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"Force of nature": Tributes flow for Shannen Doherty

<p>Shannen Doherty has passed away aged 53. </p> <p>The beloved actress, known for her roles on <em>Little House on the Prairie</em>, <em>Charmed</em> and <em>90210</em>, died over the weekend following a nine-year battle with breast cancer. </p> <p>Doherty's death was confirmed by her publicist, Leslie Sloane, who said in a statement: "It is with a heavy heart that I confirm the passing of actress Shannen Doherty. On Saturday, July 13, she lost her battle with cancer after many years of fighting the disease."</p> <p>"The devoted daughter, sister, aunt and friend was surrounded by her loved ones as well as her dog, Bowie. The family asks for their privacy at this time so they can grieve in peace."</p> <p>Tributes have flowed in for Doherty from friends, co-stars and loved ones, who have remembered her as a "force of nature". </p> <p>"Shannen Doherty had the heart of a lion," fellow<em> Charmed </em>co-star Rose McGowan wrote in a tribute shared to Instagram. </p> <p>"Passion for craft is often mislabelled as trouble. Shannen was passion," McGowan continued.</p> <p>"I met her in the 90s and was awed. Getting to really know her later in life, a beautiful gift. This woman fought to live," McGowan added, before praising Doherty's work ethic which was "inspiring to the end".</p> <p>"Shannen's great love for directing, for acting, Holly [Marie Combs], her friends, her parents, dog and her beloved fans was legendary."</p> <p>"Our lives had been intertwined in a unique way. We laughed at dark forces who wanted us to hate each other, instead we chose love and respect. A soft-hearted badass as there ever was. A force of energy that will live forever in hearts," McGowan wrote. </p> <p>"Rest now warrior, we will never forget you dear sister."</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C9aLxGVvLH_/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/reel/C9aLxGVvLH_/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Rose McGowan (@rosemcgowan)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Fellow Charmed co-star Alyssa Milano - who Doherty had a complicated relationship with - also paid tribute to her via a statement shared with<em> People</em>. </p> <p>"It's no secret that Shannen and I had a complicated relationship, but at its core was someone I deeply respected and was in awe of," Milano wrote.</p> <p>"She was a talented actress, beloved by many and the world is less without her. My condolences to all who loved her," she concluded.</p> <p>Meanwhile, actress Olivia Munn, who bonded with Doherty over their shared breast cancer battle, shared a lengthy tribute to her Instagram story. </p> <p>"I am absolutely heartbroken over the passing of Shannen Doherty. When I was first diagnosed with breast cancer I remembered how she bravely let the world into her journey and reached out to her," Munn wrote.</p> <p>"We became instant friends – which I honestly couldn't comprehend at times because watching her on 90210 was everything to me when I was 10."</p> <p>"Looking back on the last text she sent me just a couple months ago, she asked how I was doing and if she could do anything for me.... True to form, Shannen was offering her support even though she was in the final stages of fighting this horrific disease," Munn continued.</p> <p>"Cancer is really f---ing scary and Shannen faced it with such dignity, strength and grace.</p> <p>"I'm sending all my love to her mother who was her best friend, hero and champion every step of the way. Fly so high, my friend 💔💔💔💔".</p> <p>Doherty's <em>Beverly Hills</em> and <em>90210 </em>co-star Jason Priestly described her as a  "force of nature" in an Instagram post. </p> <p>"I will miss her," he wrote.</p> <p>"Sending love and light to her family in this dark time."</p> <p>"Shocked and saddened by news of Shannen Doherty's death," Carol Potter, who played her on-screen mum in <em>90210</em>, wrote on Instagram.</p> <p>"What a journey she has been on! Gone too soon. Throughout, she stayed true to herself and gave us an example of courage and perseverance in facing her own death. May she rest in peace.❤️🙏"</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p> <p> </p>

Caring

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Dr Chris Brown recalls "dramatic" personal renovation disaster

<p><em>Dream Home</em> host Dr Chris Brown has revealed his own renovation fail on the latest episode of the show. </p> <p>The vet turned TV star has taken on a new role where he guides six teams of aspiring renovators through the joys — and pitfalls — of house remodelling in the new Channel 7 reality show. </p> <p>Speaking to 7NEWS, the star recalled the terrifying moment his home nearly fell in on itself when he was trying to build a garage. </p> <p>“On my first renovation, I decided I needed a garage underneath my house,” he said, adding that he had council approval for the renovation. </p> <p>“With a couple of tradies, we went about digging out the garage underneath the house, in the sand.</p> <p>“We just kept on digging, digging, digging, until a rather large sound indicated the house was about to fall into the hole!</p> <p>“So that’s about as dramatic as it as it gets.</p> <p>“To have your house sort of falling in on itself, that was a pretty big learning curve.”</p> <p>He said that the problem was solved "very quickly" with a lot of underpinning and structural support. </p> <p>“A lot of those steel support posts that you can sort of wind up and down, they went in, and thankfully the house didn’t fold in half,” he said, laughing at the situation. </p> <p>He added that unexpected situations like this are what make renovation shows so appealing as "there’s so much natural drama, you don’t have to fake anything." </p> <p>“Choices have to be made, and it’s either the right way or the wrong way, and you only really discover that as you go along," he added. </p> <p>“Sometimes it’s too late to turn back once you realise you’ve made a terrible mistake.”</p> <p>Chris added that his role on the show is almost as a"coach" to the pairs, supporting them through the renovation challenges, and helping them get to the finish line. </p> <p>“What these couples are going through, and just how much they put on the line to get these renovations done, is quite inspiring and quite uplifting and but also thoroughly entertaining,” he said. </p> <p><em>Image: Seven</em></p>

Real Estate

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How to fall asleep without sleeping pills: 7 natural sleep aids that actually work

