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Kyle slaps comedy legends with lifetime ban for "twisted" Trump joke

<p>US comedy-rock duo Tenacious D have found themselves at the centre of a media maelstrom during their current Australian tour. The reason? A blink-and-you'll-miss-it moment during which guitarist Kyle Gass expressed that his birthday wish at their Sydney show was: “Don’t miss Trump next time.”</p> <p>The comment quickly sent shockwaves through the media landscape, and has even managed to ruffle the feathers of the famously unshockable Kyle Sandilands. </p> <p>It all started innocently enough at Sydney’s ICC Theatre. As the band celebrated Kyle Gass' 64th birthday, Tenacious D frontman and star of the big and small screen Jack Black paused the show for the ceremonial blowing out of candles. What better time for Gass to wish for world peace, or perhaps a new guitar?</p> <p>But no: “Don’t miss Trump next time,” he quipped, referring to the failed assassination attempt that very morning on the former US President. </p> <p>As expected, the moment was captured by at least one concertgoer and shared on TikTok, where the comment section swiftly became a battlefield. “As a Tenacious D fan, no. Just no,” lamented one disappointed follower. “Hmm … the left condoning gun violence. Hypocrisy at its finest. Keep showing us your colours,” declared another.</p> <p>However, not everyone was scandalised. “My respect for Tenacious D,” reads the top comment, with another fan chiming in, “Aaand I like them even more.” </p> <p>But the real kicker came when Sandilands, on the Kyle & Jackie O show, took to the airwaves to express his utter dismay. “Someone’s promoting the assassination of another human being? Seriously?” he said. “That’s some serious, twisted s**t. And whoever that is, is banned for life.” </p> <p>Sandilands was especially flabbergasted to learn the comment came from Tenacious D. “See, those two seem like normal people, not unhinged lunatics,” he mused.</p> <p><em>Images: KIIS FM | TikTok</em></p>

Music

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Paw-sitively hilarious finalists of the Comedy Pet Photography Awards 2023 revealed

<p>The annual Comedy Pet Photography awards have announced their finalists for the competition, proving you can always rely on your furry friends to put a smile on your face.</p> <p>The 25 finalists have snapped their pets in their silliest moments, with the paw-sitively hilarious photos making instant classics. </p> <p>The finalists for the 2023 competition captured a photo-bombing dog, a lazy cat, unlikely friends, a sneak attack, a mishap at the beach and many other funny predicaments they found their furry friends in. </p> <p>The annual competition began several years ago, when professional photographers Tom Sullam and Paul Joynson-Hicks, who already ran the Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards, wanted to branch out and bring awareness to the joy pets bring to people's lives. </p> <p>Their website shares that their mission is to "promote positive awareness of animal welfare issues and celebrate the incredible and hugely valuable contribution that pets can and do have on our lives."</p> <p>"Through the wonders of photography, we want to share the hilarious expressions, antics and naughty capers that your joyous pets get up to and share the love and laughter with the world!"</p> <p>Fans of the funny furry friends can <a href="https://www.comedypetphoto.com/peoples-choice-award/vote-peoples-choice-award.php" target="_blank" rel="noopener">vote</a> on their favourite pic to determine the winner of the People's Choice Award for the 2023 competition. </p> <p><em>All image credits: Comedy Pet Photography Awards</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Two decades of Kath & Kim

<p dir="ltr">It has been 21 years since<em> Kath &amp; Kim</em> graced the screens and became one of Australia’s most beloved series.</p> <p dir="ltr">Arguably one of the most quotable TV shows, it saw Gina Riley and Jane Turner rise to fame.</p> <p dir="ltr">Turner, who plays Kath in the hit comedy, became a representative for the United Nations during and after the show, travelling to refugee camps and assisting charity efforts in Africa.</p> <p dir="ltr">She then made her theatrical debut in London in 2021, performing in the Aussie play, <em>Holding the Man</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">Her real-life personality isn’t so similar to Kath, "I'm actually quite a shy person, quite reserved," she told The Age in 2004.</p> <p dir="ltr">"I hate seeing myself on film and hearing my voice ... It's quite hard to be yourself, I think. Maybe that's why a lot of actors are actors – because they get to cover up and hide.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Turner is now 62 and married with three children.</p> <p dir="ltr">As for Kim, Gina Riley appeared in the drama series <em>The Beautiful Lie</em> and the comedy <em>Please Like Me</em>.</p> <p dir="ltr">She also starred in a stage adaptation of Alfred Hitchcock’s classic spy thriller North by Northwest in 2015. She’s also appeared in stage adaptations of Into the Woods and Chicago.</p> <p dir="ltr">In 2013, Riley revealed she was diagnosed with breast cancer. It was fortunately caught early and she made a full recovery post-treatment.</p> <p dir="ltr">Riley, 62, is married to Rick McKenna and they share a daughter Maddie, who is also an actress. </p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-0c49a65f-7fff-a72e-ae5b-f055659de420"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credit: Getty</em></p>

TV

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"I've been attacked": Barry Humphries' response to Comedy Festival incident

<p>Anti-trans campaigner Graham Linehan has shared an email he received from the late Barry Humphries in the response to the fallout from the Melbourne International Comedy Festival incident. </p> <p>In 2019, Humphries name was removed from one of the key awards at the annual comedy festival after he made comments ridiculing transgender people, included labelling gender affirmation surgery as “self-mutilation”.</p> <p>In an interview in 2018, Humphries branded being transgender “a fashion” and criticised teachers who support trans youth in schools, declaring it a "pretty evil" practice. </p> <p>As a result, the Melbourne International Comedy Festival, which was partly founded by Humphries, renamed their 'Barry Award' amid the controversy. </p> <p>Now, just days after Humphries passing, writer and anti-trans campaigner Graham Linehan has shared an email he allegedly received from Humphries after the renaming of the award. </p> <p>The email purportedly from Humphries said, “Thanks for your letter. I’ve been banned by the Melbourne Comedy Festival which Peter Cook and I launched! I’ve been attacked and branded fascist and ‘transphobic’ by the ‘they’ brigade, and accused of racism by people who have never met an [Indigenous person]."</p> <p>“That actors who have become rich and famous by performing in JKR’s plays and films and then vindictively excoriated her, seems to me a cowardly betrayal. Thanks for writing to me and good luck against a powerful and malign foe.”</p> <p>Humphries appears to be referring to J.K. Rowling by “JKR”, as the <em>Harry Potter</em> creator is one of the most high-profile anti-trans campaigners and refers to herself as “TERF”, an acronym for “trans-exclusionary radical feminist”.</p> <p>Linehan co-created TV comedies including <em>Father Ted</em>, <em>Black Books</em> and <em>The IT Crowd</em> but has in recent years become better known for his strident anti-trans views.</p> <p>In the wake of Humphries’ death, the Melbourne International Comedy Festival’s 2019 decision has come under attack by some commentators, who accused the festival of “cancelling” the comedian.</p> <p>However, festival’s director Susan Provan defended the organisation for their decision, while also paying tribute to Humphries' influence on comedy. </p> <p>She told ABC radio in Melbourne, “We’ve never cancelled Barry Humphries. There seems to be some misconceptions going on around there. We changed the name of an award, which… was the right decision to make when we did that."</p> <p>“We have celebrated, and continue to celebrate Barry, an incredible comedian, comic artists, who took Australian comedy global. We will always celebrate that he was amazing. And we really value his contribution to the comedy festival too.”</p> <p>Provan added the decision had been made in 2019 because Humphries’ “comments did not reflect the values of our community”.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

