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Beloved author slams Carrie Bickmore for “schoolyard bullying”

<p>New Zealand author and poet Jessica Urlichs has voiced her extreme displeasure with Carrie Bickmore and Tommy Little for her radio program "Carrie &amp; Tommy", claiming that she experienced what amounted to "schoolyard bullying" during a recent segment.</p> <p>Bickmore read one of Urlichs’ poems on air recently while speaking to her co-host, Tommy Little. Urlichs, who has nearly half-a-million followers on Instagram, felt that her work was shamefully mocked during the broadcast.</p> <p>"I don’t have any words left to truly articulate the schoolyard bullying you displayed in your recent segment across multiple radio stations," Urlichs wrote in an Instagram post on Sunday.</p> <p>She continued, "You used my heartfelt poem (without permission) as your very weak punchline. Your co-host wasn’t allowing a voice for post-partum women, nor you for that matter, and as a woman who was once post-partum it was very disappointing to see you reduce yourself to his childlike behaviour on such an important topic."</p> <p>In her caption, Urlichs explained she wrote the poem for herself and for mothers who might be offended by the radio segment. She also mentioned that her requests to have the content removed had been ignored.</p> <p>During the radio segment, Bickmore explained to Little that the poems, written from the perspective of a baby to its mother, frequently appeared in her social media feed. Little responded with skepticism and humour, questioning the premise that a baby could write such a poem.</p> <p>Bickmore defended the work, identifying Urlichs as the author and stressing the poem's emotional significance for mothers dealing with sleepless nights. Despite this, Little continued to mock the poem, suggesting it was written by a middle-aged man pretending to be a baby.</p> <p>The segment continued with Bickmore reading the poem aloud, accompanied by background music, while Little laughed and interjected. This tone persisted throughout the reading, leading to further comments from Little that questioned the poem's authenticity and meaning.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/C8Q8DaXPMd9/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/C8Q8DaXPMd9/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by J E S S I C A U R L I C H S (@jessurlichs)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Following the broadcast, a video clip of the segment was posted on Instagram, where Urlichs expressed her disappointment in the comments. "If you’d asked for my permission to post this and I’d seen how it was mocked throughout I would have said no," she wrote on the post that has now been removed. She added that while she appreciates people sharing her work to support other mothers, she felt her writing was treated as a punchline in this instance.</p> <p>The full text of the remarkable poem can be read below.</p> <p><iframe style="overflow: hidden;" src="https://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fjessurlichs%2Fposts%2Fpfbid02jzy9gwBKnMAAX12NYp7XiZ1CpWsgxfd2zyhRaHVQfgLJ3NoB1kCcGXNbhJucZcYNl&amp;show_text=true&amp;width=500" width="500" height="666" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" allowfullscreen="allowfullscreen"></iframe></p> <p> </p>

Family & Pets

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"How can people bully a baby?": Paris Hilton's son mercilessly mocked

<p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">In a world dominated by social media, celebrities often share glimpses of their personal lives with their followers. It's a way to celebrate their joys and connect with fans. However, this can also invite unwarranted negativity, as recently experienced by Paris Hilton when she posted innocent photos of her nine-month-old son, Phoenix, on Instagram. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, 'Segoe UI', Roboto, Oxygen, Ubuntu, Cantarell, 'Open Sans', 'Helvetica Neue', sans-serif;">While she was trying to cherish a beautiful moment in her baby's life, vile comments from some of her followers overshadowed the happiness considerably.</span></p> <p>Hilton, the hotel heiress turned entrepreneur, proudly shared the series of snaps capturing her son during his first trip to New York City. The images featured the adorable baby boy sitting on her lap, evoking smiles and warmth from those who understood the significance of the moment. Paris captioned the photos with the words, "My precious angel baby Phoenix's first time in NYC."</p> <p>However, the joyous occasion quickly turned sour due to some insensitive comments from trolls who chose to focus on the appearance of baby Phoenix in an attempt to make fun of an innocent child.</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cylt-26pDR7/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Cylt-26pDR7/?utm_source=ig_embed&utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Paris Hilton (@parishilton)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>Some followers expressed genuine concern for the baby, suggesting that Hilton should seek medical advice for her son. These comments, though well-intentioned, were also made without understanding the full context. In particular, one comment advised, "Please take him to the neurosurgeon ASAP; he needs a helmet soon." Another mentioned, "He really does look like he has macrocephaly," referring to a condition where an infant's head circumference is larger than normal.</p> <p>In contrast to the negativity, many of Paris Hilton's followers came to her defence, emphasising the importance of kindness and compassion, especially when it comes to a baby. One commenter wisely stated, "If you don't have anything nice to say, you shouldn't say anything at all."</p> <p>"How can people Bully a baby?" wrote another. "What is wrong with you? It’s an innocent little baby 🥺🥺❤️"</p> <p>"She was so kind to share a precious photo of her son with us," wrote yet another. "I don't understand why people have to make fun of him or make comments about the way she is holding him."</p> <p>Some even criticised those pretending to be concerned about Phoenix's health but failing to consider the emotional toll such comments can take on a family.</p> <p>It's crucial to recognise that public figures like Hilton are also parents who cherish their family's privacy. In the weeks following Phoenix's birth, Hilton explained that she wanted something personal for herself, away from the spotlight. "I didn't want the media and people online just speaking about my son even before he was here on this earth," she revealed on the US <em>Today </em>show.</p> <p>The episode serves as a poignant reminder of the harshness that can exist on social media platforms, even towards the most innocent of beings. Behind every celebrity persona is a human being, oftentimes a parent, who simply wants to celebrate a cherished moment in their child's life.</p> <p><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

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"Disgraced actor, bully, monster": Craig McLachlan opens up on assault allegations

<p>Craig McLachlan has opened up about how the incident assault trial took a toll on his mental health and career. </p> <p>The former Neighbours actor was charged with seven counts of indecent assault and six of common law assault in 2019, after four women, who he starred alongside with in the stage production of the <em>Rocky Horror Show</em> came forward. </p> <p>McLachlan has long denied the allegations, and was eventually cleared of all charges. </p> <p>Now, the former actor is appearing on the new season of <em>SAS Australia</em>, and has spoken candidly about how his life changed after the trial. </p> <p>“When I started on Neighbours, I was in people’s lounge rooms night after night, day after day,” he told <em>SAS</em> producers.</p> <p>“But there was something that happened about five years ago that was shocking for the public and shocking for me."</p> <p>“Craig McLachlan, disgraced actor. Workplace bully, monster.</p> <p>“So I’m here to exorcise some pretty extreme pain with some pretty extreme pain.”</p> <p>Speaking with <em>SAS</em> Chief Instructor Ant Middleton and DS Jamie ‘Jay’ Morton, McLachlan said he is still angry about what happened, and carries a lot of emotional weight from the trial. </p> <p>"I suffer extreme social anxiety. I find it very difficult to trust situations where there are a lot of people, especially women."</p> <p>“I’m more anxious about being in a new group of people than I am about climbing up the side of a mountain."</p> <p>“I know that sounds bizarre, but for me, I’m afraid it’s true.”</p> <p>Middleton sensed McLachlan was becoming angry when talking about the case, to which McLachlan responded, "I was charged with 14, 15, 16 offences ... It’s one thing to be so publicly crucified, it’s another thing to be charged. I was found not guilty of any wrongful behaviour. It’s because I was f***ing innocent ... I’ve been profoundly hurt, so there’s always going to be some residual anger."</p> <p>McLachlan went on to share how he was "abandoned" by close friends in the entertainment world when the allegations first came to light. </p> <p>He said, "People who only months before looked me in the eye and said 'You create the most wonderful work environments imaginable' ... abandonment, total abandonment. A tiny handful of courageous people I have friendships with over 30 years were always there, but the vast majority - gone."</p> <p>He said the abandonment from his friends "really f**king hurt", to which the SAS team told him he has "gotta let it go". </p> <p>"That’s why I’m here," McLachlan said.</p> <p>"For me, the big takeaway from this experience will be moving forward, to find that I can function without anger and fear. But beyond that, learning to trust people again."</p> <p><em>Image credits: Channel Seven - SAS Australia</em></p>

