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BBC star's heartbreaking plea after wife and daughters were killed

<p>Grief-stricken BBC racing commentator John Hunt has broken his silence after his wife and two daughters were <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/finance/legal/man-arrested-after-bbc-presenter-s-wife-and-children-murdered" target="_blank" rel="noopener">killed</a> during a crossbow attack. </p> <p>Carol Hunt, 61, Hannah Hunt, 28, and Louise Hunt, 25, were fatally injured at their home in North London last Tuesday, with Hertfordshire Police confirming that 26-year-old Kyle Clifford had been arrested in connection to their murders. </p> <p>Speaking to the <em><a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/articles/cx825zwy2r5o" target="_blank" rel="noopener">BBC</a></em> about the devastating incident, John's friend and fellow commentator, Matt Chapman, said, "Family means more to some than others and for John, his family unit was something he absolutely adored."</p> <p>"He told me: 'Matty, the message I would tell everyone is you never know when it's going to be the last day you see your family'."</p> <p>"The message was very clear: make the most of every day because you just don't know."</p> <p>Mr Chapman said proceeds from a <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/f/the-family-of-john-hunt" target="_blank" rel="nofollow noreferrer noopener">fundraiser </a>set up after the horrifying attack, which has currently raised more than $53,000 AUD, will go to John's surviving daughter, Amy. </p> <p>He said John had said his "biggest desire" was to make sure Amy had "no money worries for the rest of her life".</p> <p>"There are a lot of people, including myself, who feel helpless and would like to do something," he said.</p> <p>"John would like nothing more for Amy after these horrific events than a life that is a little less stressful, because life will never be stress-free again."</p> <p>"It's not going to take their grief away - it's not going to take the pain away or change anything - but it might help them have an easier life."</p> <p>John and Amy released a joint statement on Saturday, thanking the public for their messages of support during what they described as "an extremely difficult time for us".</p> <p>"The devastation that we are experiencing cannot be put into words," they said. </p> <p>"We would like to thank people for their kind messages and for the support we have received in recent days. These have provided great comfort to us for which we are very grateful."</p> <p>"As you can imagine, this is an extremely difficult time for us, and we need time and space to come to terms with what has happened and start the grieving process."</p> <p>As the investigation continues into the brutal deaths, police shared that they have not yet been able to speak to him as he remains in a serious condition after suffering self-inflicted wounds. </p> <p><em>Image credits: GoFundMe / Facebook</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Today show star's replacement revealed

<p>Brooke Boney's replacement on the <em>Today</em> show has been announced. </p> <p>The reporter announced on-air in March that she was quitting to pursue her studies at Oxford University in the UK. </p> <p>On Tuesday, Nine’s director of morning television Steven Burling announced that current <em>Weekend Today</em> co-host, Jayne Azzopardi, will move to weekdays to cover the news round for <em>Today.</em></p> <p>“We’re thrilled to welcome Jayne Azzopardi, one of Nine’s most accomplished journalists, to Today in the news chair,” he said in a statement. </p> <p>“Jayne has covered politics in Canberra, reported on major news events, and co-hosted <em>Weekend Today.</em>"</p> <p>Celebrity interviewer Renee Bargh will also have a boosted role on the breakfast TV show, and will cover the entertainment round alongside Richard Wilkins. </p> <p>“Joining her is Renee Bargh, known for her career at Channel [V] and as a correspondent for EXTRA in LA, to cover the entertainment round alongside Dickie," Burling added. </p> <p>“We’re privileged to have Jayne and Renee join our team at Today.”</p> <p>While Boney has yet to announce her final day on-air, she previously said that she will be leaving the show after the Olympics, which is being broadcast on Nine from July 26 to August 11. </p> <p>“I’ve been offered a place at Oxford University later this year, which means I’ll be leaving the show after the Olympics,” Boney said on-air in March.</p> <p>While she didn't go into too much detail she added: “It’s been a dream of mine to be able to study at an overseas university, and it just felt like the right time to take that step."</p> <p><em>Images: Nine</em></p>

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"Rest in love": All Blacks legend and Dancing with the Stars winner dies at 55

<p>The sports and entertainment communities are mourning the loss of former All Blacks hooker and <em>Dancing with the Stars</em> winner Norm Hewitt, who has passed away at the age of 55.</p> <p>Hewitt, a beloved figure both on and off the rugby field, succumbed to a lengthy battle with motor neurone disease, as confirmed by his family in a heartfelt statement.</p> <p>"Although rugby dominated his early life, he established a thriving human relations consultancy after retirement, and his services were much in demand both nationally and internationally," his family shared. "He walked confidently in both Māori and Pākehā worlds and was a particular role model for troubled youth, citing his own background, and offering inspirational teachings that one’s present life need not be one’s future."</p> <p>Hewitt leaves behind his wife Arlene and their two children, Elizabeth and Alexander. Born and raised in Pōrangahau, southern Hawke’s Bay, Hewitt's rugby career was nothing short of illustrious. Over 13 seasons, he played 296 representative matches for Hawke’s Bay, Southland and Wellington, earning 23 caps for the All Blacks. Hewitt was also a pivotal member of the Hurricanes during the formative years of Super Rugby, missing only one match in the first five years.</p> <p>The rugby community has been profoundly affected by Hewitt's passing. Former teammate Ofisa Tonu’u posted a touching tribute on Facebook: "I’m just devastated finding out the news today. I will never forget how you always stuck up for me during the Black Tracker days when no one else would, you always look after all the players and we always followed you into battle. No more pain, brother, you can now rest in Love. Fa’afetai tele lava my uso for having my back as I did yours. I know the other boys will be welcoming you with open arms at the gates. Rest in Love, Normy."</p> <p>Beyond his rugby career, Hewitt transitioned into a public speaker and mentor, focusing heavily on violence prevention programmes and advocacy. He worked with the SPCA as an animal cruelty and anti-violence publicity officer, visiting schools to spread his message. In 2005, Hewitt showcased his versatility by winning the first season of<em> Dancing with the Stars</em> alongside professional dancer Carol-Ann Hickmore.</p> <p>Hewitt's life was not without its struggles. In 1999, he made a public apology for a drunken incident in Queenstown, marking a turning point as he renounced alcohol and dedicated himself to helping others facing similar challenges.</p> <p>The outpouring of tributes was immediate, with The All Blacks expressing their sorrow: “We are saddened by the loss of All Black #938 Norm Hewitt who passed away yesterday in Wellington. Hewitt played 9 Tests and 14 Games between 1993 and 1998. Our thoughts are with Norm’s family and loved ones at this time.”</p> <p>Podcaster Martin Devlin shared his personal experience: “RIP Norm Hewitt. Not a lot of people know how kind & generous this man was. A truly wonderful person. Reached out to me and helped me considerably a long time ago when things were very rough. Love & respect.”</p> <p>Richard Hills echoed the sentiments of many: “This is bloody sad. A sad way to lose a kiwi icon so young. He had a really rough childhood and upbringing and faced it and turned his life around to become not only a rugby legend but also helped others who’d been through similar issues.”</p> <p>Norm Hewitt’s legacy will endure through the lives he touched and the positive change he inspired. His story is a testament to the strength of the human spirit and the profound impact one individual can have on the world.</p> <p><em>Image: Radio New Zealand</em></p>