News

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“I thought you needed a morale boost”: Tom Gleeson’s rough review for The Project

<p>Tom Gleeson has built a name for himself with his particular brand of comedy - sarcastic and dry, it’s a rare sight to behold when a sincere moment breaks through. </p> <p>But that’s exactly what happened when the stand-up comedian and host of <em>Taskmaster Australia </em>stopped by The Project for a chat, surprising everyone when he seized an opportunity to sing his praises for the show’s new line-up. </p> <p>“It's no surprise that he [Tom] finds it very weird to be nice,” <em>The Project</em>’s official Twitter account wrote when sharing a clip of his segment, “and he tried it on us.”</p> <p>“I like making fun of comedians, that’s always a treat. But I can be nice as well,” Tom began, “but it’s off-putting. Would you like to see me be nice?” </p> <p>The panel were eager to accept the unexpected offer, with Tom then informing them, “it’s weird, I’m loving the new <em>Project</em>. It’s great! I love it.” </p> <p>When one remarked that it “still sounded mean”, Tom agreed that it didn’t sound right, and decided the next best thing was to compliment them all. </p> <p>“What’s not to like about this show?” he asked. “We’ve got Liz, you know, a legend of Australian sports. Sarah Harris who’s a natural on camera, I’ve always loved you since I saw you on <em>Studio 10</em>. We’ve got Waleed, an intellectual with - you know - political opinions that are hard to pin down. We’ve got Sam who’s the best comedian of his generation - I’ve seen his act, it’s amazing.” </p> <p>This time, the panel believed him, gushing over the nice words to a round of applause from the live studio audience. </p> <p>Tom again admitted that it was weird for him, and when he was asked if it was bad for his reputation to say such things, he said, “well, to be honest, I only said it ‘cause I’ve seen your ratings and I thought you needed a morale boost.” </p> <p>Thankfully, the hosts - and the audience - saw the funny side, bursting into laughter while Tom declared that it felt better to be “back to normal.” </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">.<a href="https://twitter.com/nonstoptom?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@NonStopTom</a> holds two of the meanest positions on TV, Hard Quizmaster and Taskmaster, so it's no surprise that he finds it very weird to be nice… and he tried it on us.<a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/TheProjectTV?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#TheProjectTV</a> <a href="https://t.co/5DL5FCj9vQ">pic.twitter.com/5DL5FCj9vQ</a></p> <p>— The Project (@theprojecttv) <a href="https://twitter.com/theprojecttv/status/1635923339544784897?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 15, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p>However, the new ‘normal’ for <em>The Project </em>drives Tom’s joke a little too close to home. Over the course of a year, the talk show’s broadcast audience numbers have seen a sizeable drop - almost 100,000 down.</p> <p>While shows across multiple Australian networks have been hit with a viewership slump, <em>The Project</em>’s coincides with the departure of hosts Carrie Bickmore, Peter Helliar, and Lisa Wilkinson. </p> <p>It was only in 2023 that the show locked in the new line-up of Waleed Aly, Sarah Harris, Georgie Tunny, Michael Hing, Sam Taunton, and Hamish MacDonald. </p> <p>A panel that Tom Gleeson, at least, is a fan of. </p> <p><em>Images: Channel 10 </em></p>

TV

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The value of a banana: understanding absurd and ephemeral artwork

<p>In September 2020, the Guggenheim Museum in New York acquired <a href="https://news.artnet.com/art-world/guggenheim-banana-cattelan-1909179">Maurizio Cattelan’s Comedian</a> by anonymous donation. The work – a banana duct-taped to a wall — was first shown and sold at the <a href="https://www.theartnewspaper.com/news/this-art-is-bananas-maurizio-cattelan-presents-first-new-work-for-an-art-fair-in-15-years#:%7E:text=The%20maverick%20Italian%20artist%20Maurizio,wall%20with%20grey%20duct%20tape.">Art Basel fair in Miami Beach</a> in the autumn of 2019 where it generated attention, derision and <a href="https://wwd.com/fashion-news/fashion-scoops/art-basel-2019-art-banana-memes-1203395572/">innumerable memes</a>. Social media was, for a brief time, overflowing with images of <a href="https://www.news18.com/news/buzz/people-are-coming-up-their-own-duct-tape-art-after-banana-in-art-basel-sells-for-rs-85-lakh-2416655.html">just about anything duct-taped to walls</a>: tamales, beer cans, cabbage, a <a href="https://knowyourmeme.com/photos/1668205-duct-tape-banana">durian</a> fruit, a sandal, someone’s cat. <a href="https://adage.com/article/digital/brands-are-trying-one-art-basel-banana/2221661">Companies quickly countered with online ads</a> where their products, from deodorants to French fries, were shown duct-taped to the wall with a modest price tag.</p> <p>Comedian reignited a set of questions that seem to flare up with some regularity: what makes something a high-priced artwork when another, seemingly identical, object is not? </p> <p>Since the work was shown at an art fair, it is relevant to consider what exactly is being bought when acquiring an artwork like Comedian. The original banana had to be replaced several times during the course of the fair, once after it was eaten as <a href="https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-50704136">a stunt by another artist</a>.</p> <p>The collectors who bought and subsequently donated the work to the Guggenheim did not receive an actual banana or a piece of duct tape. Instead, what they got was a document, a so-called certificate of authenticity that granted them the right to recreate the work and instructions of how to do so. <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/18/arts/design/banana-art-guggenheim.html">It stipulated</a>, among other things, that the banana should be hung 175cm above ground and that it should be replaced every seven to ten days.</p> <h2>A banana is a banana is a banana</h2> <p>Although the art world has accepted the idea of <a href="https://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/r/readymade">ready-made</a> everyday objects as art, at least since the mid-20th century, Cattelan’s artwork invited a collective focus on the structure of evaluation of artworks. If anyone can tape anything to the wall — as many did — what is the point of a document granting the legal right to do the same?</p> <p>Let’s compare Comedian to another fruit-based artwork: Zoe Leonard’s <a href="https://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/92277.html">Strange Fruit</a> (1992-1997), a large installation of fruit peels, carefully stitched together by the artist. It was made during the Aids crisis and functioned as a ritualised act of mourning and memorialising.</p> <p>After closely working with a conservator who developed a method of halting material decay at a particular point, <a href="http://contemporary.burlington.org.uk/journal/journal/intent-in-the-making-the-life-of-zoe-leonards-strange-fruit">Leonard decided</a> that it was more in line with the work’s idea to have it turn slowly into dust. In contrast to Comedian, replacing the fruit peels was not an option since the specific acts of stitching as mourning was key to the work’s meaning. The material manifestation of Leonard’s organic objects is far from stable – time passes and they change – but it is crucial that it is these precise pieces of fruit that undergo that transformation.</p> <p>Conceptual artists in the 1960s argued that an artwork’s identity is not to be found in its physical manifestation but in the artist’s idea. That idea can, but does not have to, take material form. </p> <p>Following that logic, the material object is a manifestation of an idea, and it is the idea that is bought and sold on the art market. When the object is reproducible or immaterial, the certificate of authenticity ensures the artwork’s identity as an artwork. Comedian is not dependent on a specific banana, any banana could be used without altering the meaning of the work. That, however, is very different from saying that any banana and piece of duct tape is an artwork by Maurizio Cattelan.</p> <h2>Poking fun at the market</h2> <p>Even though the <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/dec/06/maurizio-cattelan-banana-duct-tape-comedian-art-basel-miami">US$120,000 (£92,000) price tag for Comedian</a> was by contemporary art standards fairly moderate, it is obviously a huge mark-up for the act of combining two very cheap and readily available materials. </p> <p>The work’s title hints that it is aware of the comedic absurdity of its own evaluation on the art market. Also, the banana’s upward curve on the wall recalls a stylised smiling face, and the banana peel, as we know, is involved in the most basic of slapstick skits. </p> <p>Comedian was in fact not the first time Cattelan poked fun at the market, art dealers and their place within this system. In 1995, he made his dealer Emmanuel Perrotin (in whose booth at Art Basel Comedian was shown) <a href="https://www.frieze.com/article/maurizio-cattelan">dress up as a giant pink penis-shaped bunny</a> for the duration of his exhibition at Perrotin’s Paris gallery. The piece was called “Errotin le vrai lapin (Errotin the true rabbit). By making Perrotin wear a ridiculous and humiliating phallic costume while carrying out his day-to-day work as a commercial gallery owner, the spectacle of the art market came into sharp view.</p> <p>Comedian is not the only of Cattelan’s works that has drawn attention to the Guggenheim in recent years. In 2016, the artist installed the work <a href="https://www.guggenheim.org/exhibition/maurizio-cattelan-america">America</a> in one of the lavatories of the museum. The 18-karat gold toilet is a tongue-in-cheek commentary on the excesses of America’s rich; a piece of satirical participatory art that welcomes people to actually use it. It has reverberations of <a href="https://www.tate.org.uk/art/artworks/duchamp-fountain-t07573">Marcel Duchamp</a> and <a href="https://whitney.org/media/760">Sherrie Levine</a>’s lavatorial works. </p> <p>It <a href="https://www.vanityfair.com/style/2018/01/the-art-museum-that-offered-donald-trump-a-solid-gold-toilet">could have been President Trump</a>’s after he requested to borrow a Van Gogh from the Guggenheim but was offered America instead – he declined. It then was taken in by Blenheim Palace in Oxford in 2019 where art critic Jonathan Jones <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/2019/sep/13/maurizio-cattelan-blenheim-palace-review-hitler-golden-toilet-blenheim-churchill">commented, "</a>How does it feel to urinate on gold? Much like peeing on porcelain. But here, among all the photos of young Winston, it also feels like pissing on British history."</p> <p>Soon after, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/11/20/arts/design/gold-toilet-america.html#:%7E:text=14%2C%20a%20fully%2Dfunctioning%20toilet,the%20birthplace%20of%20Winston%20Churchill.&amp;text=The%20police%20may%20not%20know,palace%2C%20have%20plenty%20of%20theories.">it was stolen</a>. Its whereabouts remain unknown.</p> <p>Cattelan’s works — like other pieces — must be considered in relation to other artworks and the structures in which it operates. The questions they raise are relevant but in part unanswerable: are we to take Comedian seriously, or is it an elaborate joke? And if it is a joke, who is in on it and who, or what, is mocked?</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/the-value-of-a-banana-understanding-absurd-and-ephemeral-artwork-147689" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>. </em></p>