TV

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Quaden Bayles’ hopes for the future after being a victim of bullying

<p dir="ltr">Three years ago, Quaden Bayles went viral after his mother posted a devastating video of her young son coming home from school.</p> <p dir="ltr">In the video posted to Facebook in 2020, Quaden, who was in primary school at the time, pleaded with his mother to let him end his life after being relentlessly bullied. </p> <p dir="ltr">At the start of the five-minute clip, Ms Bayles is heard saying, “I just picked my son up from school, witnessed a bullying episode, rang the principal, and I want people to know this is the effect bullying has. This is what bullying does.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Quaden’s heartbreaking moment touched the hearts of many around the world, including famous faces such as Hugh Jackman, who sent his well wishes to the young boy.</p> <p dir="ltr">Now, three years on, Quaden is in high school and has shared how much his life has changed since the video went viral. </p> <p dir="ltr">Speaking candidly with <em>Australian Story</em>, he said he is still the target of bullies, but he tries to not let it get to him. </p> <p dir="ltr">He said, “I'm just so happy now that I'm in high school like I'm not in primary school. It's finally over.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I am not sitting on the carpets and grounds; I love high school now.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“But I still get hate here and there, but it's not as bad as it was back then.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Since the video went viral, Quaden has been offered many once in a lifetime opportunities through the people who have supported him, including being offered roles in several films. </p> <p dir="ltr">He said, “I’ve got so many good opportunities when people heard me, that I started to love acting and fashion.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve done my first movie, <em>Three Thousand Years of Longing</em>. The second one I’ve done is <em>Mad Max Furiosa</em>, and I’ve got another one I'm working on.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Quaden’s foray into the world of film has given him a new sense of confidence, with the 13-year-old saying he wants to keep making movies. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I want to keep going with my journey of acting. That’s what I want my future to be. I cannot wait to see myself on that big screen. I’m just gonna say ‘That’s me everyone!’” </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: ABC</em><span id="docs-internal-guid-e5ba7d51-7fff-4600-81a7-f36e5a9eef1a"></span></p>

Caring

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“Shocked and amazed”: Neighbours raise over $50,000 for bullied boy

<p dir="ltr">A couple from Texas has helped raise over $55,000 for their young neighbour who was being bullied.</p> <p dir="ltr">Their story began when young Shayden Walker knocked on the door of Brennan Ray and Angell Hammersmith, looking for friends.</p> <p dir="ltr">The conversation was captured on their home’s video doorbell system, as Walker asked if they knew any children between the ages of 11 and 12 because he “needs some friends really bad”.</p> <p dir="ltr">Walker, who approached their house wearing a Jaws t-shirt, explained that some neighbourhood kids had been bullying him.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I could hear the innocence and vulnerability in his voice,” Ray told DailyMail.com. “All I knew is that I wanted to help the kid.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The video has since been viewed on TikTok more than 66 million times, with TikTokers from across the world commenting that they hope he finds some “REAL friends soon” and saying “I have never wanted to hug a kid so bad in my life.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Ray and Hammersmith decided to start a GoFundMe page for Walker, asking people to “spread kindness for Shayden” and give what they can to help provide for the boy, while encouraging people to “come together and show him he's got some friends.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“We are raising money to help buy him a gaming system, school clothes and hopefully some amusement park tickets and anything else he may want or need,” the fundraising page reads.</p> <p dir="ltr">In just four days of the fundraising page being online, people from around the world have helped donate more than $55,000AUD to Shayden and his family, with the organisers saying they are “shocked and amazed” at people’s generosity.</p> <p dir="ltr">Many of the donations came with messages for Shayden, saying “You have a friend in me.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Walker's stepfather now says Shayden's a “totally different kid” than he was just last week, while the young boy said in a video posted to his father's TikTok page that “Y'all have touched my heart so much, it's just literally to the point where I want to cry.”</p> <p dir="ltr">The family have requested that the donations be turned off on the donations page, saying they are not seeking any money.</p> <p dir="ltr">Many people commented on Shayden’s message, praising his bravery and sending messages of support.</p> <p dir="ltr">One person wrote, “Shayden, you are a strong kid. No one deserves to be bullied or made fun of.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“You are incredibly brave to be putting yourself out there and actively looking for friends instead of staying in the house.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“I know you are young, but the best advice I can give you is that you do not need anyone's validation but your own to know your worth. If you love yourself, you will never be alone.”</p> <p><em>Image credits: GoFundMe</em></p>

Family & Pets

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"Who picks a fight with a rock star?" Jimmy Barnes confronts on-road "bully"

<p>Jimmy Barnes' wife Jane has ripped into a truck driver who "bullied" the couple on the road, with the driver attempting to "fight Jimmy on the roadside". </p> <p>Jane Barnes said the incident occurred on Wednesday night in the south Sydney suburb of Botany Bay, when the couple had been driving home from a charity event.</p> <p>In a furious thread on Twitter, Jane detailed the terrifying incident which resulted in the police being called.</p> <p>Jane wrote, "(He) cut us off across our lane and swiped our mirror, wanted to fight Jimmy on the roadside."</p> <p>"Trucks are like weapons, bullies behind the wheel a danger to us all," she wrote, alongside the hashtags #TOLL and #NOtobullies.  </p> <p>Jane then shared a photo of the truck drivers' side profile as he almost came to blows with the rockstar, as well as photos of the truck's license plate and the Barnes' car which shows the drivers' side wing mirror bent out of place. </p> <p>Jane went on to say the truckie had shared his details with the couple and that NSW Police had been called over the altercation. </p> <p>However, she said, officers "couldn't do much" if there were no injuries or damages.</p> <p>Jane's post drew in a wave of attention, with one fan asking, "Who picks a fight with a rock star?"</p> <p>Ms Barnes replied, "Shouldn't matter who it is. This guy was just a pig. Swearing, smug, ignorant, misogynist bully."</p> <p>The musician continued her rant on Instagram, writing, "When you drive a truck you're in charge of a weapon. A bully at the wheel can kill people."</p> <p>Many sent their sympathies to the couple, with some saying the tweet was "poignant" given the increase in accidents on Aussie roads. </p> <p><em>Image credits: Twitter</em></p>

Travel Trouble

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"Proud mum": Opinions divided after mum praises teen daughter for punching bully in the face

