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Paris in spring, Bali in winter. How ‘bucket lists’ help cancer patients handle life and death

<div class="theconversation-article-body"> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/leah-williams-veazey-1223970">Leah Williams Veazey</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alex-broom-121063">Alex Broom</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/katherine-kenny-318175">Katherine Kenny</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p>In the 2007 film <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0825232/">The Bucket List</a> Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman play two main characters who respond to their terminal cancer diagnoses by rejecting experimental treatment. Instead, they go on a range of energetic, overseas escapades.</p> <p>Since then, the term “bucket list” – a list of experiences or achievements to complete before you “kick the bucket” or die – has become common.</p> <p>You can read articles listing <a href="https://www.cnbc.com/2023/01/11/cities-to-visit-before-you-die-according-to-50-travel-experts-and-only-one-is-in-the-us.html">the seven cities</a> you must visit before you die or <a href="https://www.qantas.com/travelinsider/en/trending/top-100-guide/best-things-to-do-and-see-in-australia-travel-bucket-list.html">the 100</a> Australian bucket-list travel experiences.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/UvdTpywTmQg?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <p>But there is a more serious side to the idea behind bucket lists. One of the key forms of suffering at the end of life <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/pon.4821">is regret</a> for things left unsaid or undone. So bucket lists can serve as a form of insurance against this potential regret.</p> <p>The bucket-list search for adventure, memories and meaning takes on a life of its own with a diagnosis of life-limiting illness.</p> <p>In a <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/14407833241251496">study</a> published this week, we spoke to 54 people living with cancer, and 28 of their friends and family. For many, a key bucket list item was travel.</p> <h2>Why is travel so important?</h2> <p>There are lots of reasons why travel plays such a central role in our ideas about a “life well-lived”. Travel is often linked to important <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annals.2003.10.005">life transitions</a>: the youthful gap year, the journey to self-discovery in the 2010 film <a href="https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0879870/">Eat Pray Love</a>, or the popular figure of the “<a href="https://theconversation.com/grey-nomad-lifestyle-provides-a-model-for-living-remotely-106074">grey nomad</a>”.</p> <p>The significance of travel is not merely in the destination, nor even in the journey. For many people, planning the travel is just as important. A cancer diagnosis affects people’s sense of control over their future, throwing into question their ability to write their own life story or plan their travel dreams.</p> <p>Mark, the recently retired husband of a woman with cancer, told us about their stalled travel plans: "We’re just in that part of our lives where we were going to jump in the caravan and do the big trip and all this sort of thing, and now [our plans are] on blocks in the shed."</p> <p>For others, a cancer diagnosis brought an urgent need to “tick things off” their bucket list. Asha, a woman living with breast cancer, told us she’d always been driven to “get things done” but the cancer diagnosis made this worse: "So, I had to do all the travel, I had to empty my bucket list now, which has kind of driven my partner round the bend."</p> <p>People’s travel dreams ranged from whale watching in Queensland to seeing polar bears in the Arctic, and from driving a caravan across the Nullarbor Plain to skiing in Switzerland.</p> <p>Nadia, who was 38 years old when we spoke to her, said travelling with her family had made important memories and given her a sense of vitality, despite her health struggles. She told us how being diagnosed with cancer had given her the chance to live her life at a younger age, rather than waiting for retirement: "In the last three years, I think I’ve lived more than a lot of 80-year-olds."</p> <h2>But travel is expensive</h2> <p>Of course, travel is expensive. It’s not by chance Nicholson’s character in The Bucket List is a billionaire.</p> <p>Some people we spoke to had emptied their savings, assuming they would no longer need to provide for aged care or retirement. Others had used insurance payouts or charity to make their bucket-list dreams come true.</p> <p>But not everyone can do this. Jim, a 60-year-old whose wife had been diagnosed with cancer, told us: "We’ve actually bought a new car and [been] talking about getting a new caravan […] But I’ve got to work. It’d be nice if there was a little money tree out the back but never mind."</p> <p>Not everyone’s bucket list items were expensive. Some chose to spend more time with loved ones, take up a new hobby or get a pet.</p> <p>Our study showed making plans to tick items off a list can give people a sense of self-determination and hope for the future. It was a way of exerting control in the face of an illness that can leave people feeling powerless. Asha said: "This disease is not going to control me. I am not going to sit still and do nothing. I want to go travel."</p> <h2>Something we ‘ought’ to do?</h2> <p>Bucket lists are also a symptom of a broader culture that emphasises conspicuous <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JH_Pa1hOEVc">consumption</a> and <a href="https://productiveageinginstitute.org.au/">productivity</a>, even into the end of life.</p> <p>Indeed, people told us travelling could be exhausting, expensive and stressful, especially when they’re also living with the symptoms and side effects of treatment. Nevertheless, they felt travel was something they “<a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/14461242.2021.1918016">ought</a>” to do.</p> <p>Travel can be deeply meaningful, as our study found. But a life well-lived need not be extravagant or adventurous. Finding what is meaningful is a deeply personal journey.</p> <hr /> <p><em>Names of study participants mentioned in this article are pseudonyms.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/225682/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/leah-williams-veazey-1223970">Leah Williams Veazey</a>, ARC DECRA Research Fellow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/alex-broom-121063">Alex Broom</a>, Professor of Sociology &amp; Director, Sydney Centre for Healthy Societies, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/katherine-kenny-318175">Katherine Kenny</a>, ARC DECRA Senior Research Fellow, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-sydney-841">University of Sydney</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/paris-in-spring-bali-in-winter-how-bucket-lists-help-cancer-patients-handle-life-and-death-225682">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Caring