<p>It’s 3am and you’re suddenly wide awake. Try these seven science-backed strategies to fall back to sleep fast.</p> <p><strong>Give meditation a try </strong></p> <p>As a mindfulness coach, I’m very aware of the day-to-day anxieties and worries that can interfere with a good night’s sleep. One of the most effective natural sleep aids is a quick meditation session to ease yourself out of those stresses. If you’ve never meditated before, you’ll likely find the meditation interrupted by thoughts flashing through your mind.</p> <p>It’s important for you to know that this isn’t a failure on your part, and that you aren’t doing anything wrong. Thinking is just what the brain does, as naturally as lungs take in air. The point is to be non-judgmental yet aware of your thoughts, bodily experiences and breath, moment by moment.</p> <p><em>Sleep better, feel better! <a href="https://gaiam.innovations.com.au/p/gaiam-wellness/rollers-resistance/27-72435-gaiam-strengthen-stretch-kit?affiliate=GAIAM6O" target="_blank" rel="noopener">This Blackout Sleep Mask from Gaiam</a> will help you feel well rested and renewed. </em></p> <p><strong>Stop wanting to fall asleep</strong></p> <p>It’s counterintuitive, isn’t it? Sometimes trying too hard to do something is the very thing that prevents us from achieving it – and that’s never more true than when it comes to falling asleep. Desperately wanting to sleep will only stoke anxieties that will further stress your brain, essentially feeding it the message that it’s not safe to sleep.</p> <p>Throw in those worries about your to-do list at work the following day, and the whole thing can snowball into a panic attack. Try letting go of that feeling that you absolutely must sleep now, and observe your own anxieties for what they are without judgment. When you stop looking at sleep as a goal, you’ll find it easier to fall asleep.</p> <p><em>Before you climb into bed, set aside 10-15 minutes to help relax your body and mind, with <a href="https://gaiam.innovations.com.au/p/gaiam-wellness/restore-massage/27-73353-gaiam-wellness-acupressure-neck-back-pillow?affiliate=GAIAM60" target="_blank" rel="noopener">this wellness acupressure neck and back pillow from Gaiam</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>Start a journal </strong></p> <p>If you find yourself struggling to fall asleep, pick up a pen and paper (not your phone!), and start writing: simply scribble down an account of what’s going on inside your head. Although there’s no “right” way to journal, you might start by listing the events of your day, and from there, how those events and encounters made you feel.</p> <p>Building this structured picture of your thoughts may help you see that the problem that’s keeping you up at night, and is likely less overwhelming than you thought. Why my insistence on a pen and paper? First off, studies show the simple motor action that’s involved in the act of handwriting has a calming effect. Secondly, the light emitted by laptops and phones isn’t conducive to falling asleep.</p> <p><strong>Find yourself a "3am friend"</strong></p> <p>Some of us are lucky to have a ‘3am friend’, that close confidant you can call up in the wee hours knowing that they won’t hold it against you in the morning. Although it’s great to have someone to talk to when you want to fall asleep, it’s important that the conversation doesn’t just rehash the anxieties that are preventing you from catching shut-eye in the first place.</p> <p>Rather than using the call to seek solutions for those issues, talk about things that calm your nerves, or even have them assist you in deep breathing. It may sound silly, but doing a series of deep, relaxing breaths can help you let go of the troubles that are keeping you wide awake.</p> <p><strong>Take a warm shower</strong></p> <p>Taking a warm shower not only relaxes your muscles and soothes minor aches and pains, but it also raises your core body temperature. As soon as you step out of the shower, your body starts working at lowering that temperature, which is something that normally happens when you’re falling asleep naturally.</p> <p>(That’s why we always feel the need for a blanket when we sleep, no matter how warm it is!) By kick-starting that temperature-lowering process, you’re tricking your body into falling asleep fast.</p> <p><strong>Stretch yourself to sleep </strong></p> <p>Anxiety keeping you up? Research suggests mild stretching can help take the edge off and relax muscles that have become stiff and sore after a long day. We’re not talking intricate yoga poses or acrobatics here, either: Simple stretches like an overhead arm stretch and bending over to touch your toes should do the trick. Ramp up the relaxation potential with a soundtrack of ambient noise at a volume that’s just barely audible.</p> <p>There are plenty of white noise apps that are free to download, but soft music can work as well (so long as there are no lyrics). Just remember, if you’re using an electronic device to play these sleep-promoting sounds, make sure it’s placed screen-down so you’re not distracted by the light it emits.</p> <p><em>Stretching is healing, and this <a href="https://gaiam.innovations.com.au/p/gaiam-wellness/rollers-resistance/27-72435-gaiam-strengthen-stretch-kit?affiliate=GAIAM60" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Strengthen and Stretch Kit from Gaiam</a> is a great way to start. An on-line workout is also included to get you started.</em></p> <p><strong>Read (or listen!) to something new</strong></p> <p>When you’re struggling with insomnia, it might be tempting to pull an old favourite off the bookshelf. In reality, it’s better to read or listen to an audio book that covers a topic on which you know absolutely nothing. New information, while taking attention away from the stressors that are keeping you up at night, gives your brain enough of a workout to make it tire more quickly than when it’s engaged with familiar subjects and concepts.</p> <p>Again, if it’s an audio book or podcast you’re listening to, make sure the light-emitting side of the device is face down to keep the room as dark as possible. Darkness and warmth play an essential part in the production and maintenance of melatonin, the hormone that plays the central role falling asleep.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article by </em><em>Deepak Kashyap </em><em style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/conditions/sleep/how-to-fall-asleep-without-sleeping-pills-7-natural-sleep-aids-that-actually-work" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Body

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Woolies CEO quits after disaster interview

<p>Woolworths chief executive Brad Banducci has announced his retirement amidst a flurry of challenges facing the Australian supermarket behemoth. As the company grapples with a staggering loss and contends with allegations of price gouging and unfair dealings with suppliers, the announcement of Banducci's departure marks a significant shake-up at the top.</p> <p>The supermarket giant wasted no time in appointing a successor, promoting Amanda Bardwell to the coveted position after what was described as an "extensive international search process". Bardwell, a veteran of the company with 23 years of experience, currently leads WooliesX, a vital sub-division within Woolworths.</p> <p>Banducci's retirement comes hot on the heels of Woolworths' latest financial results, which revealed a substantial $781 million statutory loss. This loss was largely attributed to a $NZ1.6 billion ($1.5 billion) writedown in the value of its New Zealand grocery business and a $209 million reduction in the value of its stake in ASX-listed alcohol and hotels spin-off Endeavour. Despite these setbacks, Woolworths managed to announce a 2.5 per cent rise in half-year profit to $929 million, buoyed by a 4.4 per cent increase in revenue compared to the previous year.</p> <p>However, amidst these financial intricacies lies a more troubling narrative. Woolworths has found itself embroiled in allegations of price gouging and unfair practices with suppliers, casting a shadow over its operations. The spotlight intensified with the release of an ABC investigation featuring a contentious interview between Banducci and reporter Angus Grigg. The interview, part of a comprehensive examination of the Australian supermarket industry amid the ACCC's investigation into allegations of unfair pricing, saw Banducci visibly flustered and defensive.</p> <p>The program scrutinised how supermarkets profit from rising prices amid a cost of living crisis and included conversations with key industry figures, including Banducci and Coles boss Leah Weckert. Banducci's exchange with Grigg, particularly his dismissal of former ACCC head Rod Sims' remarks, underscored the tension surrounding the allegations. Banducci's subsequent request to edit his comments mid-interview, followed by a brief exit to confer with his PR team, highlighted the sensitivity of the issue.</p> <p>Grigg, reflecting on the incident, described Banducci's reaction as "pretty startling", while pointing out that the lack of scrutiny faced by supermarket executives over the years was very significant. </p> <p><em>Images: ABC / Woolworths</em></p> <p> </p>

Retirement Life

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Spin cycle disaster: man puts winning Lotto ticket through the wash

<p>In a harrowing tale that's sure to wring out a chuckle or two, a man in his late 20s from <span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">Belmont, Western Australia, </span><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">narrowly escaped laundering his way out of a $2.8 million windfall – after nearly sacrificing his winning lottery ticket to the treacherous depths of his washing machine.</span></p> <p>It all started innocently enough at the Here's Luck Lottery Centre in Belmont Forum, where our hero – who very sensibly prefers to remain incognito – purchased what would turn out to be a life-changing ticket for the Saturday Lotto. Little did he know, his unassuming trousers would soon become the epicentre of a near-catastrophe.</p> <p>In a classic case of absentmindedness, our hero forgot to take his ticket out of his pants pocket before succumbing to the siren song of laundry day.</p> <p>"I forgot to take the ticket out of my trousers and put it in the washing machine," confessed the forgetful winner. "After five minutes I realised and stopped the washing machine to grab the ticket, fortunately, it was safe."</p> <p>Indeed, it was a race against the spin cycle as the man scrambled to rescue his potential fortune from a soapy demise. "I couldn’t think, I couldn’t sleep, I am still processing the win," he admitted with palpable relief.</p> <p>But our protagonist emerged victorious from this sudsy saga, managing to salvage his ticket just in the nick of time. With a sigh of relief, he made his way to Lotterywest HQ to claim his well-deserved prize.</p> <p>Lotterywest spokesman James Mooney chimed in, highlighting the importance of registering tickets to avoid potential mishaps of this magnitude. "For this player, it all came out of the wash okay, but it’s a reminder for players to register their ticket to prevent what could be a multimillion-dollar mistake," he wisely advised.</p> <p><em>Image: Getty</em></p>

Money & Banking

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Taste depends on nature and nurture. Here are 7 ways you can learn to enjoy foods you don’t like

