’s Kew gardens</a> around 1818.</p> <p>Possibly, jacaranda trees arrived from Kew in colonial Australia. Alternately, Cunningham may have disseminated the tree in his later postings in Australia or through plant and seed exchanges.</p> <p>Jacarandas are a widespread imperial introduction and are now a feature of many temperate former colonies. The jacaranda was exported by the British from Kew, by other colonial powers (Portugal for example) and directly from South America to various colonies.</p> <p>Jacarandas grow from seed quite readily, but the often preferred mode of plant propagation in the 19th century was through cuttings because of sometimes <a href="https://mhnsw.au/stories/general/dream-tree-jacaranda-sydney-icon/">unreliable seed</a> and <a href="https://academic.oup.com/histres/article/93/262/715/5938031?login=true">volume of results</a>.</p> <p>Cuttings are less feasible for the jacaranda, so the tree was admired but rare in Australia until either nurseryman Michael Guilfoyle or gardener George Mortimer succeeded in propagating the tree in 1868.</p> <p>Once the trees could be easily propagated, <a href="https://www.woollahra.nsw.gov.au/library/local_history/woollahra_plaque_scheme/plaques/michael_guilfoyle">jacarandas became more widely available</a> and they began their spread through Australian suburbs.</p> <h2>A colonial import</h2> <p>Brisbane claims the earliest jacaranda tree in Australia, <a href="https://blog.qagoma.qld.gov.au/godfrey-rivers-under-the-jacaranda-a-quintessential-image-of-brisbane-queensland/">planted in 1864</a>, but the Sydney Botanic Garden jacaranda is dated at “around” 1850, and jacarandas were listed for sale in <a href="https://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/13055858?searchTerm=Jacaranda%20OR%20Jakaranda">Sydney in 1861</a>.</p> <p>These early park and garden plantings were eye-catching – but the real impact and popularity of jacarandas is a result of later street plantings.</p> <p>Jacaranda avenues, in Australia and around the world, usually indicate wealthier suburbs like Dunkeld in <a href="https://www.wisemove.co.za/post/top-10-richest-suburbs-in-johannesburg">Johannesberg</a> and Kilimani in <a href="https://gay.medium.com/hashtag-jacaranda-propaganda-2f20ac6958b9">Nairobi</a>.</p> <p>In Australia, these extravagant displays appear in older, genteel suburbs like Subiaco and Applecross in Perth; Kirribilli, Paddington and Lavender Bay in Sydney; Parkville and the Edinburgh Gardens in North Fitzroy in Melbourne; Mitcham, Frewville and Westbourne Park in Adelaide; and St Lucia in Brisbane.</p> <p>The trend toward urban street avenue plantings expanded internationally in the <a href="https://www.journals.uchicago.edu/doi/abs/10.2307/3983816?journalCode=foreconshist">mid 19th century</a>. It was particularly popular in growing colonial towns and cities. It followed trends in imperial centres, but new colonial cities offered scope for <a href="https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/whp/eh/2009/00000015/00000003/art00004">concerted planning of avenues in new streets</a>.</p> <p>Early Australian streets were often host to a mix of native plants and exotic imported trees. Joseph Maiden, director of the Sydney Botanic Gardens from 1896, drove the move from mixed street plantings towards avenues of single-species trees in the early 20th century.</p> <p>Maiden selected trees suitable to their proposed area, but he was also driven by contemporary aesthetic ideas of <a href="https://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/whp/eh/2009/00000015/00000003/art00004">uniformity and display</a>.</p> <p>By the end of the 19th century, deciduous trees were becoming more popular as tree plantings for their variety and, in southern areas, for the openness to winter sunshine.</p> <p>It takes around ten years for jacaranda trees to become established. Newly planted jacarandas take between two and 14 years to produce their first flowers, so there was foresight in planning to achieve the streets we have today.</p> <p>In Melbourne, jacarandas were popular in post-first world war plantings. They were displaced by a move to native trees after the second world war. Despite localised popularity in certain suburbs, the jacaranda does not make the list of top 50 tree plantings for <a href="https://www.proquest.com/docview/220356756/714CC7FF6134038PQ/6?accountid=12001">Melbourne</a>.</p> <p>In Queensland, 19th-century street tree planting was particularly ad hoc – the <a href="https://apps.des.qld.gov.au/heritage-register/detail/?id=602440">Eagle Street fig trees</a> are an example – and offset by enthusiastic forest clearance. It wasn’t until the early 20th century street beautification became more organised and jacaranda avenues were planted in areas like New Farm in Brisbane.</p> <p>The popular plantings on the St Lucia campus of the University of Queensland occurred later, in the <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/queensland-review/article/abs/for-shade-colour-and-in-memory-of-sacrifice-amenity-and-memorial-tree-planting-in-queenslands-towns-and-cities-191555/459CD1E02E7FD581B4B89ADD7073D705">1930s</a>.</p> <h2>A flower for luck</h2> <p>In Australia, as elsewhere, there can be too much of a good thing. Jacarandas are an invasive species <a href="https://weeds.brisbane.qld.gov.au/weeds/jacaranda">in parts of Australia</a> (they seed readily in the warm dry climates to which they have been introduced).</p> <p>Parts of South Africa have limited or banned the planting of jacarandas because of their water demands and <a href="http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&amp;pid=S0006-82412017000200020">invasive tendencies</a>. Ironically, eucalypts have a similar status in South Africa.</p> <p>Writer <a href="https://gay.medium.com/hashtag-jacaranda-propaganda-2f20ac6958b9">Carey Baraka argues</a> that, however beloved and iconic now, significant plantings of jacarandas in Kenya indicate areas of past and present white population and colonial domination.</p> <p>Despite these drawbacks, spectacular jacaranda plantings remain popular where they have been introduced. There are even myths about them that cross international boundaries.</p> <p>In the southern hemisphere – in Pretoria or Sydney – they bloom on university campuses during examination time: the first blooms mark the time to study; the fall of blooms suggests it is <a href="https://mhnsw.au/stories/general/dream-tree-jacaranda-sydney-icon/">too late</a>; and the fall of a blossom on a student bestows <a href="https://newcontree.org.za/index.php/nc/article/view/34">good luck</a>.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/214075/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/susan-k-martin-107846"><em>Susan K Martin</em></a><em>, Emeritus Professor in English, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/la-trobe-university-842">La Trobe University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/streets-of-purple-haze-how-the-south-american-jacaranda-became-a-symbol-of-australian-spring-214075">original article</a>.</em></p>

Home & Garden

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Top End tourism surge after massive search for fake Aussie town