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Final goodbyes to Sydney dad after Bali scooter crash

<p>Kevin Malligan, 24, who was critically injured in a horror <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/news/news/heartbreaking-update-after-young-father-critically-injured-in-bali-scooter-crash" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Bali scooter crash</a> has been taken off life support, after he was declared brain dead by doctors.</p> <p>The young father-of-two was left fighting for his life after the accident. He suffered a brain bleed and a fracture to his neck, and was put into an induced coma at the BIMC Hospital in Nusa Dua.</p> <p>On Friday, his mother-in-law confirmed his death via a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/kevin-malligan-accident#xd_co_f=NDIzY2U3YjUtNTQ2Yi00MjhjLWEwNTMtNGNhZTMyZmNiMzc0~" target="_blank" rel="noopener">GoFundMe</a> page that was previously set up to raise funds for his return to Australia. </p> <p>“Our last hours with our son-in-law Kevin were this morning as we all said our goodbyes,” she wrote, with a heartbreaking photo of Malligan's heavily pregnant wife, Leah and young daughter Ivy at his bedside.</p> <p>“We had to go through a traumatic time that no wife, father, mother, dad and family should have to go through.</p> <p>“Leah and his dad made the beautiful, generous choice to donate his internal organs," she added. </p> <p>She then thanked everyone who has supported their family during these tough times, with over  $122,000 raised by generous donors in the fundraiser.</p> <p>“We are forever grateful for so much support over these last two weeks from family, friends, work colleagues, community and complete strangers.</p> <p>“Leah is overwhelmed by the support to bring Kevin back home and to have the opportunity to farewell her beloved husband and father to Ivy and her soon-to-be bub – due early February 2024.”</p> <p><em>Images: GoFundMe</em></p>

Caring

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Heartbreaking update after young father critically injured in Bali scooter crash

<p>Kevin Malligan, 24, who was critically injured in a horror scooter crash in Bali, has been declared brain dead by doctors and now his pregnant wife is left to decide when they will turn off his life support machine. </p> <p>The young Sydney father was holidaying in Bali just weeks before the birth of his second child, before disaster struck when the moped he was a passenger on “hit a bump” and he was flung off.</p> <p>The 24-year-old suffered a brain bleed and a fracture to his neck, and was put on life support at the BIMC Hospital in Nusa Dua. </p> <p>As he fought for his life, his heavily pregnant wife Leah Malligan raced to Bali to be by her husbands side along with Mr Malligan’s father and brother. </p> <p>The young father underwent emergency brain surgery before generous donors helped him secure a $150,000 medevac flight back to Australia on January 4. </p> <p>But despite doctors best efforts, his family confirmed on Wednesday that his injuries are irreversible and he's been declared clinically brain dead. </p> <p>“This is the most difficult time of any of our lives and we just can’t be grateful enough to have been able to get him home for everyone to see him before he leaves us," his wife told <em>Daily Mail. </em></p> <p>She described her husband as a “great dad, husband and friend, with a generous and loving nature who will be missed by all.” </p> <p>“He was always up for a good laugh and would do anything to put a smile on someone’s face," she said.</p> <p>“There was nothing more valuable than seeing how excited he was when he got home to give his Ivy girl a great big cuddle.</p> <p>“They then would play constantly until it was dinner and bedtime. He loved her so much and she doesn’t love anyone else as much as she loved Kev.”</p> <p>The heartbreaking update was shared to the family’s <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/kevin-malligan-accident" target="_blank" rel="noopener">GoFundMe</a> page yesterday, with it already raising over $119,000. </p> <p>“Leah would like to thank everyone from the bottom of her heart who has donated, helped, sent messages to help her and the family at this time,” Mrs. Malligan’s mum Jodie French said.</p> <p>“She and the Malligan family now has the awful decision of when to turn off his life support.”</p> <p>“We are sending all our love and prayers for strength at this time to our daughter and Kevin’s family," she added before thanking everyone who has donated to their family. </p> <p><em>Images: 7NEWS</em></p>