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nicholas-archer-181464">Nicholas Archer</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/csiro-1035">CSIRO</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/astrid-poelman-1481227">Astrid Poelman</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/csiro-1035">CSIRO</a></em></p> <p>You’re out for dinner with a bunch of friends, one of whom orders pizza with anchovies and olives to share, but you hate olives and anchovies! Do you pipe up with your preferred choice – Hawaiian – or stay quiet?</p> <p>This scene plays out every day around the world. Some people ferociously defend their personal tastes. But many would rather expand their palate, and not have to rock the boat the next time someone in their friend group orders pizza.</p> <p>Is it possible to train your tastebuds to enjoy foods you previously didn’t, like training a muscle at the gym?</p> <h2>What determines ‘taste’?</h2> <p>Taste is a complex system we evolved to help us navigate the environment. It helps us select foods with nutritional value and reject anything potentially harmful.</p> <p>Foods are made up of different compounds, including nutrients (such as proteins, sugars and fats) and <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2P_0HGRWgXw">aromas</a> that are detected by sensors in the mouth and nose. These sensors create the <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZn2PMUWO-Y">flavour of food</a>. While taste is what the tastebuds on your tongue pick up, flavour is the combination of how something smells and tastes. Together with texture, appearance and sound, these senses collectively influence your food preferences.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/MZn2PMUWO-Y?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe><figcaption><span class="caption">Flavour is the overall impression you get when eating.</span></figcaption></figure> <p>Many factors influence food preferences, including age, genetics and environment. We each live in our own sensory world and no two people will have the same <a href="https://theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-do-some-people-find-some-foods-yummy-but-others-find-the-same-foods-yucky-77671">experience while eating</a>.</p> <p>Food preferences also change with age. Research has found young children have a <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24452237/">natural preference</a> for sweet and salty tastes and a dislike of bitter tastes. As they grow older their ability to like bitter foods grows.</p> <p>Emerging evidence shows bacteria in saliva can also produce enzymes that influence the taste of foods. For instance, saliva has been shown to cause the release of sulphur aromas in cauliflower. The <a href="https://www.acs.org/pressroom/presspacs/2021/acs-presspac-september-22-2021/childrens-dislike-of-cauliflower-broccoli-could-be-written-in-their-microbiome.html">more sulphur that is produced</a>, the less likely a kid is to enjoy the taste of cauliflower.</p> <h2>Nature versus nurture</h2> <p>Both genetics and the environment play a crucial role in determining food preferences. Twin studies estimate genetics have a moderate influence on food preferences (between 32% and 54%, depending on the food type) in <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000291652305027X?via%3Dihub">children</a>, <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27385609/">adolescents</a> and <a href="https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/twin-research-and-human-genetics/article/dietary-patterns-and-heritability-of-food-choice-in-a-uk-female-twin-cohort/8507AAF01330C599BAC62BCC0EF4CF06">adults</a>.</p> <p>However, since our cultural environment and the foods we’re exposed to also shape our preferences, these <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24452237/">preferences are learned</a> to a large degree.</p> <p>A lot of this learning takes place during childhood, at home and other places we eat. This isn’t textbook learning. <a href="https://www.cabidigitallibrary.org/doi/10.1079/9780851990323.0093">It’s learning</a> by experiencing (eating), which typically leads to increased liking of the food – or by watching what others do (modelling), which can lead to both positive or negative associations.</p> <p><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S000291652305027X?via%3Dihub">Research</a> has shown how environmental influences on food preferences change between childhood and adulthood. For children, the main factor is the home environment, which makes sense as kids are more likely to be influenced by foods prepared and eaten at home. Environmental factors influencing adults and adolescents are more varied.</p> <h2>The process of ‘acquiring’ taste</h2> <p>Coffee and beer are good examples of bitter foods people “acquire” a taste for as they grow up. The ability to overcome the dislike of these is largely due to:</p> <ul> <li> <p>the social context in which they’re consumed. For example, in many countries they may be associated with passage into adulthood.</p> </li> <li> <p>the physiological effects of the compounds they contain – caffeine in coffee and alcohol in beer. Many people find these effects desirable.</p> </li> </ul> <p>But what about acquiring a taste for foods that don’t provide such desirable feelings, but which are good for you, such as kale or fatty fish? Is it possible to gain an acceptance for these?</p> <p>Here are some strategies that can help you learn to enjoy foods you currently don’t:</p> <ol> <li> <p>eat, and keep eating. Only a small portion is needed to build a liking for a specific taste over time. It may take 10–15 attempts or more before you can say you “like” the food.</p> </li> <li> <p><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0950329302001106">mask bitterness</a> by eating it with other foods or ingredients that contain salt or sugar. For instance, you can pair bitter rocket with a sweet salad dressing.</p> </li> <li> <p>eat it repeatedly in a positive context. That could mean eating it after playing your favourite sport or with people you like. Alternatively, you could eat it with foods you already enjoy; if it’s a specific vegetable, try pairing it with your favourite protein.</p> </li> <li> <p>eat it when you’re hungry. In a hungry state you’ll be more willing to accept a taste you might not appreciate on a full stomach.</p> </li> <li> <p>remind yourself why you want to enjoy this food. You may be changing your diet for health reasons, or because you’ve moved countries and are struggling with the local cuisine. Your reason will help motivate you.</p> </li> <li> <p>start young (if possible). It’s easier for children to learn to like new foods as their tastes are less established.</p> </li> <li> <p>remember: the more foods you like, the easier it’ll become to learn to like others.</p> </li> </ol> <p>A balanced and varied diet is essential for good health. <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0195666315003438?ref=pdf_download&amp;fr=RR-2&amp;rr=82a5fd5069821f63">Picky eating</a> can become a problem if it leads to vitamin and mineral deficiencies – especially if you’re avoiding entire food groups, such as vegetables. At the same time, eating too many tasty but energy-dense foods can increase your risk of chronic disease, including obesity.</p> <p>Understanding how your food preferences have formed, and how they can evolve, is a first step to getting on the path of healthier eating.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/215999/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/nicholas-archer-181464"><em>Nicholas Archer</em></a><em>, Research Scientist, Sensory, Flavour and Consumer Sciences, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/csiro-1035">CSIRO</a> and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/astrid-poelman-1481227">Astrid Poelman</a>, Principal Researcher, Public Health &amp; Wellbeing Group, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/csiro-1035">CSIRO</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Shutterstock</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/taste-depends-on-nature-and-nurture-here-are-7-ways-you-can-learn-to-enjoy-foods-you-dont-like-215999">original article</a>.</em></p>

Food & Wine

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“Bloody ripper of a meteor” lights up Perth skies

<p>A few lucky Western Australians have witnessed the moment a bright green meteor flashed brightly across the state's South West.</p> <p>The meteor was the size of a cricket ball and had a 200-kilometre-long tail, which was first spotted at around 8.50pm on Wednesday after entering the atmosphere over Pemberton.</p> <p>The rare spectacle, which only happens around three times a year, lasted about five seconds and travelled at a speed of 30 km/h  before the mix of iron, rock and ice dissolved over the Southern Ocean. </p> <p>“Iron meteors give off that beautiful green glow,” Perth Observatory spokesperson Matt Woods told <em>7NEWS</em>.</p> <p>Experts also said that this was triggered by the outer layer of the meteor melting because of intense friction.</p> <p>The observatory said that the meteor had set off a flood of messages, emails and calls from the people that witnessed the natural phenomenon. </p> <p>“That was a bloody ripper of a meteor tonight,” they posted on their Facebook page. </p> <p>One witness said that you had to see it with your own eyes to fully appreciate its beauty. </p> <p>“I will say it was way better in person. It looked almost rainbow-coloured. Just spectacular,” commented one person. </p> <p>“Did anyone just see a bright streak of light shooting from the sky? It was too bright to be a shooting star,” another person shared on social media. </p> <p>“It was massive and extremely bright.”</p> <p><em>Image: 7NEWS</em></p> <p> </p>

Domestic Travel

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Extraordinary snaps from around the world for the Nature Photographer of the Year awards

<p>Every year, the <a href="https://naturephotographeroftheyear.com" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Nature Photographer of the Year</a> awards showcase the best that Mother Nature has to offer. </p> <p>For the 2023 competition, photographers from all around the world have captured beautiful snaps of wildlife in their natural habitat, picturesque landscapes and much more. </p> <p>The annual competition is an initiative of Nature Talks, the organisation responsible for the Nature Talks Photo Festival that takes place in the Netherlands. </p> <p>This year, the competition saw entrant from South Africa, Germany, the USA, England, Finland, France, Luxembourg and many more corners of the globe. </p> <p>This year's winner is a photographer hailing from Canada, Jacquie Matechuk, who stole the show with her photo of the Spectacled Bear. </p> <p>Chairman Marco Gaiotti explained why her photo was chosen as the winner, "The Spanish moss hanging from this centuries-old fig tree gives an incredible sense of three-dimensionality while the soft light filtering through the colours highlights the profound connection between species and habitat in this image."</p> <p>"Finally, the pose of this spectacled bear fits perfectly into the texture of the photograph. Congratulations to Jacquie Matechuk for this outstanding photograph of the spectacled bear."</p> <p><em>All image credits: Nature Photographer of the Year</em></p>

