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Woman seeks advice over family member’s list of “stupid” baby names

<p dir="ltr">A woman has asked for advice after seeing her cousin’s list of potential baby names, with many of them being classed as “just stupid”. </p> <p dir="ltr">The woman took to Reddit to explain how her cousin sent her baby name list to her family group chat, and no one has yet replied. </p> <p dir="ltr">"This was all sent in a family group chat and no-one has replied yet. I feel bad because at least she has put some thought into these names, especially compared to how most of us were named. On the other hand, well, you saw the names," the woman posted on Reddit. </p> <p dir="ltr">The names her cousin has shared and her logic behind them include: </p> <ol> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Urf (Earth..because no matter where the child lives in life, it will always be on Earth. Can't fault the logic on that one – Elon Musk might take umbrage though.)</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Seaeoh (CEO. Apparently names dictate destiny and this name will cosmically transform the child into a successful business magnate.)</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Stamp (She was in a long distance relationship with the father for a while and they used to send each other letters with...stamps. Sounds like what a caveman character in a film would be called.)</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Biotic (Connected to antibiotic. This will protect the child from disease. Antibiotic would be and I quote, 'Ridiculous because it would sound like 'Aunty' which would cultivate bullying because she would sound old.')</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">Ayeai (AI. In the future AI will take over and if it turns nasty it will go easy on her kid because they share a name.)</p> </li> </ol> <p dir="ltr">The woman explained that her cousin's logic for going with something very different for a name is "so many children nowadays have unique names that it will eventually become normal and people with 'standard' names will be the ones looking foolish." </p> <p dir="ltr">She also added that her cousin's husband isn't "brave enough" to say anything about the names and hopes she will lose interest. </p> <p dir="ltr">The people of Reddit had a lot to say about the choices, with one person commenting, “Those are all just terrible." </p> <p dir="ltr">"I say this in the kindest way possible. She is delusional and I dare say, stupid. That poor future child deserves better," wrote another user. </p> <p dir="ltr">Another suggested a normal name might actually be unique now and wrote, "Having a 'standard' name is what is unique now. How many kids are being named David and Lisa?" </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p>

Family & Pets

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Why you should never take nutrition advice from a centenarian

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/bradley-elliott-1014864">Bradley Elliott</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-westminster-916">University of Westminster</a></em></p> <p>It’s a cliche of reporting on people who reach 100 years of age, or even 110, to ask them some variation of the question: “What did you do to live this long?”</p> <p>Inevitably, some interesting and unexpected answer is highlighted. <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/society/2024/apr/05/briton-says-becoming-worlds-oldest-man-at-111-is-pure-luck">Fish and chips</a> every Friday. Drinking a glass of <a href="https://news.sky.com/story/worlds-oldest-man-juan-vicente-perez-dies-aged-114-13107627">strong liquor</a> every day. <a href="https://www.businessinsider.com/susannah-mushatt-jones-loves-bacon-2015-10">Bacon</a> for breakfast every morning. <a href="https://apnews.com/article/health-france-nursing-homes-795c8273f66b61669e93103cc9c25cd0">Wine and chocolate</a>.</p> <p>While a popular news story, this is a relatively meaningless question that doesn’t help us understand why certain people have lived so long. Let me try to explain why, via beautiful buildings, fighter pilots and statistics.</p> <p>In the second world war, Allied statisticians were applying their skills to minimising the number of bombers being shot down by enemy fire. By studying the damage patterns of bombers returning from action, maps could be drawn up of the most frequently damaged parts of aeroplanes so that expensive, heavy armour could be added to these areas.</p> <p>Simple enough, right? Then, along comes statistician Abraham Wald who argues for the exact <a href="https://www.jstor.org/stable/2287454?origin=crossref">opposite point</a>. The planes that they’re studying are all those that did return from combat with extensive damage, but what about those that didn’t return?</p> <p>Wald argues that armour should be added to those places that are undamaged on all the returning planes, as any plane hit in these undamaged areas was shot down, never making it back to be surveyed.</p> <h2>Survivorship bias</h2> <p>This phenomenon is known as survivorship bias, or the cognitive and statistical bias introduced by only counting those that are around to count but ignoring those that haven’t “survived”.</p> <p>You can take these examples to the absurd. Imagine a group of 100 people, all of whom have smoked their entire life. As a group, the smokers would die earlier of cancers, lung disease or heart disease, but one or two might defy the odds and live to 100 years of age. Now imagine the intrepid journalist interviewing the lucky soul on their 100th birthday with that classic question: “What do you attribute your successful ageing to?”</p> <p>“Smoking a pack a day,” says the newly minted centenarian.</p> <p>It seems obvious but survivorship bias is everywhere in society. We can all think of that one famous actor or entrepreneur who succeeded despite adversity, who worked hard, believed in themselves and one day made it. But we never read about or hear about the countless examples of people who tried, gave it their all and never quite made it.</p> <p>That’s not a good media story. But this creates a bias, we primarily hear the successes, never the failures. This bias applies to our perceptions of architecture (mostly great buildings from a given period “survive”), to finances (we often hear examples of people who have succeeded in risky investments, those who fail don’t sell books or self-help plans) and to career plans (“If you work hard, and drop out of college now, you can be a successful athlete like me,” say those who have succeeded).</p> <p>I work with a variety of older people and often include extreme outliers who have lived to extreme ages. We’re currently studying over 65-year-olds who have maintained unusually high levels of exercise into older age and have maintained excellent health.</p> <p>They’re phenomenal examples of older humans, many of them are faster, fitter and stronger than me by many of the measures we perform in the lab, despite being almost twice my age.</p> <p>While we know that their lifelong exercise is associated with their unusually good health into older age, we can’t directly say one causes the other yet. It could be that highly active people are protected against chronic diseases such as cancers, diabetes and heart disease. But it also could be that these people are still active into older age as they’ve not been afflicted by cancers, diabetes or heart disease earlier in their lives.</p> <p>Conversely, there could be some unknown third factor that we’ve not yet identified about these people that both keeps them healthy and separately keeps them exercising.</p> <p>For clarity, there are things that scientists like me will say in carefully caveated, scientific language that will probably help you to live longer. Being very physically active, not eating too much and not smoking are all on that list, along with generally having a positive outlook in life, and of course, picking the right parents and grandparents.</p> <p>Correlation does not equal causation. That point is hammered home relentlessly to students in science degrees. It’s how our brain works, we see a pattern between two variables, and assume they’re linked in some way. But often, like in survivorship bias, we’re not looking at all the data, and so finding patterns where there are none.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/229159/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/bradley-elliott-1014864">Bradley Elliott</a>, Senior Lecturer in Physiology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-westminster-916">University of Westminster</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-you-should-never-take-nutrition-advice-from-a-centenarian-229159">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Retirement Life

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Fergie reveals the advice she received from Queen Elizabeth before she died