Art

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Trevor Noah brought a new perspective to TV satire - as well as a whole new audience

<p>After seven years of hosting <a href="https://www.cc.com/shows/the-daily-show-with-trevor-noah" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Daily Show on Comedy Central</a>, a hit comedy show produced in the US but with global reach, South African born comedian Trevor Noah has announced <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2022/09/29/entertainment/trevor-noah-daily-show/index.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">plans to leave</a> and focus on his stand-up comedy. During his tenure as host of the political satire series, which he took over from the revered <a href="https://www.forbes.com/profile/jon-stewart/?sh=35f2ad793fbc" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Jon Stewart</a>, Noah has offered important takes on issues in the US – and the world.</p> <p>Considering that the late-night television satire scene in the US remains <a href="https://theconversation.com/trevor-noah-is-leaving-the-daily-show-how-did-he-fare-191699" target="_blank" rel="noopener">populated by white men</a>, Noah has offered unique “black” African insights into issues that affect black Americans. He has also been lucid in talking about issues that have an effect on Africa and Africans. Noah’s knowledge of Africa and African politics has helped him demonstrate that there are few differences between America, lauded as one of the greatest democracies in the world, and global south countries that Trump once called “<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HcMFmoTCdcU" target="_blank" rel="noopener">shithole</a>” states.</p> <p>Noah’s approach attracted more African Americans than was the case during Stewart’s tenure. A 2017 study <a href="https://decider.com/2017/10/16/trevor-noah-tds-nielsen-ratings-analysis/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">by Nielsen Media Research</a> showed that during Stewart’s final season, 84.5% of the viewers were white. Noah lost 40% of the white viewers and gained 16% more black viewers than his predecessor.</p> <p>He spoke with great clarity on issues such as the <a href="https://theconversation.com/black-lives-matter-protests-are-shaping-how-people-understand-racial-inequality-178254" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Black Lives Matter</a> protests against racism, discrimination and racial inequity experienced by black people, the turbulent Trump presidency, the rise in white supremacy and the global COVID pandemic. By commenting on these different issues, he was able to bring home the inequalities that continue to be seen and experienced in the US.</p> <p>Noah has defied the odds, offered a youthful, “black” perspective and drawn in a new audience. He will be a hard act to follow - which is what people said of his predecessor.</p> <h2>Noah’s particular past</h2> <p>Growing up and coming of age in South Africa has undoubtedly shaped Noah’s worldview. In his book <a href="https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/29780253-born-a-crime" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Born a Crime</a> (2016), and in his numerous stand-up comedy shows, he set out what it meant growing up in apartheid South Africa, with its white-minority rule and policies of racial segregation. Because his father was white and his mother black, he could not have a normal childhood in which he could grow up in the same home as both his parents. It was legally impossible. the <a href="https://omalley.nelsonmandela.org/omalley/index.php/site/q/03lv01538/04lv01828/05lv01829/06lv01884.htm" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Immorality Act</a> prohibited sex between people of different races.</p> <p>Noah drew on his experiences in South Africa in his role as chief anchor of The Daily Show. In particular he was able to show the striking parallels between present day America and apartheid-era South Africa. He explains this reality in one of the <a href="https://www.ccn.com/trevor-noah-frightening-us-south-africa/" target="_blank" rel="noopener">episodes</a> of the show at the height of the global coronavirus pandemic:</p> <blockquote> <p>Living in this period in America, as much as I hate to say it, a lot of the things that I’m seeing are similar to what we experienced in South Africa. Mass unemployment, a government that doesn’t seem to have the best interests of the people at heart. People who are getting angrier and angrier.</p> </blockquote> <p>He explained in another <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FPrJxTvgdQ" target="_blank" rel="noopener">episode</a> of the show during the run-up to the 2016 US elections that</p> <blockquote> <p>as an African, there’s just something familiar about Trump that makes me feel at home.</p> </blockquote> <p>He went on to talk about striking resemblances between former US president Donald Trump and several former African presidents such as Jacob Zuma of South Africa, Idi Amin of Uganda and Robert Mugabe of Zimbabwe.</p> <h2>Comedy and political satire</h2> <p>I argue in a <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-81969-9_3" target="_blank" rel="noopener">book chapter</a> on political satire that the comic offers important ways of criticising those in power. During his tenure at The Daily Show, Noah has used comedy and satire to discuss diverse pressing contemporary issues, in the US and globally. As he has <a href="https://www.latimes.com/entertainment-arts/tv/story/2020-08-27/daily-show-trevor-noah-emmys-2020" target="_blank" rel="noopener">explained</a>:</p> <blockquote> <p>I believe in the importance of jokes. I will never lose that. I always tell people, ‘Jokes are what made me’. That’s how I see the world.</p> </blockquote> <p>Before joining The Daily Show, Noah was an established stand-up comedian. In South Africa, he was known for satirising Jacob Zuma during his presidency for corruption and his role in state capture.</p> <p>Comedy has allowed him to deal with difficult subjects in a lighthearted way. He has <a href="https://edition.cnn.com/2022/09/29/entertainment/trevor-noah-daily-show/index.html" target="_blank" rel="noopener">stated</a> that:</p> <blockquote> <p>I’ve loved trying to find a way to make people laugh, even when the stories are particularly s—, even on the worst days.</p> </blockquote> <p>Noah has infused the comic into his anchoring of The Daily Show and managed to tackle controversial topics in a cheerful yet hard-hitting way.</p> <h2>Poking holes in American exceptionalism</h2> <p>Being a foreigner in the US, Noah has the necessary distance to offer sobering analyses of current affairs in that country. Through his examination of the Trump presidency and the Black Lives Matter movement, he has shown that the idea of America being “exceptional” is an illusion.</p> <p>At the height of the Black Lives Matter protests in the US, he took to The Daily Show to give a <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jb4Bg8mu2aM" target="_blank" rel="noopener">grim yet poignant monologue</a> about race in the US. Noah traced the chain of events that went beyond the killing of George Floyd, a black man who was suffocated to death on the side of a road by a group of white policemen, to show the precarity of black lives in contemporary America.</p> <p>The monologue is sharp, knowledgeable and nuanced in its explanation of what was happening in the US. He grounded it on historical events to show that nothing was new. The US was not exceptional. The US democracy was as imperfect as that of the many countries that it had preached to for many years.</p> <p>It has taken a late-night host from outside the US to point to the failings of the US and its democracy.</p> <h2>Late night TV without Noah</h2> <p>The late-night circuit will be different without Noah, the only black and African host of a late-night show in the US. Because of his intimate knowledge of global popular culture, he has had a youthful viewership.</p> <p>His peers do not have the same perspective or viewership. If Noah replacing Stewart was seen as a daunting exercise, filling the shoes of Noah might prove to be even more challenging.</p> <p><strong>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://theconversation.com/trevor-noah-brought-a-new-perspective-to-tv-satire-as-well-as-a-whole-new-audience-191800" target="_blank" rel="noopener">The Conversation</a>.</strong></p> <p><em>Image: Facebook</em></p>