<p>In an absolute boon to Top End tourism, it appears that Google users have been working overtime trying to locate a little slice of Northern Territory paradise known as Agnes Bluff and its nearby neighbour Mia Tukurta National Park. Why, you ask? Because they're convinced it's the next hidden holiday hotspot. But here's the catch: it's completely made up.</p> <p>This newfound obsession with Agnes Bluff and Mia Tukurta National Park is all thanks to Amazon Prime's latest hit series, <em>The Lost Flowers Of Alice Hart</em>. People have been binge-watching the show and drooling over the stunning landscapes, causing Google searches for these places to shoot up like a rocket on a sugar rush. </p> <p>According to <a href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/australian-holidays/northern-territory/google-searches-surge-for-agnes-bluff-an-aussie-town-that-doesnt-exist/news-story/59f00cc1e89074de0e6464c0072ae4b8" target="_blank" rel="noopener">news.com.au</a>, Google searches for Agnes Bluff skyrocketed by a whopping 1640 per cent between July and August in Australia, and then another 40 per cent in September, all thanks to the series. And it's not just our fellow Aussies on the hunt for these mystical places – folks from Spain, Canada, the UK, the United States and Italy are also joining the imaginary treasure hunt.</p> <p>Can we blame them for trying to uncover these hidden gems? After all, in the show, Agnes Bluff and Mia Tukurta National Park look so darn spectacular that even the Loch Ness Monster might want to visit. But chin up, dear travellers! While you can't exactly book a one-way ticket to Fantasyland, you can still visit the real-life locations that inspired the series.</p> <p>This show was born from the creative genius of Aussie author Holly Ringland, who drew inspiration from her time living on Anangu land in Australia's Western Desert. In her news.com.au interview, she said, "To know people are Googling these places I fictionalised feels like a shot of joy straight to my heart – I don't know that there could be a greater compliment given to my writing." </p> <p>So, where was the series actually filmed? Well, it turns out they filmed all over Central Australia, including places like the Alice Springs Desert Park, Simpsons Gap, Ooraminna Station, Standley Chasm and Ormiston Gorge – just to name a few.</p> <p>And that crater that had everyone drooling? It's called Tnorala, or Gosses Bluff, and it's a mere 175km from Alice Springs.</p> <p>In fact, search interest in Gosses Bluff crater has hit a 15-year high in Australia, increasing by a whopping 500 per cent in August alone – so, it seems like people are genuinely eager to find their own piece of Alice Hart's world.</p> <p>Now, if you're wondering about the burning question that's on everyone's minds, it's this: "What is the crater in <em>The Lost Flowers for Alice Hart</em>?" And let me tell you, Gosses Bluff, or Tnorala, is the crater-du-jour.</p> <p>But here's the best part – this place is absolutely real; it's not a mirage or a figment of some writer's imagination. You can actually go there, touch it (not the crater itself, though), and breathe in the stunning views. Sure, you can't frolic inside the crater, but there are viewing points that will have you oohing and aahing like a kid in a candy store.</p> <p>And so, while Agnes Bluff and Mia Tukurta National Park might be the stuff of dreams, Gosses Bluff is the real deal. So it could be  ime to pack your bags, grab your camera and get ready for an adventure that's so real, it'll make your Google searches feel like a distant dream. </p> <p><em>Images: Prime Video</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Little House on the Prairie star passes away

<p>Hersha Parady, renowned for her role in <em>Little House on the Prairie</em>, has passed away at the age of 78.</p> <p>According to a statement provided to <em>The Hollywood Reporter </em>by her son, Jonathan Peverall, Parady passed away at her residence in Norfolk, Virginia on Wednesday August 23. Her son had been actively seeking financial assistance before her demise, as Parady had been diagnosed with meningioma, a prevalent type of brain tumour.</p> <p>Peverall initiated a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/helping-hersha" target="_blank" rel="noopener">GoFundMe campaign</a> with the intention of aiding his mother's escalating medical expenses. In a heartfelt plea on the fundraising page, he recounted how the illness had depleted her vitality, memory and vibrant demeanour, rendering her predominantly bedridden and struggling with day-to-day tasks.</p> <p>Relocating his mother to his own home, Peverall worked diligently to ensure she received the necessary medical attention. He emphasised that the associated costs extended beyond medical procedures, encompassing aspects such as moving expenditures, at-home nursing care and medical equipment.</p> <p>"While we contemplate a surgery to potentially ameliorate her condition, the path to recovery is an arduous one," he stated, acknowledging the substantial financial burden posed by these circumstances. Balancing a full-time job and caring for his three children added to the challenge, yet he reassured that they were providing the best care they could, regardless of external contributions.</p> <p>"Rest assured, we are taking care of her to the best of our ability, and we will continue to do so, regardless of any contributions made here," Peverall wrote. "This GoFundMe is about improving my Mom’s quality of life and giving her the support she needs during this difficult time. It's also about showing her that she is not alone in her fight.</p> <p>"Her family and friends have been here supporting her through everything, but there is only so much help she is willing to accept from the people she loves. My Mom has always been a fiercely independent woman, and asking for help isn't in her nature. That's why I'm stepping in to do it on her behalf."</p> <p>Peverall expressed his gratitude and urged supporters to rally around Parady, demonstrating that her on-screen "Little House" family was united in this battle, just as she had been a presence in their lives through the show.</p> <p>In an update dated August 1, Peverall shared that his mother had undergone a "successful" surgery. However, complications arose as Parady developed pneumonia during her recovery, leading to her admission to the intensive care unit. Unfortunately, her condition deteriorated to a point where she couldn't regain full consciousness. The medical team at the hospital launched an investigation into her condition.</p> <p>Peverall maintained ongoing communication with the medical professionals, seeking insights to guide the best decisions for her care. Despite the trying circumstances, he expressed hope and called upon others to remain optimistic.</p> <p>Parady embarked on her career in theater after graduating from Berea High School in 1963. Her journey took her to Los Angeles, where she secured a role opposite Jon Voight in a production of <em>A Streetcar Named Desire</em>. Subsequently, she transitioned to the silver screen, featuring in an episode of <em>Bearcats!</em>.</p> <p>However, it was in 1977 that Parady achieved widespread recognition for her portrayal of school teacher Alice Garvey in the fourth season of <em>Little House on the Prairie</em>. Appearing in 35 more episodes, her character, Alice, met a tragic end in season six, perishing in a fire. The actress also appeared in other shows including <em>Kenan & Kel</em>, <em>The Phoenix</em>, and <em>The Quest</em>, and movies like <em>The Break</em> and <em>The Babysitter's Seduction</em>.</p> <p>Parady is survived by her son Jonathan Peverall and her three grandchildren.</p> <p><em>Images: GoFundMe / Instagram</em></p>

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Classics Direct is bringing classical music back to life!