International Travel

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6 natural remedies for tinnitus

<p>As anyone who’s ever experienced will agree, tinnitus is about as fun as repeatedly stubbing your big toe. But the good news is needn’t suffer in silence. There is a range of natural remedies available, and while these won’t eliminate tinnitus completely they may be used to help manage the condition.</p> <p>Before we go through some of the natural remedies, it might be useful to take a moment to understand what tinnitus actually is. Tinnitus is a physical condition that is usually caused by a fault in the hearing system where someone experiences noises or ringing in their ears when there is no external noise presents. It’s important to know tinnitus is symptom, and not a disease. It can be caused by a variety of things including exposure to loud noises, earwax blockages, ear-bone changes and age-related hearing lost. Approximately one in five Australians suffer from tinnitus.</p> <p><strong>1. Gingko biloba</strong></p> <p>Across the board, gingko biloba is generally considered one of the stronger herbal remedies for tinnitus. This widely available herbal remedy is often used to improve blood circulation, which can reduce the ringing sensation and improve the function of your ears. It also contains handy antibacterial and antifungal properties that can help eliminate any existing infections.</p> <p><strong>2. Apple cider vinegar</strong></p> <p>Apple cider vinegar provides a particularly useful daily tonic to help reduce the effects of tinnitus. A natural antifungal and anti-inflammatory agent, apple cider vinegar also works to alkalize your body and help rebalance your internal levels. Again, this remedy is quite helpful when it comes to getting rid of any underlying infections or fungus that may be contributing to your tinnitus.</p> <p><strong>3. Alpha lipoic acid</strong></p> <p>Alpha lipoic acid provides tinnitus sufferers with another handy supplement that can help minimise the effects of this condition. Functioning as an antioxidant, this vitamin-like chemical is known to help treat cell damage and restore natural vitamin levels in your body. Alpha lipoic acid has also been known to help improve neuron function and conduction, which may be contributing factors.</p> <p><strong>4. Holy basil</strong></p> <p>Here’s another natural remedy for treating tinnitus. Holy basil is known to contain a range of antibacterial properties and can be used to help kill the bacteria that may be contributing to the problem. In addition, holy basil can also be used as a way to provide you with relief from more severe forms of ear pain. It won’t solve the problem, but it will make it easier to manage.</p> <p><strong>5. Onions and garlic</strong></p> <p>While they might not make your breath smell the best on a hot date, onions and garlic have been used in the past to provide relief for tinnitus sufferers. Onions contain medicinal and antibacterial properties to help fight infections, while garlic can help reduce inflammation and improve blood circulation, which is particularly useful for tinnitus that is caused by high altitudes.</p> <p><strong>6. Saline solution</strong></p> <p>Here’s another nifty way to treat tinnitus naturally. Saline solution can help clear any blocked nasal passages and ease the pressure caused by excessive fluids that are building up in your sinuses. This simple remedy is a great way to provide effective relief from particular forms of tinnitus. </p> <p>So there you go, six handy ways to help relive yourself of the effects of tinnitus. Ultimately we would recommend that you go to a doctor and get a proper diagnosis if you happen to be suffering from tinnitus, but at the very least it’s handy to know that these natural remedies are around.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Body

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Our planet is burning in unexpected ways - here’s how we can protect people and nature

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/luke-kelly-159658">Luke Kelly</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/david-bowman-4397">David Bowman</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-tasmania-888">University of Tasmania</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ella-plumanns-pouton-1470045">Ella Plumanns Pouton</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/grant-williamson-109967">Grant Williamson</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-tasmania-888">University of Tasmania</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michael-shawn-fletcher-99786">Michael-Shawn Fletcher</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p>People have been using fire for millennia. It is a vital part of many ecosystems and cultures. Yet human activities in the current era, sometimes called the “<a href="https://theconversation.com/did-the-anthropocene-start-in-1950-or-much-earlier-heres-why-debate-over-our-world-changing-impact-matters-209869">Anthropocene</a>”, are reshaping patterns of fire across the planet.</p> <p><a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-environ-120220-055357">In our new research</a>, published in the Annual Review of Environment and Resources, we used satellite data to create global maps of where and how fires are burning. We calculated about 3.98 million square kilometres of Earth’s land surface burns each year. We also examined research spanning archaeology, climatology, ecology, Indigenous knowledge and paleoecology, to better understand the causes and consequences of fires.</p> <p>Our international team found strong evidence fires are burning in unexpected places, at unusual times and in rarely observed ways. These changes in fire patterns are threatening human lives and modifying ecosystems.</p> <p>But the future does not have to be bleak. There are many opportunities to apply knowledge and practice of fire to benefit people and nature.</p> <h2>Here’s how fire patterns are changing</h2> <p>Exploring multiple approaches and scales enables a deeper understanding of where, when and how fires burn.</p> <p>Satellite data provide evidence of changes in fire patterns at a global scale. <a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2020RG000726">Annual fire season length</a> increased by 14 days from 1979 to 2020 and <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-04325-1">night fires</a>, which indicate fires that cannot be quickly controlled, increased in intensity by 7.2% from 2003 to 2020.</p> <p>Other changes are apparent only when we look at data from particular regions. An increase in fire size and the frequency of large fires has recently been observed in <a href="https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.2103135118">forests and woodlands of the western United States</a>. Meanwhile fire-dependent grasslands and savannahs across <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/gcb.14711">Africa</a> and <a href="https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1029/2019GL082327">Brazil</a> have experienced reductions in fire frequency.</p> <p>It’s also important to consider the timescale and type of fire when interpreting changes. In Australia, <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-021-27225-4">satellite records show</a> the frequency of very large forest fires has increased over the past four decades. At longer time scales, <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s13280-020-01339-3">charcoal and pollen records</a> indicate the frequency of low-intensity fires <a href="https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fee.2395">decreased in parts of southeastern Australia</a> following British colonisation in 1788.</p> <h2>Changes in fire affect air, land and water</h2> <p>Many animals and plants have evolved strategies that enable them to thrive under particular fire patterns. This means changes to fire characteristics can <a href="https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abb0355">harm populations and ecosystems</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://conbio.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/conl.12905">Large and intense fires</a> are reducing the available forest habitat preferred by the greater glider. But a <a href="https://theconversation.com/research-reveals-fire-is-pushing-88-of-australias-threatened-land-mammals-closer-to-extinction-185965">lack of fire can be problematic too</a>. Threatened species of native rodents can benefit from food resources and habitats that flourish shortly after fire.</p> <p>There is evidence that emissions from recent fires are already modifying the atmosphere. The historically exceptional 2019–20 Australian wildfires produced <a href="https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.abe1415#:%7E:text=Intense%2C%20widespread%20bushfires%20in%20Australia,from%20a%20moderate%20volcanic%20eruption.">record-breaking levels of aerosols</a> over the Southern Hemisphere, as well as substantial carbon emissions.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41893-020-00610-5">wildfire smoke-related health costs</a> of the 2019–20 wildfires in Australia included an estimated 429 smoke-related premature deaths as well as 3,230 hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory disorders.</p> <p>Changes in fire patterns are modifying water cycles, too. In the western United States, <a href="https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2009717118">fires are reaching higher elevations</a> and having strong impacts on <a href="https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2200333119">snow</a> and water availability.</p> <p>New studies are revealing how the air, land and water that support life on Earth are connected by fires. Smoke plumes from the 2019–20 Australian wildfires transported nutrients to the Southern Ocean, resulting in <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03805-8">widespread phytoplankton blooms</a>.</p> <h2>Humans are responsible for the changes</h2> <p>Human drivers such as climate change, land use, fire use and suppression, and transportation and extinction of species <a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-environ-120220-055357">are causing shifts in fire patterns</a>.</p> <p>Increasing global temperatures and more frequent heatwaves and droughts increase the likelihood of fire by promoting hot, dry and windy conditions. A pattern of extreme fire weather outside of natural climate variation is already emerging in <a href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.15388">North America</a>, <a href="https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10584-014-1183-3">southern Europe</a> and <a href="https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1088/1748-9326/ac1e3a/meta">the Amazon basin</a>.</p> <p>Humans modify fire regimes by changing land use for agricultural, forestry and urban purposes. Until recent decades, large fires in tropical forests were uncommon. But <a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-021-03876-7">deforestation fires</a> used to clear primary forest for agriculture often promotes more frequent and intense uncontrolled fires.</p> <p>Humans have transported plants and animals across the globe, resulting in novel mixes of species that modify fuels and fire regimes. In many parts of the world, <a href="https://www.pnas.org/doi/abs/10.1073/pnas.1908253116">invasive grasses</a> have increased flammability and fire activity.</p> <p>Social and economic changes propel these drivers. Colonisation by Europeans and the displacement of Indigenous peoples and their skilful use of fire has been linked with fire changes in <a href="https://esajournals.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/fee.2395">Australia</a>, <a href="https://www.pnas.org/doi/10.1073/pnas.2116264119">North America</a> and <a href="https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rstb.2015.0174">South America</a>.</p> <h2>Using knowledge and practice of fire to achieve sustainability goals</h2> <p><a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-environ-120220-055357">The pace and scale of these changes</a> represent challenges to humanity, but knowledge and practice of fire can help to achieve sustainability goals.</p> <p>This includes:</p> <ul> <li><a href="https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rstb.2015.0174">good health and wellbeing</a>, by supporting community-owned solutions and fire practices that increase social cohesion and health</li> <li><a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0301479718314658">sustainable cities and communities</a>, by designing green firebreaks and mixed-use areas with low fuels, strategically located in the landscape</li> <li><a href="https://www.science.org/doi/10.1126/science.aam7672">life on land</a>, by tailoring use of fire to promote and restore species and ecosystems</li> <li><a href="https://www.nature.com/articles/s41561-021-00867-1">climate action</a>, by applying low-intensity fire to promote the stability of soil organic matter and increase carbon storage</li> <li><a href="https://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/18/8/3921">reduced inequalities</a>, by allocating resources before, during, and after wildfires to at-risk communities and residents.</li> </ul> <p>As the world changes, society as a whole needs to keep learning about the interplay between people and fire.</p> <p>A deep understanding of fire is essential for achieving a sustainable future – in other words, <a href="https://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-environ-120220-055357">a better Anthropocene</a>.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/213215/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/luke-kelly-159658"><em>Luke Kelly</em></a><em>, Associate Professor in Quantitative Ecology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/david-bowman-4397">David Bowman</a>, Professor of Pyrogeography and Fire Science, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-tasmania-888">University of Tasmania</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/ella-plumanns-pouton-1470045">Ella Plumanns Pouton</a>, PhD candidate, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a>; <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/grant-williamson-109967">Grant Williamson</a>, Research Fellow in Environmental Science, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/university-of-tasmania-888">University of Tasmania</a>, and <a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/michael-shawn-fletcher-99786">Michael-Shawn Fletcher</a>, Professor in Biogeography, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/the-university-of-melbourne-722">The University of Melbourne</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/our-planet-is-burning-in-unexpected-ways-heres-how-we-can-protect-people-and-nature-213215">original article</a>.</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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"Absolute f***ing disaster": The Block presenter slams former contestants