<p dir="ltr">Bianca Austin, wife of former soccer star Charlie Austin has divided the internet after posting a tweet praising her daughter, Mallayla, for punching a bully in the face.</p> <p dir="ltr">Last week, she tweeted: “After weeks of being bullied by the same girl, numerous phone calls to the school and nothing changing, today when being called names my daughter finally punched the bully in the face.</p> <p dir="ltr">"Proud mum,” she wrote.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">After weeks of being bullied by the same girl, numerous phone calls to the school and nothing changing,today when being called names my daughter finally punched the bully in the face👏🏻👏🏻 proud mum👏🏻</p> <p>— Bianca Austin (@BiancaAustin90) <a href="https://twitter.com/BiancaAustin90/status/1635307000992260097?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 13, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">The tweet, which now has over 2 million views and 17,000 likes, generated varying responses from those who sympathise to those who believe that hitting back is unacceptable.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Probably deserved!” commented one user.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bianca replied: “I told the school how proud of her I was for standing up for herself when they rang up to tell me Mallayla would be sanctioned for retaliating violently. No child should be able to make school hell for another child day in day out”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“We all have our breaking points and can only be pushed so far. Does she feel better now she’s stood up for herself?” commented another user.</p> <p dir="ltr">“No, but she's hoping the girl will leave her alone now. X,” Bianca tweeted in response.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bianca then posted a follow up tweet expressing her dissatisfaction with the school’s response.</p> <p dir="ltr">“2 days in-school exclusion for my daughter, whilst the other child has gone to class because she was 'only' verbally abusive🙃 No wonder bullying is never stopped in schools,” she wrote.</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">2 days in-school exclusion for my daughter, whilst the other child has gone to class because she was 'only' verbally abusive🙃 No wonder bullying is never stopped in schools... head high Mallayla🙏🏻</p> <p>— Bianca Austin (@BiancaAustin90) <a href="https://twitter.com/BiancaAustin90/status/1635608089754841088?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">March 14, 2023</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“I get that bullying is awful and harmful but when I said that your daughter’s actions would make things worse, you can now see where I was going,” one user wrote in response.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Bullying someone “back” by hitting is also bullying,” the user added.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bianca went straight to the point with her response and asked them what their resolution would be.</p> <p dir="ltr">“School couldn't stop it, it was wrecking her mental health and affecting her GCSE studies. What is the right course of action here?!</p> <p dir="ltr">“Also she didn't "bully" back. Bullying is repeated behaviour,” she wrote, defending her daughter’s actions.</p> <p dir="ltr">Bianca also tweeted that her daughter had no malicious intent and only did it because she wanted to “be left alone to quietly enjoy school”.</p> <p><em>Image: Twitter</em></p> <p> </p>

Family & Pets

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ABC presenter bullied for “distasteful” wardrobe choice

<p dir="ltr">An ABC presenter has been the target of online trolls for her “questionable” choice in outfit.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>ABC News Breakfast</em> host Lisa Millar appeared on Monday morning’s show sporting a multi-coloured blouse and mint-coloured skirt which featured a large split in the front.</p> <p dir="ltr">One outraged viewer wrote on Twitter, “Goodness me Lisa Millar go back to ‘wardrobe’ and change that skirt! You’re on national television.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Another said, “Good morning, darling, what on earth are you wearing, you silly girl.”</p> <p dir="ltr">“Well frankly, I wish Lisa Millar would stop flashing her knees on #breakfastnews because it’s entirely distasteful and unnecessary,” a third person commented.</p> <p dir="ltr">A lot of the criticism came in the form of unwavering misogyny and threats, prompting other Australian media personalities to jump to Millar’s defence.</p> <p dir="ltr">As well as being backed up by her industry colleagues, regular viewers of the show called out the hateful comments for being “too harsh”.</p> <p dir="ltr">One person said, “I just love that as much as the trolls have tried, there seems to be more Twitter users defending Lisa Millar and all women: judge us by our skills and performance and not by our clothes. Amen.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Another disgruntled viewer wrote, “People attacking Lisa Millar today seriously need a new hobby.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Another put it bluntly, saying, “Given the hysterics about Lisa Millar’s skirt, I think we need to sacrifice a misogynist by cracking his head between some strong woman’s knees. That might shut the f***ers up.”</p> <p dir="ltr">It’s not the first time Lisa has been subject to an onslaught of online trolling, as she was bullied off Twitter more than a year ago after a brutal online attack.</p> <p dir="ltr">The host deactivated her Twitter account in September 2021 despite being an avid tweeter and boasting almost 55,000 followers.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>ABC News Breakfast</em> co-host Michael Rowlands confirmed Millar was pulling the plug on her social media account after receiving “next level” and “truly vile distressing personal attacks”.</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Image credits: ABC / Instagram</em></p>

TV

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Why do kids bully? And what can parents do about it?