<p>Are you passionate about music? Looking for an easy way to update your classical collection, replace some of those old scratched-up records, or even find a new favourite you never knew existed? Classics Direct can help your music collection soar to new heights and get a discount on your first purchase simply by <a href="https://classicsdirect.com.au/pages/newsletter?utm_source=over-sixty&utm_medium=native-article" target="_blank" rel="noopener">signing up to the Classics Direct mailing list!</a></p> <p>Offering an expertly curated selection from the world’s most prominent classical music labels including Deutsche Grammophon, Decca Records, Blue Note, Verve, ECM, Eloquence and many more, Classics Direct is your one-stop shop for everything classical.</p> <p>Whether you’re in the market for classic Christmas collections to add that extra touch of charm to the up-coming festive season, or perhaps you want to splash out on a box set for yourself (or that special someone in your life), Classics Direct can bring the joy of music direct to you.</p> <p><strong>Christmas Albums</strong><br />Christmas is a time for gathering with loved ones, reflecting on the year gone by, giving thanks for all the special elements of your life and taking time to relax and rejoice. What could be a more fitting accompaniment for a perfect Christmas than a stunning variety of classical music to score those moments?</p> <p><a href="https://classicsdirect.com.au/collections/christmas?utm_source=over-sixty&utm_medium=native-article" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img class="alignnone wp-image-64159 size-full" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/10/ChristmasCDs_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="308" /></a></p> <p>Jump right into the festive spirit with the blockbuster Christmas title “A Family Christmas” by internationally renowned tenor Andrea Bocelli and his son Matteo and daughter Virginia. Their first ever album together, “A Family Christmas” showcases their multi-generational musical talent in a range of festive favourites. Featuring new renditions of traditional carols arranged for all three voices, including “Away in a Manger” and “Joy to the World” plus popular Christmas tunes from around the world such as “Feliz Navidad” and “Il Giorno Piu Speciale”.</p> <p>Or be transported by the ethereal sounds and angelic classics of “Christmas Music for Harp”, featuring favourite carols in sublime arrangements by harp master Carlos Salzedo, performed with grace and charm by Australian harp virtuosa Alice Giles.</p> <p>“I Dream of Christmas” by Norah Jones; “Paul Kelly’s Christmas Trains”; “The Three Tenors at Christmas” – these titles and many more are available right now and can be with you in time to enjoy the festive season to the full. Explore the entire range of wonderfully festive <a href="https://classicsdirect.com.au/collections/christmas?utm_source=over-sixty&utm_medium=native-article" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Christmas options here</a>.</p> <p><iframe title="YouTube video player" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/fJJaeCHi-tU" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p><strong>Box Sets</strong><br />Is there a music fan in your life – or perhaps it’s even YOU! – who absolutely must have every CD in an artist’s back catalogue? These completists are a rare and wonderful breed and when it comes to buying gifts for them, a CD Box Set is a hands down winner every time. The value for money is almost second to none, with some exceptional box sets containing upwards of 20, 30, 50 – even 90 CDs! That equates to hours and hours of listening enjoyment in one easy package. What’s not to love?</p> <p><a href="https://classicsdirect.com.au/collections/box-set?sort_by=best-selling&utm_source=over-sixty&utm_medium=native-article" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><img class="alignnone wp-image-64160 size-full" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/10/BoxCDs_1280.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="313" /></a></p> <p>Relax and enjoy the stirring sounds of the 16-disc box set of “Sir Adrian Boult – The Decca Legacy, Vol 1”, the first in a limited-edition three-volume set of the complete Decca recordings of Boult, including previously unpublished recordings of Holst and a pioneering cycle of Vaughan Williams.</p> <p>Sit back and immerse yourself in the ultimate box set “The New Complete Beethoven, Essential Edition”. Featuring more than 115 hours of sublime music across an epic 95 CDs! Representing Beethoven's entire oeuvre in legendary interpretations from Deutsche Grammophon’s unrivalled Beethoven catalogue, together with reference recordings and musical treasures from Decca and many other labels, this is a must-have for any true fan of classical music.</p> <p>From Strauss to Stravinsky, Beethoven to Bach, all your musical tastes are covered at Classics Direct – even if you fancy something a little more whimsical like “Classic 100: Music for the Screen”, “The Complete Classics Kids” collection, or favourite love songs throughout the decades. Dive into the <a href="https://classicsdirect.com.au/collections/box-set?sort_by=best-selling&utm_source=over-sixty&utm_medium=native-article" target="_blank" rel="noopener">best-selling Box Sets for the ultimate CD Collectors here</a>.</p> <p><iframe title="YouTube video player" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/hkJdSBsflnY" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p>So, why not visit the <a href="https://classicsdirect.com.au/?utm_source=over-sixty&utm_medium=native-article" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Classics Direct</a> website now for a leisurely browse through old favourites and new discoveries galore? Don’t forget to <a href="https://classicsdirect.com.au/pages/newsletter?utm_source=over-sixty&utm_medium=native-article" target="_blank" rel="noopener">sign up to the mailing list</a> for a discount off your first purchase!</p> <p><em>Images: Supplied</em></p> <p><em>This is a sponsored article produced in partnership with <a href="https://classicsdirect.com.au/?utm_source=over-sxity&utm_medium=native-article" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Classics Direct</a>.</em></p>

Music

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5 hidden beaches in Australia to try in spring