News

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"Heartbreaking" issue set to engulf Bali

<p>A viral video has shown the devastating side of tourism in Bali, with mountains of garbage taking over the popular holiday destination. </p> <p>Gary Bencheghib, a French filmmaker living in Indonesia, captured a heartbreaking video of a massive “open rubbish dump” 50 metres high covered in trash.</p> <p>He said it is one of many open dumps around Bali, which are overflowing with waste. </p> <p>“I’ve just made it here, right at the foot of this giant open landfill. It’s so high we can’t even see the top and it falls right into the river,” he said.</p> <p>Gary’s post has attracted hundreds of comments from shocked users who described the state of the site as “depressing”. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CvH6Sw2t09U/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/CvH6Sw2t09U/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Gary Bencheghib (@garybencheghib)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“My️ [heart] brakes by seeing this … such a beautiful country! They need education and see this. How can I help???” one person asked</p> <p>“Totally heartbreaking,” said another.</p> <p>A third person wrote, “As we love Bali so much, things like this need to be addressed also by the local community and local government hand-in-hand.”</p> <p>In an attempt to combat the ever-growing rubbish problem, that Indonesian officials have said will cost $40 million to fully resolve, a new tourism tax has been implemented. </p> <p>In July, Bali Governor Wayan Koster confirmed as of next year tourists will need to pay 150,000 Indonesian rupiah (about $15) to enter the popular island.</p> <p>He said the funds would be used for “the environment, culture and [to] build better quality infrastructure”.</p> <p>Indonesia’s co-ordinating minister for Maritime Affairs and Investment, Luhut Binsar Pandjaitan, suggested to have the money spent on addressing Bali’s waste problem.</p> <p>"I think it [tourism tax] is good for Bali; why not use it to look after its waste,” he told reporters last week after signing a new conservation agreement at the Bali Turtle Special Economic Zone.</p> <p>“Garbage must be cleaned; now there is a smell. I spoke to the mayor of Denpasar to fix it but don’t use it as a political issue, it’s not good just fix it and reduce the smell.”</p> <p>He explained that if it continues without “significant and rapid improvement” the problem will become “uncontrollable”,<em> <a title="thebalisun.com" href="https://thebalisun.com/minister-says-new-tourism-tax-in-bali-should-be-used-to-tackle-islands-waste-problem/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Bali Sun</a></em> reported.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Tourist jailed over nude stunt at Bali temple

<p>A German tourist could face time in jail after stripping naked and crashing a sacred dance performance at a temple in Bali. </p> <p>The backpacker, identified by police as 28-year-old Darja Tuschinski, casually strolled up to the stage with no clothes on while the dancers remained professional and calm. </p> <p>In the now-viral clip filmed earlier this week, the backpacker was filmed climbing the stairs and attempting to open a door into the temple, as a local man attempted to stop her. </p> <p>After barging the door open, she was then filmed then walking down and kneeling in front of the stage, where she appeared to pray in front of horrified onlookers. </p> <p>“The female foreigner went naked on the stage of Saraswati Ubud Temple owned by Tjokorda Ngurah Suyadnya AKA Cok Wah,” Bali Police spokesman Stefanus Satake Bayu Setianto told local media outlet <em><a title="coconuts.co" href="https://coconuts.co/bali/news/naked-german-woman-crashes-balinese-dance-show-at-ubud-temple/">Coconuts Bali</a></em>.</p> <p>The bizarre stunt sparked backlash online, with one local writing, “Why weren’t you immediately given clothes and secured first? There was someone who was performing the Balinese dance … We don’t need crazy caucasians, do we?”</p> <p>Another wrote, “Sad to see the behaviour of this one person.” </p> <p>A third pointed out the cultural clash, writing, “Caucasians who go to Asia usually feel the most spiritual freedom (and) enlightenment … But (their) life and mindset are not in accordance with traditional Asian spiritual and spiritual values, especially in Bali.”</p> <p>Local council chief Wayan Widana told another local media outlet, <em><a title="radarbali.jawapos.com" href="https://radarbali.jawapos.com/pariwisata/24/05/2023/dewa-ratu-viral-wanita-jerman-bugil-di-pentas-tari-polda-bali-telisik-begini-kata-camat-ubud/">Radar Bali</a></em>, that Tuschinski was known to suffer mental health issues and had been “brought to the Bangli Mental Institution.”</p> <p>In recent months, Indonesian officials have expressed their frustrations with unruly tourists.</p> <p>Ravindra Singh Shekhawat, who is the general manager for Bali operations at Melbourne-based tour company Intrepid Travel, told <a href="https://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-updates/incidents/crazy-caucasians-bali-community-slams-german-tourists-naked-act/news-story/035939942bb25f7e127ee419131031fb" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>news.com.au</em></a> earlier this year, “Recently there has been an increase in tourists not following the local laws and respecting local culture and traditions, including instances of tourists getting into heated arguments with local police for not wearing helmets or breaking traffic laws.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Twitter</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Chilling new theory into death of Aussie real estate agent in Bali