<p>Bullying is unfortunately a common problem in Australian schools, with surveys suggesting <a href="https://www.missionaustralia.com.au/publications/youth-survey/1326-mission-australia-youth-survey-report-2019/file">one in five</a> teenagers are bullied.</p> <p>While schools are responsible for ensuring a safe environment, parents are likely to be distressed and unsure about what to do if their child is being bullied.</p> <p>What exactly is bullying? And how can you help your child if you are concerned?</p> <h2>What is bullying?</h2> <p>Bullying is not just kids being thoughtless or a bit mean. It is <a href="https://www.ncab.org.au/bullying-advice/bullying-for-parents/definition-of-bullying/">not</a> a single act, a mistake, or a mutual disagreement.</p> <p>Bullying is a <a href="https://www.naeyc.org/resources/blog/bullying-early-childhood">repeated</a> act of aggression that is intended to cause harm. It can be physical (harming the person or their belongings), verbal (written and spoken words that cause harm), or social (isolating someone, harming their social standing, or sharing private information).</p> <p>It is not a “normal” childhood experience – it is targeted and has long-lasting and serious effects for the victim.</p> <p>These effects include <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5371173/">reduced engagement</a> in education and loneliness at school, <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/epdf/10.1177/070674370304800904">loss of self-esteem</a>, psychological distress, depressive symptoms, problems with sleep, suicide and suicidal ideation, non-suicidal self-injury and <a href="https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S1751722210000715">substance abuse</a>.</p> <h2>Bullying can be overt and hidden</h2> <p>Bullying can be <a href="https://www.education.vic.gov.au/about/programs/bullystoppers/Pages/what.aspx">overt</a> with observable actions like kicking or name-calling.</p> <p>Or it can be covert, which is more hidden and can include whispering, exclusion, and rumours. While females and males are <a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC7957129/">equally likely to have experienced bullying</a> and are equally likely to bully, males are more likely to engage in overt physical bullying, while females are more likely to engage in covert bullying through social or cyber behaviour.</p> <p>A 2019 Mission Australia <a href="https://www.missionaustralia.com.au/publications/youth-survey/1326-mission-australia-youth-survey-report-2019/file">survey found</a> 21% of young people aged 15–19 reported bullying in the past 12 months. Of those who had been bullied, nearly 80% said the bullying took place at school.</p> <p>More than 70% said the bullying was verbal, 61% said it was social, 36.5% said it was cyberbulling and about 20% said it was physical.</p> <p>There is less concrete data about younger children’s experiences of bullying. One reason is they tend to <a href="https://www.naeyc.org/resources/blog/bullying-early-childhood">over-report behaviours</a> that would not be defined as bullying. For example, a young child may believe they are being bullied if someone does not want to play with them.</p> <p>Bullying in this age group can also be viewed by some researchers and educators with less concern as it can be incorrectly labelled as a “<a href="https://bmjpaedsopen.bmj.com/content/5/1/e000939">normal</a>” part of childhood.</p> <h2>Why do people bully?</h2> <p>Bullying behaviour is often motivated by a <a href="https://www.proquest.com/docview/206845307?pq-origsite=gscholar&amp;fromopenview=true">desire to meet basic needs</a> for recognition, attention and approval. It is a misguided attempt to <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2003-00452-003">increase your popularity</a> by making other people look small.</p> <p>As UK bullying expert Elizabeth Nassem <a href="http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/24541/1/NaseemBully.pdf">notes</a>, if children are popular they can</p> <blockquote> <p>achieve respect, influence, admiration and leadership over their peers – sadly, at the expense of other children.</p> </blockquote> <p>Another reason young people is bully is because they have been mistreated, experienced shame, or <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0272431601021001002">bullied</a> themselves by peers, parents, or siblings. They bully others as an attempt to seek <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0044118X14547876">revenge</a> and regain a sense of <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/0044118X14547876">self-worth</a>.</p> <p>There are also systemic reasons why young people bully. Schools that <a href="https://ridskolepedagogik.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/School-Bullying-and-Social-and-Moral-Orders.pdf">don’t adequately supervise students</a>, or have <a href="http://eprints.hud.ac.uk/id/eprint/24541/1/NaseemBully.pdf">practices or policies</a> that exclude young people with diverse needs can contribute to bullying.</p> <p>When systems exclude or shame young people, young people within the system are more likely to do the same.</p> <h2>How can parents help?</h2> <p>Bullying is a complex problem. While the onus should be on schools to fix it, parents can be empowered to support their child if they are the victim of bullying.</p> <p><strong>1. Make space for your child to tell you</strong></p> <p>Children need to talk about their experiences of bullying in order for parents to act. However, research indicates they often don’t speak out, with <a href="https://academic.oup.com/her/article/20/1/81/632611">one study</a> indicating only 53% of children told their teacher and 67% told their parents they were being bullied.</p> <p>Young people <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03054980601094594">report</a> they don’t tell because adult responses are often ineffective, insensitive or excessive.</p> <p>They <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28147302/">also say</a> they fear looking weak, making the situation worse, and that adult support might undermine their sense of autonomy. In one study, <a href="https://www.kairaranga.ac.nz/index.php/k/article/view/2">children explained</a> the main reason they wouldn’t report bullying behaviour was because they “didn’t want to be a little nark” [an informer] and lose the approval of their peers.</p> <p>These findings suggest it is important to provide space for your children to talk and to be well equipped to respond when they do.</p> <p>Listen to your child carefully, ask them what role they would like you to play in solving the problem. Assure them you will handle the situation sensitively and with a view to protect them from further harm.</p> <p>Parents can also praise their children’s <a href="https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/28147302/">maturity and strength</a> when they report bullying and reinforce that it is <a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/03054980601094594">not “telling-tales” or “weak”</a> when someone’s safety is at risk.</p> <p><strong>2. Approach school</strong></p> <p>While it can be distressing to hear your child has been bullied, it is important to process these feelings before you act so you can be calm.</p> <p>Your first action should be contacting the school to report the bullying. It is <a href="https://www.verywellfamily.com/pros-and-cons-of-calling-a-bullys-parents-4120955">not advised</a> to contact the other child’s parents directly. This can escalate the issue, break your relationship with the parent, take away your child’s power, and the other parents may not act – so it leaves the problem unresolved.</p> <p>When you <a href="https://www.gov.nl.ca/education/k12/bullying/whattodo/">contact the school</a>, ask for an investigation of the issue and a response timeline. This approach demonstrates that you are open to other perspectives and not seeking to blame anyone. It also indicates you expect an outcome.</p> <p>You may also request that your child’s identity is not shared to protect them from further retaliation. If there is no response, follow up until there is a resolution. Don’t promise your child you won’t do something because if your child or another is unsafe, you need to intervene to ensure their safety.</p> <p><strong>3. Provide your child with skills</strong></p> <p>Your child can also be better equipped by teaching them <a href="https://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/what_can_parents_do_about_bullying">emotional and interpersonal skills</a> to help them navigate instances of bullying.</p> <p>These skills include self-regulation, social skills, and problem solving. This can enable your child stay calm and not appear distressed, to be assertive when appropriate, and to consider creative ways of resolving difficult situations.</p> <p>You can also teach your child safe, practised, and planned responses they can use in instances of bullying. One example of this is “<a href="http://www.kenrigby.net/07c-Fogging">fogging</a>”. This is a technique where the child agrees the bully may or may not be correct but does not get defensive and upset.</p> <p>For example, a bully may say “your shirt is ugly”. A fogging response would be “you may be right”. With this approach the bully is not getting a reaction to their insult and therefore not meeting their need for attention and control.</p> <p><strong>4. Gather a support crew</strong></p> <p>Help your child identify safe spaces, peers and adults they can turn to for support.</p> <p>They need to understand that in the middle of the bullying behaviour, they have people they can depend on who care for them. Bullies try to isolate. Your child needs to know they are not alone, they are loved, and they are supported.</p> <hr /> <p><em>If this article has raised issues for you or your child, you can call Lifeline on 13 11 14 or Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800.</em><!-- Below is The Conversation's page counter tag. Please DO NOT REMOVE. --><img style="border: none !important; box-shadow: none !important; margin: 0 !important; max-height: 1px !important; max-width: 1px !important; min-height: 1px !important; min-width: 1px !important; opacity: 0 !important; outline: none !important; padding: 0 !important;" src="https://counter.theconversation.com/content/194812/count.gif?distributor=republish-lightbox-basic" alt="The Conversation" width="1" height="1" /><!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/mandie-shean-199959">Mandie Shean</a>, Lecturer, School of Education, <em><a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/edith-cowan-university-720">Edith Cowan University</a></em></p> <p>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/why-do-kids-bully-and-what-can-parents-do-about-it-194812">original article</a>.</p> <p><em>Image: Shutterstock</em></p>

Caring

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Anthony Albanese accused of bullying female MP

<p dir="ltr">Anthony Albanese has been accused of bullying by Federal MP Michelle Landry after she "left Question Time in tears".</p> <p dir="ltr">The Prime Minister was called out by Ms Landry who said she was left “intimidated, bullied and treated with disrespect”. </p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Landry was questioning Mr Albanese if the government was going to delay $800m in Commonwealth funding to construct the Rockhampton Ring Rd in her electorate.</p> <p dir="ltr">The prime minister began his response but instead confused Yeppen Floodplain with Yeppoon before opposition leader, Peter Dutton interjected to correct him. </p> <p dir="ltr">The parliament got rowdy with Mr Albanese explaining that he was speaking about the Yeppen Floodplain with footage showing Ms Landry laughing. </p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Albanese then yelled at the other side of parliament saying, “Queenslander…says it all. I know about Queensland roads because the Bruce Hwy under John Howard’s government put $1.3 billion in, we put $6.7 billion in in half the time. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Including the Yeppen Floodplain, including planning the money for the Rockhampton Ring Rd.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But when the government changed in 2013 it went on the backburner. So you were in government for almost a decade and you haven’t dug a hole on the project.” </p> <p dir="ltr">Mr Albanese continued his response but after Question Time, Ms Landry accused the Prime Minister of bullying her after claiming she had to leave parliament. </p> <p dir="ltr">“I did not expect the response I received from him and his colleagues. I felt intimidated and bullied,” Ms Landry said in a statement. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Unfortunately, this is not the first time the Prime Minister has treated me with disrespect.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Speaker of the House Milton Dick however refuted Ms Landry’s comments after reviewing footage saying she was not disrespected and did not leave parliament. </p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">How on earth is this answer bullying, as the PM is now being accused of. He was asked a question, was interjected with a factually inaccurate comment and he dealt with it as he should have. Give me a break… 🙄🤯🤦‍♂️ <a href="https://t.co/kknRF7Ox6h">pic.twitter.com/kknRF7Ox6h</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/auspol?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#auspol</a></p> <p>— Dr Peter van Onselen (@vanOnselenP) <a href="https://twitter.com/vanOnselenP/status/1585528117606895616?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 27, 2022</a></p></blockquote> <p dir="ltr">“In reviewing the footage, I did not see the Prime Minister show any disrespect to the member for Capricornia,” Mr Dick said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“As the footage was not on the member for Capricornia for the entire response, I did not see her leave the chamber. Of the footage I was able to review, she seemed engaged in the response from the Prime Minister.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Ms Landry confirmed that Mr Albanese called to apologise but she demanded an apology in the House of Representatives.</p> <p dir="ltr">“While I appreciate the gesture of calling me personally, it does not ignore the fact that he screamed, pointed, and yelled at me on a national stage,” she said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I am no shrinking violet, and I have been in politics for a long time. I respectfully ask the Prime Minister to publicly apologise to me in the House of Representatives.”</p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Twitter</em></p>

News

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50-plus Baywatch star blows away body-shaming bullies