<p dir="ltr">Sarah Ferguson has revealed the heartfelt advice she received from Queen Elizabeth before she died.</p> <p dir="ltr">In an interview with <a href="https://www.hellomagazine.com/royalty/555582/sarah-ferguson-feeling-better-than-ever-exclusive-interview/"><em>Hello</em>!</a> magazine, the Duchess of York has opened up about her battle with cancer, and how a piece of advice she received from the late Queen helped her through her health journey. </p> <p dir="ltr">Speaking about how her outlook on life has changed after her diagnosis, Fergie reflected on what her ex-mother-in-law said to her before she passed away. </p> <p dir="ltr">"One of the only people who saw me properly was the Queen [the late Elizabeth II]," she told the publication. "And before she died, she said: 'Sarah, being yourself is enough'."</p> <p dir="ltr">The Duchess of York still carries that advice with her to this day, explaining that she's raised her daughters, Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie, to be honest in who they are.</p> <p dir="ltr">Fergie has previously opened up about her relationship with the late Queen, sharing how her words of wisdom have impacted her for years. </p> <p dir="ltr">In September 2023, she shared that the last thing the Queen ever said to her was to “just be yourself”. </p> <p dir="ltr">"And she saw it. She just got so annoyed when I wasn't being myself," she explained on an episode of the podcast Tea Talks with the Duchess and Sarah. "And that's probably when I got into all the pickles. But now I am myself, and I'm just so lucky to be able to be myself."</p> <p dir="ltr">Earlier that same year, the Duchess reflected on the calming presence of the Queen, telling <em><a href="https://people.com/sarah-ferguson-reveals-queen-elizabeth-last-words-before-death-7964451">People</a></em> magazine that Queen Elizabeth was "so brilliant at putting you at ease," adding, "She had the most incredible faith of any single person I've ever met."</p> <p dir="ltr">"She just knew what to do," Fergie continued. "She knew how to make people feel good. She never took it onboard as about her."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Family & Pets

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Gina Rinehart's financial advice for Anthony Albanese

<p>Gina Rinehart has offered some free and unsolicited financial advice to Prime Minister Anthony Albanese in the wake of his divisive Federal Budget. </p> <p>Australia's richest woman, who has no experience in politics, suggested cutting the fuel excise and halting immigration would have a greater positive impact on the economy, as opposed to the Albanese government's measures to curb the cost of living. </p> <p>Rinehart has been critical of the $300 handout to combat energy bills regardless of household income, and believes that a big-spending budget is not the best way forward.</p> <p>Rather than tax Australians more to hand the money out again through handouts and welfare, she said lower taxes overall was a better way forward.</p> <p>Ms Rinehart said cutting fuel tax, which the government has rejected as too expensive, was one option.</p> <p>“I have advocated strongly for the government to directly reduce costs of living for Australians by cutting their fuel excise taxes, which would spread not only to car users, but all products that require transport,’’ she told <a href="https://www.news.com.au/finance/economy/australian-economy/gina-rinehart-tells-anthony-albanese-to-cut-fuel-excise-migration/news-story/bb84ef69e8a19506e7e3ae3e1f678e7c" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><em>news.com.au</em></a>.</p> <p>“I have also advocated for cutting other taxes, payroll tax, stamp duty and license fees, that not only would bring down the cost of living, but were supposed to have been cut when GST was introduced decades ago."</p> <p>“Big spending, big government costs all (which I advocate against), and adds to the costs of living."</p> <p>“Recycling taxes paid is very inefficient, the taxpayer is actually better off paying less tax, and spending their income as they prefer.”</p> <p>Ms Rinehart, who has racked up a net worth of over $46.5 billion AUD through her investments into mining, has previously suggested a better way is to cut taxes and allow people to keep more of what they earn.</p> <p>“To help people suffering the most on low incomes, such as veterans, pensioners and uni students, if the government really cared about these fellow Australians struggling with high costs, they would remove the onerous government paperwork and their unfair limits on pensioners, veterans and students working hours, each of whom face higher effective tax rates than me if they choose to work above a very small threshold of hours,’’ she said.</p> <p>“Letting Australians who want to work, work, would be not only better for those Australians and their families, but would save the need for the government’s very expensive policy of hugely increased immigration, to allegedly bring in more workers.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Darren England/EPA-EFE & LUKAS COCH/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock Editorial</em></p> <p> </p>

Money & Banking

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5 questions to ask before becoming a carer

<p>Thinking about becoming a caregiver? Deciding to step up and provide care for a loved one is a huge responsibility. Make sure you’re prepared and ask these five vital questions first.</p> <p><strong>Do I need to hire help?</strong></p> <p>Just because you’re taking on caregiving duties doesn’t mean you have to be super human. It’s perfectly okay to ask for help, whether it’s in the form of a cleaner or someone to take on tasks that you would prefer to outsource. According to Health.com, 40 per cent of caregivers say dealing with incontinence is one of their most difficult task, while 30 per cent say helping relatives bathe is hard as well.</p> <p><strong>What is my Plan B?</strong></p> <p>If something should happen to you and your schedule or demands change, it’s important to discuss a back-up plan. As the primary carer, a lot of responsibility will rest on you so make sure you have a Plan B before you need one.</p> <p><strong>Should I be compensated?</strong></p> <p>A survey found that 60 per cent of careers adjust their work schedule to look after others, which means either cutting back hours or taking a leave of absence. While you might not want to accept money to care for loved ones, it’s a good idea to have an open discussion with close friends and family about how the responsibilities might impact your life and earning capacity, so that all parties agree on a fair solution.</p> <p><strong>What is Power of Attorney?</strong></p> <p>If you are looking after someone with memory loss, you may need to look into a legal document called power of attorney. Talk to family about who should have this responsibilities, and how you will navigate legal issues that could arise.</p> <p><strong>Who is my support group?</strong></p> <p>Roughly one in three carers don’t receive any help. Having a strong support network of people you can turn to, even just for a chat, can make a huge difference. You might be surprised by how many people you know are also caregivers.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

Caring

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"Arrogance personified": Rich lister slammed for "pointless" job advice

<p>An Aussie rich lister has gone viral for all the wrong reasons, after her "tone deaf" advice for young Aussies to get a job fell flat. </p> <p>Sarina Russo, who made her start on the property market, shared the importance of relying on yourself to achieve financial independence.</p> <p>Ms Russo, who is ranked 59th on Australia’s 2024 Rich Women list with an estimated net worth of $271 million, runs a business that provides government-funded entrepreneurship programs to create self-employment opportunities.</p> <p>Known for handing out unsolicited financial advice, Russo was filmed on sharing her opinions on young people holding down work. </p> <p>“Today I thought I would emphasise how important it is to have a job,” she said. “You know, I’ve been thinking about this. I’ve been an ambassador for being the ‘Job Queen’ for Australia and global for something like 45 years," she said.  </p> <p>“I just want to emphasise that if you have a job, you have dignity. You have a job, you have more respect and positive self esteem."</p> <p>“If you have a job, you become financially (in)dependent and absolutely empowered. You can become more, enjoy more, have more and see more."</p> <p>“So today, I’m going to say to you and say to myself ... let’s get a job, let’s get excited, let’s get that passion growing and I’ll see you at the top. Ciao for now.”</p> <p>Given the current state of the job market for young Aussies in the wake of increased reliance on AI, many were quick to slam Ms Russo's comments. </p> <p>Social media users said her comments were "hypocritical" and "arrogance personified" given that she made her fortune as a landlord and became a multimillionaire based off other people's employment. </p> <p>“Yes watch Sarina, dressed in designer funk wear, as she meanders through the extravagant but ultimately aimless alleyways of the wealthy yet pointless. With each step, she peels off essential life lessons, like “I’m the jobs Queen; Get a job!” Classic. So tone deaf” one person wrote on Twitter.</p> <p>“Standing outside the Westin Hotel telling people to get a job as if nobody’s thought of it. Last day of the comedy festival - no stars,” another wrote under her Instagram video.</p> <p>This is not the first time Ms Russo' controversial comments caused a stir, attracting controversy two years ago after posting a video of herself telling victims of the devastating Queensland floods that “it’s the time to exercise”.</p> <p>Ms Russo told the victims “fitness is everything” and to “just do it”.</p> <p>“We’re here overlooking the most beautiful city called Brisbane and sadly last week we had massive floods – once in a hundred year flooding, and it called massive devastation,” she said to the camera.</p> <p>“But you know, when things are going wrong and endorphins are low, this is the time you need to exercise.I really believe that fitness is everything.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram</em></p>