<p>The family of Charlie Bradley have shared an emotional plea for answers, asking anyone with information on Charlie's final hours to come forward. </p> <p>The 28-year-old real estate agent <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/news/news/aussie-real-estate-agent-found-dead-in-bali-street" target="_blank" rel="noopener">tragically died</a> in Bali, after being found unresponsive outside a hospital in north Kuta, several hours after leaving a club on April 16th.</p> <p>Charlie's family are asking for anyone with information on his whereabouts between the hours of leaving the club and being found at the hospital to come forward, as they try to piece together what caused his untimely death.</p> <p>Charlie's sister Beth Bradley has told <a href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-11994795/Charlie-Bradley-Bali-death-sinister-new-theory-emerges-hunt-continues-man-filmed-him.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>Daily Mail Australia</em></a> that she suspects her brother may have been a victim of methanol poisoning, after being assured by his friends that no drugs were taken.</p> <p>"Charlie doesn't drink beer - he sticks to spirits," she said.</p> <p>"There's a lot of methanol poisoning in Bali. It seems that a lot of the bars pump their alcohol with ethanol themselves to save them money in terms of producing it."</p> <p>"The body can't hack that much which can end up with you having hallucinations, not being able to walk, shaking and multiple other symptoms."</p> <p>Ms Bradley said she had "wracked her brain a million times over" in a search for answers for what happened to her brother and believes this was the most plausible. </p> <p>"Every time I've Googled people dying in Bali it seems to be a very similar situation and it seems to be happening more as of late," she said.  </p> <p>While Beth stressed that this was just a theory, she believed methanol poisoning could explain an unusual phone call she received from a doctor who treated her brother at Siloam Hospital in Kuta.</p> <p>"The doctor told me that a man had brought Charlie into the hospital and that he showed him a video of Charlie standing, looking confused and shouting," she said.</p> <p>"He then fell to the ground and was rolling around. He stood up, fell again and banged his head on the floor - five times. By the time he received Charlie at the hospital, Charlie had passed away."</p> <p>The family now face an agonising wait to repatriate Charlie's body for a post mortem examination in Australia to determine his cause of death. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Facebook</em></p>

News

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Aussie real estate agent found dead in Bali street

<p> An Australian real estate agent who was found dead in the middle of a Bali street is being remembered as a “mate to so many”.</p> <p>Charlie James Bradley, 28, was found dead outside a hospital in north Kuta after leaving a club on April 16.</p> <p>The 28-year-old had flown from Sydney to attend a music festival at the holiday hotspot with a friend.</p> <p>His heartbroken sister confirmed the news of his death on social media.</p> <p>“This shocking news has rocked our family entirely, Charlie was loved by so many,” she wrote.</p> <p>“Let this be a reminder to you all that life is too short, and hug those closest to you tightly.”</p> <p>Mr Bradley worked for real estate firms such as Belle and McGrath and specialised in selling homes in Newcastle.</p> <p>Originally a UK citizen, Mr Bradley migrated from Coventry to Sydney in 2013.</p> <p>He posted a photo of himself in front of the Harbour Bridge alongside the caption, “Beats Coventry I reckon."</p> <p>Mr Bradley’s family, who live in Adelaide, are working with UK authorities to bring his body back to Australia.</p> <p>Indonesian police said they have launched an investigation into the death and have spoken to two witnesses.</p> <p>Friends and family took to social media with tributes for Mr Bradley.</p> <p>Beverley Page shared that he was cherished by loved ones.</p> <p>“He had the biggest heart and personality,” she wrote.</p> <p>“Everyone who had the fortune of meeting him loved him.</p> <p>“His contagious smile, good looks and charm were only a few of his many qualities and he will be terribly missed by so many.”</p> <p><em>Image credit: Facebook</em></p>

News

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Firing squad demanded for teen in Bali