Caring

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Father of fallen footy star speaks out

<p>The father of a talented young footballer killed in a devastating crash over the weekend has expressed a selfless wish for the tragedy to serve as a vital reminder about road safety.</p> <p>Nick Campo, a South Fremantle Colts player, was the rear passenger in a Toyota HiLux that rolled and collided with a Jeep Patriot in Perth’s southern suburbs on Saturday night. Having recently turned 18, Campo <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/health/caring/rising-star-footy-player-dies-at-just-18" target="_blank" rel="noopener">tragically died at the scene</a>.</p> <p>A 17-year-old HiLux driver faced Perth Children's Court on Monday from his hospital bed, charged with several dangerous driving offences. Despite the heartbreaking loss, Campo's father <a href="https://7news.com.au/news/father-of-nick-campo-sends-remarkable-message-after-tragic-death-of-south-fremantle-footballer-c-15363644" target="_blank" rel="noopener">told 7NEWS</a> that the family is not angry at the driver accused of causing the crash and wants the incident to serve as a crucial reminder about road safety.</p> <p>Dozens of loved ones gathered at the crash site on Farrington Rd in North Lake to lay flowers and remember the talented sportsman known for his cheeky sense of humour.</p> <p>“Nick was one of a kind. A lot of people loved him,” one friend remarked. Another added, “He had a really good heart and was really funny. No matter what situation he was in, he could always make a joke.”</p> <p>Nick's heartbroken sister, Eva, also remembered her brother, expressing gratitude for the support she has received. “I just wanted to say thank you to everyone that’s reached out,” she said. “A lot of people loved him. I think a piece of him lives in a lot of people, including me.”</p> <p>Campo's school reached out to parents to offer support for those needing it. <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">“There are no adequate words to express our grief and sympathy around the loss of this wonderful young man.” Cockburn Cricket Club added, “We are thankful for the time we spent with Nick. A life well lived but gone way too soon.”</span></p> <p>Tyler Rowe, another 18-year-old passenger in the HiLux, remains in critical condition in Royal Perth Hospital’s intensive care unit. The charged driver was granted bail on the condition he does not operate a motor vehicle and will face court again in September.</p> <p><em>Images: 9 News | 7 News</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Rising star footy player dies at just 18

<p>Rising football star Nick Campo has tragically died just two days after his 18th birthday. </p> <p>The South Fremantle player was in the backseat of a ute when it crashed and rolled just before midnight in Perth, before the ute smashed into an oncoming SUV. </p> <p>Two of Campo's teammates, Tyler Rowe and Josh Jackson, were also in the ute and were taken to hospital with injuries. </p> <p>Cameron Britt, CEO of South Fremantle, said the club was in "deep shock" following the sudden tragedy.</p> <p>"South Fremantle Football Club is deeply saddened by news of a car accident overnight involving several of our Colts players, resulting in the tragic death of South Fremantle footballer Nick Campo," he said.</p> <p>"We are a club in deep shock, focused upon supporting our players, staff and their families in these tragic circumstances."</p> <p>Campo's parents have also shared their heartbreak following the accident, saying their lives had been "ripped apart" by the sudden loss. </p> <p>"In the early hours of this morning our beautiful son Nick passed away after he was involved in a tragic car accident," they said on Facebook.</p> <p>"Our lives have been ripped apart, 18 years old, a future with so much hope taken away, we are praying others in the car involved will be ok."</p> <p>In Kalgoorlie, where Campo spent his childhood, his former club described him as "a popular friend to many" with a "life full of promise that was taken way too soon".</p> <p><em>Image credits: Nine </em></p>

Caring

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Julie Goodwin's next move following injury on Dancing With The Stars

<p>Julie Goodwin's highly anticipated debut on Dancing With The Stars has been postponed, following an injury. </p> <p>The 53-year-old was forced to withdraw from the first round on Sunday night after suffering two serious tears to her calf muscles during rehearsal with her dance partner, Andrey Gorbunov. </p> <p>She was taken to hospital and immediately treated. </p> <p>"I was jumping on poor Andrey here and something snapped. Fortunately, it was my leg and not his back," she told DWTS show hosts Sonia Kruger and Dr Chris Brown during the premiere. </p> <p>But on Monday, she appeared in good spirits and vowed to hit the dance floor again. </p> <p>“Despite being told that I probably should withdraw, I’m going to give it everything I’ve got, so I don’t quit easy,” Goodwin told <em>The Morning Show </em>hosts<em>. </em></p> <p>“And the beautiful thing about this production is that they’ve got some marvellous people. They’ve got the dance doctor in Bondi, who is all over this.</p> <p>“So I’m getting acupuncture, homeopathic treatment, massage. I’m swimming, I do healing meditations and listen to healing tones in my headphones.</p> <p>“So, I’m absolutely going hell for leather to get as well as I can in the hope that I can be up and dancing again very soon.”</p> <p>Goodwin is rumoured to return on the show in the third episode. </p> <p>In the interview, she also praised her dance partner, saying: "He’s amazing and he’s also very patient. He’s also very strong. And he’s also just so capable."</p> <p>“He would just be so patient and I’ve loved it. He got me sort of doing steps that I never, ever thought I would do. As you can see from the footage, we have laughed and laughed.”</p> <p><em>Images: Seven</em></p>