Money & Banking

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‘Girl math’ may not be smart financial advice, but it could help women feel more empowered with money

<div class="theconversation-article-body"><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ylva-baeckstrom-1463175">Ylva Baeckstrom</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/kings-college-london-1196">King's College London</a></em></p> <p>If you’ve ever calculated cost per wear to justify the price of an expensive dress, or felt like you’ve made a profit after returning an ill-fitting pair of jeans, you might be an expert in <a href="https://www.standard.co.uk/news/world/girl-maths-tiktok-trend-its-basically-free-b1100504.html">“girl math”</a>. With videos about the topic going viral on social media, girl math might seem like a silly (<a href="https://www.glamourmagazine.co.uk/article/girl-math-womens-spending-taken-seriously">or even sexist</a>) trend, but it actually tells us a lot about the relationship between gender, money and emotions.</p> <p>Girl math introduces a spend classification system: purchases below a certain value, or made in cash, don’t “count”. Psychologically, this makes low-value spending feel safe and emphasises the importance of the long-term value derived from more expensive items. For example, girl math tells us that buying an expensive dress is only “worth it” if you can wear it to multiple events.</p> <p>This approach has similarities to <a href="https://www.investopedia.com/terms/m/modernportfoliotheory.asp">portfolio theory</a> – a method of choosing investments to maximise expected returns and minimise risk. By evaluating how each purchase contributes to the shopping portfolio, girl math shoppers essentially become shopping portfolio managers.</p> <h2>Money and emotions</h2> <p>People of all genders, rich or poor, feel anxious when dealing with their personal finances. Many people in the UK do not understand pensions or saving enough to <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/workplacepensions/articles/pensionparticipationatrecordhighbutcontributionsclusteratminimumlevels/2018-05-04">afford their retirement</a>. Without motivation to learn, people avoid dealing with money altogether. One way to find this motivation, as girl math shows, is by having an emotional and tangible connection to our finances.</p> <p>On the surface, it may seem that women are being ridiculed and encouraged to overspend by using girl math. From a different perspective, it hints at something critical: for a person to really care about something as seemingly abstract as personal finance, they need to feel that they can relate to it.</p> <p>Thinking about money in terms of the value of purchases can help create an <a href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/every-time-i-use-my-card-my-phone-buzzes-and-that-stops-me-shopping-ps0fjx6nj">emotional relationship</a> to finance, making it something people want to look after.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/GPzA7B6dcxc?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <h2>The girl math we need</h2> <p>Women are a consumer force to be reckoned with, controlling <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/bridgetbrennan/2015/01/21/top-10-things-everyone-should-know-about-women-consumers/#7679f9d6a8b4">up to 80%</a> of consumer spending globally. The girl math trend is a demonstration of women’s mastery at applying portfolio theory to their shopping, making them investment powerhouses whose potential is overlooked by the financial services industry.</p> <p><a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/oct/28/women-paid-less-than-men-over-careers-gender-pay-gap-report">Women are disadvantaged</a> when it comes to money and finance. Women in the UK earn on average £260,000 less than men during their careers and the retirement income of men is twice as high as women’s.</p> <p>As I’ve found in <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Gender-and-Finance-Addressing-Inequality-in-the-Financial-Services-Industry/Baeckstrom/p/book/9781032055572">my research</a> on gender and finance, women have lower financial self-efficacy (belief in their own abilities) compared to men. This is not helped by women feeling patronised when seeking financial advice.</p> <p>Because the world of finance was created by men for men, its language and culture are <a href="https://www.routledge.com/Gender-and-Finance-Addressing-Inequality-in-the-Financial-Services-Industry/Baeckstrom/p/book/9781032055572">intrinsically male</a>. Only in the mid-1970s did women in the UK gain the legal right to open a bank account without a male signature and it was not until 1980 that they could apply for credit independently. With the law now more (<a href="https://www.worldbank.org/en/news/press-release/2023/03/02/pace-of-reform-toward-equal-rights-for-women-falls-to-20-year-low">but not fully</a>) gender equal, the financial services industry has failed to connect with women.</p> <p>Studies show that 49% of women are <a href="https://www.ellevest.com/magazine/disrupt-money/ellevest-financial-wellness-survey">anxious about their finances</a>. However they have not bought into patronising offers and <a href="https://www.fa-mag.com/news/gender-roles-block-female-financial-experience--ubs-says-73531.html">mansplaining by financial advisers</a>. This outdated approach suggests that it is women, rather than the malfunctioning financial system, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/sep/16/women-are-not-financially-illiterate-they-need-more-than-condescending-advice">who need fixing</a>.</p> <p>Women continue to feel that they do not belong to or are able to trust the world of finance. And why would women trust an industry with a <a href="https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/earningsandworkinghours/bulletins/genderpaygapintheuk/2019">gender pay gap</a> of up to 59% and a severe lack of women in senior positions?</p> <p>Girl math on its own isn’t necessarily good financial advice, but if it helps even a handful of women feel more empowered to manage and understand their finances, it should not be dismissed.</p> <p><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ylva-baeckstrom-1463175">Ylva Baeckstrom</a>, Senior Lecturer in Finance, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/kings-college-london-1196">King's College London</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/girl-math-may-not-be-smart-financial-advice-but-it-could-help-women-feel-more-empowered-with-money-211780">original article</a>.</em></p> </div>

Money & Banking

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Asking ChatGPT a health-related question? Better keep it simple