<p>Shelley Craft has ripped into two former contestants of <em>The Block</em>, saying the team was an "absolute f***ing disaster".</p> <p>The Block presenter was chatting candidly about the formula of the show on Hit radio show <em>Breakfast with Maz &amp; Matty</em>, where she described what she thought was the ultimate pairing for a team to partake in the renovation show. </p> <p>Shelley was asked about the calibre of contestants on the upcoming season, admitting that the show’s producers generally cast for “characters,” rather than previous experience.</p> <p>“I always thought the best team would be an accountant and an HR manager, because you have to be able to manage your money and manage your trades,” she said, revealing her own personal pick for a successful team. </p> <p>“[But] we sort of had that last year and it was an absolute f***ing disaster. That was the worst team that there is, it’s not the recipe!” she continued, to laughter from the radio hosts. </p> <p>“We’re really after great people that are happy to give it everything they’ve got, and we’ve got five teams this year who are ready to give it a red hot crack.”</p> <p>The “disaster” Craft is referring to is last year’s most controversial couple, lawyer-turned actor Sharon and her accountant husband Ankur, who copped a fierce backlash from viewers over their apparent negative attitudes while filming <em>The Block</em>.</p> <p>The couple repeatedly clashed with their builders, foremen Keith and Dan and host Scott Cam, and also declared on camera numerous times that they wished they’d never signed up to do the show. </p> <p>The couple even had their finances frozen by Scott Cam due to their apparent inability to manage their budget during the intense renovation project.</p> <p>Sharon and Ankur later said they felt “ambushed” and were upset at how they’d been portrayed on the show, prompting Cam to later say in an interview that he thought the couple had “made [the experience] harder” on themselves than it needed to be.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images </em></p>

TV

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6 cruise ship disasters

<p>While a cruise nowadays is a safe way to explore the world in consummate luxury, in the early days catching a cruise ship was by no means smooth sailing. Here are 6 cruise ship disaster stories.</p> <p><strong>1. The Titanic</strong></p> <p>After colliding into an iceberg somewhere in the North Atlantic the “unsinkable” Titanic sank two miles to the bottom of the ocean. More than 1,500 lives were lost, with the disaster continuing to intrigue.</p> <p><strong>2. S.S. Eastland</strong></p> <p>In 1915 Western Electric hosted an employee picnic aboard the S.S Eastland on the Chicago River which took an unfortunate turn when the ship tipped over (while still at the dock!).</p> <p><strong>3. The Norwegian Dawn</strong></p> <p>In a journey between New York City and the Bahamas, The Norwegian Dawn was hit by a 70-foot wave that ended up flooding 62 cabins. Thankfully only two people suffered minor injuries. </p> <p><strong>4. The Splendor</strong></p> <p>On a seven-day cruise to Mexico the engine room of the Splendor caught fire. The cruise was shortened to three days, and 3,299 passengers didn’t have access to toilets for 13 hours.</p> <p><strong>5. The Costa Concordia</strong></p> <p>The Costa Concordia unfortunately sank in 2012, after the ship hit shallow seas off the coast of Italy. Navy divers reportedly used explosives to access the inside of the ship, and managed to refloat the vessel to dismantle the wreckage. 32 lives were lost.</p> <p><strong>6. Carnival Conquest</strong></p> <p>Well, we’re just going to have to take their word for it, but apparently the Carnival Conquest ship is haunted by a tall man in a trench coat, who appears in the middle of the night. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Cruising

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Disaster, opulence, and the merciless ocean: why the Titanic disaster continues to enthral