<p>Don’t fight it out with the crowds at Bondi. Escape to your own secret slice of sand with one of these five hidden beaches in Australia to try in spring.</p> <p><strong>1. Sunshine Beach, Queensland</strong></p> <p>Noosa (just up the coast) gets all the publicity, but Sunshine Beach is definitely our pick. This sleepy seaside town on the Sunshine Coast has a long strip of sand fronting directly onto the Pacific Ocean. The waves can be a little rough, especially if the wind is blowing, but it’s so quiet that there’s a good chance you’ll be the only swimmer there. Don’t miss a post-swim beer at the surf club, set right over the dunes.</p> <p><strong>2. Store Beach, New South Wales</strong></p> <p>Head to Manly on a spring day and you’ll find it packed with locals and tourists alike. So hire a kayak and paddle around to Store Beach, surrounded by the lush bushland of the Sydney Harbour National Park. It's a world away from the hubbub of Manly and feels like a private little enclave for those in the know. Just make sure you pack your own supplies, including drinking water, because there’s nowhere to stock up. And keep an eye out for fairy penguins – the beach is a known breeding ground.</p> <p><strong>3. Gnarabup Beach, Western Australia</strong></p> <p>This white sand wonder is a well-kept secret among the locals from Margaret River. Just a 10-minute drive from the town, its calm turquoise waters are protected by an offshore reef so it’s a great option for families or those looking for a quiet paddle. If you’re looking for seclusion, steer clear of the popular boat ramp and head north for more than a kilometer of untouched sand where the only footprints you’ll see will be your own.</p> <p><strong>4. Godfreys Beach, Tasmania</strong></p> <p>You don’t automatically think of beaches when you think of Tasmania, our coldest state, yet Godfreys is something special. Set just outside the town of Stanley in the state’s northwest, Godfreys Beach is a kilometre of squeaky clean sand surrounded by some of the cleanest air in the world. Its east facing aspect protects the beach from much of the wild weather that can batter the Tasmanian coast, though it still has its rough days. The town itself is just as charming, stocked with colonial buildings and cute B&amp;Bs.</p> <p><strong>5. Memory Cove, South Australia</strong></p> <p>Part of the Lincoln National Park on the tip of the Eyre Peninsula, Memory Cove is one of the finest beaches in the state. Rough and rugged, it’s a secluded beach with stunning scenery that you can only access with a four-wheel drive. One of the best bits is that you can camp right on the beach and with no more than 15 vehicles allowed at any one time, you’ll have a five-star experience for less than $40 per night. The fishing is excellent – so bring your gear – and keep an eye out for dolphins and sea lions.</p> <p>Have you been to any of these hidden beaches? Are there any that you think we should add to the list? Let us know in the comments below.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Selecting plants for spring

<p>Any green thumb knows spring means one thing: planting, planting and more planting. Spring is a time of regeneration and renewal so gardening at this time of the year means you’ll enjoy the first burst of vibrant hues and fragrant scents from blossoming flowers. To get you started on a stunning garden, here is a list of the best flowers to plant in spring to ensure your garden is thriving come summer.</p> <p><em><strong>Lilacs</strong></em></p> <p>Famed for their sweet fragrance, lilacs bloom from spring to early summer. They come in all shapes and sizes as well as a variety of colours ranging from white, pale yellow, pink, mauve and purple.</p> <p>Growing condition: Full sun or light shade and well-drained, sandy and gravelly soil.</p> <p><em><strong>Tulips</strong></em></p> <p>The bloom of tulips never fails to delight especially since they come in every imaginable colours (except true blue). Tulips are perfect for any type of garden setting from the more formal to the casual.</p> <p>Growing condition: Full sun and well-drained soil. </p> <p><em><strong>Hyacinths</strong></em></p> <p>Hyacinths cluster together in bright shades of pink, red and purple making it a great flower to brighten up your garden.</p> <p>Growing condition: Full sun or part shade and well-drained soil.</p> <p><em><strong>Azaleas</strong></em></p> <p>The burst of colour Azaleas bring make them one of the most popular and best flowering shrubs in Australia. They look great planted en masse and provide a beautiful feature for a spring garden.</p> <p>Growing conditions: Part shade and moist but well-drained acidic soil</p> <p><em><strong>Daffodils</strong></em></p> <p>The sunny disposition of daffodils will not only brighten your mood, but your garden. There are many varieties and their sweet scent will keep you outside in the garden all throughout spring.  </p> <p>Growing condition: Full sun or part shade, well-drained soil.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p> <p> </p> <p> </p>

Home Hints & Tips

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Allergic to cleaning? 13 ways to keep allergies in check when Spring cleaning

<p><strong>Wear gloves and a mask</strong></p> <p>Before you start cleaning, put on a face mask and rubber gloves, recommends board-certified allergist Dr Neeta Ogden. The mask will help you avoid breathing in allergens, and the gloves will keep them away from your whole face.</p> <p>“Even quickly touching your eye or face can lead to allergens reaching your eyes and portals to your airway through the nose and mouth,” says Dr Ogden.</p> <p><strong>Clean one window at a time</strong></p> <p>Spring-cleaning is the time to hit spots you don’t clean every week, like windows. But keeping the panes open too long could let pollen, mould, and other allergens inside.</p> <p>“I would do one window at a time,” says Dr Stephen Kimura, an allergist and immunologist. “Open it, clean it, and shut it right away.” Keep the AC running as you go so the air can filter, he says.</p> <p><strong>Let clothes dry inside</strong></p> <p>No matter how much you love the idea of letting clothes dry in the natural sunlight, stay away from an outdoor clothesline.</p> <p>“If you’re pollen or mould allergic and have clothes out there, they will attract those pollens and you’ll be exposed in high quantities to those allergens,” says Dr Kimura. Any clothes that can’t go in the dryer should hang dry indoors.</p> <p><strong>Pick the right vacuum</strong></p> <p>Use a vacuum with a HEPA filter, which is designed to keep dust in the vacuum instead of blowing back up into the air, says Dr Ogden.</p> <p>Also look out for new models with complete seal technology to keep even more allergens in, she suggests. “You definitely don’t want to go with a regular old vacuum,” she says.</p> <p><strong>Leave carpet shampoo to the pros</strong></p> <p>Shampooing a carpet obviously means getting your carpet wet. The problem is, dust mites love spots with more than 50 per cent humidity and might start gathering in the damp wood or padding under the carpet, says Dr Mark Aronica, an allergist.</p> <p>“It should be done by a professional cleaner, where things are cleaned up and dried as quickly as possible,” he says.</p> <p><strong>Don't dust dry</strong></p> <p>Dusting with a dry cloth could work against you, says Dr Ogden. “Dusting in and of itself is not very helpful if you’re just disseminating dust back in the air,” she says.</p> <p>She recommends using a damp cloth or a vinegar solution when wiping down surfaces to actually trap the dust.</p> <p><strong>Pay attention to clutter</strong></p> <p>Don’t ignore your usual decluttering when you’re spring cleaning. “Piles of books and magazines and things collect dust,” says Dr Kimura.</p> <p>Toss the junk while you spring clean to keep the allergens in your home low.</p> <p><strong>Clean mould hands-off</strong></p> <p>Mould can trigger allergies, so cleaning it out effectively can be a challenge. The last thing you want is to hover over the shower scrubbing away at the allergen, so Dr Ogden suggests using a product you can spray. “You can hold them away from yourself and spray into the shower,” she says.</p> <p>“You return in 15 minutes and run the shower, and that’s it.” Use a solution that’s 10 per cent bleach, which is strong enough to kill mould but weak enough for your allergies to tolerate, says Dr Aronica.</p> <p><strong>Run a fan</strong></p> <p>Opening windows to air out fumes will just bring allergens in, but running a fan can help.</p> <p>“Make sure you’ve got the exhaust hood running in the bathroom or kitchen to keep strong odours from bothering you,” says Dr Kimura.</p> <p><strong>Use natural products</strong></p> <p>Stick with fragrance-free cleaning products because scented options can make allergies worse. “It’s not a direct allergic reaction so much as an irritant to a nose that’s already inflamed or irritated,” says Dr Aronica.</p> <p>Use natural cleaning products when you can, like mopping with a vinegar and water solution, suggests Dr Kimura.</p> <p><strong>Invest in a mattress cover </strong></p> <p>Make sure you use an allergy cover on your mattress, pillows and quilt. “The covers are impermeable to dust mites,” says Dr Aronica.</p> <p>“What does accumulate during the week gets killed in the laundry.” Wash your sheets in the hottest setting, or at least 48.8°C, to kill any mites, he says.</p> <p><strong>Give your dog a bath</strong></p> <p>Spring-cleaning doesn’t have to mean your house only – make it an opportunity to give your cat or dog a good wash, too.</p> <p>“That cuts down on whatever pollen they have on their fur or coats, and also cuts down on dander,” says Dr Kimura.</p> <p><strong>Clean our your dehumidifier</strong></p> <p>A dehumidifier will help avoid mould at bay in basements – but only if you clean it regularly.</p> <p>“Rinse it out and use a weak bleach to kill mould spores,” says Dr Kimura. Make sure to refresh it during your spring-cleaning chores.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/allergic-to-cleaning-13-ways-to-keep-allergies-in-check-when-spring-cleaning?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>.</em></p>