<p>It’s tempting to <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/news/chatgpt-and-dr-google/">turn to search engines</a> to seek out health information, but with the rise of large language models, like ChatGPT, people are becoming more and more likely to depend on AI for answers too.</p> <div class="copy"> <p>Concerningly, an Australian study has now found that the more evidence given to <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/chatgpt-an-intimate-companion/">ChatGPT</a> when asked a health-related question, the less reliable it becomes.</p> <p>Large language models (LLM) and artificial intelligence use in health care is still developing, creating a  a critical gap when providing incorrect answers can have serious consequences for people’s health.</p> <p>To address this, scientists from Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO, and the University of Queensland (UQ) explored a hypothetical scenario: an average person asking ChatGPT if ‘X’ treatment has a positive effect on condition ‘Y’.</p> <p>They presented ChatGPT with 100 questions sourced from the <a href="https://trec-health-misinfo.github.io/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">TREC Health Misinformation track</a> – ranging from ‘Can zinc help treat the common cold?’ to ‘Will drinking vinegar dissolve a stuck fish bone?’</p> <p>Because queries to search engines are typically shorter, while prompts to a LLM can be far longer, they posed the questions in 2 different formats: the first as a simple question and the second as a question biased with supporting or contrary evidence.</p> <p>By comparing ChatGPT’s response to the known correct response based on existing medical knowledge, they found that ChatGPT was 80% accurate at giving accurate answers in a question-only format. However, when given an evidence-biased prompt, this accuracy reduced to 63%, which was reduced again to 28% when an “unsure” answer was allowed. </p> <p>“We’re not sure why this happens,” says CSIRO Principal Research Scientist and Associate Professor at UQ, Dr Bevan Koopman, who is co-author of the paper.</p> <p>“But given this occurs whether the evidence given is correct or not, perhaps the evidence adds too much noise, thus lowering accuracy.”</p> <p>Study co-author Guido Zuccon, Director of AI for the Queensland Digital Health Centre at UQ says that major search engines are now integrating LLMs and search technologies in a process called Retrieval Augmented Generation.</p> <p>“We demonstrate that the interaction between the LLM and the search component is still poorly understood, resulting in the generation of inaccurate health information,” says Zuccon.</p> <p>Given the widespread popularity of using LLMs online for answers on people’s health, Koopman adds, we need continued research to inform the public about risks and to help them optimise the accuracy of their answers.</p> <p>“While LLMs have the potential to greatly improve the way people access information, we need more research to understand where they are effective and where they are not.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <div> <p align="center"><noscript data-spai="1"><em><img decoding="async" class="aligncenter size-full wp-image-198773" src="https://cdn.shortpixel.ai/spai/q_lossy+ret_img+to_auto/cosmosmagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2023/12/MICROSCOPIC-TO-TELESCOPIC__Embed-graphic-720x360-1.jpg" data-spai-egr="1" width="600" alt="Buy cosmos print magazine" title="asking chatgpt a health-related question? better keep it simple 2"></em></noscript></p> </div> <p><em><!-- Start of tracking content syndication. Please do not remove this section as it allows us to keep track of republished articles --> <img id="cosmos-post-tracker" style="opacity: 0; height: 1px!important; width: 1px!important; border: 0!important; position: absolute!important; z-index: -1!important;" src="https://syndication.cosmosmagazine.com/?id=301406&amp;title=Asking+ChatGPT+a+health-related+question%3F+Better+keep+it+simple" width="1" height="1" loading="lazy" aria-label="Syndication Tracker" data-spai-target="src" data-spai-orig="" data-spai-exclude="nocdn" /></em><em><a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/technology/ai/asking-chatgpt-a-health-related-question-better-keep-it-simple/">This article</a> was originally published on <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com">Cosmos Magazine</a> and was written by <a href="https://cosmosmagazine.com/contributor/imma-perfetto/">Imma Perfetto</a>. </em></div>

Caring

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90-year-old grandma's secrets, regrets and brutal "advice"

<p>An amazingly sprightly 90-year-old grandmother has appeared on TikTok to share her deepest regrets in life, leaving viewers both amused and contemplative with her surprising take on being a nonagenarian.</p> <p>The video, which has garnered a whopping 70,000 views, features the wise words of wisdom from a woman who has seen it all, or at least enough to make her wish she hadn't seen quite so much.</p> <p>The nanna, who spilled the beans to her inquisitive granddaughter <a href="https://www.tiktok.com/@racheljdillon?lang=en" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Rachel Dillon</a> – an online fitness coach –  began by revealing what she wishes she did less of in her life.</p> <p>"Probably less of nothing," she admits. "I mean I never worked after I was married or anything like that. I wish I had probably done more mixing with people with that. More socialising." </p> <p>It's then that the truth bombs really start to drop. When Rachel asks, "Do you have any regrets", a cloud of laughter fills the room, before the answer comes.</p> <p>"Yes, I do regret marrying too young," she says emphatically. "I met my husband when I was 13 and he was 15. We got married at 17 and 19. I met him at the library. He used to ride me up on the bicycle when I was going to the library."</p> <p>Then, when asked about the secret to turning 90, Rachel's grandma confesses not only that there isn't one, but that she regrets having made it this far at all.</p> <p>"I didn't really want to get to 90," she declares with the nonchalance of someone choosing between tea and coffee. "I've had enough. I've had all I wanted out of the world. I am quite happy to go and meet my little puppy dog waiting there for me."</p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">When asked about her secret to looking so young, Rachel's grandma almost brushes the question aside, laying the blame simply in the quality of her genes for having "always been a fox", according to Rachel.</span></p> <p>The final question, and the final brutally honest response – which may have made Rachel regret asking about regrets – was simply: "Do you have any advice for us?"</p> <p>"Oh God no," comes the world-weary answer. "Not the way the world's going. No, I'm just glad I'll be gone. I don't want to be part of anything that I can see going on."      </p> <p>TikTok users were quick to commend the grandmother, not just for her unexpected revelations but also for her timeless beauty. "She looks absolutely amazing," gushed one admirer, proving that age is just a number – albeit one that sometimes takes us by surprise.</p> <p>In the end, this nonagenarian nanna has become an unexpected sensation, leaving us all to ponder life's mysteries, library love stories, and the prospect of meeting puppy dogs in the great beyond.</p> <p>If her story has taught us anything, it's that life is unpredictable, love can blossom in the unlikeliest of places (like a library), and sometimes it's OK to regret that hasty decision to say "I do" before you even knew how to do your taxes.</p> <div class="post_body_wrapper" style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 8px 0px 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; caret-color: #323338; color: #323338; font-family: Figtree, Roboto, 'Noto Sans Hebrew', 'Noto Kufi Arabic', 'Noto Sans JP', sans-serif;"> <div class="post-body-container" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline;"> <div class="post-body-renderer-component post_body" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: top; position: relative; transition: max-height 0.14s ease 0s; overflow: hidden; color: var(--primary-text-color); max-height: none;"> <div class="post-body-content" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; width: 630px; overflow: auto hidden;"> <div class="body_text redactor-styles redactor-in" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin: 0px; padding: 0px 15px 15px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; position: relative; overflow: auto; color: var(--primary-text-color); font-family: var(--font-family); line-height: 1.5; word-break: break-word;"> <div class="embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; outline: none !important;"><iframe class="embedly-embed" style="box-sizing: inherit; margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border-width: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; width: 600px; max-width: 100%; outline: none !important;" title="tiktok embed" src="https://cdn.embedly.com/widgets/media.html?src=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2Fembed%2Fv2%2F7311465610821651720&display_name=tiktok&url=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.tiktok.com%2F%40racheljdillon%2Fvideo%2F7311465610821651720&image=https%3A%2F%2Fp16-sign-sg.tiktokcdn.com%2Fobj%2Ftos-alisg-p-0037%2Fo49EYZFdsEDJhfBAiE2gfGE8l3IAR2qBQx14iB%3Fx-expires%3D1702681200%26x-signature%3DL%252FvO6dLXwqFOi09XENAbVmG4tgs%253D&key=5b465a7e134d4f09b4e6901220de11f0&type=text%2Fhtml&schema=tiktok" width="340" height="700" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></div> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <div> <div> <div> <div> <div><em>Images: TikTok / @racheljdillon</em></div> </div> </div> </div> </div>

Retirement Life

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7 tips for matching wine with food