<p>Prosecutors are calling for a 19-year-old woman to be executed by firing squad after she was arrested for allegedly smuggling drugs into Bali.</p> <p>The Brazilian teenager, Manuela Vitoria de Araujo Farias, has been in custody since her initial arrest in January 2023, after allegedly being sprung with 3kg of cocaine in her luggage.</p> <p>According to global press agency <em>Newsflash</em>, prosecutors demanded the maximum penalty.</p> <p>If she is convicted of trafficking drugs into Indonesia, she could face execution by firing squad or a lifetime prison sentence.</p> <p>Authorities allege she was involved with a drug gang, but according to her lawyer, Davi Lira da Silva, the teen sold lingerie and perfume for a living and was tricked by people she trusted.</p> <p>Mr da Silva claimed the 19-year-old was tricked into cooperating after the gang who hired her told her about temples in Bali where they pray for the ill.</p> <p>Her mother had recently suffered a stroke and her lawyers claimed she was going to seek Buddhist prayers for a cure.</p> <p>They also alleged that the gang had promised to pay for surf lessons for Ms Farias following her arrival to the country.</p> <p>Her arrest made international headlines after the case was confirmed to local media by Bali Police Chief Inspector Gen Putu Jayan Danu Putra in Denpasar on January 27, 2023.</p> <p>The <em>Bali Sun</em> reported that Ms Farias had arrived at Bali Airport around 3 am on January 1 on a Qatar Airways flight, travelling from Brazil to Bali via Qatar.</p> <p>“The drug smuggling attempt was thwarted by the Bali airport customs. We really appreciate what customs have done,” Chief Inspector Putra said at a press conference on January 27, according to the outlet.</p> <p>Ms Farias’ case has been adjourned with the sentences to be announced on a later date in April.</p> <p><em>Image credit: Twitter</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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"I MARRIED my best friend!": Aussie superstar's secret wedding

<p>Tones and I singer Toni Watson has announced her marriage to footballer fiancé Jimmy Bedford and has shared an inside look into her secret Bali wedding.</p> <p>On Wednesday, the star took to Instagram to share a series of photos from her big day with the caption: “Well we weren’t planning on spreading the news until after the single dropped but I MARRIED my best friend!”</p> <p>In one photo, Watson and Bedford were seen exchanging their vows under a gazebo in a romantic outdoor ceremony.</p> <p>In another photo, the couple can be seen smiling from ear to ear with a stunning view of the ocean in the background. Watson donned a long white silk dress and held a beautiful white bouquet to match.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqFHjXoBBXG/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CqFHjXoBBXG/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by TONES AND I (@tonesandi)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Watson’s bridesmaids can be seen wearing flattering orange dresses and holding up their glasses to cheer for the newlyweds.</p> <p>The <em>Dance Monkey</em> singer also shared a few photos from her reception, and she appeared to have had an outfit change to something that matched her usual style.</p> <p>Many of her friends and other stars have commented their well wishes to the couple.</p> <p>“How goods this, congrats you two 👌,” wrote Australian Cricketer David Warner.</p> <p>“CONGRATULATIONS ANGELS ❤️,” wrote Sophie Monk.</p> <p>“Such a fun weekend, what a special moment ❤️❤️” commented a friend.</p> <p>“I’m so so so happy for you guys!!” commented another.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p> <p> </p>

Relationships

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We don’t want to lose her”: Aussie mum’s desperate plea answered

<p>An Aussie mum has issued a desperate plea for help to get her severely ill baby in Bali on a medical evacuation flight to Brisbane. </p> <p>The seven-week-old bub, Lucky, who was fighting for her life on a respirator in Bali, is now on her way back to Australia.</p> <p>Melbourne mother, Honey Ahisma, spoke to <a href="https://7news.com.au/sunrise">Sunrise</a> to issue a desperate appeal to help save her seven-week-old baby Lucky who was gravely ill in Siloam Hospital in Denpasar, where the family was stranded, unable to afford the $90,000 medical evacuation to Australia. </p> <p>There is currently a major medical evacuation underway, and Lucky is on an emergency flight back to Brisbane for treatment for a severe bacterial infection. </p> <p>The Queensland’s Medical Rescue team flew to Bali on Sunday and told Sunrise there was only a small window of opportunity for little Lucky to get out safely. </p> <p>Ahisma was desperate to get Lucky back to Australia for diagnosis and treatment, but she had to wait for her daughter to be strong enough to fly. </p> <p>The mother first noticed Lucky struggling to breathe at their Bali home.</p> <p>“I tried to help her, just like normal when babies get sick, they just need sleep... but then she stopped drinking my milk,” Ahisma told <a href="https://7news.com.au/">7News</a>. </p> <p>Without specialist equipment, doctors have been unable to diagnose the specific infection Lucky is fighting. </p> <p>Lucky was transferred to the intensive care unit, where she spent a week in critical condition. </p> <p>Doctors have told Ahisma that they are not equipped to save her daughter’s life, meaning the 7-week-old will need urgent medical care elsewhere.</p> <p>“We don’t want to lose her,” Ahimsa said.</p> <p>Ahisma reported Lucky’s condition was deteriorating, and the hospital bills continued to grow.</p> <p>“Every day is very expensive ... like one day is $8000 Australian,” she said. </p> <p>There has since been $190,000 raised in a GoFundMe to help bring little Lucky back home for treatment. </p> <p><em>Image credit: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

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Terrified tourists forced to abandon sinking boat in Bali