Home & Garden

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Get your glow on this spring

<p dir="ltr">As we wish winter a fond farewell, there’s no better time to rejuvenate ourselves to welcome the sun back. </p> <p dir="ltr">It's no secret that our skin can suffer in winter, with harsh conditions making our skin look and feel dull, dry and lifeless. </p> <p dir="ltr">To get ready for warmer months, there is no better answer to our skin woes than the underrated ingredient of vitamin C. </p> <p dir="ltr">So, if you're looking for the answer to bright, even skin this spring and summer, the No7 Radiance+ Range is how you're going to glow and get it. </p> <p dir="ltr">With two holy grail products, your skin will feel more hydrated, and look glowing and radiant to recover from the dreary winter elements. </p> <p dir="ltr">A match made in heaven, the Vitamin C Serum and Hydrogel Eye Masks work to smooth skin and revitalise a tired and lacklustre complexion, completely restoring your radiance. </p> <p dir="ltr">The <a href="https://www.priceline.com.au/no7-radiance-15-vitamin-c-serum-25-ml">No7 Radiance+ 15% Vitamin C Serum</a> is formulated with 15% Vitamin C to transform your skin and leave you with a noticeably brighter complexion.</p> <p dir="ltr">I have personally been using this serum for a number of months, and my skin has never looked healthier and brighter, giving me a natural glow everyday.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CJy4J7IIOe5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CJy4J7IIOe5/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by No7 (@no7uk)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">To get an extra daily boost of vitamin C goodness, the <a href="https://www.priceline.com.au/no7-radiance-eye-masks-3g-5-pack">No7 Radiance+ Illuminating Hydrogel Eye Masks</a> work to reduce the appearance of puffiness and darkness under the eyes in a matter of minutes. </p> <p dir="ltr">The masks adhere seamlessly to the under-eye area maximising the delivery of ingredients to energise sensitive skin under the eyes. </p> <p dir="ltr">These under-eye masks help make you look well rested, rejuvenated and ready to tackle anything!</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CJ6mjf8Itp1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CJ6mjf8Itp1/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by No7 (@no7uk)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The No7 Radiance+ range is available now exclusively at <a href="https://www.priceline.com.au" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Priceline</a>. </p> <p dir="ltr" style="line-height: 1.38; margin-top: 12pt; margin-bottom: 12pt;"><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em><span id="docs-internal-guid-bf52039e-7fff-51cc-d684-52352e5ae9ac"></span></p>

Beauty & Style

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5 ways to Spring clean your finances

<p>Running a stocktake of your personal finances is a worthwhile process to go through on a regular basis. Reviewing the numbers is good for both your pocket and your peace of mind, ensuring your nest egg is not only protected but also working effectively for you.</p> <p><strong>1. Budget and financial planning</strong></p> <p>Review your budget and spending. It’s a valuable exercise to break out the highlighters particularly on your savings and credit card statements. You might be surprised at your spending patterns. Identify necessary and discretional costs and get ruthless on reducing unnecessary spending.</p> <p>Also look at updating your financial calendar and plan. If you don’t already have them, think about talking to a financial planner or accountant to assist on these to put you on top of future spending income and costs. If you haven’t got a budget, create one and ensure you stick to it!</p> <p><strong>2. Debt</strong></p> <p>It’s always worth reviewing your personal debt to shrink and shave wherever you can. Ensure you’re paying off the highest interest non-tax deductible debt first, consolidate your debt where possible, reduce non essential spending and pay off as much interest as you can on the credit cards.</p> <p><strong>3. Housekeeping</strong></p> <p>Having all your financial records organised in an orderly, accessible way can do wonders for getting on top of your finances and feeling in control.</p> <p>Create an ICE (in case of emergency) folder to centralise and consolidate all your key documents and accounts so they can be easily located by a trusted person such as a spouse, the executor of your will or a trustee if required.</p> <p>Update and streamline your accounts where possible, and look at automating your payments for a more time and cost-effective approach to bills. If you’re comfortable with it, go paperless. Pretty much all financial documentation these days can be provided online, giving you the benefit of less paperwork, more convenience and simpler record-keeping. Not to mention being better for the planet!</p> <p><strong>4. Getting the best deal</strong></p> <p>Take a fresh look at how much you’re spending on services like mortgages and insurance policies, as well as telco, internet and utility plans. Plus the interest rates you’re getting on your savings and investment accounts. As products get more and more competitive and it becomes easier to compare different services, this should be a regular exercise to ensure you’re always getting the best deals available.</p> <p><strong>5. Estate planning</strong></p> <p>As your circumstances change, make sure you check whether you need to update your estate planning or review your will including your beneficiaries. Ensure you’ve got an executor organised and your assets allocated through a trust or will.</p>