TV

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Prince Harry stars in comedy skit to promote "green" travel venture

<p>Prince Harry has flexed his acting muscles as he stars in a comedy skit promoting his new "green" travel venture in New Zealand. </p> <p>The Duke of Sussex's eco-tourism venture Travalyst, which he founded in 2019, has launched a new initiative to rate holidayers on their environmental credentials. </p> <p>Travellers will also be able to choose their hotel based on how "green" the hotels and resorts are. </p> <p>In the hilarious ad promoting the new move, Prince Harry is seen jogging through a park, wearing a t-shirt that says "Girl Dad", in honour of his daughter Lilibet. </p> <p>The clip also features New Zealand actors Rhys Darby, Dave Fane and Rena Owen.</p> <p>In the video, Harry is accosted by Darby, who plays a "rating agent", who accuses him of littering on a beach in Auckland during his and Meghan's royal tour in October 2018. </p> <p>Darby explains that the country is trialling a system in which holiday destinations rate their visitors, giving Harry three stars out of five.</p> <p>He gives the royal a positive review for only using one out of 12 provided towels, buying honey from local vendors and turning off the tap when he brushed his teeth.</p> <p>When asked about his experience in the country, Harry says, "It was an incredible time. We had an amazing time in New Zealand. It's beautiful".</p> <p>The Duke of Sussex made the announcement on Māori Television's Te Ao with Moana on Monday night.</p> <p>Harry told viewers he had always felt a deep connection and respect towards the Maori people.</p> <p>"Tena Koutou katoa. I've been to Aotearoa a number of times throughout my life and I've always felt a deep connection and respect towards the Māori people who make me feel so welcome every time," Harry said.</p> <p>You can check out the video below. </p> <p><iframe title="YouTube video player" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/V_sUwhZhTTY" width="560" height="315" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p><em>Image credits: Travalyst</em></p>

TV

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Grace Tame makes waves at comedy show