<p dir="ltr"><em>Baywatch</em> star Donna D’Errico shared a photo showing off her stunning figure and youthful looks.</p> <p dir="ltr">The 54-year-old took to Instagram wearing a light pink bikini and was squatting on the coffee table.</p> <p dir="ltr">D’Errico’s seemingly innocent photo was however a clap back at women who called her out for wearing an American flag-printed two-piece as she celebrated the Fourth of July. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Quite a few women complained about the 4th of July video I posted in a red white &amp; blue bikini because they thought I was 'classier than that' and 'too old to wear a bikini' and, my favorite, 'desperate',” she wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Let me tell you something that might surprise you. I can actually wear and do literally whatever I want. </p> <p dir="ltr">“On that note, here is me in a bikini squatting on a coffee table.” </p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" style="background: #FFF; border: 0; border-radius: 3px; box-shadow: 0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width: 540px; min-width: 326px; padding: 0; width: calc(100% - 2px);" data-instgrm-captioned="" data-instgrm-permalink="https://www.instagram.com/p/CgGM80mDOOY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" data-instgrm-version="14"> <div style="padding: 16px;"> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; align-items: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 40px; margin-right: 14px; width: 40px;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 100px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 60px;"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="padding: 19% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: block; height: 50px; margin: 0 auto 12px; width: 50px;"> </div> <div style="padding-top: 8px;"> <div style="color: #3897f0; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: 550; line-height: 18px;">View this post on Instagram</div> </div> <div style="padding: 12.5% 0;"> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: row; margin-bottom: 14px; align-items: center;"> <div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(0px) translateY(7px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; height: 12.5px; transform: rotate(-45deg) translateX(3px) translateY(1px); width: 12.5px; flex-grow: 0; margin-right: 14px; margin-left: 2px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; height: 12.5px; width: 12.5px; transform: translateX(9px) translateY(-18px);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: 8px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 50%; flex-grow: 0; height: 20px; width: 20px;"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 2px solid transparent; border-left: 6px solid #f4f4f4; border-bottom: 2px solid transparent; transform: translateX(16px) translateY(-4px) rotate(30deg);"> </div> </div> <div style="margin-left: auto;"> <div style="width: 0px; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-right: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(16px);"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; flex-grow: 0; height: 12px; width: 16px; transform: translateY(-4px);"> </div> <div style="width: 0; height: 0; border-top: 8px solid #F4F4F4; border-left: 8px solid transparent; transform: translateY(-4px) translateX(8px);"> </div> </div> </div> <div style="display: flex; flex-direction: column; flex-grow: 1; justify-content: center; margin-bottom: 24px;"> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; margin-bottom: 6px; width: 224px;"> </div> <div style="background-color: #f4f4f4; border-radius: 4px; flex-grow: 0; height: 14px; width: 144px;"> </div> </div> <p style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 17px; margin-bottom: 0; margin-top: 8px; overflow: hidden; padding: 8px 0 7px; text-align: center; text-overflow: ellipsis; white-space: nowrap;"><a style="color: #c9c8cd; font-family: Arial,sans-serif; font-size: 14px; font-style: normal; font-weight: normal; line-height: 17px; text-decoration: none;" href="https://www.instagram.com/p/CgGM80mDOOY/?utm_source=ig_embed&amp;utm_campaign=loading" target="_blank" rel="noopener">A post shared by Donna D'Errico (@donnaderrico)</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p dir="ltr">Despite telling followers that she can “wear and do literally whatever I want”, D’Errico limited comments on her post. </p> <p dir="ltr">Those who were able to comment praised her comeback telling her that ignore anyone who tries to bring her down. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Be you. You are an amazing person no matter what,” someone wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Gorgeous and F anyone who tries to tear you down. You look incredible period,” another commented.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Good for you! If I looked that good I’d be posting pictures in a bikini every day!” another person wrote. </p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: Instagram</em></p>

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“I will not be bullied”: 2GB hosts Chris Smith and Ray Hadley go head-to-head

<p dir="ltr">2GB radio presenters Chris Smith and Ray Hadley have been engaged in a bitter stoush over the Coral Princess cruise ship scare.</p> <p dir="ltr">Smith said he has hired defamation lawyers and rejected claims he had received money from the cruising industry after Hadley accused him of playing down the cruise ship’s decision to allow passengers to disembark in Sydney after recording 118 cases of COVID-19 on board.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’ve actually engaged two media defo lawyers and will work on that very closely on Monday,” he told listeners on Saturday.</p> <p dir="ltr">The stoush began after Hadley slammed Smith for comments suggesting people “shouldn’t panic” about the Coral Princess, adding that he was “embarrassed to be on the same network” in a rant last Wednesday.<br />“One of my colleagues this morning was saying nothing to see here – it’s all wonderful,” Hadley said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I’m sorry – but the sort of nonsense I heard on the network this morning is just foolish. I’m almost embarrassed to be on the same broadcast network as that bloke. But anyway, that’s another story I’ll deal with privately.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Smith, who had been filling in for breakfast host Ben Fordham for the week, hit back at Hadley at the start of his regular Saturday morning show, though he didn’t mention his fellow radio host by name.</p> <p dir="ltr">“You may have been following the disagreements that have taken place here on-air over the arrival of the cruise ship the Coral Princess into Sydney Harbour on Tuesday,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I made the point that considering 95 percent of us are fully vaccinated, considering the antivirals that are available now, the new Covid treatments, the testing kits, the many protocols we’ve adopted in two years, the cruise rule that states at a minimum you should be fully vaccinated — the arrival of the Coral Princess was absolutely nothing like the drama and concern that surrounded the Ruby Princess more than two years earlier.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Smith described the situation surrounding the Ruby Princess as “a terrible tragedy” that “we were defenceless” to deal with.</p> <p dir="ltr">“But the way the television media traced this latest ship’s every move was way over the top,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“That was my simple point. It was a beat-up, there was no comparison. There were no critically ill people, no ambulances, and at one stage just four passengers infected. That’s not the same as 28 passing away, no vaccines, no treatments, no protocols, no masks, no defence. Any reasonable person can see the contrast here.”</p> <p dir="ltr">He went on to say that those who were “peddling fear”, particularly for those with loved ones on board, were “foul and shameful”.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Peddling fear in this context is foul and shameful, especially for families with loved ones on board. It scares people for no reason, which is what Dr Nick Coatsworth said to me on the breakfast show as well,” Smith said. </p> <p dir="ltr">“Which is why I said what I said. It was also consistent with what I’ve said throughout the second half of this pandemic — we need to live with this and stop panicking.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I don’t hold a candle for the cruise industry, except I feel terribly sorry for the tens of thousands of families whose loved ones have been left jobless because the industry was shut down for so long.”</p> <p dir="ltr">He emphasised that he wasn’t affiliated with the cruising industry, and that he had read commercials and taken listeners on cruises “without payment” and as part of his job.</p> <p dir="ltr">“It’s not a paid role, I take no financial advantage from it at all, none, it doesn’t work that way. I have absolutely no link to cruise companies,” Smith said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“Why would I ever go into bat for cruise companies for the sake of it? Anyone who suggests I have, anyone who peddles that suspicion had better be prepared to defend themselves in court — I know I can.”</p> <p dir="ltr">Smith concluded by thanking fans for their support and stressing that he wouldn’t be intimidated by critics.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I hold my head up high on this subject and won’t be intimidated, bullied or scared into acquiescence ever, so thank you so much for your overwhelming support, it’s been phenomenal. Those that have elected to go down a twisted path and get personal to hurt me have terrible glass jaws, they have copped a terrible bashing too on various media platforms which says it all. I will not be bullied, even by lifetime bullies,” he said.</p> <p dir="ltr">“I love a good rumble, I look forward to further disagreements and I look forward to standing up for myself each and every time.”</p> <p><span id="docs-internal-guid-7f9cb439-7fff-4e35-b1d6-2a4d0cc46cf9"></span></p> <p dir="ltr"><em>Images: The Chris Smith Show (Facebook) / Getty Images</em></p>

Legal

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Princess Mary removes son from high school amid bullying and abuse allegations