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Happy Days star's warning to tourists after costly mistake

<p><em>Happy Days </em>star Henry Winkler has issued a warning to fans about rickshaw rides in London, after he was charged £134 (AU$250) for a short trip.  </p> <p>The star revealed on X, formerly Twitter, that he was left with the huge bill after taking a ride on the pedicab, and attached a picture from the back of the rickshaw. </p> <p>“TRAVEL TIP: Do not take one of these bicycle taxis without absolutely negotiating the price first. This person in London rode us around in circles then finally to our destination seven blocks away … for $170 US!" he wrote. </p> <p>“My fault, I paid, but passenger beware!</p> <p>A few hours later, he reiterated his point and added:  "Can NOT say this enough."</p> <p>Fans were quick to back the veteran actor, with one saying: “How can the guy do The Fonz like that?”</p> <p>Others urged him to take the tube or a cab instead, with one writing: "I would've taken you for free." </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">TRAVEL TIP: DO NOT take one of these bicycle taxis without absolutely negotiating the price first. This person in London rode us around in circles then finally to our destination 7 blocks away...for $170 US! My fault, I paid, but passenger beware! <a href="https://t.co/l9yxNUkOuM">pic.twitter.com/l9yxNUkOuM</a></p> <p>— Henry Winkler (@hwinkler4real) <a href="https://twitter.com/hwinkler4real/status/1808556199824273671?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">July 3, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>Another former cab driver added: "London cabbies are known for being honest, knowledgeable, and decent-It takes a full year for someone to gain all the Knowledge necessary to become a cab driver. I believe they drive black cars. Anyway, this is a former cabbie telling you to grab a real cab."</p> <p>To which Winkler replied: "I did all the time. For that moment I LOST my mind."</p> <p>According to the U.K's Local Government Association, pedicabs have been able to charge extortionate prices because they are "exempt from the regulations which cover taxis and private hire vehicles.</p> <p>"They do not need a [license] to operate, are able to set their own prices and are not subject to checks on the safety and ability of their drivers, or the road worthiness of their vehicles."</p> <p>However, Transport for London is stepping in to license rickshaw riders and regulate their fares to bring it into line with other forms of transport in the city. </p> <p><em>Image: Mark Doyle/ Shutterstock Editorial</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Former Home and Away star admits brutal attack on woman

<p>A former <em>Home and Away</em> star has admitted to bashing a woman during a suspected mental health crisis.</p> <p>Orpheus Pledger, 31, faced Melbourne Magistrates’ Court on Monday via a video link from custody at Ravenhall Correctional Centre. </p> <p>Police prosecutor Fionnuala Kennedy said Pledger attacked the victim repeatedly over a three-month period at a home in Northcote, Melbourne, with one of the attacks captured on a motion-capture camera on March 25. </p> <p>Footage from the camera showed Pledger grabbing the woman's hair, pulling her to the ground and stomping on her head. </p> <p>The court was told that the woman called triple zero at 1.35am to raise concerns Pledger was suffering a “mental health episode", before the line disconnected right after she said “he’s coming.” </p> <p>Officers arrived 15 minutes later and found the woman lying on the floor of her home unable to get up, with Pledger nowhere to be seen.</p> <p>The woman was taken to hospital, where doctors noted that she had bruising on her forehead, a laceration to her cheek, bruising to her right hand and marks on her face and ear.</p> <p>The court was told that he was arrested the following day, but he was unable to be interviewed because of his "erratic behaviour". </p> <p>He was released in April for a court-ordered medical assessment due to concerns for his mental health, but he fled from the hospital on April 23 after a six hour wait. </p> <p>He then returned to the woman's home to collect his things and when asked to leave, he told her: “why, I haven’t done anything”. </p> <p>Police issued a public appeal before he was arrested two days later. </p> <p>Defence lawyer Jasper MacCuspie noted that during that time, his client was unable to get the mental health assessment he required, due to limited resources, saying that it was a widespread issue within the health system.</p> <p>The court heard that there is currently a shortage of ambulance and police resources, which Magistrate Justin Foster labelled as “outrageous”.</p> <p>““The only reason I bailed him at the time was because there was nothing available for him to be  … assessed in a prison setting. And there is no money in the hospital to have these important things assessed,” he said. </p> <p>“There’s a shortage of everything at the moment, it’s outrageous.”</p> <p>MacCuspie also said that his client had begun acting at the age of eight or nine but fell into the wrong crowd, and his drug use escalated in his late 20s when he was declined a role on US TV series <em>The 100</em>. </p> <p>“At the very last minute that fell through. It was a destabilising event,” MacCuspie said.</p> <p>“He aspires towards acting in future, but accepts by virtue of matter that’s a somewhat challenging prospect,” he added. </p> <p>Pledger will be assessed for a community corrections order, but has pleaded guilty to four assault-related charges, and will be sentenced on Wednesday. </p> <p><em>Images: news.com.au/ Channel Seven</em></p>

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"No disrespect": Home and Away star's swipe at Robert Irwin's Logie nomination