<p dir="ltr">Grace Tame has tried her hand at comedy to the delight of attendees at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-72f5cd86-7fff-6b7b-1d28-3ea7cf6b441d"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">The 23-year-old Tasmanian appeared on a panel of comedians that touched on everything from climate change, housing affordability, and gender equality to Australia Day and misinformation and social media - all in a hilarious way, of course.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Last night’s <a href="https://twitter.com/ARationalFear?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ARationalFear</a> live show in Melbourne was 👌 <a href="https://twitter.com/GabbiBolt?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@GabbiBolt</a>, <a href="https://twitter.com/aliterative?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@aliterative</a> hilarious, Dane Simpson &amp; <a href="https://twitter.com/TamePunk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TamePunk</a> both nailed it, <a href="https://twitter.com/Andy_McClelland?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Andy_McClelland</a> brought the bangers and <a href="https://twitter.com/vidyarrrr?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@vidyarrrr</a> was superb. Congrats <a href="https://twitter.com/danilic?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@danilic</a>, creative director of Meta. Download the pod when it comes out</p> <p>— Charlotte George 🌈 (@ccl_george) <a href="https://twitter.com/ccl_george/status/1513289276813119488?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 10, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">She received the loudest applause as she was introduced by podcast host Dan Ilic, who pointed out how she was the master of the side-eye, referencing the famous photo of her and Prime Minister Scott Morrison at the Lodge.</p> <p dir="ltr">After monologues from Ilic, Gabbi Bolt, Alice Fraser and Dane Simpson, it was Ms Tame’s turn.</p> <p dir="ltr">She joked that she wasn’t going to get political, apologising to anyone who came to see her take aim at Mr Morrison - at least not directly.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-9f097c8e-7fff-7f7d-aba1-d68f28881c76"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">“Grace Tame referring to no particular politician as ‘A giant self-saucing joke pudding’,” one attendee tweeted about Ms Tame’s monologue.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Wow! <a href="https://twitter.com/ARationalFear?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@ARationalFear</a> was extraordinary...<br />Thank you to the incredible team of<a href="https://twitter.com/vidyarrrr?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@vidyarrrr</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/Andy_McClelland?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@Andy_McClelland</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/LewisHobba?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@LewisHobba</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/aliterative?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@aliterative</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/GabbiBolt?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@GabbiBolt</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/thedanesimpson?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@thedanesimpson</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/LewisHobba?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@LewisHobba</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/zdaniel?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@zdaniel</a><br />And the incredible <a href="https://twitter.com/TamePunk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TamePunk</a> who brought the house down by comparing herself to an Airfryer. <a href="https://t.co/9QqNEEUPwU">pic.twitter.com/9QqNEEUPwU</a></p> <p>— Dan Ilic (@danilic) <a href="https://twitter.com/danilic/status/1513254582864199680?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 10, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Ms Tame also told stories about <em>My Little Pony</em>, her favourite show to watch as a child, with veiled references to Mr Morrison and his government.</p> <p dir="ltr">One of the characters who “sharted in Old MacDonald’s farm” was a particularly clear reference to the longstanding rumour that Mr Morrison soiled himself at a McDonald’s in Engadine in 1997.</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Tame didn’t just focus on the PM, going on to describe NSW One Nation leader Mark Latham as her “favourite comedian”.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-042906cc-7fff-99b6-2ad8-2622707b60eb"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">A joke about someone claiming Tasmania wasn’t a real place led to Tame saying it was okay because she lived ‘rent-free’ in Mr Latham’s head, along with domestic violence campaigner Rosie Batty (who he has publicly attacked), the 2004 election results (which saw him lost as Labor leader), and anyone who wasn’t a white man.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">To be clear, this isn’t a “career move”.</p> <p>Advocacy is my first priority, always. It’s my life and purpose. I ummed and aahed over whether or not this was the right thing to do.</p> <p>Would it send a hopeful, empowering message to survivors? Or would it trivialise the cause? <a href="https://t.co/UDGm7iE0UG">pic.twitter.com/UDGm7iE0UG</a></p> <p>— Grace Tame (@TamePunk) <a href="https://twitter.com/TamePunk/status/1512934253662654464?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">April 9, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Before Sunday’s gig, Ms Tame took to social media to explain her decision to take part in the comedy festival and clarify it wasn’t a ‘career move’, as many outlets reported.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Advocacy is my first priority always. It’s my life and purpose. I ummed and aahed over whether or not this was the right thing to do,” she wrote on Sunday morning.</p> <p dir="ltr">“There are risks in doing this, as there are with just about anything else in this mad life.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Things have been especially tough lately. But I reckon we could use a laugh. Either way, the joke’s on me. And if I fail, I’ll pick myself up and move.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You never know unless you try.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The show, which also included Lewis Hobba and independent candidate Goldstein Zoe Danila as a special guest, was recorded and will be released as an episode of Ilic’s podcast A Rational Fear.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-7df8bcd5-7fff-ad0b-740d-d96fa80b86b3"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Twitter</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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Grace Tame's unusual career move

<p dir="ltr">Grace Tame, known for her tenure as Australian of the Year and her advocacy for sexual assault survivors, is adding another string to her bow that has surprised many: comedy.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 23-year-old is making her first appearance at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival on April 10, which Melbourne Lord Mayor Sally Capp confirmed on Monday.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Comedy really does showcase so many people and issues,” Ms Capp said while speaking with <em>Studio 10</em>. “I did see Grace last week and I was actually surprised when she told me she was going to be a part of the comedy festival.</p> <p dir="ltr">“She is somebody that has a very sharp wit, as we know.</p> <p dir="ltr">“She has some amazing insights and I am looking forward to supporting Grace as she takes on comedy in the same amazing way that she has taken on so many other amazing roles more recently.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Tame will be joining a line-up of comedians for a show by popular political comedy podcast <em><a href="https://www.comedyfestival.com.au/2022/shows/a-rational-fear" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A Rational Fear</a></em>.</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-eabfa592-7fff-d274-8884-4c36b028a0ae"></span></p> <p dir="ltr">The podcast, hosted by comedian Dan Ilic, tackles the news and climate change issues, and its show at the festival promises to do the same - this time with Ms Tame, Triple J’s Lewis Hobba, Gabbi Bolt from The Chaser, DJ Andrew McClelland, and comedians Dane Simpson and Alice Fraser.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">and in her first ever comedy spot, <a href="https://twitter.com/TamePunk?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@TamePunk</a>.<br />Funny, top shelf, rabble-rousery. <br />👇 <a href="https://t.co/GnSTc2xeBY">pic.twitter.com/GnSTc2xeBY</a></p> <p>— A Rational Fear (@ARationalFear) <a href="https://twitter.com/ARationalFear/status/1500404020011499520?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 6, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The appearance comes as an unexpected move from Ms Tame, who has spent recent years focused on her advocacy work.</p> <p dir="ltr">Entertainment reporter Peter Ford told 6PR her comedy appearance was a “pretty big deal”, but that he expected she wouldn’t be speaking about her advocacy at the event.</p> <p dir="ltr">“She’s highly intelligent,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m imagining that her comedy is not going to involve the horrible serious subject that she’s so devoted to, which is about protecting children.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I can’t imagine that is going to be part of the routine, but good luck to her.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><span id="docs-internal-guid-a58d2713-7fff-e9c9-a2f1-feeca2d8a1d5"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Twitter</em></p>

Beauty & Style

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How Mr Bean came to be

<p dir="ltr">We all grew up watching Rowan Atkinson in the much loved <em>Mr Bean</em> television series, animation and movies.</p> <p dir="ltr">But how did it all come to be? </p> <p dir="ltr">Atkinson, who actually has a degree in electrical engineering from Oxford University, came up with the show’s idea while studying.</p> <p dir="ltr">It was his love for acting and performing with the university’s comedy group known as “The Oxford Revue” which helped bring his character to life.</p> <p dir="ltr">The British actor had a stutter which would disappear while portraying a character but he was well received by his peers and eventually by large audiences.</p> <p dir="ltr">Atkinson described the show as “a child in a man’s body” and went on to create his dream which debuted on New Year’s Day in 1990 on ITV to a worldwide audience.</p> <p dir="ltr">Not many actors can boast that. </p> <p dir="ltr">Atkinson worked with fellow actor Richard Curtis, who saw a successful five-year run of <em>Mr Bean</em> which in turn saw the production of several movies.</p> <p dir="ltr">Then in 2002, an animated series of <em>Mr Bean</em> was also created, which saw it enjoyed by millions more around the globe. </p> <p dir="ltr">So how much did this make for Atkinson? </p> <p dir="ltr">Are you ready? An eye-watering $150 million. </p> <p dir="ltr">Not bad when you consider that the iconic character barely even utters a word! </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

Movies

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30 years since The Addams Family hit the big screen, it is still the perfect blend of horror and comedy