<p>Food and wine matching is the perfect way to enhance the flavours of your meal, and while the people who get paid to do if for a living would have you think it’s a complex science, it’s actually not too hard to do. Here’s a simple seven-step guide to get you started as a food/wine-matching expert!</p> <p><strong>1. Sweet with heat</strong> – Wines that have a little bit of residual sugar (like a German Riesling) combine really well with spicy foods. This is because as the residual sugar enters your mouth it actually cools down spice in your food and creates a balance that allows you to savour the flavour.  </p> <p><strong>2. Smoke with oak</strong> – When cooking foods that have been grilled or charred, you really want to be looking for a wine that has been aged in oak barrels. Oaked wines tend to be a little more intense, so they need to be matched with grilled/charred foods that can match and bring out the fruit flavours.</p> <p><strong>3. Match flavours and textures</strong> – Similar flavours and textures go well together, as you’d imagine. Just as rich foods suit rich wines, mild foods go well with mild wines and as a general rule when food and wine possess similar qualities they can complement each other and enhance common flavours.</p> <p><strong>4. Fats with acid and tannins</strong> – Wines that are high in acid (Sauvignon Blanc) or tannin (Cabernet Sauvignon) go well with fried or fatty foods and help round out the flavours in your mouth. It also acts as a palate cleanser and creates balance between the rich/oily foods and the wine.</p> <p><strong>5. Sweet with salt</strong> – As anyone who’s ever combined blue cheese with port would agree. The combination will bring out the fruity taste in sweet wine and the savoury taste in salty foods. So yeah, you’re completely justified with your pairing of a bottle of Moscato with a packet of Cheezels.</p> <p><strong>6. Sweet with sweet</strong> – But as anyone who’s had ice cream served with another variety of ice cream would agree two sweet things can make a very sweet thing. Sweet wines can help bring out the flavours in the food. Just take care to make sure the wine is sweeter than the food is.</p> <p><strong>7. If it grows together, it goes together</strong> – Hey, there’s a reason why you generally don’t have stein of lager with a bowl of risotto. Foods and wines of a particular ethnicity or region usually work together like clockwork and naturally have flavours and textures that work well in combination. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Food & Wine

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No more brown leaves: sage advice from a gardening expert

<p>We’ve all been there before. We’re watering our seemingly healthy houseplant when suddenly there it is: a tinge of brown on the plant’s leaf. Yikes. But what do brown tips on leaves mean for your plant, and what can you do to make them go away? Read on to find out.</p> <p><strong>Lack of water or humidity</strong></p> <p>If your plant is sporting crispy, dark, or brown tips on its leaves, it may mean you need to water more often. Check the soil moisture and slowly reduce the number of days in between watering. Watch your plants for signs of improvement.</p> <p>Lack of humidity could also be the cause. Tropical plants prefer higher humidity levels than we have in our homes. When we turn on the heat in winter, there’s even less moisture in the air. Group plants together so that as one loses moisture through its leaves, the neighbours benefit. Or place plants on saucers or trays filled with pebbles and water. Set a pot on the pebbles above the water. As the water evaporates, it will increase the humidity around the plant, where it is needed.</p> <p><strong>Lack of nutrients</strong></p> <p>A lack of key nutrients may be behind the brown tips on leaves of your plant. Burned-looking leaf tips, or old leaves with dark green or reddish-purplish colouring, may indicate a phosphorus deficiency. With a potassium deficiency, you may see yellow or brown along older leaf tips and edges, yellowing between veins, curling leaves, or spotting.</p> <p>For potted plants, add a slow-release type of fertiliser to the soil mix before planting. Every time you water, a little fertiliser is released, providing a steady flow of nutrients. But depending on the growing conditions and number of plants in the container, a midseason boost may be needed. Stay on top of your fertiliser applications by making notes on a calendar.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/food-home-garden/gardening-tips/why-does-my-plant-have-brown-tips-on-the-leaves" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Home & Garden

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Karl's mum steals the show on Today

<p>Karl Stefanovic's mum has stolen the show on <em>Today</em> after she called in to offer some health advice. </p> <p>The <em>Today</em> panel were discussing tick bites on Friday morning, consulting Dr Nick Coatsworth earlier in the show about how to remove them, with the doctor saying you must remove the tick around the head, as well as any pincers to reduce the risk of reactions and inflammation.</p> <p>After consulting Dr Coatsworth, Karl's mum Jenny joined the conversation via video link to ask some advice from a parents point of view. </p> <p>"So, let's go to Dr J now, AKA my mum, Jenny from the block," Karl joked before introducing his mum on the show.</p> <p>"I had a big argument with you at the start of the year about all this, when I pulled a tick out of a cousin and you got very cranky at me, so what is your solution?"</p> <p>"I got cranky, because you didn't know if it was a tick and I saw it and said it was a tick and my suggestion is, if you can't get it out right from the head, like Nick the doctor [said], you need to go to the doctor and get it all out," she said.</p> <p>"I said if you leave the head in it can cause infections and you can get all those sort of weird tick diseases these days."</p> <p>"Jenny knows what she's talking about," Today co-host Sarah Abo said.</p> <p>"Before we go Dr J, where do you think you went wrong with me as a parent?" Karl questioned his mum as his co-hosts giggled.</p> <p>"Did you leave a tick inside your own son, Jenny?" Sarah joked.</p> <p>"We got them," Karl quipped as his mum added that he didn't get too many.</p> <p>Jenny added that you need to put some alcohol on the area where the tick was after pulling it out at the head, with Karl joking, "And that's where my love of alcohol came from!"</p> <p>"It all makes sense now," Sarah added.</p> <p>Karl's sister-in-law and co-host of <em>Today Extra</em> Sylvia Jeffreys said with a laugh, "The best part of that was the way she very carefully dodged that question about where it all went wrong, Karl!"</p> <p>"And thanks for revisiting that one, Sylvie," he responded.</p> <p>"Couldn't help it!" she quipped.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Today</em></p>

Family & Pets

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"Gosh, this is hard": Jana Pittman's cry for parenting advice

<p>Jana Pittman has pleaded with parents for advice on how to tackle the common issue of sleep deprivation with her two babies. </p> <p>The former Olympian and mum-of-six posted a lengthy story on Instagram, detailing  the sleep issues she is experiencing with 16-month-old twins Quinlan and Willow.</p> <p>In the candid post, the retired athlete turned doctor shared how much she was struggling, calling her babies "the worst sleepers" she's ever had. </p> <p>"So while I am managing... I am no longer thriving!"</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CuVN6n0haGj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CuVN6n0haGj/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Jana Pittman (@janapittmanofficial)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Pittman shared a series of vulnerable photos to her page, posing with her twins who celebrated their first birthday in March this year.</p> <p>"I love my kids but simultaneous twin sleep issues is killing me! Plus the new onset tantrums x 2 can drain the smiles away. They are 16mths old and the worst sleepers I have had," the mum captioned the post.</p> <p>"I used to call Willow 'princess peach' but her new name is 'cranky crab' and 'Quinny Bear' is now 'midnight monster'."</p> <p>"I joke.. but sleep deprivation is real!! They will grow out of it in time and I know how privileged I am to have them when so many are struggling with infertility but gosh this is hard!!"</p> <p>Jana admitted she had even hired a sleep consult to try to help her kids' issues, but Pittman's working schedule made it hard for her kids to form a routine. </p> <p>"I work a lot of nights, so my little ones have different people caring for them. It means routine is hard," she expressed.</p> <p>She then ended her post with a call out to other parents for advice, writing, "Anything that works, please share as I am sure I am not the only one on this roller coaster."</p> <p>Many parents chimed in to the comment section sharing their pieces of advice, while the overall message to the Olympian was to hang in there, as her babies will eventually grow out of it.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Instagram </em></p>