<p>Terrifying footage has captured the moment dozens of tourists were forced to abandon a sinking boat off the coast of Bali. </p> <p>Passengers were seen jumping overboard into rough seas in lifejackets, while travelling from the island of Nusa Penida-Sanur to the Bali mainland.</p> <p>The boat was struck by a large wave due to wild weather, which caused the trust vessel to sink, according to local news outlets. </p> <p>More than 23 people were rescued, with no casualties reported.</p> <p>Fortunately for those onboard, several boats were in the vicinity of the sunken vessel and came to the rescue of frightened passengers. </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cm86aaBDXZy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/Cm86aaBDXZy/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by INFOBALI (@punapibali)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>While there were no causalities, some passengers suffered minor injuries as they exited the boat, while personal possessions were also lost.</p> <p>Footage of the terrifying ordeal has gone viral online, with many Aussies warning other tourists about the dangers of travelling by boat in Bali.</p> <p>"When boats get cancelled or there's a bad weather warning. Don't try and find a cheap boat to get you across," one said.</p> <p>"I vowed never to go on one of those boats again after a horrific trip to Gili T when the captain got on his knees and started to pray," a second said. </p> <p>"We were also coming across shipping lane which made it even worse. These boat operators probably have no insurance and no regular maintenance."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Facebook</em></p>

News

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Main bomb maker of 2002 Bali bombings released early

<p dir="ltr">Umar Patek, a convicted terrorist and the main bomb maker in the 2002 Bali bombings, has been released from jail.</p> <p dir="ltr">Patek, a leading member of the al Qaida-linked network Jemaah Islamiyah, helped build the car bomb that killed more than 200 people, including two Kiwis and 88 Australians, at two nightclubs in Kuta Beach in 2002.</p> <p dir="ltr">Patek served just over half of his original 20-year sentence and was released from jail after Indonesian authorities claimed that he was successfully reformed.</p> <p dir="ltr">"The special requirements that have been met by Umar Patek are that he has participated in the de-radicalisation coaching program," Ministry of Law and Human Rights spokesperson Rika Aprianti said.</p> <p dir="ltr">Patek will be required to report to the parole office once a week, before it becomes once a month.</p> <p dir="ltr">He is required to stay on parole until 2030, but his freedom can be revoked if he fails to report to the parole office or breaks the law.</p> <p dir="ltr">During his jail stint, Patek received a total of 33 months of sentence reduction with the most recent one on August 17, Indonesia's Independence Day.</p> <p dir="ltr">This saw Patek given a five-month reduction of his sentence after fulfilling the parole requirement of serving two-thirds of his current sentence</p> <p dir="ltr">At the time of the reduced sentence, Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese said the government will look at making "diplomatic representations" to oppose Patek’s release.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I feel a great deal of common distress, along with all Australians, at this time," Albanese said.</p> <p dir="ltr">"We had been advised by the Indonesian government of this further reduction.</p> <p dir="ltr">"This will cause further distress to Australians who were the families of victims of the Bali bombings."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Nine News</em></p>

Legal

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Aussie travellers warned over strict new sex law

<p dir="ltr">Indonesia has introduced a new law that could see many Aussies and other tourists thrown into jail.</p> <p dir="ltr">The predominately Muslim country announced that the government has approved legislation that would outlaw premarital sex.</p> <p dir="ltr">The news has been met with outrage with many saying it is setting the country back and taking away from people’s freedoms.</p> <p dir="ltr">This new law will also affect Bali, an extremely popular holiday destination and far more liberal than the rest of the country.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bambang Wuryanto, the head of the parliamentary commission in charge of revising the code, told politicians that the old rule is no longer relevant.</p> <p dir="ltr">"The old code belongs to Dutch heritage … and is no longer relevant now."</p> <p dir="ltr">Yasonna Laoly, the Minister of Law and Human Rights said it was time to leave the “colonial criminal code” behind.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We have tried our best to accommodate the important issues and different opinions which were debated,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“However, it is time for us to make a historical decision on the penal code amendment and to leave the colonial criminal code we inherited behind.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The new law is not just applied for tourists, but also citizens with acts of premarital and extramarital sex could only be reported by a spouse, parents or children.</p> <p dir="ltr">Anyone found guilty of premarital and extramarital sex will face a year in jail.</p> <p dir="ltr">Despite the law passing, it is clear that it won’t be applied immediately as it will take time to transition from the old code to the new one.</p> <p dir="ltr">The new code is expected to be implemented within the next three years.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Aussie survivors reflect on the Bali bombings 20 years on