<p>The dark side of films has always had a strong relationship with the light side. Mixing comedy with horror often ensured a hit even in the early days of cinema –comedian Harold Lloyd was making such films <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D-CXQspZtMs">as early as the 1920s</a>.</p> <p>This combination of light hearted horror worked on the small screen as well.</p> <p>In the 1950s and 1960s, family sitcoms The Andy Griffith Show, My Three Sons, The Beverley Hillbillies and Leave it to Beaver were all hugely popular. But the 60s were also a time of the counter-culture revolution. Beatniks, hippies and a general anti-establishment youth culture progressively dismissed the conforming stereotypes of the wholesome family.</p> <p>From this a TV show, based on a long running New Yorker cartoon by Charles Addams, was launched: The Addams Family, based around a family who, while not outright monsters, definitely played on the dark side of life.</p> <p>The series itself only ran for two seasons and was dropped for poor ratings. But in the intervening years the show’s status grew.</p> <p>Children of the 1960s to the 1980s discovered the reruns and grew in love with the weirdness and offbeat humour. These children grew into adults who never lost interest in one of the strangest shows ever made.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/F3jnymeJof4?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>In 1991 this nostalgia culminated with the release of The Addams Family Movie.</p> <p>Set around a family of oddballs whose pastimes include grave digging, cutting the heads off roses (because the thorns are far more precious) and stealing stop signs to revel in the sound of cars crashing, 30 years on the film has not lost any of its eccentric charm or quirky sensibilities.</p> <h2>A plot for the madness</h2> <p>The Addams Family Movie starts with the dilemma of attempting to contact Gomez’s brother, Fester (who has been in the afterlife for 25 years) and constantly failing. When someone claiming to be Fester turns up (the ever-versatile Christopher Lloyd), he is quickly embraced by the Addams’s as the long-lost Uncle. What they don’t know is the fake Fester is just there to find and steal their hidden riches.</p> <p>But this whole story is just a flimsy backdrop to all the crazy jokes, one-liners and sight-gags that each member of the family gets up to throughout the film.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/G388UMkJIBE?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <p>The parents, Gomez and Morticia Addams are difficult to describe. Gomez is somewhere between a 1930s gangster and a wide eyed man-child who finds wonder at everything. But he is definitely a Renaissance man: just as skilled with a rapier sword as he is with a golf club, his dance moves are unparalleled. The late Raul Julia plays Gomez to perfection – arguably even better than John Astin who played the TV original.</p> <p>Angelica Huston steals the show as his wife Morticia. Wistful, sublime and ethereal, Huston mixes eroticism with playful innocence. She also gets many of the best lines.</p> <p>When Gomez asks Morticia if she is “Unhappy, darling?”, Morticia smoothly supines with a smile “Oh yes, yes completely” – as though that is the ultimate state of ecstasy. Gomez looks on her with constant adoring eyes, and cannot control his unbridled lust whenever Morticia speaks French.</p> <p>It is a love fuelled by constant romance. As Morticia says, “Gomez, last night you were unhinged. You were like some desperate, howling demon. You frightened me … Do it again!”. And when Gomez is racked by angst Morticia tells him “Don’t torture yourself, Gomez … that’s my job”.</p> <p>Every horror movie needs a creepy kid. And the Addams children, daughter Wednesday (Christina Ricci) and son Pugsley (Jimmy Workman), fit the bill nicely. Wednesday is like a mini version of her mother, but in a much more dour mood, with an intense interest in instruments of torture and execution. Pugsley is more playful, always following Wednesday’s lead – to the point of climbing into her electric chair to play her game of “Is there a God?”.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/5I0xFZ34uT4?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <h2>Ghoulish with heart</h2> <p>Horror is supposed to make you frightened; comedy is supposed to make you laugh. They’re genre polar opposites. Then why do horror-comedies work? The Addams Family is so accessible to a wide audience because, while it plays with the dark side of life, it’s a horror film without any of the horror. The darkness is very low level, and it isn’t represented as being real.</p> <p>This is why children and people who don’t like real horror films love it. They can dip their toes in the horror genre but it is played for laughs, not scares.</p> <p>In a way, it has a been a gateway film for when children grow older and watch real horror films. The Addams Family introduces them to the dark world, but there’s nothing to fear. For now, it’s just fun.</p> <p>Overall, though, the one thing The Addams Family movie teaches audiences is regardless if you’re a witch, or a ghoul, or even just a hand, the most important thing in life is family.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/172042/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/daryl-sparkes-828631">Daryl Sparkes</a>, Senior Lecturer (Media Studies and Production), <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-southern-queensland-1069">University of Southern Queensland</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/30-years-since-the-addams-family-hit-the-big-screen-it-is-still-the-perfect-blend-of-horror-and-comedy-172042">original article</a>.</p>

TV

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Preppers is a deep reading of colonial violence – and a hilarious, must-watch Aussie TV comedy