Body

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Advice on dealing with tricky in-laws

<p>From heated discussions to awkward family dinners, your relationship with your in-laws can have a big impact on family time. Here’s how to navigate this sometimes tricky dynamic.</p> <p>There’s nothing worse than heading to a family engagement when you have a son-in-law (or your daughter’s parents-in-law) that you just don’t get along with. Whether there's been a fight that you haven’t been able to move on from, or you simply don’t get along, if you find your in-laws draining or annoying, you may need to change the boundaries.</p> <p>Do you know the old saying, “good fences make good neighbours”? Think of your in-laws like your neighbours – there needs to be really good fences (aka boundaries) in place for the relationship to run smoothly. The best way to go about this is in such a way that you don’t make anyone feel as though you're closing them out, but rather comes off that you are simply focussing on yourself and things you have going on.</p> <p>Once you’ve set boundaries, don’t be afraid to talk to your family and in-laws about them, they’re not as fragile as you think. But do choose your words carefully and keep the focus on you and what your needs are, rather than making any judgements or comments about them or their behaviour.</p> <p>Still not sure how to deal with your son, daughter, sister or brother in-law? Here are some top tips for setting boundaries and dealing with awkward situations:</p> <ol> <li>The person with the primary relationship (for example your daughter, not your son-in-law) should be the one to step in and help fix a problem if it arises. You should never be the messenger or go straight to an in-law. Gently raise the issue or concern with your immediate family member. </li> <li>Decide with your partner, or in your own time if you are single or widowed, what type of role you want your in-law/s to play in your life. If you don’t get along and spending time with them just seems to cause issues, then you might want to limit catch-ups to birthdays and big events. This is ok. Just be gentle if asked to explain. And keep your explanation brief and about you. Something along the lines of, my schedule is quite busy at the moment or I don’t feel up to going out too much, but I am looking forward to the next family get together. </li> <li>Never criticise your family for their relationship with his or her spouse/your in-laws, nor comment on your in-law to your immediate family member – for example don’t criticise your son-in-law to your daughter/his wife. This tends to only lead to complications and awkwardness. And remember, you only know what your daughter tells you and if they come to you everytime they’re upset or angry with their partner or their partner’s extended family, you’re only hearing the problems when your daughter is frustrated and upset. You might not hear all the good things and about when they make up. Don’t take these things on board and stay out of it by reserving any judgement or comments. </li> <li>Don’t get involved. Easier said than done, right? You have to trust that you have brought your children up right and they are responsible enough to navigate their own relationships, treat others respectfully and can stand up for themselves if need be. As such, you should not get involved in their issues, arguments and general day-to-day dealings with their other relationships. Stay on the peripheral, be there for some light guidance if need be, but ultimately you should just help them come to their own opinions, decisions and judgements on things rather than sharing your ones with them. </li> <li>Don’t get pulled into arguments by your child and in-law. You can be supportive and still let the couple handle their own problems. Take a step back and trust that you have raised an adult who has the vision and the courage to resolve the problems that concern his/her own family. Couples need to set boundaries for their own relationships and this can, as I am sure you know, take some time to find the right ones. </li> <li>Think of yourself as a guest. When spending time with family in big groups, and especially when you’re at someone else’s home, it is best to think of yourself as a guest and act accordingly. For example you may not like the way you son’s wife is doing things in her home (child rearing, cooking, cleaning etc), but unfortunately it is not really any of your business. This is between your son and his wife. A good checkpoint is to ask yourself if you have a sense of entitlement and expectancy that is inappropriate. If there are issues that you just can’t stand but can’t let go, then you may need to consider not visiting them.</li> </ol> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Survival guide for cool-weather camping

<p>Being comfortable is king to enjoying winter camping. Take a look at our suggestions to help you gear up and get out there when the weather is cold but the campfire is hot.</p> <p><strong>Shelter</strong></p> <p>It’s one of the most important aspects of camping in any season! Your bedding and shelter arrangement should be both comfortable and functional so you can always create a home away from home.</p> <p>Winter around the country can mean different things – for instance, some camp spots during winter are often covered in a blanket of snow where as at others the temperature is cool at night and moderate during the day. Depending on the type of winter you’ll be camping in, you’ll need to adjust the shelter and bedding options to suit but there are a few things every winter camper should be aware off.</p> <p>Make sure your tent pegs are suited to the type of ground where you’ll pitch your tent or shelter. For example in light sandy soil conditions a strong sand peg should work well however in snow covered ground or loose sand locations a longer sturdier peg will keep you tent and shelter firmly in place. Laying a ground sheet underneath your tent will help keep the dew and moisture away from your gear. Pitching your tent or shelter in a location that will take advantage of the morning sun is also a nice touch and one that your fellow campers will appreciate!</p> <p>If you’re likely to be camping in light snow or humid conditions, it’s a good idea to pitch a flysheet over your tent or even a tarpaulin. This will trap “dead air” between your tent and the cold air providing extra insulation and will also help reduce moisture and condensation from appearing in your tent. The same principle applies to your swag – a fly and ground sheet will help prevent condensation and creating a layer of dead air will help give you a comfy and warmer sleep.</p> <p>Hot Tip: Using a ground sheet underneath your tent or swag will help prevent moisture from entering your shelter from below.</p> <p><strong>Sleeping</strong></p> <p>What you sleep in or on can also affect your comfort level. In cold conditions the humble airbed isn’t the best insulator so it’s a good option to use a self-inflating or 4WD mattress. These bedding options also trap dead air and your body warmth will help to create a warmer bed of air to sleep on. Your choice of sleeping bag is also important so it’s a good idea to match the bag to the climate. Along with fill material and weight, sleeping bags are also rated on their insulation or temperature rating. Sleeping bags such as the Blackwolf Zambezie sleeping bag are suited to sub-zero temperatures where as less insulating sleeping bags will keep you comfortable in plus zero degree conditions. Some of us “feel the cold” more than others so it’s important to take this into consideration when deciding what sleeping bag you’ll need. We recommend using a sleeping bag rated to below the temperatures you’re expecting – it’s easier to make yourself cool than it is to add extra warmth.</p> <p>Hot Tip: Hot water bottles are great additions for a warm sleep.</p> <p><strong>What to wear</strong></p> <p>Dressing in layers is a great idea as this allows you to adjust your warmth to suit the conditions or activity. A base layer such as thermals will control your core body temperature. An insulating or middle layer such as a fleece jumper will create a micro-climate and trap warmth around your body. An outer or protective layer will protect you from the elements such as wind or rain.</p> <p><em>How To: As most of your body heat is lost through your extremities don’t forget your accessories such as beanies, scarves and gloves.</em></p> <p><strong>Cooking</strong></p> <p>Everyone loves a warming winter meal and we all have memories of a great winter stew or roast. Bringing these meals to the campsite in winter and sharing them with family and friends are easily some of the best pleasures of winter camping. Cooking over a fire is a great idea as the campers are able to enjoy the warmth provided by the fire whilst the meal is cooking. Options for cooking over a fire include the traditional cast iron cookware or fire grill and cast iron plate. Cooking options not needing a fire include thermal cookers such as the Dream Pot or a Cobb cooker. These options are perfect for cooking delicious stews, soups and roasts.</p> <p><em>Hot Tip: When cooking with cast iron, charcoal briquettes provide a long burning and consistent source of heat making cast iron cooking so easy! If firewood is your heat source, don’t forget to bring enough firewood for your heating and cooking needs!</em></p> <p>With a heap of easy cooking options available there’s no reason why you can’t be sharing a warm and hearty stew or sensational roast on your next winter camping trip.</p> <p><strong>Winter warmers</strong></p> <p>Comfort and warmth are key for enjoying your winter camping experience. Hot showers and gas heaters are just two options that will make your winter camping trip much easier and more comfortable. Gas heaters are great as they are portable and provide a constant source of heat. Water heaters such as the Coleman Hot Water on Demand system are popular options for winter campers – who can say no to an instant warm shower or hot cuppa?</p> <p><em>First appeared on the Ray’s Outdoors website. <a href="http://blog.raysoutdoors.com.au/expertadvice?category=Camping" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>Visit them</strong> </a><a href="http://blog.raysoutdoors.com.au/expertadvice?category=Camping" target="_blank" rel="noopener"><strong>here for more camping advice</strong></a>.</em></p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="../lifestyle/caravan-camping/2015/05/4-campfire-recipes/">4 simple and delicious campfire recipes you should try</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="../lifestyle/caravan-camping/2015/05/outdoor-photography-tips/">Outdoor photography tips to help you take shots like a pro</a></strong></em></span></p> <p><span style="text-decoration: underline;"><em><strong><a href="../lifestyle/caravan-camping/2015/03/bush-damper-recipe/">How to make bush damper</a></strong></em></span></p>