<p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kristie-patricia-flannery-1220337">Kristie Patricia Flannery</a>, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/australian-catholic-university-747">Australian Catholic University</a></em></p> <p>The question on many minds this week is why did some of the world’s richest men risk death to venture to the bottom of the sea in a cold and cramped <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2023/06/20/us/oceangate-titanic-missing-submersible.html">“experimental” submersible</a> for a chance to glimpse the wreck of the Titanic?</p> <p>The “unsinkable” ship that sunk on its maiden voyage across the Atlantic in 1912 after colliding with an iceberg is arguably the world’s most well-known boat. The Titanic is recognisable to more of the world’s population than, say, the Niña, the Pinta, and the Santa Maria (Christopher Colombus’s fleet that launched the Spanish conquest of the Americas), or Captain Cook’s HMS Endeavour (the tall ship that set in motion the British conquest of Australia). The Endeavour’s long-forgotten wreck was found scuttled off the coast of Rhode Island <a href="https://theconversation.com/has-captain-cooks-ship-endeavour-been-found-debate-rages-but-heres-whats-usually-involved-in-identifying-a-shipwreck-176363">just last year</a>.</p> <p>The Titanic’s maiden voyage and calamitous end was one of the biggest news stories of 1912, and has continued to fascinate us ever since. The disaster inspired songs and multiple films in the twentieth century, including James Cameron’s 1997 epic romance, which long reigned as the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_highest-grossing_films#Timeline_of_highest-grossing_films">highest-grossing film of all time</a>. More recently, Titanic exhibitions that invite visitors to examine relics and <a href="https://titanicexhibition.com/nyc/#sec_instafeed">explore the ship’s recreated rooms have attracted huge crowds in New York, Seville and Hong Kong</a>.</p> <h2>Opulence and immigrants</h2> <p>There are two reasons why we are so drawn to the Titanic, and why the super-rich are apparently willing to part with their money and even risk their lives to catch a glimpse of its broken hull.</p> <p>The first is its opulence. The White Start Line that built the Titanic advertised the ship as the most luxurious ever to set sail. Wealthy passengers paid up to £870 for the privilege of occupying the Titanic’s most expensive and spacious first-class cabins. To put this 110-year-old money in perspective, when the first world war broke out in 1914, infantry soldiers in the British army were paid a basic salary of around £20 per year.</p> <p>Titanic movies and exhibitions are popular because audiences enjoy the voyeurism of gazing on the ship’s beautiful furnishings, the stunning clothes worn by its rich and beautiful passengers, and their elaborate meals in fancy restaurants. First-class passengers feasted on <a href="https://online.ucpress.edu/gastronomica/article-abstract/9/4/32/93511/The-Night-the-Good-Ship-Went-Down-Three-Fateful">multi-course dinners</a> with salmon, steak, and pâté de foie gras. Chefs in Australia and around the globe occasionally <a href="https://www.timeout.com/melbourne/things-to-do/titanic-dining-experience">recreate Titanic meals</a> for curious clients.</p> <p>Hundreds of poor immigrant passengers, represented by Jack (played by Leonardo DiCaprio) in Cameron’s movie, were also aboard the Titanic. They lived in crowded quarters and enjoyed less thrilling meals such as boiled beef and potatoes. If their ilk were the only people on board the Titanic, the ship would arguably have faded quickly from memory.</p> <figure><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/erAQ9LkftwA?wmode=transparent&amp;start=0" width="440" height="260" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></figure> <h2>The power of the sea</h2> <p>The fact the Titanic was touted as unsinkable also adds to its allure. The ship, whose name evoked its massive size, was engineered to cheat the ocean. When it departed England it symbolised man’s domination over nature. At the bottom of the Atlantic, it serves as a visceral reminder of the indomitable sea’s awesome power.</p> <p>The same two factors - the excess of the voyage, and its defeat by the sea – are now driving the current global interest in the Titan submersible disaster. Few world events garner so much attention, including statements from Downing Street and the White House, and live news blogs from The New York Times and the Guardian.</p> <p>The Titan, like the Titanic, commands our attention because of its obscenely rich passengers, who each reportedly paid US$250,000 (or between four and five times the average US salary) to visit the wreck of the famous ship that battled the sea and lost.</p> <p>And then there is the intriguing mystery and power of the sea. News outlets are publishing helpful graphics that try to teach our terrestrial brains to comprehend just how deep the ocean is, and how far below the sea’s surface the Titanic and possibly the Titan lie.</p> <h2>The limits of human knowledge</h2> <p>Last night I spied <a href="https://neal.fun/deep-sea/">Neal Argawal’s Deep Sea</a> website circulating on social media. The site allows viewers to scroll from the sea surface to the sea floor, diving down past images of various marine animals that inhabit different oceanic depths.</p> <p>At 114 metres is an orca, and 332m marks the the deepest depth a human has ever reached using SCUBA gear. It takes a lot of scrolling to descend to the Titanic almost 4,000m below the waves.</p> <p>Besides gross income inequality, reflecting on the Titan and the Titanic invite us to confront just how little we can “see” of the sea in this age of mass surveillance. Not even the powerful US navy, assisted by the Canadian, UK and French governments, can muster the resources and technology required to locate, let alone rescue, the missing submersible.</p> <p>As the sea seems to have swallowed yet another ship, we are reminded of limits of human knowledge and mastery over the ocean.<!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/208200/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><em><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/kristie-patricia-flannery-1220337">Kristie Patricia Flannery</a>, Research Fellow, Institute for Humanities and Social Sciences, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/australian-catholic-university-747">Australian Catholic University</a></em></p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/disaster-opulence-and-the-merciless-ocean-why-the-titanic-disaster-continues-to-enthral-208200">original article</a>.</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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Eerie link between OceanGate pilot and Titanic disaster

<p>A chilling link has been discovered between pilot Stockton Rush, who was onboard the OceanGate submersible, and the Titanic disaster in 1912. </p> <p>Mr Rush, who was at the helm of the vehicle bound for the Titanic wreckage, has a personal connection to two of the victims who were onboard the Titanic when it sank over 100 years ago. </p> <p>His wife, Wendy Rush, is the great-great-granddaughter of Isador Straus, who co-founded Macy’s department store, and Ida Straus, who were among the wealthiest people aboard the Titanic’s ill-fated transatlantic voyage, according to archived records obtained by the New York Times.</p> <p>The Strauses have long been remembered for their display of love and affection when the ocean liner hit the iceberg before infamously sinking in the North Atlantic, claiming the lives of more than 1500 people. </p> <p>Survivors of the disaster reported seeing Ida refuse a place on the lifeboats, which were reserved largely for women and children, and decided to stay onboard the sinking vessel with her husband of more than 40 years. </p> <p>Their tragic love story was depicted in James Cameron’s fictionalised version of the tragedy, his 1997 blockbuster <em>Titanic</em>, which features a scene showing an elderly couple holding on to each other in bed as waters rise around them. </p> <p>Wendy Rush is descended from one of the couple’s daughters, Minnie Strauss, who married Dr. Richard Weil in 1905, and their son, Richard Weil Jr., served as president of Macy’s New York,</p> <p>His son, Dr. Richard Weil III, is Wendy Rush’s father, Joan Adler, the executive director of the Straus Historical Society. </p> <p>Isador’s body was found at sea weeks after the Titanic sank, but his wife’s body was never recovered.</p> <p>Wendy also worked for OceanGate as their communications director, with her LinkedIn indicating she had been on several trips to the wreckage of the Titanic herself. </p> <p>The OceanGate submersible <a href="https://oversixty.com.au/news/news/surprising-cause-of-death-revealed-for-missing-titan-sub-crew" target="_blank" rel="noopener">reportedly imploded</a> hours after it went missing, with all five people on board believed to be dead. </p> <p><em>Image credits: OceanGate / Wikimedia</em></p>

Family & Pets

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13 homemade weed killers that work

<p>Don’t want to use chemicals on your garden? You don't have to! Mix up these handy helpers in the kitchen.</p> <p><strong>1. Boiling water</strong></p> <p>Homemade treatments don’t come much cheaper than this. Put the kettle on, boil a pot of water and then pour it straight over the weeds – just make sure to avoid any surrounding plants. This works especially for small weed coming up through the cracks in pavement or in brickwork.</p> <p><strong>2. White vinegar</strong></p> <p>Is there anything white vinegar can’t do? You can use regular old kitchen vinegar or get the heavy duty stuff from gardening stores. Spray directly onto the leaves of the weeds and watch them fade away.</p> <p><strong>3. Salt</strong></p> <p>Another kitchen staple that can do double duty in the garden. You can either sprinkle rock salt or basic table salt directly around garden beds where weeds usually appear or create a 3:1 solution of water and salt to spray onto the leaves.</p> <p><strong>4. Salt &amp; vinegar</strong></p> <p>Combine the two and you’ll get even better results! Mix a cup of table salt with a litre of vinegar, then brush directly onto the leaves of the weeds. It’ll kill anything it touches, so avoid other plants.</p> <p><strong>5. Vegetable oil</strong></p> <p>For bulbous weeds, like onion weed and oxalis, you can inject vegetable oil into the ground surrounding the bulbs. The oil will coat the bulbs so they suffocate and will then rot into the soil.</p> <p><strong>6. Cornmeal</strong></p> <p>This won't kill existing weeds but is great for preventing them from sprouting in the first place. Cornmeal is a pre-emergent, meaning it stops seeds from growing, so it’s best for using around established plants.</p> <p><strong>7. Clove or citrus oil</strong></p> <p>Mix 15 to 20 drops of clove or citrus oil with a litre of water and spray or brush directly onto the leaves. This works best on small, actively growing seedlings rather than more established weeds.</p> <p><strong>8. Rubbing alcohol</strong></p> <p>Grab that bottle of rubbing alcohol out of the bathroom cabinet and mix two tablespoons with a litre of water. Pour it into a spray bottle and spray directly onto the weeds. The alcohol removes moisture so the weeds will quickly dry out and die.</p> <p><strong>9. Baking soda</strong></p> <p>Baking soda is sodium bicarbonate (essentially a salt), so increases the salinity of the ground to a point where the weeds cannot survive. Use around a teaspoon per weed to cover the entire plant, especially the stem. It’s also great for weeds in cracks.</p> <p><strong>10. Bleach</strong></p> <p>This one couldn’t be simpler. Pour undiluted bleach straight over the top of mature weeds at the hottest part of the day, then let the sun do its work. You should be able to pull the dead weeds out the next day. Plus the bleach stays in the soil and prevents new growth.</p> <p><strong>11. Newspaper</strong></p> <p>Rather than killing the weeds, you can smother them with leftover newspaper. Lay down at least four sheets (though the thicker the better) and the lack of sun means the weeds won’t be able to sprout.</p> <p><strong>12. Mulch</strong></p> <p>Another one from the smothering camp, a good layer of mulch will keep your soil moist, healthy and weed-free. It also blocks out the sunshine weeds need to grow while leaving the surrounding plants untouched.</p> <p><strong>Elbow grease</strong></p> <p>Ok, so this isn’t actually something you put on the weeds, but it’s all you really need to get rid of most of them. Roll up your sleeves, put on some gloves and get pulling. Make sure you get the roots so they don’t grow straight back.</p> <p><em>Image: Unsplash / Josue Michel</em></p>