<p><em>Home and Away</em> veteran Lynne McGranger has taken a savage swipe at Robert Irwin, who has earned his first Gold Logie nomination. </p> <p>The young wildlife warrior is among a group of Aussie TV old-hands in the running for the 2024 Gold Logie, with the 20-year-old being the youngest male ever nominated for the award. </p> <p>Also battling it out for the Gold is Larry Emdur, Andy Lee, Asher Keddie, Julia Morris, Sonia Kruger, and ABC's Tony Armstrong.</p> <p>The nomination comes hot on the heels of Irwin's TV debut as co-host of <em>I'm A Celebrity... Get Me out of Here!</em> alongside Julia Morris, as he took over from Dr Chris Brown for the 2024 season. </p> <p>After Robert's nomination was announced, despite how well the new season of <em>I'm A Celeb</em> was received, many wondered how someone with so little TV experience could find himself in the running for the award. </p> <p>One of those skeptics was <em>Home and Away</em> actress Lynne McGranger, who made a cheeky swipe towards Robert when commenting in support of her Channel Seven colleague Larry Emdur who is up for the award for the first time.</p> <p>"I'm sorry but ol'mate Irwin has been on telly for a bloody minute!! No disrespect intended. #Lazforgold 🫶🏾🥇😍" she wrote on Larry's Instagram post, with over 300 people liking the comment.</p> <p>The comment came after Larry shared a screenshot of a message he was sent, with someone congratulating him on the nomination but telling him they'd be voting for Irwin.</p> <p>Lynne's rogue comment was met with mainly support from people.</p> <p>"You said what everyone is thinking," one person said. "I agree 💯 #Lazforgold all the way! No disrespect intended for Irwin … Larry has my vote 🙌 he truly deserves to win 🥇," another commented.</p> <p>"You have my first vote ever today, only for you Larry, for the laughter that lights up my life!" another dedicated fan said.</p> <p>Lynne's comments weren't the first time someone called out Robert's nomination, after sister Bindi Irwin was quick to <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/family-pets/it-just-got-real-bindi-irwin-s-cheeky-swipe-at-brother" target="_blank" rel="noopener">tease</a> on Instagram. </p> <p style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1rem; caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji';">Bindi took to social media to share a cheeky throwback post of her clutching her own Silver Logie in 2008, for Most Popular New Female Talent for her work in <em style="box-sizing: border-box;">Bindi the Jungle Girl</em>. </p> <p style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1rem; caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji';">“Hey Australia, vote for my awesome brother so he can catch up to me 16 years later …” she captioned the post.</p> <p style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1rem; caret-color: #212529; color: #212529; font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, 'Helvetica Neue', Arial, sans-serif, 'Apple Color Emoji', 'Segoe UI Emoji', 'Segoe UI Symbol', 'Noto Color Emoji';">"At least mine's gold," Robert teased, to which Bindi replied "You haven't won it yet..." alongside a laughing emoji. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p> <p> </p>

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Former All Blacks star dies at 58

<p>Former All Black and Canterbury stalwart Shayne Philpott has died aged 58. </p> <p>The former New Zealand rugby union player died on Tuesday after a medical event. </p> <p>Philpott was All Black No.895 and a prolific points scorer during a decade-long career for Canterbury, playing 113 games for them. </p> <p>His death has been confirmed by New Zealand Rugby. </p> <p>"Our thoughts are with the family and loved ones of former All Black Shayne Philpott, who has passed away aged 58," their tribute read on social media. </p> <p>"Philpott played 14 matches for the All Blacks between 1988-1991, and was a stalwart of Canterbury rugby. </p> <p>"Rest in love All Black #895 🖤"</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Our thoughts are with the family and loved ones of former All Black Shayne Philpott, who has passed away aged 58.</p> <p>Philpott played 14 matches for the All Blacks between 1988-1991, and was a stalwart of Canterbury rugby.</p> <p>Rest in love All Black #895 🖤 <a href="https://t.co/M7IcglhhxW">pic.twitter.com/M7IcglhhxW</a></p> <p>— New Zealand Rugby (@NZRugby) <a href="https://twitter.com/NZRugby/status/1805737931849572842?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">June 25, 2024</a></p></blockquote> <p>Philpott started playing for Canterbury in 1986 at the age of 20, before being selected by the All Backs and making his debut on the 1988 tour of Australia. </p> <p>He played 12 games and two Tests for the All Blacks, and was known for his versatility as he could fill most positions in the backline. </p> <p>Loved ones have paid tribute to the rugby player and father. </p> <p>“It is with a very heavy heart that we share the shocking news of Shayne Philpott’s passing today ..." one family member wrote on Facebook. </p> <p>“A much-loved father and brother. Rest in peace brother.”</p> <p>“It’s just unfathomable…,” another emotional tribute read. </p> <p>“Shayne Philpott you have been the epitome of humbleness and decency. I will miss you at celebrations, with your great yarns and humour.</p> <p>“I’m just so terribly sad we don’t get to say goodbye, and to thank you for being you. You are gone way too soon my friend. Rest in peace and love, you wonderful human xox.”</p> <p><em>Images: Twitter</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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Hollywood star's heartbreaking health update

<p>Gena Rowlands's son has shared his mother's heartbreaking health battle, that is reminiscent of one of her most iconic movie character's similar health issue.</p> <p>The 94-year-old Golden Globe winner who portrayed an older version of Rachel McAdam’s character, Allie, in the 2004 film<em> The Notebook</em>, has been battling Alzheimer’s disease for the past five years.</p> <p>While discussing the film's 20 year anniversary, Nick Cassavetes, the director of the movie and Rowlands’ son, revealed his mother’s diagnosis. </p> <p>“I got my mum to play older Allie, and we spent a lot of time talking about Alzheimer’s and wanting to be authentic with it, and now, for the last five years, she’s had Alzheimer’s,” Cassavetes told <em><a href="https://ew.com/the-notebook-star-gena-rowlands-has-alzheimers-8668642">Entertainment Weekly</a></em> of Rowlands’ character, who also had dementia.</p> <p>“She’s in full dementia. And it’s so crazy — we lived it, she acted it, and now it’s on us.”</p> <p>Back in 2004, Rowlands — whose mother, actress Lady Rowlands, also suffered from the disease — explained why playing Allie was “particularly hard.”</p> <p>“This last one — The Notebook, based on the novel by Nicholas Sparks — was particularly hard because I play a character who has Alzheimer’s,” she told <em><a href="https://www.oprah.com/spirit/gena-rowlands-aha-moment">O magazine</a></em>.</p> <p>“I went through that with my mother, and if Nick hadn’t directed the film, I don’t think I would have gone for it — it’s just too hard. It was a tough but wonderful movie.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: New Line Cinema/Demmie Todd/Warner Bros/Spring Creek/Kobal/Shutterstock Editorial </em></p>