Money & Banking

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Top tip for the Top End

<p dir="ltr">Travellers are flocking to the top end of Australia to relax in remote crystal clear hot springs during the winter months.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Katherine Hot Springs are natural thermal pools located on the banks of the Katherine River, approximately three hours southeast of Darwin. </p> <p dir="ltr">The beautiful temperature of the picturesque springs averages between 25 and 30 degrees Celsius - making it an ideal travel destination for winter. </p> <p dir="ltr">Tourists can take a relaxing dip into the hot springs and soak up the natural green scenery surrounding the pools.  </p> <p dir="ltr">The popular destination is open from 7am to 7pm daily and the main pool has steel hand rails formed out of rock as well as a wheelchair access ramp. </p> <p dir="ltr">But the hot springs are often restricted during the wet season between September to April dependent on river level.</p> <p dir="ltr">As the springs are naturally heated, it's a great way to let your muscles unwind after a day of hiking or sight seeing. The average time spent at the springs is three hours and the several pools filled with clear water are open to the public. </p> <p dir="ltr">Visitors have shared Instagram-worthy photos with others online, describing the location as 'incredibly beautiful'. </p> <p dir="ltr">Surrounding the hot springs is an 'epic' 58km Jatbula hiking trail along with southern and western walk in the Nitmiluk National Park. </p> <p dir="ltr">Only an hour away from Katherine is another popular destination adored by travellers and locals alike. </p> <p dir="ltr">Bittersprings, which are located approximately two km’s from Mataranka in the Katherine region of the Northern Territory, are set among palms and tropical woodlands in Elsey National Park.</p> <p dir="ltr">The area features a series of naturally-fed thermal pools that are the perfect place to relax and unwind, while exploring the surrounding beauty of the national park. </p> <p dir="ltr">Unlike some other swimming holes in the Northern Territory, Bitter Springs is safe to swim in all year round and free to access.</p> <p dir="ltr">The warm, clear water - which is dappled by light filtered from overhanging palms - is a balmy 30 plus degrees Celsius all year round.  </p> <p dir="ltr">Bitter Springs is also situated close to another natural swimming hole, the Mataranka Thermal Pools, also within the national park.</p> <p dir="ltr">There is a short circuit 1.3 kilometre walk at Bitter Springs that circles through the palms and tropical woodlands in Elsey National Park.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-174b0dfc-7fff-4352-c529-6d832b796fde"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">Those who have visited Bitter Springs describe the experience as 'breathtaking' and 'magical'.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Travel Tips

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5 spring cleaning mistakes that could make you sick

<p><strong>You’re stirring up dust</strong></p> <p>Anyone who’s ever cleaned a dusty bookcase or a neglected spare room knows dust makes you sneeze. “Dust is a common trigger for asthma and allergy symptoms,” says family physician, Dr Jennifer Caudle. But did you know dust can actually be toxic? A meta-analysis from George Washington University found unhealthy levels of chemicals in dust that can cause everything from hormone disruptions to asthma to even cancer.</p> <p>To avoid ingesting or breathing dust as much as possible, wipe up dust frequently – don’t just save hard-to-reach spots for spring cleaning – and follow a ‘top-down’ strategy. “Start with ceilings and high shelving, and work your way to the floors to limit redistribution of dust and other particles to freshly cleaned surfaces,” says Samara Geller, a senior research and database analyst at Environmental Working Group (EWG). In addition, “look for a vacuum equipped with a HEPA filter to more effectively trap dust, allergens, and contaminants,” she says.</p> <p><strong>You’re using fragranced cleaners</strong></p> <p>Your cleaner may smell like lemons or flowers, but unfortunately, that may be linked to health problem. “In my national population studies, I found over one-third of users report adverse health effects from fragranced consumer products, such as air fresheners, deodorisers, laundry detergents, dryer sheets, hand sanitisers, essential oils, scented candles, disinfectant sprays, dish-washing detergents, and other types of scented products,” says Dr Anne Steinemann, a professor of civil engineering at the University of Melbourne in Australia. “Common health problems from exposure to fragranced cleaning products include migraines, asthma attacks, breathing difficulties, dizziness, seizures, nausea, watery eyes, and skin rashes.”</p> <p>Dr Caudle also warns that strong smells from cleaners can trigger headaches. Instead, opt for products labelled ‘fragrance-free’ not ‘unscented’ as those may include a masking fragrance, Steinemann says.</p> <p><strong>You’re using harsh cleaners</strong></p> <p>The products you choose may also be too abrasive for your needs. Some cleaning products are caustic, meaning they have a very high or very low pH. This can lead to caustic burns to the skin, eyes, or internally if swallowed. In addition to being a poisoning risk, even cleaning with them can be harmful. “As a family doctor, I’ve seen patients get skin irritation from contact with cleansers or other chemicals,” Dr Caudle says.</p> <p>Avoid products that use the ingredients sulphuric acid and sodium hydroxide. Some cleaners tend to be more acutely hazardous, such as heavy-duty degreasers and general purpose solvents, drain cleaners, toilet bowl cleaners, and oven cleaners. In general, use the gentlest product that can get the job done.</p> <p><strong>You mix bleach and ammonia</strong></p> <p><span>The golden rule of cleaning (and poison prevention): never mix cleaners with chlorine bleach and those with ammonia together. Mixing bleach and ammonia can lead to the formation of chloramine vapour, which is toxic if inhaled. Cleaning expert Melissa Maker, founder of cleaning service Clean My Space advises using oxygen bleach as a non-toxic option when a job calls for disinfecting. “I don’t like chlorine bleach in my home, which is why I recommend oxygen bleach,” she says.</span></p> <p><strong>You’re not airing out enough</strong></p> <p><span>Because studies have shown cleaning is linked to exposures that cause a decline in lung function, reduce toxic particles and fumes by circulating the air in your house during the task. “Keep the inside of your home well-ventilated while cleaning and dusting,” Geller says. “Open windows – and even doors – and run the central air system or an exhaust fan.” This goes for cleaning in general, not just when you’re dusting. In addition, try bringing your cleaning into the outdoors. “Airing things out outside is fantastic: sunlight, or UV rays, act as an antibacterial so it can help kill bacteria,” says Maker. For example, air out winter blankets on a clothesline to help get rid of dust mites, and shake out throw rugs to rid them of dust – vacuuming them can be difficult.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Written by <span>Tina Donvito</span>. This article first appeared in </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/15-spring-cleaning-mistakes-that-could-make-you-sick" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Reader’s Digest</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, </span><a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">here’s our best subscription offer.</span></a></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Home & Garden

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Woman jailed after walking on natural wonder in US national park