<p>On October 12th 2002, three bombs were detonated in two Bali hotspots which resulted in the death of 202 people, 88 of whom were Australian.</p> <p>It was the single largest loss of Australian life due to an act of terror.</p> <p>Now, 20 years on from the tragedy, survivors told <a href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/bali-bombings-20-year-anniversary-survivors-rescuers-victims-stories/8f6a1661-e377-4ce9-aa17-204d67ca065c" target="_blank" rel="noopener">9News</a> their inspirational yet harrowing stories of survival, and how their lives have changed since since that fateful day two decades ago. </p> <p><strong>Therese</strong></p> <p>After suffering devastating burns to 85 percent of her body, Therese Fox has fought valiantly through hundreds of skin grafts, life-threatening infections and agonising physiotherapy.</p> <p>Therese spent a year in hospital and defied doctor's expectations to survive, only to be confronted with the reality of survivor's guilt. </p> <p>Two decades on, she is still haunted by the loss of her good friend Bronwyn Cartwright and dozens of others.</p> <p>"I could go through my burns a hundred times over. The guilt of survival is the hardest thing to live with," Fox said, before breaking down in the face of the overwhelming emotion of her first return to Bali.</p> <p><strong>Ashleigh</strong></p> <p>When Ashleigh Airlie was just 14-years-old, she was faced with the trauma of losing her mother Gayle, who was killed in the terror attack. </p> <p>Four other mothers were holidaying in Bali with their teenage daughters, who were in the back of the Sari Club when the second bomb went off. </p> <p>It was just two days before Ashleigh's 15th birthday when she was buried under the collapsing roof and leaving her grasping for strangers' legs to make it out to the street.</p> <p>"When I think about it, that's the last place I had a good time with my mum," Ashleigh, now 34, told 9News.</p> <p>"It was the last place we had fun and she was having the time of her life."</p> <p><strong>Peter</strong></p> <p>When Peter Hughes was interviewed from his hospital bed, he unknowingly became the Australian face of the Bali bombing tragedy, which left him feeling "a little bit embarrassed about it all".</p> <p>"I was dying at the time and I knew that," he said, describing the interview as a chance to show his son Leigh that he was ok, even though he knew he wasn't.</p> <p>"I was just hanging on back then."</p> <p>While appearing on TV, Peter was swollen and barely able to breathe, but seemed unconcerned about his injuries. </p> <p>He slipped into a coma days later with burns to more than half his body. </p> <p>Now, he still struggled with the physical and mental effects of surviving the attack, but that doesn't stop him from returning to Bali several times a year. </p> <p><strong>Andrew</strong></p> <p>While Andrew Csabi was laying in the street dying outside the smoking ruins of the Sari Club, he gave himself the last rites. </p> <p>"I looked down, I said, 'my leg's blown off' and I couldn't believe it," he said.</p> <p>"I laid there quietly and I issued myself last rights."</p> <p><strong>Natalie and Nicole</strong></p> <p>Nicole McLean and Natalie Goold were just 23 when the bombs went off in Bali. </p> <p>After Nicole lost her right arm and suffered horrific leg injuries in the attack, Natalie fought to save the life of her friend in an act that saw her <span style="font-family: inherit; font-size: inherit; font-style: inherit; font-variant-caps: inherit; caret-color: #333333; color: #333333;">became one of only four people awarded the Star of Courage medal in the </span>Bali honours list.</p> <p>"She was just a force to be reckoned with. She knew where we had to go, where we had to be, and she wasn't leaving my side," McLean said.</p> <p>"She was ripping people's t-shirts off them and shoving them in my leg to stop the blood."</p> <p>Nicole McLean had survived the horror of the Sari Club and made it onto an RAAF jet that could get her back to Australia within hours.</p> <p><em>Image credits: 9News</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Aussies invited overseas to live and work tax-free

<p dir="ltr">Does the digital nomad lifestyle seem too good to be true? Well, working poolside could be your next sensible business move, with popular tropical holiday destination Bali introducing a new visa to entice visitors.</p> <p dir="ltr">The Indonesian government has announced a foreign “remote workers” visa where freelancers can dial in from the beautiful resort-style island tax-free.</p> <p dir="ltr">Proposed earlier in 2022, the renewed B211A visa allows Australians to work in Indonesia for up to six months without paying tax, according to the Tourism Minister Sandiaga Uno. The announcement was made last week in an attempt to attract workers who are keen on a change of lifestyle.</p> <p dir="ltr">Typically, digital nomads are on 30-day tourist visas and have had to leave and re-enter the country monthly if they wanted to stay. Tourism Minister Uno now hopes the government turning its attention to Bali’s remote worker crowd will help foster growth.</p> <p dir="ltr">He said the move could help create an extra 4.4 million jobs across Indonesia by 2024.</p> <p dir="ltr">“With a visa valid for two months and can be extended for six months, I am more confident that the number of foreign tourists interested in residing in Indonesia will increase and will automatically impact the economic revival,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">A proposal for an extended version of a similar visa is still under discussion.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Money & Banking

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"You had so much love to give": Aussie tourist unexpectedly dies in Bali