Caring

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Long-serving ABC star calls it quits

<p>Paul Barry, the veteran host of <em>Media Watch</em>, who has made a career out of poking the media bear, has announced his departure from the ABC show in December. After an illustrious (and occasionally infamous) tenure that would make a soap opera look like a nap, Barry is hanging up his microphone at the ripe age of 72.</p> <p>“I’ve been in the hot seat for 11 years and it’s time to give someone else a go,” Barry remarked, possibly while the hot seat sighed in relief. Indeed, hosting Media Watch is no small feat – it's a bit like riding a roller coaster while simultaneously refereeing a brawl. But Barry has certainly done it with aplomb, panache and a fair amount of flair.</p> <p>His announcement has left viewers with mixed feelings – a blend of gratitude for his unyielding service and a tinge of sadness, akin to the bittersweet end of a beloved TV series. Barry promised to stay with us until December, giving us ample time to stock up on popcorn and enjoy the remaining episodes. "Lots of fun to be had before then," he teased, hinting at some final rounds of media mischief.</p> <p>For those who might be wondering what Barry plans to do next, well, that's still a mystery. Perhaps he'll take up knitting, but knowing him, it’ll likely be with barbed wire.</p> <p>Barry first commandeered <em>Media Watch</em> in 2000 before returning in 2013, making a grand comeback that rivalled any reality TV show. Over the years, he has ruffled enough feathers to fill a sizeable pillow factory. Commercial media outlets, politicians and even his own network – as <em>Media Watch</em> famously runs independently of the ABC – have all been on the receiving end of his sharp critiques. His fearless approach has made him a hero to many and a headache to some.</p> <p>One of Barry’s most memorable moments came in 2013 during a spat with columnist Andrew Bolt. When Bolt provocatively asked Barry to reveal his salary on air, Barry did just that – $191,259, to be precise. It was a jaw-dropping moment that left viewers stunned and Bolt, presumably, a bit flummoxed.</p> <p>In between his stints at <em>Media Watch</em>, Barry has donned many hats – investigative reporter for the <em>Sydney Morning Herald</em>, correspondent for <em>60 Minutes</em>, and author of several books, including a controversial unauthorised biography of James Packer. His career has been a veritable smorgasbord of journalism, controversy and unflinching honesty.</p> <p>An ABC spokesperson paid tribute to Barry, highlighting his “track record of independent commentary, analysis, and robust discussion about the media industry and its ethics – or lack thereof.” Barry has indeed been the watchdog’s watchdog, never shying away from calling out malpractice, no matter where it reared its head.</p> <p>As the ABC gears up to announce a new host, the shoes left behind are large ones to fill. Barry’s departure marks the end of an era – one filled with wit, grit and an unwavering commitment to holding the media accountable.</p> <p>So, here’s to Paul Barry – the feather-ruffler, the truth-seeker, the man who made us laugh, gasp and, most importantly, think. As he steps down from <em>Media Watch</em>, we wish him the very best in his next adventure, whether that’s taking on new journalistic endeavours or finally perfecting that tricky scarf pattern.</p> <p>Bravo, Mr Barry. You will be missed.</p> <p><em>Image: Media Watch</em></p>

TV

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Belated tributes for iconic Sylvania Waters star

<p>One of Australia's first ever reality TV star has died, but her death went unreported for over a year. </p> <p>Noeline Donaher, the star of <em>Sylvania Waters</em>, died on May 2023, with Australian pop culture producer Matt Fulton bringing attention to her death by sharing a Facebook post written by Donaher’s son, Mick, on X, formerly known as Twitter. </p> <p>“Holy c*** — Noeline Donaher DID pass away May 2023, and there wasn’t a blip in any news/media,” <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">Fulton </span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">wrote on X. </span></p> <p>“How did we miss this news? I had to do a deep dive to find the info. It really was not reported anywhere," <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">the pop culture producer </span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">added. </span></p> <p>The Facebook post announcing her death was shared on May 30 2023 and read: “Dad has asked me to share with you all the sad news that Noeline Donaher, his partner of over 40yrs, recently passed away."</p> <p>“Noeline absolutely loved Appendix J racing ... Together they raced everything from a couple of Valiants to a Lotus Cortina ... More importantly she made lots of great friends over the years and had many laughs/memorable times at tracks all around Australia, including Tasmania and WA!</p> <p>“I’m just with (her husband) Laurie today and going through some old pics on the wall and in albums so thought I’d share a few of them with you all and say THANKS, on their behalf, to the Appendix J Old Boys for many years of fun, friendship and great memories.”</p> <p><em>Sylvania Waters </em>which aired for 12 episodes in 1992 caused a lot of controversy at the time, because of its unique concept. </p> <p>The show followed the Donahers as they went about their lives in their home in the titular south Sydney suburb of Sylvania Waters.</p> <p>At the time, some critics and viewers criticised how the reality TV show depicted the family, saying that it showed all Aussies – as “materialistic, argumentative and heavy-drinking”, according to the <em>SMH</em>. </p> <p>When the series aired in the UK, <em>The Daily Telegraph Mirror</em> dubbed the show  “a vicious putdown tailor-made for British audiences” and many viewers were shocked at the antics of the Australian family. </p> <p>Viewers of the show were stunned to learn that her death went unreported, and many shared their condolences on X. </p> <p>“Vale the original Kath Day-Knight,” wrote one follower, referring to <em>Sylvania Waters</em> influence on another beloved show, <em>Kath and Kim</em>.</p> <p>“One of the world’s first reality TV series, and one that put Sylvania Waters on the map," added another. </p> <p>“Get me a bourbon, Laurie,” wrote a third, citing one of her iconic lines. </p> <p>“Sad. I grew up around the corner and went to school with their kids,” added a fourth. </p> <p><em>Images: X</em></p>