Domestic Travel

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How to leave a legacy to look after those you love

<p dir="ltr"><em>It can be difficult getting on top of your own finances, and knowing how to prepare for the transition to the next generation, but with these tips from financial expert Jacqui Clarke, it has never been easier to manage your money, “so it doesn’t manage you”. </em></p> <p dir="ltr">Leaving a legacy involves more than just material wealth. It encompasses the values, memories, and support you provide to your loved ones even after you're gone. A legacy is the enduring impact and influence you leave behind, shaping the lives of others and the world around them. To be honest, in the context of family and looking after those that you love, it’s something that’s being created from the moment your children or grandchildren, nieces or nephews are born. Legacy can simply be the way you do things and ensuring your descendants know this. For others it might be a lifelong passion project that you want to continue supporting after your lifetime.</p> <p dir="ltr">To ensure your way, your wishes and your wealth are successfully transitioned to the next generation and create an enduring legacy there are 3 crucial steps to consider. Let’s delve into the significance of these elements and explore practical steps you can take to leave a lasting legacy that will benefit those you care about the most.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>1. Understanding Estate Planning </strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Estate planning is the process of organising and distributing your assets after you pass away. It allows you to have control over who receives your property and ensures your wishes are carried out effectively. By engaging in estate planning, you not only protect your loved ones from potential legal disputes and unnecessary financial burdens but also provide them with a clear roadmap for the future.</p> <p dir="ltr">Start by taking inventory of your assets, including your savings, investments, real estate, and personal belongings. Next, consult with a qualified estate planning lawyer who can guide you through the creation of essential documents such as wills, power of attorney and possibly testamentary trusts. These legal instruments will help safeguard your assets, minimise tax liabilities, and ensure that your loved ones are taken care of according to your wishes, forming a solid foundation for your lasting legacy.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>2. Communicating Your Intentions </strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Effective communication is essential when it comes to leaving a legacy. Clearly expressing your intentions and discussing your estate plan with your loved ones can prevent misunderstandings and conflicts down the line. Initiate an open and honest conversation about your plans, and explain the reasons behind your decisions. This will help your family understand your intentions and provide them with peace of mind during a potentially challenging time.</p> <p dir="ltr">While discussing your estate plan, it's vital to listen to your loved ones' concerns and consider their perspectives. Encourage dialogue and address any questions or uncertainties they may have. Engaging in these conversations demonstrates respect for their opinions and fosters a collaborative approach to legacy planning.</p> <p dir="ltr">By effectively communicating your intentions, you lay the groundwork for a legacy that encompasses not only financial assets but also the values, memories, and guidance you wish to pass on to future generations.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>3. Incorporating Non-Financial Aspects </strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Leaving a legacy isn't limited to financial matters and serious hiccups can occur if you miss this one. Consider the non-financial aspects that make up your legacy, such as your values, traditions, and life lessons. Take the time to document your family history, personal anecdotes, and insights that can guide future generations. This could be in the form of a written memoir, video recordings, or audio messages. As an example, my parents loved touring Australia, so I asked them to provide me with all their road trip planning documents, another example are collating the recipes from my grandmother and wanting to ensure these weren’t lost.  </p> <p dir="ltr">Family gatherings are a brilliant opportunity to promote a sense of openness about your planning. It’s a good time to chat about family heirlooms and meaningful possessions with your family members, not just your sentimental items but asking them if you hold something that carries sentimental value to them. You might be surprised by the reaction you get. Seemingly everyday “things” may serve as a special reminder of your love and the unique bonds you share.</p> <p dir="ltr">Your legacy encompasses not only the tangible assets you leave behind but also the intangible gifts of wisdom, love, and values that shape the lives of your loved ones. By incorporating these non-financial aspects into your estate plan and actively transmitting them, you ensure that your legacy extends beyond material possessions and leaves a profound impact on those you cherish.</p> <p dir="ltr">Leaving a legacy is about more than just divvying up your net worth. Through estate planning, effective communication, and the incorporation of non-financial aspects, you can shape the future and ensure that your loved ones are well taken care of. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>Jacqui Clarke FCA, FTI, GAICD, JP, author of <em>Stop Worrying About Money </em>(Wiley, $29.95), is a trusted advisor, board member, executor and veteran business executive. </strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>As a personal wealth and money management expert and over three decades of experience, 25 years at Deloitte and PWC helping high-net-worth families, individuals and business owners to build, manage and preserve their wealth. Her message is simple: with careful planning and effort, you can manage your money, so it doesn’t manage you.<a href="https://www.jacquiclarke.me/"> https://www.jacquiclarke.me/</a></strong></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Retirement Life

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5 make-up mistakes making you look tired

<p>When applied correctly, a good make-up job can be a Godsend – taking you from tired and washed-out to invigorated and glowing. Unfortunately, it can work the other way as well with incorrect application making you look even more exhausted than you actually are! Fortunately it’s easy to avoid these make-you-look-tired traps. Here are the five common mistakes many women make (and how to avoid them).</p> <p><strong>1. Overdoing the powder –</strong> Dull skin is synonymous with tired skin and an overly powdered complexion often emphasises that. Try skipping the matte foundation and powder combo and try either an illuminating liquid foundation or even a BB cream or tinted moisturiser which will highlight instead of camouflaging.</p> <p><strong>2. Going beige –</strong> Skipping colour on your face may seem the best way to detract attention away from a tired complexion but by embracing beige, you’re actually doing yourself a disservice. A completely neutral face looks lacklustre and a little bit flat. Try adding some definition and pop with a darker toned lippie or rosy hued blush to lift your face and add some colour. </p> <p><strong>3. Using the wrong concealer –</strong> Concealer is there to conceal. Unfortunately, the wrong shade can actually highlight that which you’re trying to cover. Try a creamy formula no more than one shade lighter than your natural skin tone. And always try out your shade in natural light as artificial light can disguise the true match.</p> <p><strong>4. Layering on the liner –</strong> While a smoky eye may be a classic look, if you’re looking less than fresh, it can come across as harsh and unflattering. Try skipping the black and grey shades in favour of navy or even dark brown, as they’ll help lift your eyes and add definition without darkness.</p> <p><strong>5. Forgetting to curl –</strong> Curling your lashes is one of the best ways to open up your whole eye area and help you look awake and alert. Unfortunately, it’s often the first thing we forget to do when tired. Try curling your lashes first, before applying the rest of your makeup and if you really want to amp up the result, use a heated eyelash curler.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Use these 10 passwords at your own peril