Home & Garden

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6 of the world’s most beautiful waterfalls

<p>They are one of the most stunning natural wonders on the planet, and these are six of the world’s most beautiful waterfalls.</p> <p><strong>1. Slejlandsfoss, Iceland</strong></p> <p>The land of fire and ice is full of incredible waterfalls, and (if we have to choose) Slejlandsfoss is our pick. It’s 65 metres high and the water tumbles off a grassy cliff, plunging in a huge arc to the ground below. It’s possible to walk right behind it, though you’ll definitely need a raincoat. In the right light, it will look like you’re standing right beneath a rainbow.</p> <p><strong>2. Iguassu Falls, Brazil and Argentina</strong></p> <p>Easily the world’s most beautiful border crossing, Iguassu Falls splits the countries of Brazil and Argentina along the River Iguassu. Though a relatively petite 82 metres in height, it’s the width of the falls that is truly breathtaking. They stretch for just under three kilometres, running along a series of lush forested cliffs and spraying an incredible amount of water into the sky.</p> <p><strong>3. Kaieteur Falls, Guyana</strong></p> <p>This one isn’t easy to get to (you’ll probably need to fly in on a very small plane), but it’s definitely worth the effort. Tucked away in the densely forested nation of Guyana in Central America, it’s absolutely huge, standing at 226 metres tall and averaging 663 cubic metres of water per second. Few falls in the world have this kind of raw power and it is quite a sight to behold.</p> <p><strong>4. Detian Falls, Vietnam and China</strong></p> <p>Straddling the border between these two nations, Detian Falls is the collective name for two converging waterfalls. It's one of the largest falls in Asia, but the waters are relatively gentle. Boat trips can take you right up to the cascade or you can ride a bamboo raft through to tranquil swimming holes. Just make sure you don’t go too far and end up in another country…</p> <p><strong>5. Parakunui Falls, New Zealand</strong></p> <p>This waterfall can’t compete in terms of size. It falls only 20 metres over three tiers of sloping rocks surrounded by ancient forest. It makes up for it in beauty and looks like something from a fairytale. You half expect pixies to dance out from under the leaves any minute. The walk through the forest to reach the falls is just as captivating.</p> <p><strong>6. Horizontal Falls, Western Australia</strong></p> <p>While not a true waterfall in the traditional sense, Horizontal Falls will still take your breath away. Described as one of the greatest wonders of the natural world, the falls run horizontally rather than vertically as seawater builds up in a channel between a narrow rocky gap. It’s best seen from the air, so splurge on a helicopter flight.</p> <p><em>Images: Getty, Shutterstock</em></p>

International Travel

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6 natural seasickness remedies

<p>Don’t let motion sickness stop you from enjoying a cruise. While there are lots of over-the-counter medications available to stop sea sickness, these natural remedies also work wonders.</p> <p><strong>1. Ginger</strong></p> <p>Ginger is loaded with health benefits but it has been proven to be highly effective in preventing seasickness. If you know you are prone to motion sickness, include ginger into your diet the days prior to leaving on your cruise and while you are out at sea. Drinking ginger tea is an easy way to incorporate the powerful herb into your diet.</p> <p><strong>2. Herbal tea</strong></p> <p>Herbal tea is a great beverage that will help settle your stomach and prevent vomiting that is caused by seasickness. Herbal teas are also packed with antioxidants which are effective anti-ageing agents and they also improve digestion.</p> <p><strong>3. Apple juice</strong></p> <p>Drinking a glass of apple juice before departure can help settle your stomach. Although sugary foods are not always good for motion sickness, non-citrus juices will help feelings of queasiness.</p> <p><strong>4. Ice</strong></p> <p>Ice has been found to help queasiness for motion sickness – it’s even a remedy that works for morning sickness. The ice is cold, refreshing, hydrating and the water dilutes excess stomach acid. You can also opt for an ice block if you are in the prevention stage of motion sickness.  </p> <p><strong>5. Peppermint</strong></p> <p>Having peppermint either through tea, lozenges or peppermint oil, can help prevent nausea. If you are travelling with family, peppermint is great to prevent children from getting sick due to its pleasant taste.</p> <p><strong>6. Dry crackers</strong></p> <p>Dry crackers are an easily digestible snack that can help prevent nausea and vomiting. Crackers are high in starch and help absorb gastric aid. Crackers eliminate hunger without having a strong smell or taste that could increase the nausea.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p>

Cruising

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12 trusted home remedies that will only make you worse