Caring

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Naomi Watts' star-studded wedding

<p>Naomi Watts and Billy Crudup have tied the knot for the second time in a beautiful ceremony in Mexico City over the weekend.  </p> <p>The pair were joined by some major Hollywood names including Nicole Kidman, Isla Fisher, Deborra-lee Furness and Justin Theroux.</p> <p>In a video posted by Watts' brother, Ben, the actress and Crudup held hands and looked into each other's eyes as she said her speech. </p> <p>"This is a reminder of what life's about, the affirmation of love being one of the simplest things but of most importance," she shared.</p> <p>The actress' friends also took to Instagram to share a few snaps from the wedding. In one photo, Kidman was snapped carrying Watts with the caption: "Her feet never touched the ground #thebride. " </p> <p>Australian actor and director John Polson took a snap of him with Furness and Kidman with the caption: "I hit the table-seating-jackpot last night with these two spectacular women." </p> <p>Watts looked stunning in a sleeveless gown, with her hair elegantly pinned back, while Crudup wore a timeless black tuxedo. </p> <p>Crudup’s 20-year-old son William walked Watts down the aisle, and the actress' children, Sasha, 16, and Kai, 15, whom she shares with ex Liev Schreiber, were also in attendance. </p> <p>Ben also shared a video clip of the bride and groom in an elevator with their kids. </p> <p>"Off they go Naomi x Billy x family #benwatts #scrapbooking."</p> <p>Aussie journalist and editor Laura Brow also shared a snap of the couple cuddling up to one another with the caption: "Two absolute heart-bursting greats. We love you forevs. ❤️❤️"</p> <p>The two actors first married during a <a href="https://www.oversixty.com.au/lifestyle/relationships/hitched-naomi-watts-surprise-wedding-bliss" target="_blank" rel="noopener">courthouse ceremony</a> in New York City last June.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Relationships

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Beloved Home and Away star shares major health update

<p><em>Home and Away</em> star Georgie Parker has shocked her online followers by revealing she has undergone a major surgery. </p> <p>The actress, who plays Roo Stewart in the Channel Seven soap, is currently recovering from her second hip replacement and this week posted a series of pictures taken from her hospital bed after the operation.</p> <p>Now three weeks into her recovery, the 59-year-old is undergoing extensive rehabilitation.</p> <p>“I’ve been busy. Finishing a play and then straight into another theatre (get it) for a new hip,” she said on Instagram.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/C7rI2iApE3K/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C7rI2iApE3K/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by georgieparker (@georgieparker)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>“My second in six years, and thank god I had the same brilliant surgeon and his team."</p> <p>“I hate the drugs but love the rehab. I’m three weeks post op, recovery is going well and I’ve had the most brilliant support from my family, my workplace and my incredible friends.”</p> <p>She ended her post saying, “Practising patience now while I heal ... so I can get back to work baby.”</p> <p>Parker's famous friends took to the comments to wish her the best during her recovery, including fellow actor Hugh Sheridan who said, “Hip hip hooray!! We’ll be bending and stretching on play school together again in no time.”</p> <p>“Wishing you the speediest of recoveries Georgie!” actor Kat Stewart said.</p> <p>Parker previously spoke out about living with scoliosis, something she has suffered from since a child when she dreamed of becoming a dancer. </p> <p>“Every scoliosis is different, it’s like a fingerprint — but mine is all in the torso, I’ve lost about three inches (7.6cm) in height,” she told <a href="https://www.bodyandsoul.com.au/health/celebrity-profiles/how-the-home-and-away-stars-stay-healthy-all-year-round/news-story/a4072ec268f7e26cbc4926faf4e7fede" target="_blank" rel="noopener" data-link-type="article-inline"><em>Body + Soul</em> in 2020. </a></p> <p>“It impacts me on a daily basis and I just have to stay fit to keep my back as functional as possible.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