<p>Crown Princess Mary and Crown Prince Frederik have pulled their son Prince Christian from his high school following a bullying scandal that has sent shock waves through Europe.</p> <p>They've also confirmed Princess Isabella will no longer be attending the prestigious Herlufsholm Boarding School.</p> <p>The Royal couple have issued a statement announcing the move, weeks after allegations emerged of a violent culture filled with abuse and bullying at the school.</p> <p>Students have also come forward, accusing the school and its staff of covering up their stories of abuse.</p> <p>"The question about our son Christian's and our daughter Isabella's choice of school has been very important for us, and the unfortunate matter has brought many and strong opinions into play in the public," Crown Prince Frederik and Crown Princess Mary said in a joint statement.</p> <p>"That is completely understandable when it deals with the well-being of children and young people. At the same time, it has been important to stand by our basic idea that major decisions must be made on an informed basis. We now have that basis."</p> <p>Their message comes after the release of a preliminary decision from Denmark's National Agency for Education and Quality that "directs a particularly harsh critique" of the boarding school.</p> <p>"It has been a difficult process for us as a family, but, based on the overall picture and our special position as Crown Prince Couple, we have chosen that Prince Christian will stop at Herlufsholm and that Princess Isabella will not start in ninth class at the school after the summer holiday.</p> <p>"During the summer, we, together with our children, will make a decision about their future choice of schools.</p> <p>"With thoughts about the many students who will continue at Herlufsholm, it is our hope that the school now gets more peace to ensure the necessary changes and succeeds in creating a culture in which all thrive and feel safe."</p> <p>A documentary has aired, which included claims from a student who described being sexually abused by another student.</p> <p>Another student then spoke of corporal punishment and a third described being assaulted during a party at the school.</p> <p>In November 2021, four students were expelled after being accused of taking part in the abuse and filming a number of incidents.</p> <p>Some students have claimed staff turned a blind eye to these stories.</p> <p>When the allegations came to light, Princess Mary and her husband issued a swift response expressing their shock and disappointment.</p> <p>"As parents of a child who goes to Herlufsholm, we are deeply shaken by the testimonies that have emerged in the current documentary about the school," the Crown Prince couple said.</p> <p>"It is heart-breaking to hear about systematic bullying and about the culture of abuse and violence that many have been a part of. That is completely unacceptable. As parents, we expect the school to effectively ensure a culture where everyone is safe and part of the community, and we will in the coming time follow the changes that are obviously necessary."</p> <p>Herlufsholm was founded in 1565 for Danish nobility and is located 80km outside of Copenhagen in Næstved. The allegations about the school follow earlier claims about tough disciplinary practises at the institution.</p> <p>Herlufsholm School responded to the documentary's claims in a statement, with the school’s rector Mikkel Kjellberg saying many of the allegations contained within the television program were "very old cases have been used from another time - where the culture at Herlufsholm was different".</p> <p>He said the bullying and violence were "not part of the culture at Herlufsholm".</p> <p>"Bullying, violence or sexual abuse is not acceptable at Herlufsholm School," Kjellberg added.</p> <p>Princess Mary's charity issued a separate statement via The Mary Foundation. While they don't normally comment on "individual cases", the allegations contained within the documentary are "very violent and shocking".</p> <p><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

Family & Pets

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Do it for Dolly: Bullying awareness day

<p>If Australian mum Kate Everett could turn back time, she would tell her little girl Dolly to speak up and reach out for help.</p> <p>That opportunity was taken from them forever when the young girl, at only 14-years-old took her own life in January of 2018. This was a result of online bullying.</p> <p>Her death sent shockwaves around the country and five years on, the Everetts are using their grief to fight back against bullying with the common goal to prevent others from going through the same hardship.</p> <p>The family from the Northern Territory launched a charity in their daughter Dolly’s name and created “Do it for Dolly” - an annual day of bullying awareness on May the 13th.</p> <p>“The loss of a child changes a family forever,” Everett said “but creating Dolly’s Dream has helped us with healing.”</p> <p>Dolly’s story touched the hearts of people across the country, sparking the family’s plan to channel their grief into something bigger.</p> <p>They launched Dolly’s Dream and Do it for Dolly Day in 2018 as a way to be a voice for those who cannot speak for themselves. The organisation aims to help change the culture of bullying and raise awareness about the devastating impact it can have on young people and their families.</p> <p>Recounting the family’s tragic story does take its toll, but the impact they have had on the lives of others makes it all worth it.</p> <p>“Dolly’s Dream gives us the ability to focus on what positive can come from this, it’s Dolly’s legacy,” she said, adding it helps the family find comfort and healing.</p> <p><em>Image: Instagram</em></p>

Caring

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Autistic boy attacked by schoolgirl bully

<p><strong>Images have been blurred to protect the identity of the students.</strong></p> <p>Online footage of a young autistic boy being attacked by a schoolgirl has gone viral, with many parents and members of the community calling for harsher bullying penalties.</p> <p>The boy was repeatedly hit and kicked in the face on Tuesday, with the footage showing he tried to protect himself by cowering on the ground.</p> <p>A separate video of the incident shows that the boy tried to protect himself with a tennis racket, which was then used as a weapon by the girl who hit him three times in the side of the face with it.</p> <p>Furious parents have said that the girl was expelled from school and might be charged with assault.</p> <p>Parents have also called on the Department of Education to step in and address this particular school's bullying problem after their children continue to be assaulted by peers at school.</p> <p>A spokesperson for the Department of Education said to<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9375327/Defenceless-autistic-boy-repeatedly-punched-bully-North-Rockhampton-State-Highschool.html" target="_blank"><em>The Daily Mail</em></a><span> </span>that the incident had been dealt with in accordance with the school's Code of Conduct.</p> <p>"(The) school is committed to providing a safe, respectful and disciplined learning environment," they said.</p> <p>"Any situation that threatens the safety and wellbeing of students or staff is treated extremely seriously, and dealt with as a matter of priority. "Violence in any form is not tolerated in Queensland state schools.</p> <p>"Students and caregivers with concerns are strongly encouraged to report cases of bullying or misconduct to their school principal or their closest Department of Education regional office."</p>

Legal

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Buckingham Palace investigating bombshell Meghan bullying complaints

<p>Buckingham Palace has vowed to launch a thorough investigation into bombshell claims that the Duchess of Sussex bullied young staff before her and Prince Harry split from the royal family.</p> <p>The complaint was made known after<span> </span><a rel="noopener" href="https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/royal-aides-reveal-meghan-bullying-claim-before-oprah-interview-7sxfvd2c3" target="_blank"><em>The Times</em></a><span> </span>reported that the couple's communication chief filed a bullying complaint against Markle in 2018.</p> <p>According to the complaint, some young staff were reduced to tears by Markle's bullying.</p> <p>“Senior people in the household, Buckingham Palace and Clarence House, knew that they had a situation where members of staff, particularly young women, were being bullied to the point of tears,” a source told<span> </span><em>The Times.</em></p> <p>Communications secretary Jason Knauf submitted the complaint in order to protect staff at Kensington Palace, with a former aide agreeing that it “more like emotional cruelty and manipulation, which I guess could also be called bullying.”</p> <p>Allegedly, Prince Harry asked Knauf not to continue with the complaint.</p> <p>The statement from Buckingham Palace was unusual and reads:</p> <p>“We are clearly very concerned about allegations in<span> </span><em>The Times</em><span> </span>following claims made by former staff of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.</p> <p>“Accordingly, our HR team will look into the circumstances outlined in the article. Members of staff involved in the time - including those who have left the household - will be invited to participate to see if lessons can be learned.</p> <p>“The royal household has a Dignity at Work policy in place for a number of years and does not and will not tolerate bullying or harassment in the workplace.”</p> <p>Markle has outright denied the claims and said she was "saddened" by them through her spokesperson.</p> <p>“Let’s just call this what it is — a calculated smear campaign based on misleading and harmful misinformation. We are disappointed to see this defamatory portrayal of The Duchess of Sussex given credibility by a media outlet,” said the spokesperson for Markle and Harry, in part, to The Times.</p> <p>“It’s no coincidence that distorted several-year-old accusations aimed at undermining the duchess are being briefed to the British media shortly before she and the duke are due to speak openly and honestly about their experience of recent years,” read a separate statement from the spokesperson.</p> <p>“The duchess is saddened by this latest attack on her character, particularly as someone who has been the target of bullying herself and is deeply committed to supporting those who have experienced pain and trauma,” it continued. “She is determined to continue her work building compassion around the world and will keep striving to set an example for doing what is right and doing what is good.”</p>