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A woman has received a jail sentence and hefty fine after walking directly on dangerous thermal features at Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">26-year-old Madeline Casey from Connecticut pleaded guilty to the misdemeanour offence and served seven days in jail. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"Although a criminal prosecution and jail time may seem harsh, it's better than spending time in a hospital's burn unit," acting US Attorney Bob Murray said.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In July, Madeline and a friend ignored safety signs and left the protective walkway to walk directly on the ground. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">"The ground is fragile and thin and scalding water just below the surface can cause severe or fatal burns.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“More than 20 people have died from burns suffered after they entered or fell into Yellowstone's hot springs," park spokesperson Morgan Warthin said in the statement.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The judge ordered Madeline to pay US$2040 in fines, fees and community service as well as her week-long jail stint. </span><span style="font-weight: 400;"><br /></span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She is also banned from re-entering Yellowstone National Park during her two year probation. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This incident has prompted park officials to stress the importance of adhering to safety signs through the park. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Madeline is just one of many people who have ignored safety signs at the park and landed themselves in trouble. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In May last year, a woman was burned after falling into a thermal feature at Yellowstone when it was closed due to the coronavirus pandemic.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">She told park rangers she was moving back to get photos when she fell in the hot thermals. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Two men last year were caught trespassing on the cone of Old Faithful, which is a closed thermal area. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">They were sentenced to 10 days in jail and five years of probation, as well being ordered to pay $738 restitution and banned from the park for five years.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Park Chief Ranger Sarah Davis said, “Visitors must realise that walking on thermal features is dangerous, damages the resource, and illegal."</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Getty Images</span></em></p>

Travel Trouble

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See the world’s 10 best outdoor bathing spots

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Whiling away the hours soaking in a hot spring is a must for many travellers, and though we might not be able to travel now, these ten spots should be added to your travel bucket list.</span></p> <p><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.qssupplies.co.uk/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">QS Supplies</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> has ranked the best hot springs around the world, with each location receiving a score out of ten based on reviews on TripAdvisor, social media mentions, the number of rainy days and other factors.</span></p> <p><strong>1. Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa, Iceland</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843366/spa1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/43aed5804a8942679858bc914031165e" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Guide to Iceland</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Taking out the top spot with a score of 6.79/10, the Blue Lagoon Geothermal Spa offers warm waters containing minerals which both give the lagoon its name and are great for the skin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The water is drilled out of the ground, used to heat up fresh water that heats Icelandic homes at a nearby plant, and is then filtered and fed into the lagoon.</span></p> <p><strong>2. Travertine Hot Springs, USA</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843367/spa2.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/0e22ffb4c55e4263aa0bc48448c233c4" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Instagram</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Scoring 5.39 out of ten, these geothermal hot springs are just outside the town of Bridgeport, California. The hot, mineral-rich waters are popular among locals and hikers, offering a stunning view of the surrounding sierras.</span></p> <p><strong>3. Pamukkale Thermal Pools, Turkey</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843368/spa3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/284afc518ecf44719a9cc2d135f81135" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Getty Images</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1988, the natural thermal pools of Pamukkale in western Turkey have been visited for thousands of years.</span></p> <p><strong><span style="font-weight: 400;">The mineral-rich waters have also caused stunning limestone cliffs called travertines to form over the last 400,000 years, with the nearby Greco-Roman city of </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://oversixty.com.au/travel/international-travel/gate-to-hell-myths-confirmed" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hierapolis</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;"> having been a popular spa town since the 2nd century.</span></strong></p> <p><strong>4. Hammam Al Andalus Baths, Spain</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843369/spa4.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/757268114ffb4cf09b0a53920d612a20" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Hammam Granada</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">After being closed for five centuries, the Arab baths in Granada, Spain, were restored and reopened to the public in 1998. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The baths feature geometric mosaics, carved columns, and vaulting ceilings, along with pools of varying temperatures.</span></p> <p><strong>5. Bagby Hot Springs, USA</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843370/spa5.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/7d1eba5520774e8b977b47743c16794b" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Forest Service, The United States Department of Agriculture</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Nestled in among the towering firs of Oregon's Mount Hood National Forest, the hot springs are a secluded haven for nature lovers. The springs are contained in hand-hewn tubs and cedar plumbing. </span></p> <p><strong>TIED: 6. Chena Hot Springs, USA</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843371/spa6.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/79a8852a7b29448c9c9a5e96c89aa4c4" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Chena Hot Springs / Instagram</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Chena Hot Springs are surrounded by the icy Alaskan landscape and offer amazing views of the Northern Lights.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The nearby Chena Hot Springs Resort is also home to the world’s biggest ice museum, featuring ice sculptures, an ice chapel, and an ice bar.</span></p> <p><strong>TIED: 6. Terme Di Saturnia, Italy</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843372/spa7.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8a4a10ce618d4c3e97e86e8571dec40c" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Discover Tuscany</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The Terme Di Saturnia can be found in the central Italian region of Tuscany, with the most popular of the springs being the Cascate del Mulino - the “waterfalls of the mill”.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The mill that the site takes its name from is surrounded by rippling thermal pools, backed by a tranquil forest.</span></p> <p><strong>8. Termas Geometricas, Chile</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843373/spa8.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/10c0251062d649d7bef81525ef36de62" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Termas Geometricas / Instagram</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">With waters warmed by nearby Villarrica volcano, the Termas Geometricas hot springs are the largest complex of springs in Chile.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Temperatures range from 30-45 degrees across 20 pools surrounded by mountains, waterfalls, rivers, and lakes.</span></p> <p><strong>9. Ma’in Hot Springs, Jordan</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843374/spa9.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/8192d671d4594a3d8d9dc1021855e5e8" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Ma’in Hot Spring Resort and Spa</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Located near the eastern coast of the Dead Sea, the Ma’in hot springs are filled with waters with minerals taken from the basaltic mountains. With water temperatures reaching up to 67 degrees and a surround of waterfalls, the springs offer a change of scenery from Jordan’s dry environment.</span></p> <p><strong>10. Szechenyi, Hungary</strong></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7843375/spa10.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/352d3c2d24aa4999852afc6d57f84e8a" /></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Szechenyi Baths</span></em></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">A large complex of baths fed by two hot springs, Szechenyi Baths are a popular spot for tourists and locals alike in Budapest for their medical and relaxing qualities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">As one of the largest spa baths in Europe, there are 15 indoor baths and three outdoor baths for guests to choose from.</span></p>

International Travel

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Be amazed by Queensland’s new 65-million-year old attraction

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Talaroo Hot Springs, Queensland’s latest attraction, has officially opened to the public.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 65-million-year old hot springs are found in the heart of Queensland’s outback brimming with soaking pools that reach a surface temperature of up to 68C.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The destination also features a new campground, caravan park, and elevated walking tracks for visitors to explore.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The site also offers 40-minute sessions in private soaking pools, which are the ideal size for couples.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The region has been managed by Ewamian rangers, the Traditional Owners of the land, and is considered an Indigenous Protected Area and Nature Refuge.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Rangers also encourage visitors to learn about the secrets and history of the land.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“Every part of our country tells a piece of our story,” said Ewamian Elder and Talaroo cultural advisor Jimmy “JR” Richards. “From the plants we’ve used for thousands of years to the history and culture of our people and to the future we’re building right here. It’s an incredible evolving journey that mirrors the constantly changing Springs at the heart of our land.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Travellers can book campsites and activities on Talaroo’s </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.talaroo.com.au/" target="_blank"><span style="font-weight: 400;">new website</span></a><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Images: Talaroo Hot Springs / Instagram</span></em></p>

Domestic Travel

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Spring has sprung for the Royal family!