Caring

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Doctors at war

<p><em>In the annals of military history, the valour and sacrifices of doctors who served alongside soldiers in combat zones often go unrecognised. Yet their stories, as retired colonel Robert Likeman poignantly illustrates in his Australian Doctors at War series, reveal a legacy of courage and commitment that is integral to understanding the full scope of wartime heroism.</em></p> <p>---</p> <p>Winston Churchill, in his <em>Sketches on Service During the Indian Frontier Campaign of 1897</em>, wrote, “The spectacle of a doctor in action among soldiers, in equal danger and with equal courage, saving life where others are taking it, allaying pain where all others are causing it, is one which must always seem glorious, whether to God or man”.</p> <p>It is certainly true that doctors in a combat zone share the risks of shot and shell equally with the fighting soldier, but they also experience the added stress of taking responsibility for those wounded and dying on the battlefield, and in situations where the best of treatment cannot be readily given.</p> <p>Glorious or otherwise, the stories of our Australian Army doctors at war remain relatively unrecognised. Doctors have always been among the first to volunteer – in all 1,242 doctors served with the first Australian Imperial Force, careless for their own safety, and 55 of them failed to return. These men represented a significant proportion of the medical workforce in Australia, which by 1937 only reached 5,000. In World War 2, with the introduction of compulsory military service, the number of serving doctors exceeded 2,500. Hardly any of them are still with us today, but their children and grandchildren are our fellow citizens, and in many cases our local doctor may be one of these. It is a legacy not to be dismissed lightly. </p> <p>Those who have served in the Army know that treating the ailments of soldiers and preserving their health occupies much more time than dressing their wounds. In World War 1, fought over the agricultural lands of Europe, infectious diseases such as gas gangrene, tetanus and trench fever were common. In the deserts of World War 2, these were replaced by hepatitis, sandfly fever and eye infections. New Guinea presented a wholly different spectrum of disease, dominated by malaria, scrub typhus and amoebic dysentery. The maintenance of “fighting fitness” was a daily struggle for the doctors. </p> <p>The 2021 Interim Report of the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide did not identify medical officers as being particularly at risk of psychological injury as a result of their service in a war zone. But in view of their exposure to mass trauma and death, they might be assumed to have a significant risk of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, both from the chances of being wounded or killed, and from the guilt associated with the failure to preserve life. Two of the medical officers who served at Gallipoli shot themselves on their return to Egypt, perhaps because they had seen men die who might have been saved with better medical attention. Fourteen other doctors from the 1st Australian Imperial Force are known to have committed suicide after their return to Australia. </p> <p>Close to 3,000 Australian nurses served overseas with the Australian Army Nursing Service in World War 1, but female doctors were not permitted to enlist. A significant number of them however, at least 19, served in the British Army or in voluntary hospitals in Europe. One of them, Phoebe Chapple, was awarded the Military Medal for Bravery. In World War 2, 22 women doctors were commissioned in total – moreso due to the shortage of manpower than from egalitarian principles – though none of them were posted overseas. In recent overseas deployments, women doctors in the Army have quite properly taken their rightful place.</p> <p>The military service and civilian practice of all the Australian doctors who served in both World Wars has been meticulously documented in my six-volume series, <em>Australian Doctors at War</em>, published by Halstead Press. Your relatives may be among them.</p> <p><img src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/2024/06/Robert_Likeman_01.jpg" alt="" width="1280" height="720" /></p> <p><em>The Inevitable Hour</em> is the sixth and final volume of my <em>Australian Doctors at War</em> series, covering the period from January 1943 to the disbanding of the Second Australian Imperial Force in April 1947. Even after the Japanese had been driven from Papua and New Guinea, they still retained most of the archipelago. The threat to Australia was great, and despite being a then small nation, the country mobilised quickly to disrupt Japanese holdings in Madang, Wewak and Wau. Overcoming the constant influx of wounded men needing treatment, suffering themselves from afflictions such as hepatitis, dysentery and depression, aggravated by extreme and tropical climates, Australia’s medical officers were under considerable pressure, during the war and in the monumental demobilisation of the 2nd AIF that followed Japanese defeat.</p> <p><em><strong>ABOUT THE AUTHOR</strong></em><br />Robert Likeman is a graduate of Oxford University, where he studied Classics, Oriental Languages and Medicine. He is a specialist in obstetrics and gynaecology, in tropical medicine, and in rural and remote medicine. After service in the British Army he migrated to Australia in 1972. He is the author of seven books of military history and two biographies, and co-author of a textbook of obstetrics and gynaecology for doctors practising in developing countries.</p> <p><em>Images courtesy of Robert Likeman.</em></p>

Books

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Boomers vs millennials? Free yourself from the phoney generation wars

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/bobby-duffy-98570">Bobby Duffy</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/kings-college-london-1196">King's College London</a></em></p> <p>Generational thinking is a big idea that’s been horribly corrupted and devalued by endless myths and stereotypes. These clichés have fuelled fake battles between “snowflake” millennials and “selfish” baby boomers, with younger generations facing a “war on woke” and older generations accused of “stealing” the future from the young.</p> <p>As I argue in my book, <a href="https://atlantic-books.co.uk/book/generations/">Generations</a>, this is a real shame. A more careful understanding of what’s really different between generations is one of the best tools we have to understand change – and predict the future.</p> <p>Some of the great names in sociology and philosophy saw understanding generational change as central to understanding society overall. <a href="http://dhspriory.org/kenny/PhilTexts/Comte/Philosophy2.pdf">Auguste Comte</a>, for example, identified the generation as a key factor in “the basic speed of human development”.</p> <p>He argued that “we should not hide the fact that our social progress rests essentially upon death; which is to say that the successive steps of humanity necessarily require a continuous renovation … from one generation to the next”. We humans get set in our ways once we’re past our formative years, and we need the constant injection of new participants to keep society moving forward.</p> <p>Understanding whether, and how, generations are different is vital to understanding society. The balance between generations is constantly shifting, as older cohorts die out and are replaced by new entrants. If younger generations truly do have different attitudes or behaviours to older generations, this will reshape society, and we can, to some extent, predict how it will develop if we can identify those differences.</p> <p>But in place of this big thinking, today we get clickbait headlines and bad research on millennials “<a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/millennials-hate-napkins-2016-3?r=US&amp;IR=T">killing the napkin industry</a>” or on how baby boomers have “<a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/ideas/archive/2019/06/boomers-are-blame-aging-america/592336/">ruined everything</a>”. We’ve fallen a long way.</p> <h2>Myth busting</h2> <p>To see the true value of generational thinking, we need to identify and discard the many myths. For example, as I outline in the book, gen Z and millennials are not lazy at work or disloyal to their employers. They’re also no more materialistic than previous generations of young: a focus on being rich is something we tend to grow out of.</p> <p>Old people are not uncaring or unwilling to act on climate change: in fact, they are more likely than young people to boycott products for social purpose reasons.</p> <p>And our current generation of young are not a particularly unusual group of “culture warriors”. Young people are always at the leading edge of change in cultural norms, around race, immigration, sexuality and gender equality. The issues have changed, but the gap between young and old is not greater now than in the past.</p> <p>Meanwhile, there are real, and vitally important, generational differences hidden in this mess. To see them, we need to separate the three effects that explain all change in societies. Some patterns are simple “lifecycle effects”, where attitudes and behaviours are to do with our age, not which generation we are born into. Some are “period effects” – where everyone is affected, such as in a war, economic crisis or a pandemic.</p> <p>And finally, there are “cohort effects”, which is where a new generation is different from others at the same age, and they stay different. It’s impossible to entirely separate these distinct forces, but we can often get some way towards it – and when we do, we can predict the future in a much more meaningful way.</p> <p>There are many real generational differences, in vitally important areas of life. For example, the probability of you owning your own home is hugely affected by when you were born. Millennials are around half as likely to be a homeowner than generations born only a couple of decades earlier.</p> <p>There is also a real cohort effect in experience of mental health disorders, particularly among recent generations of young women. Our relationship with alcohol and likelihood of smoking is also tied to our cohort, with huge generational declines in very regular drinking and smoking. Each of these point to different futures, from increased strain on mental health services to declining alcohol sales.</p> <p>But lifecycle and period effects are vitally important too. For example, there is truth in the idea that we grow more conservative as we age. One analysis suggests that this ageing effect is worth around <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0261379413000875">0.35% to the Conservatives each year</a>, which may not sound like a lot, but is very valuable over the course of a political lifetime.</p> <p>And, of course, the pandemic provides a very powerful example of how period effects can dramatically change things for us all.</p> <h2>Reaching beyond the avocado</h2> <p>When there is such richness in the realities, why are there so many myths? It’s partly down to bad marketing and workplace research – that is, people jumping on the generation bandwagon to get media coverage for their products or to sell consultancy to businesses on how to engage young employees.</p> <p>This has become its own mini-industry. In 2015, US companies spent up to US$70 million (£51 million) on this sort of “advice” <a href="https://www.wsj.com/articles/helping-bosses-decode-millennialsfor-20-000-an-hour-1463505666">according to the Wall Street Journal</a>, with some experts making as much as US$20,000 an hour. Over 400 LinkedIn users now describe themselves solely as a “millennial expert” or “millennial consultant”.</p> <p>Campaigners and politicians also play to these imagined differences. Our increasing focus on “<a href="https://www.kcl.ac.uk/policy-institute/assets/culture-wars-in-the-uk.pdf">culture wars</a>” often involves picking out particular incidents in universities, such as the <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-manchester-45717841">banning of clapping</a> at events or the <a href="https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-oxfordshire-57409743">removal of a portrait of the Queen</a> to exaggerate how culturally different young people today are.</p> <p>Maybe less obviously, politicians such as former US President Barack Obama repeatedly lionise coming generations as more focused on equality, when the evidence shows they’re often not that different. These assertions are not only wrong, but create false expectations and divides.</p> <p>Some have had enough, calling on the Pew Research Center in the US, which has been a champion of generational groups, to <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2021/07/07/generation-labels-mean-nothing-retire-them/&amp;data=04%257C01%257C">stop conducting this type of analysis</a>. I think that misses the point: it’s how it’s applied rather than the idea of generations that’s wrong.</p> <p>We should defend the big idea and call out the myths, not abandon the field to the “millennial consultants”.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/167138/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/bobby-duffy-98570">Bobby Duffy</a>, Professor of Public Policy and Director of the Policy Institute, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/kings-college-london-1196">King's College London</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/boomers-vs-millennials-free-yourself-from-the-phoney-generation-wars-167138">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Mind