News

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“Sit down you sook!” Dan Andrews accused of bullying

<p><span>During a heated question time on Wednesday, Victorian Premier Daniel Andrews was accused of being a bully by a fellow politician.</span><br /><br /><span>State Liberal MP for Warrandyte Ryan Smith chimed into debate early, telling the Speaker he was “tired of the bullying we get from the Premier”.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Andrews snapped back: “Sit down, you sook.”</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Smith however continued his attack on the Andrews government, and challenged Health Minister Martin Foley on surgical wait times.</span><br /><br /><span>The politician references one of his constituents, Marcus, who is having difficulty getting on a wait list.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839154/minister-3.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/1fba5f418bd24494a87d4fd9000d7146" /></p> <p><em>State Liberal MP Ryan Smith accused the Victorian Premier of bullying</em><br /><br /><span>Mr Smith asked Mr Foley if he would provide parliament with an “undertaking” that his department was working on slashing wait times.</span><br /><br /><span>He then went on to question exactly how many Victorians were waiting to see a specialist before they were put on a surgical wait list.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Foley did not fold and accused Mr Smith of personalising “the tragic circumstances of one of his constituents”.</span><br /><br /><span>Opposition leader Michael O’Brien said Mr Foley was “seeking to censor” the ability of members to raise cases of their constituents.</span><br /><br /><span>He added that the tactic was “contrary to the practice of question time”.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Foley said the coronavirus pandemic had caused a number of deferrals on important surgery arrangements.</span></p> <p><img style="width: 500px; height: 281.25px;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7839155/minister-1.jpg" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/b01dbfe3574f41868d30af2d521a4702" /></p> <p><em>Health Minister Martin Foley</em><br /><br /><span>“That is why the government has invested over $300 million in the forward projections – starting now – to work on a blitz to make sure that those important issues of deferred care are dealt with as expeditiously as possible,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>“I give the honourable member an undertaking and all honourable members an undertaking that that is a priority that this government is serious about.”</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Foley concluded that the government is “committed to reducing those surgical waiting times”.</span></p>

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Malcolm Turnbull weighs in on “bully” China: “Never seen anything like it”

<p><span>Former Australian prime minister Malcolm Turnbull has weighed in on the rift with China, and urged the government to “not give in to this bully.”</span><br /><br /><span>The two nations have had a tense relationship over the last week, after China’s foreign ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijian shared a disturbing doctored image showing an Australian soldier slitting the throat of an Afghan child.</span><br /><br /><span>The post was slammed as “repugnant” by Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison, and resulted in the two leaders combatting with words.</span><br /><br /><span>This led to another disturbing cartoon released by state-run news organisation <em>The Global Times</em>, that featured Mr Morrison and Australia’s alleged war crimes.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Turnbull gave a word of advice to the government on Thursday, telling <em>9News</em> "we just need to let the temperature lower or at least do nothing to raise it ourselves”.</span><br /><br /><span>An official from the Chinese embassy has reportedly given the media outlet a list of 14 grievances, which includes several of Turnull’s own policies, including foreign interference laws that “targeted China” and banning Huawei from the rollout of the 5G network.</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Turnbull blasted the list as "utterly counterproductive” and “not acceptable”, before saying the best thing to do with that list was “bin it”.</span><br /><br /><span>"There's a reason why governments don't conduct themselves in this way," he said.</span><br /><br /><span>"I've never seen anything like it before.”</span><br /><br /><span>Mr Turnbull said China’s behaviour only hurt their own image and urged Australia not to give in to playground antics.</span><br /><br /><span>"The one thing you can guarantee will see more bullying is if you start giving in to bullies,” he said.</span><br /><br /><span>"Is this style of diplomacy increasing China's influence around the world? No, it's diminishing it.</span><br /><br /><span>"Australians can see there is transparently, plain bullying, attempted bullying going on.</span><br /><br /><span>“The government's obviously got to respond to this astutely and carefully but it certainly shouldn't be giving into this bully or any others."</span></p>

News

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Major warning signs your grandchild is a bully

<p>With one out of every four children getting bullied, it's a growing epidemic. But what if your child is the bully? Experts share the signs that indicate your child might be the one causing the trouble.</p> <p><strong>They justify bad behaviour</strong></p> <p>Bullies may attempt to shift blame to the victim rather than themselves. Licensed professional counsellor Jay Clark says a behaviour that tends to correlate with bullying is when a child fails to recognise their actions may be contributing to a problem. Emotions may quickly escalate in intensity in a child with bullying tendencies, and they feel justified in treating another child badly. They may feel the other child ‘has it coming’.</p> <p><strong>They have friends who act aggressively</strong></p> <p>Children who bully often don’t have a shortage of friends. In reality, they usually have a large network of friends and a smaller, intimate group that encourages bullying behaviour, according to the Pacer Centre. No parent wants to find out their child is ill-behaved towards other students. However, if your child’s friends are mean towards other kids, or if they engage in some other type of bullying, your child might be participating in bullying as well.</p> <p><strong>They have difficulty sleeping</strong></p> <p>A 2011 study by the University of Michigan, published in the <em>Sleep Medicine</em> journal, revealed children with aggressive or bullying tendencies were twice as likely to exhibit sleep-disordered breathing problems like snoring or daytime sleepiness. While this study doesn’t prove sleep disorders actually cause bullying, it does show a possible link between sleep problems and contentious behaviour. A lack of sleep impairs mood and decision-making. If you think your child has sleep issues, a visit to the doctor might be a beneficial step to curb potential bullying.</p> <p><strong>They get in trouble at school</strong></p> <p>When Tori Cody received a call from the assistant director of her son’s preschool telling her she needed to talk to her son because he was “messing” with another boy, she felt shocked, saddened and embarrassed. “How could my four-year-old be a bully?” she asked. Realising she needed to take his aggressive behaviour seriously, she sprang into action. She began frequent talks with her son challenging him to consider how he would feel if someone behaved towards him in the same manner he behaved towards his classmate. Though it’s a work in progress, Cody has seen an improvement in her son’s actions at school.</p> <p><strong>They have behavioural problems</strong></p> <p>“Certain behaviours, if elevated, tend to correlate with bullying,” says Clark. Children who are hot-tempered, easily frustrated, impulsive, prone to fighting, and lack empathy towards others have a higher risk of being bullies. Some children may even brag about handling conflict by fighting.</p> <p><strong>They live in a violent home</strong></p> <p>If a child is in a home where they’re seeing violence, or they too are victims of violent behaviour, they are more likely to react violently in pressure situations.  Frustration builds up in kids who experience violence, Clark says. When an explosion of anger is modelled in the home, similarly, they might be inclined to take out their own anger on other children.</p> <p><strong>They have experienced bullying first-hand</strong></p> <p>Occasionally, children who have been the target of bullying will become bullies in an effort to regain some control over their lives. This was the case for Mischa van Loder, whose seven-year-old daughter began getting in trouble after she was the victim. Van Loder credits encouraging her daughter into friendship groups with positive role models as a key to curtailing her daughter’s behaviour. “Parental presence is everything in this situation,” she says. “Without support, love and lots of investigation, the problem is difficult to solve.”</p> <p><strong>They act aggressively towards their siblings</strong></p> <p>Clark suggests if you have more than one child, monitor how they’re treating the other siblings. If they display aggression towards their siblings, it’s likely they may also demonstrate aggression towards their peers.</p> <p><strong>They spend a lot of time online</strong></p> <p>With cyberbullying on the rise, Clark cautions parents to monitor their child’s internet use. There’s a level of anonymity that occurs online, allowing children to say things they might not otherwise say to another child face-to-face.</p> <p><strong>They’re intolerant towards children who are different</strong></p> <p>Licensed clinical social worker Carmen Berzinski says some children she works with show a lack of ability or willingness to accept kids who are different (diverse ethnic backgrounds, gender, disabilities, sexual orientation, etc). In an attempt to exert some control over these differences, a bully might engage in name-calling, sending harsh messages via text or social media, and fighting. For parents, Berzinki has this advice, “Nurture empathy and create opportunities for your child to do good. Reward your child for the positive steps forward they take.”</p> <p>Written by  Jenny Lelwica Buttaccio. This article first appeared in Reader’s Digest. For more of what you love from the world’s best-loved magazine, <a href="https://readersdigest.innovations.com.au/c/readersdigestemailsubscribe?utm_source=over60&amp;utm_medium=articles&amp;utm_campaign=RDSUB&amp;keycode=WRA87V">here’s our best subscription offer.</a></p> <p><img style="width: 100px !important; height: 100px !important;" src="https://oversixtydev.blob.core.windows.net/media/7820640/1.png" alt="" data-udi="umb://media/f30947086c8e47b89cb076eb5bb9b3e2" /></p>