<p>A sophisticated multi-layered critique of colonialism, capitalism and patriarchy with an all-star Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander cast (along with some well-known non-Indigenous personalities playing an assortment of “allies”), Preppers is hilarious.</p> <p>Trying to navigate being the only Indigenous person on an all-white TV morning show, Wake up Australia, and dealing with <a href="https://www.booktopia.com.au/unmasking-the-racial-contract-debbie-bargallie/book/9781925302653.html">daily microaggressions</a>, Charlie (Nakkiah Lui) finds herself suffering feelings of inadequacy and soothing herself with self-help affirmations.</p> <p>Then, after a series of unfortunate events, she wakes to find herself at a doomsday preppers hold out known as “Eden 2”. The six-part series then unfolds in an isolated camp where power relations shift as everyone prepares for the end of the world.</p> <p>The core cast of seven is led by a group of brilliant Blak actors: Lui is joined by Jack Charles, Meyne Wyatt, Ursula Yovich and Aaron McGrath, with non-Indigenous actors Eryn Jean Norvill and Chum Ehelepola rounding out the preppers.</p> <p>Many other wonderful actors move in and out of the series, including Miranda Tapsell, Luke Carroll and Christine Anu, as it tackles some big issues such as colonial violence, frontier wars, inter-generational trauma and the politics of identity.</p> <p>But it does this all in the great Aussie tradition of <a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-84796-8_6">taking the piss</a>: making fun of the things that are absurd, risible, offensive and hurtful.</p> <p><iframe width="440" height="260" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/nvb1Mx34TiA?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen=""></iframe></p> <h2>A story of allyship</h2> <p><a href="https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-030-84796-8_10">Much has been written on the topic of allyship</a> with Indigenous people, particularly the danger that, in seeking “ally” status one is really seeking to position oneself as the “good white person”.</p> <p>If white allies are motivated solely by a desire to be seen as a “good person”, there is a danger they might remain <a href="https://ro.uow.edu.au/lhapapers/2070/">ignorant of or indifferent</a> to larger structures of power. Preppers explores this complexity in a way that will make us all laugh, while also revealing how allyship operates to silence or take from Indigenous people.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/430732/original/file-20211108-25-bmjnpb.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/430732/original/file-20211108-25-bmjnpb.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="A white woman dressed like a coloniser, and an Aboriginal woman dressed as an Aussie flag thong." /></a> <span class="caption">Is this allyship?</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">ABC TV</span></span></p> <p>In one episode, the group is accidentally locked in the bunker. Jayden (Aaron McGrath) calls on Kirby (Eryn Jean Norvill) to be sacrificed before they run out of air. As Jayden describes it, this would be “the ultimate display of white allyship”.</p> <p>Kirby, not very happy to comply, responds by stating she should survive to go on and tell the story.</p> <p>“We don’t need another white person to tell a Black story,” says Jayden.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/430731/original/file-20211108-10550-nd7vuv.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/430731/original/file-20211108-10550-nd7vuv.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="A white woman with a shotgun mike, looked on by three Aboriginal people." /></a> <span class="caption">‘We don’t need another white person to tell a Black story’, Jayden tells Kirby.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">ABC TV</span></span></p> <p>Becoming an ally is no simple or straightforward matter. Instead, it requires constant reflection on your social position, and remaining accountable to those with whom you are “allied” – but you probably won’t be called to self-sacrifice to ensure enough air is left in your doomsday bunker.</p> <p>In true Hollywood end-of-days fashion, the group turns on itself. Kirby declares Charlie (Lui) will be the one to die.</p> <p>Charlie’s reward will be becoming the namesake for a future child of born again Christians Lionel (New Zealand-Sri Lankan actor Chum Ehelepola) and Kelly (Ursula Yovich). Not the first or the second child but one of the later ones, Kelly notes.</p> <p>An annual day of honour will also be bestowed upon Charlie – “a day of mourning and dancing and stuff”. Thankfully, they are saved by the arrival of Charlie’s mum, Marie (Christine Anu).</p> <h2>Tough truths through comedy</h2> <p>Preppers unpacks what we think we know – and what has been taught to us as truth – about colonisation. In one scene, bones are found. The preppers suspect the bones could be those of an Aboriginal person killed during the frontier wars.</p> <p>The truth of these atrocities is questioned by some members of the group. “Don’t they teach you that in school?”, Jayden asks.</p> <p>“We used to make boomerangs out of Popsicle sticks, does that count?”, asks Lionel.</p> <p><a href="https://images.theconversation.com/files/430733/original/file-20211108-10010-1o9yuk7.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=1000&amp;fit=clip"><img src="https://images.theconversation.com/files/430733/original/file-20211108-10010-1o9yuk7.jpeg?ixlib=rb-1.1.0&amp;q=45&amp;auto=format&amp;w=754&amp;fit=clip" alt="Jack Charles" /></a> <span class="caption">Through Monty (Jack Charles), Preppers tells the truth about Australia’s history.</span> <span class="attribution"><span class="source">ABC TV</span></span></p> <p>The resident Elder, Monty (Jack Charles), reveals he may have some records of local frontier wars and quips “that is the thing with you white fellas. You deny it but you wrote it down”.</p> <p>Describing <a href="https://www.sbs.com.au/news/the-feed/this-interactive-map-highlights-150-indigenous-massacres">frontier violence</a> as an apocalypse, Monty shows the group a series of slides of colonial soldiers and settlers killing Aboriginal people, declaring they were “led by a cruel man, a real dog. He shot, burnt, beat, hung local Aboriginal people”.</p> <p>Even though Preppers is a comedy, the show provides a deep reading often left out of recollections of colonial violence. Indigenous people were not just passive victims of the heinous crimes. They were people who fought for their lives and Country.</p> <p>“They ambushed this colonial dog and his men, stole their weapons and turned the guns back on them. The Blackfullas had their revenge”, says Monty.</p> <h2>Blackfulla deadly</h2> <p>From Charlie, whose anxiety manifests into uncontrollable flatulence, to a Black <a href="https://www.vulture.com/2019/04/is-you-vs-wild-real-netflix-bear-gryllls.html">Bear Grylls</a>-alpha-male-wannabe (Guy, played by Meyne Wyatt), to a pair of amorous born again Christians practising abstinence, Preppers includes brilliant performances from all in the cast.</p> <p>Preppers embodies the true definition of Blak humour in all its intricacies, and the unique ways Indigenous comedy can address the complexities of everyday life of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in contemporary Australia.</p> <p>The series is, to quote a line in one of the episodes, “like deadly, like Blackfulla deadly, not like gammin [fake or pretend]” - a must watch!</p> <p><em>Preppers is on ABC from November 10.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important; text-shadow: none !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/170100/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/bronwyn-carlson-136214">Bronwyn Carlson</a>, Professor, Indigenous Studies and Director of The Centre for Global Indigenous Futures, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/macquarie-university-1174">Macquarie University</a></em></span></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/preppers-is-a-deep-reading-of-colonial-violence-and-a-hilarious-must-watch-aussie-tv-comedy-170100">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: ABC</em></p>

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Ivermectin fan Joe Rogan thought an Australian comedy sketch was ‘propaganda’

<p dir="ltr">Former reality TV host and podcaster Joe Rogan shared a video on his Instagram on Monday night, writing, “Not only has Australia had the worst reaction to the pandemic with dystopian, police-state measures that are truly inconceivable to the rest of the civilized world, but they also have the absolute dumbest propaganda.”</p> <blockquote style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CVvyYXzgrD2/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"></div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"></div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"></div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"></div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"></div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" rel="noopener" href="https://www.instagram.com/tv/CVvyYXzgrD2/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank">A post shared by Joe Rogan (@joerogan)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The biggest problem with his caption was that the video was from the satirical ABC show<span> </span><em>Gruen,<span> </span></em>and Rogan had just made the embarrassing mistake of being unable to distinguish between satire and reality.</p> <p dir="ltr">An easy mistake to make for someone who can’t differentiate between human medicine and horse medicine; after contracting COVID-19, Rogan<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.npr.org/2021/09/01/1033485152/joe-rogan-covid-ivermectin" target="_blank">made sure his fans knew</a><span> </span>that he had included Ivermectin as part of his treatment, despite the FDA confirming it to be  ineffective against COVID-19.</p> <p dir="ltr">This isn't Rogan's first time expressing concern about the plight of innocent Australians who are living in a police state and being force fed dumb propaganda; he<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.ladbible.com/news/latest-joe-rogans-interview-with-yeonmi-park-is-being-called-his-best-ever-20210805" target="_blank">told North Korean defector Yeonmi Park that</a>, “There’s some crazy s*** going on right now where the army is trying to keep people inside in Australia."</p> <p dir="ltr">He continued, "They have full-on government lockdowns where the government is flying helicopters over the streets (and telling people) ‘go back indoors, you’re not allowed to be outside’, which is crazy.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The<span> </span><em>Gruen<span> </span></em>video features a man falling to the floor while having an allergic reaction, and a woman crouched over him, reassuring him while getting ready to use an EpiPen on him. He stops her and asks, “Wait, what brand EpiPen is that?”, “What’s in it?”, “Medicine? How long was it researched for?”, “What are the stats from Europe?”, and, most importantly, and why Rogan posted the video, the man wheezes as his throat is closing up, “What does Joe Rogan say?” before grabbing her by the shoulders, croaking out “Call Joe”, and dying.</p> <p dir="ltr">To an even slightly informed viewer, it’s an obvious send-up of anti-vaxxers who get their information from increasingly dubious sources like relatives on Facebook, Joe Rogan and other podcasters with no medical or scientific qualifications or expertise, or dodgy websites based in Eastern Europe. To Joe Rogan, it was another example of how the tyrannical Australian government was fighting back against COVID-19, apparently.</p> <p dir="ltr">A lot of his supporters seemed to also believe the sketch was genuine, with one commenting, “Australia is fine as long as you don’t watch the free TV”, and another, Australian jiujitsu black belt holder Kit Dale, commenting, “Australia has become weak”. Others pointed out that Rogan, who self-identifies as a comedian, should be able to take jokes about him since he’s more than happy to make jokes at the expense of others.</p> <p dir="ltr">Rogan eventually edited the caption to add, “apparently this is not a real ad. It’s from a satirical show.” Yeah Joe, we know. Thirty seconds of doing your own research would have told you that from the beginning.</p> <p dir="ltr">The video's creators continue to have a good sense of humour, with Paper Moose CEO Nick Hunter<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.9news.com.au/national/joe-rogan-calls-gruen-transfer-covid-19-vaccine-satire-advertisement-australian-propaganda/ac0c5bb5-45fa-404f-9715-e56fdac74088" target="_blank">telling 9News.com.au</a>, "Gruen is a satirical show. The point of the video was to talk about some of the issues anti-vaxxers have and put it in a humorous context to show the ridiculousness of what is out there."</p> <p dir="ltr">"Its literally a demonstration of the problem we are trying to solve in the world today, so it was kind of hilarious that Joe Rogan reacted the way he did."</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image: Michael S. Schwartz/Getty Images</em></p>