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Bruce Willis' daughter shares rare update on star's health

<p>Bruce Willis' daughter has opened up about her family life in her latest interview with <em>Today's</em> Hoda Kotb.  </p> <p>The actor's eldest daughter Rumer Willis shared that the actor is in good spirits, saying that "he's so good," despite his dementia. </p> <p>She added that he continues to be a wonderful grandfather to her infant daughter Louetta, and that seeing her parents Bruce and ex-wife Demi Moore, as grandparents is "so nice".</p> <p>"Honestly seeing them with her it just it almost unlocks all of these childhood memories because being a grandparent I think is the best," she told Kotb. </p> <p>"They have all of the love and joy without any of the responsibility," she laughed before adding, "so they get to just spoil her."</p> <p>She then elaborated on the special bond that Bruce shares with his granddaughter Louetta, and the sweet moments that they shared during their last visit. </p> <p>"Lou is just starting to walk a little bit and she was walking over to him and it was so sweet," she explained.</p> <p>"It's so nice because I feel like my dad is just like he's a girl dad through and through."</p> <p>She added that "he's so sweet with her" and his relationship with Lou reminded her of how he was with her little sisters. </p> <p>Bruce has been battling  frontotemporal dementia since 2022, but despite the challenges, the family is feeling the love, as Rumer revealed that a lot of people have stopped her in public to share their love for Bruce and the impact he's had on their lives. </p> <p>"It's such a testament to who he is," she said. </p> <p>"He's so beloved."</p> <p>"It really makes me a proud daughter to just see how much love he's getting."</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p> <p> </p>

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"Taken way too soon": TV star's brother breaks silence after shocking death

<p>The grieving brother of slain TV star Johnny Wactor has broken his silence over his brother's untimely death. </p> <p>Johnny Wactor, 37, was <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/health/caring/soap-star-killed-in-robbery-gone-wrong" target="_blank" rel="noopener">killed</a> in Los Angeles in the early hours of Saturday morning when he intercepted a group of men trying to steal the catalytic converter from his vehicle, and was shot dead at the scene. </p> <p>Now, Wactor's brother Grant has shared more details on the events surrounding his Johnny's death, telling <a href="https://people.com/general-hospital-actor-johnny-wactors-brother-speaks-out-on-killing-taken-way-too-early-8654340" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>People</em></a> magazine that he had finished a shift working as a bartender at the time he was shot. </p> <p>After his shift finished at about 3:25am local time, he walked to his car with a female co-worker  when he noticed that his car had been “jacked up or lifted in some way”.</p> <p>Initially, the actor thought his car was being towed away, but quickly realised the people surrounding his car were not tow-truck drivers.</p> <p>Grant said his brother physically shielded his female colleague to prevent her from being hurt and had his hands up in the air when he was shot.</p> <p>“He did not confront them,” he told the publication. “He did not try to stop them. He was just trying to diffuse the situation by stepping back.”</p> <p>After the shooting the men fled the scene in a different car, and LAPD officer Jeff Lee said the suspects were “still outstanding”.</p> <p>Grant Wactor said his family were “hoping and praying” that the killers were found and brought to justice.</p> <p>“We just want (them to be found) as quickly as possible and correctly,” he said, describing his brother as “a good person”.</p> <p>“He was taken way too early, and no one should be taken like this at all,” he said.</p> <p>“He touched a lot of people. He believed in his core values to the end, and he lived life to the fullest the way he wanted to. And he was happy doing that.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram / Ouzounova / Shutterstock Editorial </em></p>

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