<p dir="ltr">With cyberattacks increasing by the month, it’s crucial to have a strong grasp or what is - or isn’t - a strong enough password to hopefully deter hackers.</p> <p dir="ltr">And with the cybercriminals capable of unveiling 921 passwords each second, people all over have become easy targets with their choices - whether that’s from including easy-to-guess terms like the word “password” itself or common sequences like “123456” and “qwerty” - as reported by <em>9News</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">And as analysis by <em>CyberNews</em> has revealed, just 13 per cent of leaked passwords - from a review of almost 15 billion - were actually unique. </p> <p dir="ltr">According to them, two of the most popular names to appear in the selection were “Eva” and “Alex”, with a total of seven million respective uses. “Food” and “pie” were regulars, as well as the season “summer”.</p> <p dir="ltr">While these might be easy for users to remember, and appealing for that, My Business general manager Phil Parisis had a clear warning in store when he explained that “if it’s easy for you to remember, chances are it’s also easy for cybercriminals to guess.</p> <p dir="ltr">“That's not only putting you at risk but also exposing the businesses and corporations that you work for.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Another common inclusion is a year - often their birth year or another significant year in their life."</p> <p dir="ltr">Having the right information and advice at your disposal is crucial when it comes to protecting yourself, so with all of this in mind, the 10 passwords that you should avoid at all costs the next time you’re asked to come to up with one are the following: </p> <ul> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">123456</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">123456789</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">qwerty</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">password</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">12345</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">qwerty123</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">1q2w3e</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">12345678</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">111111</p> </li> <li dir="ltr" aria-level="1"> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation">1234567890</p> </li> </ul> <p dir="ltr">To further protect yourself, it can be of great benefit to mix your upper and lowercase letters in your passwords, as well as throwing in a range of symbols and numbers to further disguise your intended terms. </p> <p dir="ltr">For example, and as <em>9News</em> noted, the likes of “password123” is considered a weak password, while something like “MySecurePa$$word785!” is considered much stronger, and much more protected.</p> <p dir="ltr">And the Australian Cyber Security Centre have further suggested that internet users consider using passphrases - a number of random words put together in a string -, as they’re “harder to guess but easier to remember” than common passwords. But most of all, they recommend avoiding obvious, significant, and easy-to-guess words, like the names of children and beloved family pets. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: 9News </em></p>

Technology

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6 trusted tips for finding love

<p>Whether you are newly single or have been playing the dating game for a while, it can be tough to find someone that you have a real connection with.</p> <p>There are some guidelines that you can follow that can help you, by simply asking yourself a few questions.</p> <p><strong>1. What are you looking for?</strong></p> <p>Do you want someone to grow old with, someone to take to a movie now and then, or something more casual? Knowing what you want and being fairly upfront about it can help you filter out the options.</p> <p><strong>2. Are you ready to show your hand?</strong></p> <p>Finding someone special means you will need to be open about who you are and be ready to invest time and effort into someone else. Are you ready for this step? If you’ve recently been hurt or are grieving it may not be the right time to search for a long term partner. </p> <p><strong>3. Do you know your assets? </strong></p> <p>Work out what you have to bring to the table as a partner, as this will help you know what to say if you have to describe yourself quickly (think online dating or speed dating).</p> <p><strong>4. Would you consider yourself interesting?</strong></p> <p>It can be helpful to try something new – take an art class, take a camping trip, do some volunteer work. Not only can you meet new people, it’s also nice to have something to talk about when you meet them.</p> <p><strong>5. Can you show your funny side?</strong></p> <p>Funny people tend to be liked, so it can pay to ensure you are using the right sort of humour. Too much sarcasm or negativity can turn people off, so ensure you are keeping things light and witty.</p> <p><strong>6. Would your friends be able to help?</strong></p> <p>When you’re looking for love, it can be helpful to ask your friends if they have anyone that might be suitable. They can offer a casual introduction at a social event, or set up a dinner to introduce you to some new people without too much pressure.</p> <p><em>Images: Shutterstock</em></p>

Relationships

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6 travel myths that aren’t true

<p>There are many myths out there regarding travel.And while some are grounded in truth, that doesn’t mean they’re completely factual.We’re going to take a look at six travel myths that simply aren’t true.</p> <p>If you haven’t been away for a while, this might just be your prompt to do so.</p> <p><strong>1. Myth – Travel has to be expensive</strong></p> <p>Nothing in the world is free, but travelling doesn’t have to be prohibitively expensive. Budget travel alternatives are becoming increasingly popular and there are plenty of ways you can get out there and experience the world without having to break the bank.</p> <p><strong>2. Myth – Booking well in advance will save me money and is the best way to go</strong></p> <p>While this is rooted in truth and some attractions are best booked before you leave, there is something to be said for the flexibility of booking on the fly. While you may have to pay a little more in some instances, it’s worth it to be able to be impulsive.</p> <p><strong>3. Myth – Haggling is expected in most countries</strong></p> <p>In many tourist locations you can expect the initial asking price to be as much as four times what something is worth. But when you’re travelling through an impoverished country, sometimes you have to ask yourself whether haggling is really worth it.</p> <p><strong>4. Myth – Tours don’t make for an authentic travel experience</strong></p> <p>Some people may look down on their nose at your for booking a tour, but there’s something to be said for having an expert guide to take you around an area and point out little things that you may have missed otherwise if you’re directing yourself.</p> <p><strong>5. Myth – People more or less understand English</strong></p> <p>While English is becoming increasingly popular and the global economy is dominated by English-speaking nations, it’s a travel myth to believe that everyone speaks. Many places in the world that retain a strong national identity and refuse to speak in English.</p> <p><strong>6. Myth – There’ll be plenty of time to see anything</strong></p> <p>Unfortunately this is not true. With threats like global warming, civil unrest and overcrowding, many amazing tourist locations are becoming more difficult to visit.</p> <p><strong>Related links:</strong></p> <p><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/travel/travel-tips/2016/02/tips-for-handling-flight-delays/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">5 tips for dealing with flight delays</span></a></strong></em></p> <p><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/travel/travel-tips/2016/02/photo-shows-german-shepherd-enjoying-flight/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">German Shepherd really enjoys plane ride</span></a></strong></em></p> <p><em><strong><a href="http://www.oversixty.co.nz/travel/travel-tips/2016/02/tips-for-travelling-with-people-that-get-on-your-nerves/"><span style="text-decoration: underline;">Tips for travelling with people that get on your nerves</span></a></strong></em></p> <p><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p>

Travel Tips

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