<p><span>The royal family love many things, and spring is one of them.</span><br /><br /><span>Buckingham Palace took to Instagram to show off Her Majesty’s wonderful garden, and even took the time to share just how wonderful the Palace’s Rose Garden is during the spring.</span><br /><br /><span>"Sunrise over the lake in the Buckingham Palace Garden. Today marks the first official day of spring, as we all look towards brighter days ahead," the caption read.</span><br /><br /><span>"The garden at The Queen's London residence sees much change over the course of a year. Despite its urban location, the garden is home to a remarkable array of flora and fauna."</span></p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CMou5gEnO1I/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="13"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CMou5gEnO1I/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by The Royal Family (@theroyalfamily)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p><br /><span>"The thought of summer. Let's hope we can try and get back to normal. Whatever, that will be!!" one user wrote in the comments. .</span><br /><br /><span>The positive Instagram post follows after it was announced that the Queen's Official Birthday Parade would not go ahead as usual.</span><br /><br /><span>In a statement, Buckingham Palace said: "Following consultation with government and other relevant parties it has been agreed that The Queen's Official Birthday Parade, also known as Trooping the Colour, will not go ahead this year in its traditional form in central London."</span><br /><br /><span>"Options for an alternative Parade, in the quadrangle at Windsor Castle, are being considered."</span><br /><br /><span>Trooping the Colour was supposed to happen on June 12 to mark the monarch's 95th birthday and would have taken place two days after Prince Philip's 100th birthday.</span><br /><br /><span>It was also announced that the annual Garter Service, which is usually held around June, would not take place this year either.</span></p>

Home & Garden

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Completely natural ways to nip spring allergies in the bud

<p>If spring’s blossoms have left you red-eyed and runny-nosed, don’t rush straight to the medicine chest. Many drugs simply treat the symptoms of allergic reactions, which can often be easily prevented in the first place. Here are a few natural ways to keep your allergies at bay.</p> <ol> <li><strong> Avoid pollen </strong></li> </ol> <p>Most plants pollinate in the early hours of the morning, so try to postpone outdoor activity to the afternoon. Also, try taking a quick shower and changing your clothes every time you come home to rinse off stray pollen.</p> <ol start="2"> <li><strong> Find the triggers in your home </strong></li> </ol> <p>Mould, dust mites and pollen in your house can all inflame allergies. Use a diluted bleach solution to clean mould in basements, garages and on old patio furniture.</p> <ol start="3"> <li><strong> Avoid using window fans to cool rooms </strong></li> </ol> <p>They can suck pollen indoors.</p> <ol start="4"> <li><strong> Turn on the dehumidifier </strong></li> </ol> <p>You should keep humidity levels below 50 percent to kill dust mites, but above 30 percent to avoid making your home too dry.</p> <ol start="5"> <li><strong> Improve the air indoors</strong></li> </ol> <p>Invest in a good air filter and change it every two to three months.</p> <ol start="6"> <li><strong> Stay contained in the car</strong></li> </ol> <p>Keep windows closed when driving. If it’s hot, use the air conditioner instead.</p> <ol start="7"> <li><strong> Consider your diet</strong></li> </ol> <p>Eat foods rich in omega-3s to aid with allergies. These include fish, eggs, walnuts and flaxseed oil.</p> <ol start="8"> <li><strong> Love your laundry</strong></li> </ol> <p>Wash bed linens at least once a week in 50 degree-plus water. That’s how hot it should be to kill dust mite eggs.</p> <ol start="9"> <li><strong> Don a mask</strong></li> </ol> <p>Wear a mask while doing housework, which can stir up allergens.</p> <ol start="10"> <li><strong> Get wrapping</strong></li> </ol> <p>Bedroom items that can’t be washed, such as pillows, mattresses and box springs, should be covered in tightly woven, hypoallergenic dust-mite covers. Stuffed animals and throw pillows should be eliminated or kept to a minimum.</p> <ol start="11"> <li><strong> Pet protection</strong></li> </ol> <p>Clean your pets. Wipe off their paws when they come home and wipe down their fur after they’ve been outside.</p> <ol start="12"> <li><strong> Rinse and repeat. </strong></li> </ol> <p>Rinse out your nose with a simple saline solution. Clear the pollen from your passages using a Neti pot or a spray bottle.</p> <ol start="13"> <li><strong> Turn to herbs</strong></li> </ol> <p>Instead of drugs, take a few herbs. To alleviate a runny nose and sinus congestion, try freeze-dried stinging nettles. Eyebright can soothe red, itchy, watery eyes. And the supplement quercetin, a bioflavonoid often found packaged with Vitamin C, can also be an effective antihistamine. Butterbur can alleviate symptoms of grass allergies.</p> <p><em>This article first appeared on <a rel="noopener" href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/allergies/zap-spring-allergies-with-these-natural-remedies" target="_blank">Reader’s Digest</a>. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a rel="noopener" href="http://readersdigest.com.au/subscribe" target="_blank">here’s our best subscription offer</a>.</em></p>

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Woman discovers missing brother’s body during spring clean

<p>An elderly woman living in a small house with her two brothers claim none of them realised their third brother had died in his room and rotted away to just bones by the time they noticed anything.</p> <p>The horrifying discovery was made at the family’s house in Kasugai in the Japanese prefecture of Aichi where the woman lived with her two brothers, one of whom went missing in 2015 when he was 66 years old.</p> <p>The younger siblings didn’t seem to think that their brother’s  - who was identified as Sumio Suenaga - disappearance was unusual, and didn’t report it to the authorities until a year later.</p> <p>The case didn’t go any further until the 69-year-old woman called the police after discovering bones in her brother’s room while she was cleaning.</p> <p>It was then that she thought the bones may belong to her older brother.</p> <p>She told the police: “I found something that I think are human bones.”</p> <p>Officers showed up at the house and confirmed that the bones did indeed belong to a person.</p> <p>While the police were unable to establish the deceased’s age or gender, officers believe there is a high chance the remains belonged to Sumio.</p> <p>It’s unclear how the two siblings managed to spend multiple years in the home with a decomposing body in a nearby room and not notice anything.</p> <p>The investigation is currently ongoing. Local media also reported that the home was not like a conventional Japanese house, which makes the undiscovered body even more unusual.</p>

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