<p>A devastated Australian mother has paid tribute to her daughter who unexpectedly passed away while holidaying in Bali.</p> <p>Olyvia Cowley, a 24-year-old from the Gold Coast died on the 19th of August. It still remains unclear how she lost her life.</p> <p>She leaves behind her distraught mother, Christina, who took to social media to share her grief saying “my heart doesn’t know what to do”.</p> <p>“My twinkle. My baby. My Angel. I’ll miss you forever. What a smile, you are someone who lights up the world”, she wrote.</p> <p>“My love for you is beyond anything you’ll ever understand.”</p> <p>In another heart-warming tribute, her mum shared how there was nothing she wanted more than to be a mum, sharif she feels “lost” as she grieves her daughter.</p> <p>“You’re my air, my baby girl,” she wrote.</p> <p>“Mummy is coming home with your sister soon.”</p> <p>Loved ones have rallied behind the family, with a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/the-cowley-family" target="_blank" rel="noopener">GoFundMe</a> launching to help bring her body back to Australia.</p> <p>“The family are currently planning to bring liv home to the Gold Coast,” organiser Shae Barr wrote.</p> <p>“To ease the financial pressure on the family moving forward I am asking for any donations if you are in a position to give."</p> <p>“We all know how much of an impact it can make when a community come together and the Cowley family are extremely grateful for the overwhelming love and support already.”</p> <p>Tributes have flooded social media, with friends saying “it doesn’t seem real”.</p> <p>“The kindest soul. You had so much love to give,” one friend said.</p> <p><em>Images: Facebook / GoFundMe</em></p>

News

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Beyond Bali: Indonesia’s other islands

<p>Bali is one of the world's most popular overseas holiday destinations. But did you know that Indonesia has more than 17,500 other islands with just as much to offer? Go off the beaten track and explore some the country’s other gems.</p> <p><strong>Sumba</strong></p> <p><strong><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/08/sumba-indonesia.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /><br /></strong></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p>This rugged island in the east of Indonesia looks very different to the more touristy volcanic islands in the north. During the dry season the island can go up to seven months without a drop of rain, turning the lush jungle landscape into a parched and arid desert that more resembles Africa than southeast Asia. But once the rains come, the land springs back to life, a sparkling palette of vibrant greens, thundering waterfalls and muddy rice paddies ready for the next crop. The ancient breed of Sumba pony is a part of every day life and can be seen all over the island, used to work farms, as transport and in traditional ceremonies. Sumba is famous for its surfing, most notably for a legendary break simply called The Left that’s considered one of the best in the world. There’s only one resort on the island, the ultra luxe Nihiwatu, and guests stay in Swiss Family Robinson-style fantasy villas with private swimming pools, butler service and incredible views.</p> <p><strong>Gili Islands</strong></p> <p><strong><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/08/gili-islands.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /><br /></strong></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p>The Gilis, as they are known, are made up of three small islands sitting just off the coast of Lombok, to the east of Bali. They have long been a backpacker haven, but small-scale development is opening them up to a wider audience. There’s a great mix of buzzing bars, quiet beaches and vibrant local culture. It’s one of the best places in Southeast Asia for diving with around 25 dive sites around the islands. The water is crystal clear and a consistent 28 degrees, and once under the surface you’ll see reef sharks, rays, parrot fish, eels, octopus, the occasional whale shark and plenty of turtles – Gili is known as the turtle capital of the world.</p> <p><strong>Java</strong></p> <p><strong><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/08/java.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /><br /></strong></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p>Java is the geographical and economic centre of Indonesia, and home to the capital Jakarta as well as a number of other major cities. But before you dismiss it as another busy, smoggy Asian capital, there’s much more to Java. A visit to the smaller villages of the island will give you the chance to experience Indonesian life as it is lived every day and, while Java’s not known for its beaches, there are some nice strips of sand that are blissfully crowd-free. The island’s most famous landmark is the vast Borobudur complex, a UNESCO World Heritage Site dating from the ninth century that’s easily one of the most stunning temples in Southeast Asia. Active travellers can climb the moon-like peaks of Mount Bromo to see volcanic craters that still bubble with smoke.</p> <p><strong>Flores Komodo</strong></p> <p><strong><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2022/08/komodo-flores-island.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /><br /></strong></p> <p><em>Image: Getty Images</em></p> <p>These pristine islands form part of the Nusa Tengarra chain of islands that make up the southern arc of the Indonesian archipelago. The name is a giveaway for the islands’ most famous resident – the Komodo dragon, the world’s largest lizard. Reaching up to three metres in length and an impressive 130 (or so) kilograms, these are pretty fearsome beasts and are known to eat wild pigs, deer and even smaller dragons. They can move at around 20 kilometres an hour, so it’s best to keep your distance. Flores is also home to a row of semi-active volcanoes that make for superb hiking and both islands are ringed with sparkling water and unspoilt beaches.</p>

International Travel

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