<p><strong>Proceed with caution</strong></p> <p>Any herbal supplement or remedy could potentially cause liver or kidney failure or have dangerous interactions with other medications you may be taking. That’s why physician Dr Ehsan Ali, recommends you ask your doctor before popping any herbal pill or natural cure.</p> <p>“All patients of all ages should check with their doctor first about what home remedy they want to try,” says Dr Ali. “Better to be safe than sorry!”</p> <p><strong>St. John's Wort</strong></p> <p>This herb is touted as a treatment for depression, but comprehensive studies are lacking. Dangers can arise when patients are already taking other medications. There have been incidents of St. John’s Wort interfering with birth control pills, leading to unintended pregnancies.</p> <p>The National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health warns that St. John’s Wort can disrupt the action of many medications, including warfarin, antidepressants, and anti-rejection drugs following organ transplants.</p> <p><strong>Kava</strong></p> <p>This herb, grown on South Pacific islands is often suggested for anxiety. It has been found to have a calming effect similar to Valium. Research, including a study published in 2015 in the journal Trialssuggests that kava may be an effective treatment for generalised anxiety disorder.</p> <p>However, heavy consumption of the herb is linked with heart problems and eye irritation.</p> <p><strong>Kitchen cures for burns</strong></p> <p>Kitchen cures can seem harmless and certainly, food products can make gentle and effective beauty treatments (think: avocado or honey masks for skin and hair). But when someone has an injury or disease, natural products can do more harm than good.</p> <p>Dr Svetlana Kogan, a holistic physician, has heard many potentially dangerous cures for injuries, including applying egg whites to burns. Egg whites, especially organic ones, can be full of bacteria – including salmonella – which could lead to serious infections. Instead, minor burns can be treated at home with cool water and acetaminophen for pain.</p> <p><strong>Gargling with mouthwash</strong></p> <p>The common cold continues to confound doctors and there isn’t much sufferers can do except stay hydrated. But when the symptoms progress to an inflamed throat, indulging in the common practice of gargling with mouthwash can do more harm than good.</p> <p>“Gargling inflamed tonsils with mouthwash is actually very irritating to the area and does not have any effect on potential strep throat,” says Dr Kogan. Her recommendation for a sore throat? Warm liquids to soothe the inflamed area and get plenty of rest.</p> <p><strong>Money</strong></p> <p>The best use for money when it comes to your health is paying your medical bills. But some people use currency to try and cure ailments. For years, placing a coin or other hard, flat object on a baby’s belly to help heal an umbilical hernia has been a common practice in many cultures – a very unsafe practice: “An umbilical hernia is a gap in the layer of muscle in the abdominal wall (called the rectus abdominis muscle),” explains Dr Danelle Fisher, a paediatrician.</p> <p>“The muscle usually grows together and the hernia goes away on its own in more than 90 per cent of babies who are born with it. Having an object strapped to the baby’s belly is not advisable because it can cause a skin infection and it doesn’t change the hernia or hasten its healing.” (Not to mention that coins can be pretty dirty and are a choking hazard for your baby.) So what should you do if your baby has an umbilical hernia? Nothing, aside from watchful waiting and consulting with your child’s paediatrician.</p> <p><strong>Breast milk</strong></p> <p>Mother’s milk is the best possible natural food for babies. Although many mothers claim their milk clears up skin conditions, there’s no scientific proof of this, warns Dr Sarah Yamaguchi, an obstetrician and gynecologist. “Breast milk can transmit infectious diseases such as HIV and pumped breast milk if not stored properly can be contaminated and can actually introduce bacteria into an already infected area,” says Dr Yamaguchi.</p> <p>Instead, she advises, patients suffering from infections or inflamed skin should try to keep the area clean and dry and seek medical attention.</p> <p><strong>Castor oil</strong></p> <p>In her work as an obstetrician, Dr Yamaguchi has seen her fair share of women in the final stages of pregnancy who just cannot wait to have their baby. She has seen many women take castor oil believing it will jump-start labour.</p> <p>“Castor oil may help if you are constipated and need to pass a bowel movement, but it’s not going to help you go into labour and it tastes awful,” she says.</p> <p><strong>Syrup of Ipecac</strong></p> <p>This syrup, made from the roots of a South American plant, is often kept in the home by parents to act as a counter treatment for accidental poisoning, as it induces vomiting. However, this form of treatment is incredibly dangerous, warns Dr Fisher.</p> <p>Many poisons do further damage when they make their way out of the body, damaging the oesophagus and potentially causing breathing problems. Dr Fisher advises parents not to use syrup of ipecac at all. The only appropriate reaction to a child swallowing something poisonous, she says, is to call your local Poison Control immediately and seek medical treatment.</p> <p><strong>Charcoal</strong></p> <p>Some people believe that activated charcoal, often derived from coconut shells, is thought to trap and remove dangerous toxins from the body. It is often recommended for treating bloat and constipation. However, it is a controversial treatment.</p> <p>Dr Kogan has heard of patients swallowing activated charcoal for detoxification purposes, which she strongly discourages. “It is dangerous because it can cause life-threatening intestinal obstructions and severe dehydration,” she says. Eating well and drinking plenty of water can have similar, but safer, detoxification effects on the body.</p> <p><strong>Blowing on or licking a wound</strong></p> <p>Parents everywhere are known for spitting on a tissue and using it to clean their children’s faces and sometimes even to clean a wound. Blowing on or introducing saliva to a cut is very dangerous.</p> <p>“Our breath and saliva have tons of bacteria which can contaminate the wound and lead to an infection,” says Dr Kogan. Instead, use fresh water and consult a doctor if needed.</p> <p><strong>Vitamins</strong></p> <p>As long as you follow a healthy diet, you’ll get all the vitamins and minerals you need. That’s good because sliding into the habit of trying to make up supposed deficiencies with supplements can quickly lead to trouble, warns Dr Kogan.</p> <p>The danger comes when people ignore the recommended doses and take too much of a particular vitamin. Too much vitamin D, for instance, can cause liver and heart problems, while an overabundance of B6 can lead to nerve toxicity; a vitamin A overdose can even cause death in extreme cases.</p> <p><em>Image credits: Getty Images</em></p> <p><em>This article originally appeared on <a href="https://www.readersdigest.com.au/healthsmart/12-trusted-home-remedies-that-will-only-make-you-worse?pages=1" target="_blank" rel="noopener">Reader's Digest</a>. </em></p>

Body

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Why you shouldn’t wait to explore incredible Iceland

<p dir="ltr">Iceland, also called the Land of Fire and Ice, is the most peaceful country in the world. It ranks high in social stability, equality, democracy and more. One of the reasons it is so high on the Peace Index is because it is without a standing army - meaning no army, navy or air force.</p> <p dir="ltr">It's got a lot more to offer though as it's home to some of the most remarkable natural landmarks in the world. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>1. Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">A constantly changing natural wonder located on the edge of Vatnajökull National Park in southeast Iceland, Jökulsárlón Glacier Lagoon is famous for its icebergs that break away from the glacier and float in the lagoon before they drift out to sea.</p> <p dir="ltr">Sculptural mountains make for a majestic backdrop with seals swimming between the icebergs and reindeer roaming around the shores.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>2. Diamond Beach</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Just minutes from the lagoon you’ll find Diamond Beach. It features striking black sand and glistens with iceberg fragments drifting ashore. </p> <p dir="ltr">The beach won’t look the same every time you go as new icebergs form once the old ones disappear. A truly unique destination.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>3. Skógafoss Waterfall</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">With a width of 25 metres and a drop of 60 metres, Skógafoss Waterfall is one of the largest and most elegant waterfalls in Iceland. Its size leads to a lot of spray, often showcasing single or double rainbows on sunny days. </p> <p dir="ltr"> You can get up close to it by following the river below or taking the stairs next to it to get a stunning view from above. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>4. Seljalandsfoss Waterfall</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Seljalandsfoss Waterfall is located by a main road, making it one of the most accessible waterfalls and very hard to miss. </p> <p dir="ltr">It drops 60 metres into a tranquil pool below and is one of the few places in the world where you can walk behind a waterfall. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>5. Reynisfjara Black Sand Beach</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Reynisfjara Black Sand Beach is one of the most well-known black sand beaches in the world. It features fine textured soft black sand and a cave with huge geometric columns.  </p> <p dir="ltr">You can see the powerful waves of the Atlantic Ocean meet the shore and the towering basalt sea stacks jutting out from the ocean at 66 metres into the air.<span id="docs-internal-guid-65d3faf7-7fff-1267-2a1e-810c72dfce35"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credit: Getty</em></p>

International Travel

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Naturally combat the onset of diabetes

<p dir="ltr">Pre-diabetes is the period before diabetes is officially diagnosed. Progressing from pre-diabetes to diabetes is not imminent. There are plenty of ways you can get on top of it to reduce the risk of diabetes. </p> <p dir="ltr" role="presentation"><strong>1. Cut out sugar and refined carbohydrates </strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Eating foods high in refined carbs and sugar increases blood sugar and insulin levels, which could lead to diabetes over time. Examples of these foods are white bread, potatoes and various breakfast cereals. Limit sugar and choose complex carbs like veggies, oatmeal and whole grains.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>2. Quit smoking</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">If you’re a current smoker, cut it out! Smoking can contribute to insulin resistance which can lead to type 2 diabetes. Quitting smoking has been shown to reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes over time.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>3. Portion control</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Avoid large portions as they can contribute to the increase of insulin and blood sugar levels. Eating too much at one time can lead to higher blood sugar and insulin levels in pre-diabetics.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>4. Exercise</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Aim for at least 30 minutes of exercise a day. You don’t have to strain yourself, you can take a walk, go swimming or dance around the house, but make sure you stay on top of it and practise these activities at least five days a week. </p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>5. Drink more water</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Drinking water over other beverages may help control blood sugar and insulin levels. Drinking primarily water will stop you from over consuming beverages that are high in sugar and preservatives, in turn reducing the risk of diabetes.</p> <p dir="ltr"><strong>6. Eat more fibre</strong></p> <p dir="ltr">Getting an adequate amount of fibre is beneficial for gut health and weight management. Having a good source of fibre at each meal can help prevent spikes in blood sugar and insulin levels. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credit: Shutterstock</em></p>

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