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“We lost a comedy giant today”: Norm Macdonald dead at 61

<p>The comedy world is in mourning after Norm Macdonald died of cancer on Tuesday at age 61. </p> <p>The Canadian stand-up comic and <em>Saturday Night Live</em> cast member <span>had been battling cancer in private </span>for nearly a decade, according to his lifelong friend Lori Jo Hoekstra who was with him when he dies. </p> <p>"He was most proud of his comedy", she said.</p> <p><span>"He never wanted the diagnosis to affect the way the audience or any of his loved ones saw him."</span></p> <p><span>"Norm was a pure comic. He once wrote that ‘a joke should catch someone by surprise, it should never pander.’ He certainly never pandered. Norm will be missed terribly.”</span></p> <p><span>Norm was known in the comedic circle for his signature deadpan delivery and dry style of humour that quickly made him an icon of the craft.</span><span></span></p> <p><span>Norm's impressions of </span>famous figures, such as TV star Burt Reynolds, became a teaching tool and huge inspiration for up and coming comics. </p> <p><span>“I essentially ripped off his delivery when I first started acting,” actor and fellow Canadian Seth Rogen tweeted. </span></p> <p><span>“I would stay up specifically to watch him on talk shows. He was the funniest guest of all time. We lost a comedy giant today. One of the all time greats.”</span></p> <p><span>Norm shot to fame when he was cast on <em>Saturday Night Live</em> in 1993 after performing in comedy circuits in Canada for several years. </span></p> <p><span>He performed on <em>SNL</em> until 1998, serving as a co-host of Weekend Update for three seasons.</span></p> <p><span>Norm then went on to star in his own ABC sitcom, <em>The Norm Show</em>, from 1999 until 2001, and also became a hilarious regular on a series of talk shows. </span></p> <p><span>In 2018, he hosted a Netflix talk show, <em>Norm Macdonald Has a Show</em>, that was inspired by his podcast and garnered an international audience. </span></p> <p><span>Hundred of comedians have shared their stories of Norm on Twitter in remembrance of the comedy giant and all he did for the world of show business. </span></p> <p><span>Actor Josh Gad wrote, "Absolutely gutted. One of the most underrated and hilarious SNL performers."</span></p> <p><span>Writer and director Edgar Wright also tweeted, saying, "Of the many addictive rabbit holes you can disappear down on the internet, the most pleasurable is ‘Norm MacDonald chat show appearances'."</span></p> <p><span>“Thanks for all the laughs Norm, very sorry to see you go.”</span></p> <p><em>Image credit: Getty Images</em></p>

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Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards showcase hilarious moments

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The annual Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards are an opportunity for photographers to capture the beauty of the animal kingdom, with a comedic twist. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">This year’s finalists have produced images of all shapes and sizes striking unexpected and silly poses. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">From giraffes in Africa and polar bears in the Arctic, to pigeons in the city and otters in rivers, these animals have been immortalised in these hilarious photographs.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The finals for the competition will take place on October 22nd, with judges set to have a difficult time choosing from the pictures. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards began in 2015, and was established with the goal of promoting the conservation of wildlife and their surrounds through the use of positive and upbeat imagery. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The unique use of humorous images has seen the competition gain a global following, and offers a new approach to building conservation awareness. </span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The photographs “transcend cultures and ages to bring a smile to everyone’s face”, through these hilarious animal moments that would otherwise remain unseen. </span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image credit: Comedy Wildlife Awards</span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Photography credits:</span></em></p> <ol> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Monkey riding a giraffe: Dirk Jan Steehouwer</span></em></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Pigeon blinded by a leaf: John Speirs</span></em></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Argumentative polar bears: Cheryl Strahl</span></em></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Surprised baby otter: Chee Kee Teo</span></em></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Excitable fish: Chi Han Lin</span></em></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Stunned eagle: Arthur Trevino</span></em></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Bear lazing in the dirt: Wenona Suydam</span></em></li> <li style="font-weight: 400;" aria-level="1"><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Dancing monkeys: Sarosh Lodhi</span></em></li> </ol>

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Jean Smart leads new comedy series

<p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The award-winning actress stars in the new US comedy </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hacks</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, one of the most talked about new shows this year.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Starring Smart as the legendary Las Vegas comedian, Deborah Vance, the series follows the dark mentorship which develops between her and young writer Ava (Hannah Einbinder).</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The show’s cast also includes Carl Clemons Hopkins (</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hamilton</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">) as Deborah’s chief operating officer, and guest appearances from Kaitlin Olson (</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Coyote Ugly</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">), Christopher McDonald (</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Thelma &amp; Louise</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">), and Rose Abdoo (</span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Gilmore Girls</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">).</span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Hacks</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> was created by the trio behind </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Broad City</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">, with critics raving about its originality and humour.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">The 69-year-old has shared her enthusiasm about the role, which allows her full skill and talent to shine through.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“I read it, and I just said, ‘This has it all. This could be so great’,” she told the </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Los Angeles Times</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;"> of the script.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“It’s so funny, and it’s balanced with these dark moments. If I could pick out a dozen of my favourite parts I’ve ever done, on stage or in front of the camera, and put them in the body of one person, I feel like [Deborah] is an amalgam of a lot of my favourite things.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">Smart’s co-star, Einbinder, is a stand-up comedian and a newcomer to scripted TV.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">In a show of comradery, Smart helped ease Einbinder’s nerves ahead of her final audition according to an interview she did with </span><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Glamour</span></em><span style="font-weight: 400;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“The last stage of the audition was the screen test with Jean," Einbinder said. "I was really nervous going in, but Jean called me the night before and said, ‘I know it may feel a little surgical tomorrow with all the COVID precautions, but I just want to let you know, I think you’re really great. I think we’re going to have a lot of fun’."</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;">“She was just so classy and cool. I credit a lot of our chemistry to Jean being so warm.”</span></p> <p><span style="font-weight: 400;"><em>Hacks</em> </span><span style="font-weight: 400;">premieres to Australian audiences on Friday, August 6, with all 10 episodes available.</span><span style="font-weight: 400;"></span></p> <p><em><span style="font-weight: 400;">Image: Stan</span></em></p>

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