Caring

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Why some people are willing to challenge bullying, corruption and bad behavior even at personal risk

<p>Utah Senator Mitt Romney voted in February to convict President Donald Trump on the charge of abuse of power, becoming the first senator ever to <a href="https://www.vox.com/2020/2/5/21125118/mitt-romney-impeachment-vote-history">vote against his own party’s president in an impeachment trial</a>.</p> <p>Two Theranos employees – Erika Cheung and Tyler Shultz – <a href="https://www.penguinrandomhouse.com/books/549478/bad-blood-by-john-carreyrou/">spoke out about their concerns</a> regarding the company’s practices, even though they knew they could face lasting personal and professional repercussions.</p> <p><a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/10/05/us/harvey-weinstein-harassment-allegations.html">Actors Ashley Judd</a> <a href="https://deadline.com/2019/12/harvey-weinstein-moment-of-reckoning-silence-breakers-ashley-judd-rose-mcgowen-1202803517/">and Rose McGowan</a> came forward to report <a href="https://www.cnn.com/2020/02/24/us/harvey-weinstein-trial-verdict/index.html">Harvey Weinstein’s sexual harassment and assault</a>, despite his threats to ruin their careers if they did so.</p> <p>All of these people spoke up to call out bad behavior, even in the face of immense pressure to stay silent. Although the specifics of each of these cases are quite different, what each of these people share is a willingness to take action. <a href="https://scholar.google.com/citations?user=-dCo5lYAAAAJ&amp;hl=en&amp;oi=ao">Psychologists like me</a> describe those who are willing to defend their principles in the face of potentially negative social consequences such as disapproval, ostracism and career setbacks as “moral rebels.”</p> <p><a href="https://www.hup.harvard.edu/catalog.php?isbn=9780674241831">Moral rebels</a> speak up in all types of situations – to tell a bully to cut it out, to confront a friend who uses a racist slur, to report a colleague who engages in corporate fraud. What enables someone to call out bad behavior, even if doing so may have costs?</p> <p><strong>The traits of a moral rebel</strong></p> <p>First, moral rebels generally <a href="https://doi.org/10.1080/10508422.2015.1012765">feel good about themselves</a>. They tend to have high self-esteem and to feel confident about their own judgment, values and ability. They also <a href="https://doi.org/10.1177/0146167209346170">believe their own views are superior</a> to those of others, and thus that they have a social responsibility to share those beliefs.</p> <p>Moral rebels are also <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jsp.2015.10.002">less socially inhibited than others</a>. They aren’t worried about feeling embarrassed or having an awkward interaction. Perhaps most importantly, they are far less concerned about conforming to the crowd. So, when they have to choose between fitting in and doing the right thing, they will probably choose to do what they see as right.</p> <p>Research in neuroscience reveals that people’s ability to stand up to social influence is reflected in anatomical differences in the brain. People who are more concerned about fitting in show <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2012.01.012">more gray matter volume in one particular part of the brain</a>, the lateral orbitofrontal cortex. This area right behind your eyebrows creates memories of events that led to negative outcomes. It helps guide you away from things you want to avoid the next time around – such as being rejected by your group.</p> <p>People who are more concerned about conforming to their group also show <a href="https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2013.12.035">more activity in two other brain circuits</a>; one that responds to social pain – like when you experience rejection – and another that tries to understand others’ thoughts and feelings. In other words, those who feel worst when excluded by their group try the hardest to fit in.</p> <p>What does this suggest about moral rebels? For some people, feeling like you’re different than everyone else feels really bad, even at a neurological level. For other people, it may not matter as much, which makes it easier for them to stand up to social pressure.</p> <p>These characteristics are totally agnostic as to what the moral rebel is standing up for. You could be the lone anti-abortion voice in your very liberal family or the lone abortion rights advocate in your very conservative family. In either scenario it’s about standing up to social pressure to stay silent – and that pressure of course could be applied about anything.</p> <p><strong>The path of a moral rebel</strong></p> <p>What does it take to create a moral rebel?</p> <p>It helps to have <a href="https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2005-08753-003">seen moral courage in action</a>. Many of the civil rights activists who participated in marches and sit-ins in the southern United States in the 1960s had parents who displayed moral courage and civic engagement, as did many of the Germans who rescued Jews during the Holocaust. Watching people you look up to show moral courage can inspire you to do the same.</p> <p>A budding moral rebel also needs to feel empathy, imagining the world from someone else’s perspective. Spending time with and really getting to know people from different backgrounds helps. White high school students who had more contact with people from different ethnic groups – in their neighborhood, at school and on sports teams – have higher levels of empathy and see people from different minority groups in <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/josi.12053">more positive ways</a>.</p> <p>These same students are more likely to report taking some action if a classmate uses an ethnic slur, such as by directly challenging that person, supporting the victim or telling a teacher. People who are <a href="https://doi.org/10.1007/s11292-010-9109-1">more empathetic</a> are also more likely to defend someone who is being bullied.</p> <p>Finally, moral rebels need particular skills and practice using them. One study found that teenagers who <a href="https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2011.01682.x">held their own in an argument with their mother</a>, using reasoned arguments instead of whining, pressure or insults, were the most resistant to peer pressure to use drugs or drink alcohol later on. Why? People who have practiced making effective arguments and sticking with them under pressure are better able to use these same techniques with their peers.</p> <p>Moral rebels clearly have particular characteristics that enable them to stand up for what’s right. But what about the rest of us? Are we doomed to be the silent bystanders who meekly stand by and don’t dare call out bad behavior?</p> <p>Fortunately, no. It is possible to develop the ability to stand up to social pressure. In other words, anyone can learn to be a moral rebel.<!-- End of code. If you don't see any code above, please get new code from the Advanced tab after you click the republish button. The page counter does not collect any personal data. More info: https://theconversation.com/republishing-guidelines --></p> <p><span><a href="https://theconversation.com/profiles/catherine-a-sanderson-1126074"><em>Catherine A. Sanderson</em></a><em>, Poler Family Professor and Chair of Psychology, <a href="https://theconversation.com/institutions/amherst-college-2155">Amherst College</a></em></span></p> <p><em>This article is republished from <a href="https://theconversation.com">The Conversation</a> under a Creative Commons license. Read the <a href="https://theconversation.com/heres-why-some-people-are-willing-to-challenge-bullying-corruption-and-bad-behavior-even-at-personal-risk-140829">original article</a>.</em></p>

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